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UNIVERSITY 
OF  FLORIDA 
LIBRARIES 


Digitized  by  the  Internet  Archive 
in  2016  with  funding  from 

University  of  Florida,  George  A.  Smathers  Libraries 


https://archive.org/details/alabamahistorica06mont 


CONTENTS 


Page 

Editorial 3 

Last  Confederate  Reunion 7 

— “The  Confederate  Veteran” — Judge  Walter  B.  Jones 12 

Robert  E.  Lee— Marshall  Wingfield 23 

Origin  of  Slavery  in  America — Mattie  F.  Allison 32 

Monument  to  Negro,  Heyward  Shepherd 37 

Sam  Davis 47 

“Houston  County  in  the  Great  Bend  of  the 

Tennessee” — Oliver  D.  Street 50 

Changing  Alabama — Mary  S.  Butler___,_ 60 

Democratic  Party  Regulations  Explained — 

Gessner  T.  McCorvey : 64 

A History  of  the  Old  French  Gun  of  Demopolis— 

Bessie  Patterson  Wilburn 71 

History  of  Rock  Spring  Baptist  Church — 

Anne  Elizabeth  Newman 1 77 

Jeremiah  Austill — An  Autobiography 81 

Life  of  Margaret  Ervin  Austill 92 

Poems 99 

Book  Reviews 106 

Genealogical  Inquiries 114 


EDITORIAL 


This  Spring  Issue  of  the  Alabama  Historical  Quarterly  carries  the 
story  of  what  will  probably  be  the  last  reunion  of  the  Confederate 
Veterans  held  in  Montgomery,  September  27th  and  28th,  1944. 
The  story  of  that  meeting  is  presented  as  the  leading  article  in  the 
magazine  owing  to  its  great  historical  significance.  The  address 
of  the  Hon.  Walter  B.  Jones,  Presiding  Judge  of  the  Fifteenth 
Judicial  Circuit  of  Alabama  is  presented  in  full.  Another  item  is 
the  address  of  Dr.  Marshall  Wingfield  on  the  subject  of  the  great 
Robert  E.  Lee  delivered  on  the  General’s  birthday  of  this  year  in 
St.  Louis,  Mo.  Dr.  Wingfield  was  re-elected  Commander-in-Chief 
of  the  Sons  of  Confederate  V eterans  during  the  Montgomery  con- 
vention of  the  Sons  of  Veterans  and  agreed  for  the  Quarterly  to 
reproduce  his  St.  Louis  speech  which  appears  in  this  issue  in  the 
group  of  Confederate  items. 

An  historical  sketch  on  “Origin  of  Slavery  in  America”  by 
Miss  Mattie  F.  Allison,  of  Huntsville,  located  in  the  files  of  the 
Virginia  Clay-Clopton  Chapter,  U.D.C.,  is  also  printed  for  the 
first  time.  Following  that  article  is  one  giving  an  account  of  the 
monument  erected  by  the  Daughters  of  the  Confederacy  to  the 
memory  of  Heyward  Shepherd,  a Freedman  faithful  to  his  duties 
at  Harper’s  Ferry,  West  Virginia.  The  address  of  Mrs.  L.  M. 
Bashinsky  who  was  at  the  time  President  General  U.D.C.,  on  the 
occasion  of  the  dedication  of  the  “faithful  slave  memorial”  is  re- 
produced in  full. 

Among  the  young  heroes  of  the  Confederacy  none  gave  his 
life  to  his  country  in  a more  heroic  manner  than  did  Sam  Davis, 
of  Tennessee,  who  was  hanged  as  a spy  in  1863.  He  was  offered 
his  life  if  he  would  reveal  the  name  of  a Federal  soldier  who  had 
given  him  the  information  he  was  carrying  to  the  Confederates  at 
the  time  of  his  arrest.  Young  Davis  replied  even  at  the  moment 
when  he  was  already  standing  upon  the  gallows : “I  know  the 
danger  of  my  situation  and  am  willing  to  take  the  consequences. 
I am  ready.”  Two  monuments  have  been  erected  to  his  memory 
in  his  native  State,  one  at  Pulaski  and  the  other  in  Nashville. 
On  the  occasion  of  the  unveiling  of  the  Pulaski  monument  John 
Trotwood  Moore  read  his  poem  written  especially  for  the  occasion, 
“Sam  Davis”  which  appears  in  this  magazine. 


The  late  Judge  Oliver  D.  Street,  of  Huntersville,  was  a stu- 
dent of  Southren  history  and  wrote  a number  of  articles  on  the 
subject.  One  of  these  “ ‘Houston  County’  in  the  Great  Bend  of 
the  Tennessee”  was  written  by  Judge  Street  for  the  Tennessee 
Valley  Historical  Society  and  presented  to  the  Alabama  Historical  Quar- 
terly by  Judge  Street  himself  before  his  death.  It  is  printed  here  for 
the  first  time. 


“Changing  Alabama”  by  Mary  S.  Butler  is  an  interesting 
analysis  of  the  subject  and  was  awarded  the  first  prize  for  the 
best  current  historical  article  by  the  Federation  of  Women’s  Clubs 
at  their  last  convention. 


Following  its  custom  the  Quarterly  carries  an  article  of  cur- 
rent history  in  this  issue.  In  this  case  the  item  is  the  presentation 
of  a letter  from  Gessner  T.  McCorvey,  Chairman  of  the  State  Dem- 
ocratic Executive  Committee  relating  to  the  Primary  and  Election 
laws  and  the  procedure  of  the  Democratic  Party  in  relation  thereto. 

In  the  World  War  Memorial  Building  there  is  a room  de- 
voted entirely  to  mementoes  of  Alabama’s  French  history.  The 
Vine  and  Olive  Colony  founded  Demopolis  in  1818  and  a number 
of  relics  of  that  Napoleonic  group  of  French  people  who  fled  from 
their  native  country  to  America  for  safety  have  been  given  to  the 
Department  of  Archives  and  History  and  are  to  be  found  in  the 
French  Room  in  the  World  War  Memorial  Building.  The  most 
recent  acquisition  to  the  collection  is  a French  gun,  the  history  of 
which  is  given  by  Mrs.  Bessie  Patterson  Wilburn  who  placed  the 
gun  in  the  Department  for  preservation. 

For  a number  of  issues  the  Quarterly  has  been  printing  with 
pictures  the  history  of  certain  old  churches  in  the  State.  The 
article  in  this  issue  gives  the  history  of  Rock  Spring  Baptist 
Church  in  Chambers  County,  written  by  Miss  Anne  Elizabeth 
Newman. 

One  of  Alabama’s  most  interesting  pioneer  characters  was 
Jeremiah  Austill.  In  the  manuscripts  collection  of  the  Depart- 
ment of  Archives  and  History  is  to  be  found  Jeremiah  Austin’s 
autobiography  covering  the  early  years  of  his  life  in  this  State. 
This  article  is  produced  here  for  the  first  time  and  also  his  wife’s 
account  of  certain  adventures  in  our  Indian  warfare  period. 


The  Quarterly  is  very  grateful  to  the  poets  of  the  State  who 
have  contributed  some  of  their  work  for  each  issue  of  the  maga- 
zine. The  Book  Reviews  are  by  Dr.  Emily  Calcott,  of  State 
Teachers  College,  Troy,  and  by  Mrs.  Mary  Heath  Lee,  of  the 
Tuesday  Study  Club  of  Fairhope.  The  two  book  reviews  by  Mrs. 
Lee  were  entered  for  the  Haleyville  Study  Club  prize  for  a re- 
view of  a book  by  an  Alabama  author  and  were  awarded  prizes 
in  the  successive  years  1943  and  1944. 

There  is  a steadily  growing  interest  in  family  history.  The 
Quarterly  presents  as  its  concluding  article  inquiries  about  certain 
families  with  the  request  that  any  one  having  the  information 
wanted  write  directly  to  the  persons  whose  names  and  addresses 
are  given  in  the  inquiries. 


> C/i 


O'  « « i 


S 

rt 


LAST  CONFEDERATE  REUNION 


What  will  probably  prove  to  be  the  last  General  Confederate 
Reunion  was  held  in  Montgomery  through  the  two  days  of  Sep- 
tember 27th  and  28th.  The  attendance  was  small  owing  to  the 
great  age  of  the  Veterans  and  the  long  distance  some  of  them  had 
to  travel  to  reach  Montgomery.  In  fact  there  were  only  eight 
men  present.  Those  who  were  determined  to  hold  one  more  re- 
union insisted  upon  the  meeting  being  held  in  Montgomery  where 
they  were  given  a warm  welcome  by  the  patriotic  people  of  the 
Cradle  of  the  Confederacy.  Meeting  with  the  Confederate  Vet- 
erans were  the  National  organizations  of  the  Sons  of  Confederate 
Veterans,  the  Order  of  the  Stars  and  Bars  and  the  Confederated 
Southern  Memorial  Association.  Mrs.  Lennard  Thomas,  of  Mont- 
gomery, was  in  charge  of  the  general  program,  assisted  by  local 
representatives  of  the  other  organizations. 

Commander-in-Chief  of  the  Confederate  Veterans,  Homer  L. 
Atkinson,  of  Petersburg,  Va.,  was  unable  to  attend  on  account  of 
illness.  The  first  Veteran  to  arrive  was  Brigadier-General  W.  M. 
Buck,  of  Muscogee,  Oklahoma,  who  has  already  reached  the  age 
of  93  but  is  remarkably  active  and  came  from  Muscogee  to  Mont- 
gomery unescorted.  The  Georgia  delegation  was  sent  through  the 
courtesy  of  Governor  Ellis  Arnall  in  a beautiful  car  escorted  by 
the  Georgia  State  Highway  Patrol  in  charge  of  Corp.  Paul  Smith. 
In  the  delegation  were  Col.  W.  H.  Culpepper,  96  years  of  age  and 
Gen.  W.  L.  Dowling,  97.  Other  Veterans  present  were:  Gen.  J.  W. 
Moore,  of  Selma,  93  years  of  age,  who  was  elected  at  the  close  of 
the  Reunion  to  be  Commander-in-Chief  of  the  Veterans;  J.  D. 
Ford,  Marshall,  Texas,  95  years  of  age;  W.  W.  Alexander,  Rock 
Hill,  S.  C.,  98;  Gen.  William  Banks,  Houston,  Texas,  98;  J.  A. 
Davidson,  Troy,  100  years  of  age.  All  Veterans  except  Gen.  Buch 
were  accompanied  by  attendants. 

Sons  of  Confederate  Veterans  Participate 

The  Sons  of  Confederate  Veterans  had  a good  representation, 
including  their  Commander-in-Chief,  Dr.  Marshall  Wingfield,  of 
Memphis,  Tenn. ; Hon.  Walter  L.  Hopkins,  Adjutant-in-Chief, 
Richmond,  Va. ; Hon.  W.  Scott  Hancock,  Adjutant  General  and 
Chief  of  Staff,  St.  Louis,  Mo.;  Hon.  John  R.  T.  Rives,  Cedar  Rap- 


8 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


s 


Dr.  Marshall  Winfield,  a Congregational  minister  of  Memphis,  Tenn.,  a na- 
tive of  Virginia,  was  elected  Commander-in-Chief  of  the  Sons  of  Confederate  Vet- 
erans. 

James  W.  Moore,  Selma,  Ala.,  92  years  of  age,  was  elected  Commander-in- 
Chief  of  the  Confederate  Veterans  at  the  General  Convention  held  in  Montgomery, 
September  27-28.  He  served  as  a Private  in  Co.  I,  51st  Ala.  Mounted  Infantry. 


ids,  Iowa,  formerly  of  Birmingham,  Inspector-in-Chief,  and  nu- 
merous local  representatives  of  the  organization.  The  Daughters 
of  the  Confederacy  and  members  of  the  Confederated  Southern 
Memorial  Association  were  active  in  their  efforts  to  make  the  con- 
vention a great  success  from  every  point  of  view.  The  Exchange 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


9 


Hotel,  successor  of  the  historic  old  hotel  of  that  name,  was  head- 
quarters for  the  Veterans  and  Sons.  At  the  opening  of  the  Vet- 
eran's meeting  a prayer  was  offered  by  Dr.  Wingfield.  The  old 
Veterans  and  the  Sons  and  Daughters  sang  “Rock  of  Ages",  which 
was  Jefferson  Davis'  favorite  hymn.  Other  music  was  rendered 
and  appropriate  addresses  were  made.  Following  the  preliminary 
exercises  a memorial  service  for  Veterans  who  had  died  since  the 
last  reunion  was  held,  conducted  by  Mrs.  Belle  Allen  Ross,  of 
Montgomery,  a Vice-President  General  of  the  Confederated  South- 
ern Memorial  Association.  Mrs.  Lennard  Thomas,  vocalist  and 
Mrs.  John  Todd,  piano  accompanist,  rendered  the  music  for  this 
as  for  other  parts  of  the  program  during  the  reunion.  Mrs.  Rus- 
sell Hippe,  of  Montgomery,  carrying  in  her  arms  a large  bouquet 
of  red  roses,  read  the  lines  of  Maud  Lindsay’s  poem  “My  Land  is  a 
Red  Land  and  the  Red  Land  Breeds  the  Rose",  accompanied  by 
the  piano.  At  the  afternoon  session  Judge  Leon  McCord  of  the 
Federal  Circuit  Court,  made  a very  appealing  address  and  Mrs. 
Hippe  presented  the  roses  to  the  oldest  Veteran,  the  centenarian 
J.  A.  Davidson,  of  Troy.  The  social  feature  of  the  first  day’s  pro- 
gram included  a reception  at  the  home  of  Judge  Walter  B.  Jones 
of  the  Fifteenth  Judicial  Circuit  Court,  of  Montgomery.  The 
Jones  home,  occupied  for  so  many  years  by  the  late  Governor 
Thomas  G.  Jones  and  family,  is  now  owned  by  Judge  Walter  B. 
Jones  and  is  the  center  of  much  hospitality. 

Veterans  Stand  on  Gold  Star 

The  second  day  of  the  Reunion  was  filled  with  events  planned 
to  gratify  the  old  men  who  had  worn  the  gray  and  had  journeyed 
back  to  Montgomery  for  what  was  referred  to  as  their  last  Reun- 
ion. The  morning  of  the  28th  was  bright  and  warm  and  the  Vet- 
erans were  carried  from  their  hotel  in  a city  bus  on  a tour  of  in- 
spection of  both  Gunter  and  Maxwell  air  fields  where  they  saw 
young  soldiers  in  khaki  being  trained  as  fliers.  At  each  one  of 
these  military  establishments  the  Commander  greeted  the  Vet- 
erans with  warm  hand  clasps.  At  Maxwell  Field  General  W.  S. 
Gravely  showed  the  Veterans  all  the  wonders  of  preparation  for 
modern  warfare.  At  Gunter  Field  Colonel  Raymon  L.  Winn  also 
gave  a warm  welcome  to  the  old  men  in  their  gray  uniforms. 

The  tour  ended  at  the  Capitol  where  the  Veterans  were  receiv- 
ed on  the  Capitol  grounds  by  a detachment  of  officers  of  the  Wo- 


10 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


man’s  Army  Corps.  The  Maxwell  Field  band  seated  on  the  Cap- 
itol grounds  near  the  imposing  statue  of  Jefferson  Davis  erected 
by  the  United  Daughters  of  the  Confederacy,  played  Southern 
airs,  beginning  with  "Dixie”,  much  to  the  delight  of  the  old  men. 
The  front  of  the  Capitol  was  decorated  with  a large  Confederate 
flag  suspended  from  the  balcony  above  the  portico,  flanked  on 
either  side  by  a United  States  flag  and  the  flag  of  Alabama,  the 
latter  a red  St.  Andrew’s  cross  on  a white  field,  reminiscent  of  the 
battleflag  of  the  Confederacy.  Seats  were  provided  on  the  portico 
of  the  Capitol  for  the  Veterans  and  chairs  facing  the  Capitol  were 
occupied  by  the  audience.  Hon.  T.  B.  Hill,  of  Montgomery,  made 
the  introductory  remarks  and  presented  the  speaker  of  the  occa- 
sion, Judge  Walter  B.  Jones,  who  delivered  an  address  that  touch- 
ed all  hearts  and  will  be  preserved  in  many  libraries  as  it  is  repro- 
duced in  this  issue  of  the  Quarterly  for  that  purpose.  Each  Vet- 
eran in  turn  stood  upon  the  spot  where  Jefferson  Davis  stood 
when  he  took  his  oath  of  office  as  President  of  the  Confederate 
States  of  America.  The  spot  long  ago  was  marked  by  the  Ladies 
Southern  Memorial  Association,  of  Montgomery. 

The  Bible  on  which  Jefferson  Davis  took  his  oath  of  office 
and  upon  which  all  Governors  of  Alabama  since  1853  have  been 
sworn  into  office,  kept  securely  in  its  glass  cabinet  in  the  World 
War  Memorial  Building,  was  placed  near  the  star  for  the  occasion. 
The  Great  Seal  of  the  Confederate  States  of  America  was  also  in 
the  case. 

In  the  group  of  seven  Veterans  that  posed  for  a photograph 
was  one  Negro  man  slave  90  years  of  age  who  served  in  the  war 
as  a body  guard  to  his  master.  This  man.  Dr.  R.  A.  Gwynne,  lives 
in  Birmingham  where  he  is  a well  known  character. 

A Banquet  is  Held 

In  the  evening  a banquet  for  the  Veterans,  Sons  of  Veterans 
and  representatives  of  the  other  patriotic  organizations  of  the 
Confederacy,  was  given  at  the  Whitley  Hotel  with  an  audience 
of  four  score  men  and  women.  The  decorations  were  unique  and 
appropriately  centered  with  a large  stage  coach  around  which  were 
placed  small  Confederate  soldiers  bidding  their  sweethearts  good- 
bye. Vases  of  flowers  were  decorated  with  figures  of  old  fashioned 
girls  wearing  ante-bellum  hoop  skirts  as  were  the  decorations  of 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


11 


the  place  cards.  The  toastmaster  of  the  banquet  was  John  R.  T. 
Rives.  The  principal  speaker  was  Hon.  Chauncey  Sparks,  Gov- 
ernor of  Alabama.  Others  included  Mrs.  Adelaide  Van  Diver, 
Prattville,  Division  President  of  the  U.D.C. ; Mrs.  Bibb  Graves, 
former  U.  S.  Senator;  Mrs.  L.  M.  Bashinsky,  former  President- 
General  of  U.D.C.,  Dr.  Wingfield,  Commander-in-Chief  of  the  Sons 
of  Confederate  Veterans  and  others.  During  the  evening  the  Con- 
federate Veterans  were  introduced  and  several  of  them  made  ap- 
propriate talks.  Mrs.  Thomas  wore  a Scarlett  O’Hara  dress  and 
received  vociferous  applause  when  she  sang  “Shortenin’  Bread”. 

Golden  Anniversary  Luncheon 

Following  the  exercises  at  the  Capitol  the  whole  company  re- 
paired to  the  Civic  Room  of  the  Jefferson  Davis  Hotel  where  the 
three  Montgomery  Chapters  of  the  United  Daughters  of  the  Con- 
federacy gave  a luncheon.  Mrs.  Albert  Pickett,  of  Montgomery, 
was  in  charge.  Mrs.  Jesse  Roberts,  of  Montgomery,  Past  Division 
President  of  the  U.D.C.  was  Toastmistress.  The  long  tables  were 
soon  occupied  and  additional  tables  were  hastily  set  up  to  take 
care  of  the  many  guests  who  arrived  belatedly.  The  particular 
occasion  was  not  only  to  honor  the  Veterans  and  Sons  of  Veterans 
but  to  celebrate  the  fiftieth  anniversary  of  the  founding  of  the 
United  Daughters  of  the  Confederacy.  A large  birthday  cake  com- 
memorating that  momentous  event  was  decorated  with  fifty  golden 
candles.  The  cake  was  cut  by  Mrs.  Roberts  and  served  to  the  en- 
tire company.  Group  singing  included  “Dixie”,  “Bonnie  Blue 
Flag”,  and  “Auld  Lang  Syne.”  The  Veterans  left  Montgomery 
feeling  very  happy  and  grateful  for  the  hospitalities  shown  to  them 
and  for  the  love  expressed  for  them  by  every  one. 


12 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


THE  CONFEDERATE  VETERAN 

Address  of  Hon.  Walter  B.  Jones,  Presiding  Judge,  Fifteenth  Judicial 
Circuit  of  Alabama,  before  the  Final  Reunion  of  the  United  Confederate 
Veterans,  Montgomery,  Alabama,  State  Capitol,  September  28,  1944. 


Venerable  Veterans  of  the  Southern  Confederacy,  Sons  and 
Daughters  of  the  Confederacy,  and  my  Fellow  Americans: 

You  come  this  morning,  Veterans,  to  a Southern  city  forever 
associated  with  the  Confederate  States  of  America.  It  was  here  in 
old  Montgomery,  in  this  very  building,  on  this  very  spot,  that 
more  than  eighty  years  ago  was  cradled  the  Southern  Confederacy, 
that  noble  government  of  which  it  is  said,  beautifully  and  truth- 
fully : 


No  nation  rose  so  white  and  fair, 

None  fell,  so  pure  of  crime. 

At  this  hour  you  come  to  scenes  forever  made  historic  be- 
cause in  days  now  long  gone  Jefferson  Davis  and  the  giants  of  the 
South  walked  this  very  ground  and  stood  on  this  very  portico. 
Well  may  we  remember  on  this  sacred  spot  God’s  admonition  to 
Moses  in  the  mountain  of  Horeb  : Put  off  thy  shoes  from  off  thy 
feet,  for  the  place  whereon  thou  standest  is  holy  ground. 

Reverently  you  come  to  this  hallowed  spot  to  hold  a solemn 
service  in  this  your  final  reunion  on  earth.  The  promptings  of 
loyal  hearts  bring  you  here  to  Montgomery,  to  the  first  capital 
of  your  beloved  Confederacy,  for  the  final  scene ; and  you  stand 
in  this  morning  hour  where  so  many  heroes  of  the  Confederacy, 
and  of  the  Nation,  have  stood  in  years  past. 

You  stand  today  on  this  consecrated  hill,  with  your  faithful 
Sons  and  devoted  Daughters  about  you,  to  pay  a tribute  of  love 
and  affection  to  your  comrades  in  arms,  and  to  the  leaders  of 
your  civil  government,  and  to  join  again  in  fraternal  handclasp 
your  few  fellow  survivors. 

As  you  stand  here  on  this  beautiful  eminence,  overlooking 
Jefferson  Davis’s  first  seat  of  government,  and  in  the  shadow  of 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


13 


the  handsome  monument  here  reared  to  his  memory,  you  commune 
with  the  warrior  Spirits  of  old,  drawing-  strength  from  the  mem- 
ory of  their  glorious  deeds  and  the  bravery  of  their  spirits. 

You  come  in  this  morning  hour  with  tender  and  sweet  recol- 
lections of  the  Southern  Confederacy,  and  of  the  men  and  women 
who  founded  it.  You  recall  the  nobility  and  the  uprightness  of 
that  short-lived  government.  You  remember  the  part  that  God 
gave  you  to  play  in  those  stirring  days  of  the  Sixties  when  our 
great  Nation  was  divided  and  the  South  invaded.  You  look  back 
on  the  work  of  your  hands  and  the  sacrifices  of  your  lives  in  those 
times  with  pride  and  satisfaction.  The  gentle  winds  of  Yesterday 
waft  to  you  here  today  the  sweet  memories  of  a departed  genera- 
tion, and  bring  back  the  greatness  and  glories  of  years  now  long 
buried  beneath  the  sands  of  Time. 

Why  You  Fought 

You  took  your  place  in  the  armies  of  the  South  obedient  to  the 
summons  of  duty  and  the  instincts  of  self-preservation.  You 
marched  out  to  battle,  not  that  you  wanted  fame,  not  that  you 
coveted  reward,  not  that  you  wanted  place,  not  that  you  desired 
rank,  and  not  that  you  desired  to  keep  an  alien  race  in  bondage. 
Ambition  did  not  lure  you,  nor  did  the  lust  for  power  goad  you. 
You  took  your  place  in  the  trenches  to  battle  for  your  fire-sides, 
your  homes  and  your  people.  You  fought  to  preserve  the  union 
of  the  States  under  the  Constitution.  You  and  your  comrades 
suffered  all,  endured  all,  gave  all,  and  sacrified  all  save  honor  to 
defend  those  ideals  for  which  your  fathers  fought,  and,  dying, 
delegated  to  your  hands.  You  have  been  faithful  to  that  trust  and 
have  done  your  part  to  preserve  the  American  system  of  govern- 
ment on  this  Continent. 


What  We  Recall 

So,  we  are  reverently  gathered  here  today  to  turn  again  with 
mournful  rustling  the  golden  leaves  of  memory,  and  as  we  con- 
template the  days  of  old,  we  recall  the  secession  of  sovereign 
States  from  the  Union  because ' their  people  felt  they  could  no 
longer  live  in  peace  and  justice  within  the  Union,  and  elected  to 
exercise  their  reserved  power  under  the  Constitution  to  secede. 
We  remember  how  long  and  sincerely  Southern  statesmen  labored 


14 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


to  preserve  the  Union  of  the  Fathers.  We  remember  President 
Lincoln’s  call  for  volunteers  to  carry  the  war  into  the  South,  how 
Pennsylvania’s  troops  reached  Washington  the  next  day,  how  four 
days  later  Massachusetts’  regiments  poured  into  the  capital  of  the 
Nation,  how  New  York’s  first  regiment  came  the  next  day,  and 
how  the  sons  of  the  North  sprang  up  to  answer  the  President’s 
call  for  the  invasion  of  the  South. 

The  Soldier  of  the  Confederacy 

Then  strode  upon  the  stage  of  history,  in  all  the  glory  of  his 
young  manhood,  the  peer  of  the  world’s  greatest  soldiers,  the  Sol- 
dier of  the  Southern  Confederacy. 

Robert  E.  Lee,  true  to  the  faith  that  was  in  him,  rejected  the 
offer  of  supreme  command  of  the  armies  of  the  United  tSates  and, 
mounting  ‘Traveler’,  rode  out  to  lead  you  and  your  comrades  in 
arms.  And,  “forth  from  its  scabbard,  pure  and  bright”,  Lee’s 
sword  “flashed  in  the  cause  of  right.” 

Thomas  J.  Jackson  closed  his  textbooks  at  the  Virginia  Mili- 
tary Institute,  buckled  his  sword  on,  became  Lee’s  greatest  lieu- 
tenant, and  rode  into  fame  and  history  as  “Stonewall”  Jackson. 

The  lion-hearted  Nathan  Bedford  Forrest,  the  “wizard  of  the 
saddle”,  sprang  to  his  horse  and  commanded  your  comrades  in 
many  important  battles. 

Leonidas  K.  Polk  doffed  the  robes  of  an  Episcopal  bishop  to 
wear  the  uniform  of  a Confederate  major  general,  commanded  a 
corps  of  the  Army  of  Tennessee  and  heroically  died  in  action  at 
Marietta. 

Albert  Sidney  Johnston  mapped  your  battle  plans  at  Shiloh 
and  gave  the  last  full  measure  of  his  devotion  to  the  cause  of  the 
Confederacy. 

“Bronze-bearded”  J.  E.  B.  Stuart  and  his  cavalry  rode  around 
McClellan’s  rear,  raided  Pope’s  communications,  brought  Lee  valu- 
able information,  Stuart  dying  gloriously  at  Yellow  Tavern. 

General  George  Pickett,  at  the  head  of  his  Virginians,  Caro- 
linians, Mississippians,  Tennesseeans  and  Alabamians,  marched  out 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


IS 


steadily  as  if  on  dress  parade,  stormed  the  heights  at  Gettysburg, 
and  won  immortal  glory. 

John  Brown  Gordon,  wounded  in  battle  eight  times,  held  the 
last  lines  at  Petersburg,  and  at  Appomattox  made  the  last  charge 
of  Lee’s  valiant  army. 

John  Hunt  Morgan  made  memorable  cavalry  raids  for  the 
Confederacy,  and  gave  his  life  for  his  Southland  at  Greenville, 
Tennessee. 

John  Singleton  Mosby  and  his  Partisan  Rangers,  “the  hell-cats 
on  horseback”,  harassed  Grant  and  Sheridan  in  the  Valley  of  Vir- 
ginia and  made  their  names  synonymous  with  brave  deeds  and 
daring  escapades. 

John  Pelham  sprang  to  the  saddle  to  command  Stuart’s  Horse 
Artillery,  to  fire  Lee’s  guns  at  Fredericksburg,  and  to  pass  into 
history  at  the  height  of  his  fame  as  the  Gallant  Pelham. 

Raphael  Semmes,  commanding  the  Sumter  and  the  Alabama, 
destroyed  federal  commerce  on  every  sea  and  made  naval  history. 

Longstreet,  and  Early,  and  Hood,  and  Ashby,  and  countless 
hundreds  of  gallant  Confederates  wore  the  gray  with  bravery  and 
distinction,  and  on  countless  bloody  battlefields  you  and  your  com- 
rades fought  with  courage  and  boldness  for  the  Southern  Confed- 
eracy. 


The  Poets  of  the  South 

In  the  sweetness  of  this  hour  we  remember,  too,  the  gentle 
singers  of  the  South,  and  their  verse  and  song  which  inspired  and 
sustained  you  in  the  conflict  of  battle. 

As  the  invader  sets  foot  on  Southern  soil,  comes  the  clarion 
call  of  Albert  Pike’s  “Dixie” : 

Southrons,  hear  your  country  call  you  ! 

Up ! lest  worse  than  death  befall  you ! 

To  arms!  to  arms!  to  arms!  in  Dixie! 


16 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


For  Dixie's  land  we'll  take  our  stand. 

To  live  or  die  for  Dixie! 

And  from  South  Carolina,  first  to  secede,  Henry  Timrod  rouses 
his  countrymen  with  his  poem,  “Carolina”: 

The  despot  treads  thy  sacred  sands, 

The  pines  give  shelter  to  his  bands, 

Thy  sons  stand  with  idle  hands, 

Carolina ! 

From  the  heart  of  Maryland  comes  the  stirring  poem  of  James 
Ryder  Randall’s,  “My  Maryland” : 

The  despot’s  heel  is  on  thy  shore, 

Maryland ! 

His  torch  is  at  thy  temple  door, 

Maryland ! 

The  Confederacy  is  organized,  its  government  established. 
Patriotic  sons  and  daughters  of  the  South,  sing  from  Virginia  to 
Texas : 


Hurrah!  Hurrah! 

For  Southern  rights,  hurrah! 

Hurrah  for  the  Bonnie  Blue  Flag 
That  bears  the  single  star ! 

The  months  pass  wearily  by,  and  the  war  drags  on.  The 
poets  are  soldiers  now  and  they  write  of  the  incidents  of  the 
struggle,  day  by  day.  Thaddeus  Oliver  touches  our  hearts  with 
the  tenderness  of  “All  Quiet  Along  the  Potomac  Tonight”: 

“All  quiet  along  the  Potomac,”  they  say, 

Except  now  and  then  a stray  picket 
Is  shot  as  he  walks  his  beat,  to  and  fro 
By  a rifleman  hid  in  the  thicket. 

John  Reuben  Thompson’s  “Music  in  Camp”  tells  in  moving 
lines  the  soldier’s  longing  for  home  and  family.  You  remember 
two  armies  “covered  hill  and  plain”  as.  the  band  played.  Then  a 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


17 


federal  band,  “with  movement  light  and  tricksy”,  played  “Dixie”. 
And  how  the  Rebels  yelled  ! “Then  the  trumpets  pealed  sonorous,” 
and  the  band  played  “Yankee  Doodle”!  And  now  how  the  Yan- 
kees yelled!  Now  the  bugles  sing  again.  No  shout  rings  upon 
the  evening  air,  a holy  quiet  reigns — “all  silent  the  Yankees  stood, 
and  silent  stood  the  Rebels” — 

No  unresponsive  soul  had  heard 
That  plaintive  notes  appealing 
So  deeply  “Home,  Sweet  Home”,  had  stirred 
The  hidden  founts  of  feeling. 

The  private  soldier  dreams  in  the  trenches  during  the  long 
nights,  and  William  Gordon  McCabe’s  “Dreaming  in  the  Trenches” 
pictures  the  girl  of  his  dreams 

there  in  the  quaint  old  room, 

Where  the  fading  twilight  starts  and  falls, 

Alone  in  the  twilight’s  tender  gloom 

With  the  shadows  that  dance  on  the  dim-lit  walls. 

Alone,  while  those  faces  look  silently  down 
From  their  antique  frames  in  a grim  repose — 

Slight  scholarly  Ralph  in  his  Oxford  gown 
And  stanch  Sir  Allan,  who  died  for  Montrose. 

Marie  Ravenel  De  La  Coste,  in  her  moving  poem,  “Somebody’s 
Darling”,  brings  to  us  the  death  scene  of  a noble  Southern  lad  in 
an  army  hospital : 

Into  a ward  of  the  white-washed  walls 
Where  the  dead  and  the  dying  lay, 

Wounded  by  bayonets,  shells  and  balls 
Somebody’s  darling  was  borne  one  day. 

Somebody’s  darling,  so  young  and  brave, 

Wearing  still  on  his  pale  sweet  face — 

Soon  to  be  hid  by  the  dust  of  the  grave — 

The  lingering  light  of  his  boyhood’s  grace. 

The  knightly  deeds  of  the  Confederate  warrior  move  Francis 
Ticknor  to  tell  in  tender  pathos  the  story  of  Little  Giffen,  the  son 
of  a Tennessee  blacksmith:  “smitten  of  grapeshot  ana  gangrene — 
eighteenth  battle  and  he  sixteen”.  Then  the  poet  tells  how  the  boy 


18 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


soldier  outwitted  death,  and  how  the  crippled  skeleton  learned  to 
write.  Then  one  day  news  came  that  Johnston,  his  old  commander, 
was  pressed  at  the  front.  And  you  remember  how  Little  Giffen 
was  up  and  away.  ‘Til  write  if  spared — there  was  news  of  the 
fight,  But  none  of  Giffen!  He  did  not  write.”  And  then  you  recall 
the  noble  thought  of  the  poet : 

I sometimes  fancy  that  were  I king 

Of  the  princely  knights  of  the  Golden  Ring, 

With  the  song  of  the  minstrel  in  mine  ear 
And  the  tender  legend  that  trembles  here, 

I'd  give  the  best  on  his  bended  knee, 

The  whitest  soul  of  my  chivalry, 

For  little  Giffen  of  Tennessee. 

The  war  continues  on.  The  sons  of  the  South  on  hundreds 
of  battlefields  prove  that  greater  love  and  lay  down  their  lives  for 
their  country  and  their  friends  at  home.  A Southern  hero  dies  on 
the  field  of  battle  and  the  poet  sings,  as  John  Reuben  Thompson 
did,  in  his  elegy  in  memory  of  General  Turner  Ashby,  who  fell  at 
Harrisonburg  as  he  moved  on  foot  toward  the  enemy,  crying : 
“Forward,  my  brave  men.” 

To  the  brave  all  homage  render, 

Weep,  ye  skies  of  June! 

With  a radiance  pure  and  tender, 

Shine,  oh  saddened  moon ! 

“Dead  upon  the  field  of  glory”, 

Hero  fit  for  song  and  story, 

Lies  our  bold  dragoon. 

Pelham,  the  “Great  Cannoneer”,  dies  at  the  head  of  his  men 
at  Kelly’s  Ford,  and  John  Esten  Cook,  in  his  poem,  the  “Band  in 
the  Pines”,  pens  the  unforgettable  lines : 

Oh,  band  in  the  pinewood  cease ! 

Cease  with  your  splendid  call ; 

The  living  are  brave  and  noble, 

But  the  dead  are  bravest  of  all ! 

Oh,  band  in  the  pinewood  cease ! 

Or  the  heart  will  melt  with  tears, 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


19 


For  the  gallant  eyes  and  the  smiling  lips, 

And  the  voices  of  old  years. 

Now  the  War  for  Southern  Independence  is  ended.  The  hopes 
of  the  South  lie  crushed  and  bleeding.  The  Bonnie  Blue  Flag  that 
waved  so  proudly  and  defiantly  in  happier  days  has  become  “The 
Conquered  Banner”  of  Father  Ryan : 

Furl  that  Banner,  for  ’tis  weary; 

Round  its  staff  ’tis  drooping  dreary ; 

Furl  it,  fold  it,  it  is  best; 

For  there’s  not  a man  to  wave  it, 

And  there’s  not  a sword  to  save  it, 

And  there’s  not  one  left  to  lave  it 
In  the  blood  which  heroes  gave  it ; 

And  its  foes  now  scorn  and  brave  it ; 

Furl  it,  hide  it,  let  it  rest ! 

The  Soldier  of  the  North 

In  the  tenderness  and  sweetness  of  this  memorable  hour,  let 
it  be  said  that  the  Soldier  of  the  Confederacy  and  the  Southerner 
think  with  admiration  and  kindness  of  the  Sons  of  the  North  who 
followed  Grant  in  the  trying  days  of  old.  In  this  hour  we  pay 
tribute  to  the  courage  and  valor  of  the  Northern  Soldiers,  and  we 
remember  the  gallantry  and  loyalty  with  which  they  fought  under 
the  Stars  and  Stripes.  They  fought  for  the  principles  they  believed 
just  and  right,  and  chivalrously  died  defending  the  ideals  inherited 
from  their  fathers. 


The  Tragic  Era 

Brave  as  you  and  your  comrades  were  in  time  of  war  on  the 
field  of  battle,  braver  yet  were  you  in  the  trying  days  that  followed 
“The  Surrender”,  the  twelve  years  known  in  American  History  as 
‘The  Tragic  Era’  or  ‘Reconstruction’. 

The  kind  and  conciliatory  Abraham  Lincoln  lay  in  a martyr’s 
grave  but  a few  days  after  Appomattox.  All  of  his  sensible  poli- 
cies were  scrapped  in  a spirit  of  hate  and  vengeance.  The  South 
was  to  be  crushed  so  that  it  could  never  rise  again.  Your  civil 
and  military  leaders  were  arrested  and  chained  in  dungeons.  You 


20 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


were  branded  as  traitors.  Members  of  the  Confederate  cabinet 
were  hunted  down  as  criminals.  The  South  was  subjected  to 
every  indignity  that  cunning  and  hatred  could  devise.  Personal 
ambitions  and  party  motives  moved  those  in  control  of  the  Wash- 
ington government  to  put  the  people  of  the  South  to  torture.  Of 
this  Traigc  Era,  Mr.  Bowers  has  truthfully  noted:  “Never  have 
American  public  men  in  responsible  positions,  directing  the  destiny 
of  the  nation,  been  so  brutal,  so  hypocritical  and  corrupt.  The 
Constitution  was  treated  as  a door-mat  on  which  politicians  and 
army  officers  wiped  their  feet  after  wading  in  the  muck.  Never 
has  the  Supreme  Court  been  treated  with  such  ineffable  contempt, 
and  never  has  that  tribunal  so  often  cringed  before  the  clamor  of 
the  mob.” 


Because  the  Southern  States  exercised  their  reserved  right  to 
withdraw  from  the  Union,  and  because  you  followed  the  teachings 
of  your  fathers,  and  the  teachings  of  the  Founding  Fathers  of  this 
Republic,  you  and  your  comrades  and  your  people  were  denied, 
during  those  twelve  years,  the  right  to  vote,  the  right  to  hold  of- 
fice, and  the  right  to  sit  on  juries.  Your  State  governments  were 
abolished.  Your  States  became  parts  of  military  districts  and  fed- 
eral military  commanders  set  aside  your  constitutions,  your  laws 
and  your  State  officers,  and  terrorized  your  people.  Your  States 
were  treated  as  conquered  provinces.  Never,  in  all  the  long  annals 
of  history,  has  a defeated  people  been  treated  so  cruelly  and  so 
shamefully. 


But  your  courage,  your  daring,  your  resourcefulness  and  your 
iron  determination  ended  that  horrible  nightmare  of  reconstruction 
and  redeemed  your  States  and  your  people  from  the  rule  of  the 
Scalawag  and  the  Carpet  Bagger.  You  restored  Anglo-Saxon  civ- 
ilization to  the  South,  and  finally  the  States  of  the  Southern  Con- 
federacy, unshackled  and  unfettered,  stood  erect  once  more,  to 
take  their  rightful  place  in  the  government  of  their  country. 


The  deeds  you  did,  the  difficulties  you  overcame,  and  the 
courage  you  showed  in  those  twelve  tragic  years  after  the  South 
laid  down  her  arms,  and  accepted  in  good  faith  the  arbitrament  of 
war,  today  bring  the  glow  of  pride  and  admiration  to  the  cheek 
of  every  loyal  American  who  loves  country,  and  bring  you  the 
everlasting  gratitude  of  the  people  of  the  Southern  States. 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


21 


What  God  Has  Spared  You  To  See 

Our  Heavenly  Father  has  generously  given  you  length  of  days 
that  you  might  live  to  see  your  stricken  land,  “a  land  scarred  and 
riven  by  the  plowshare  of  war  and  billowed  with  the  graves  of 
her  dead”,  rise  from  the  ashes  and  rebuild  her  civilization. 

You  have  lived  to  see  the  sons  of  the  South  fill  with  honor 
and  distinction  the  highest  offices  in  the  land.  Woodrow  Wilson, 
Virginia  born,  won  enduring  fame  in  the  White  House  of  the  Na- 
tion. Edward  D.  White,  a Confederate  veteran,  became  one  of 
the  great  chief  justices  of  the  United  States,  and  Southerners  like 
L.  Q.  C.  Lamar,  Joseph  R.  Lamar,  Horace  H.  Burton  and  James 
F.  Byrnes  have  sat  with  honor  upon  the  court. 

In  the  cabinets  of  our  presidents  have  served  since  the  War 
for  Southern  Independence  capable  statesmen  and  distinguished 
Americans — men  like  A.  H.  Garland,  Hilary  A.  Herbert,  Jacob  M. 
Dickinson,  Luke  E.  Wright,  Carter  Glass,  Daniel  C.  Roper  and 
Cordell  Hull. 

In  the  War  with  Spain  Joe  Wheeler  won  immortal  glory  at 
Santiago  and  Hobson  won  the  plaudits  of  the  Nation  when  he 
sank  the  Merrimac. 

On  every  battlefield  of  the  first  World  War,  and  on  all  the 
seas,  the  sons  of  the  South,  with  the  patriotism  learned  at  your 
knees,  fought  manfully  and  gave  their  lives  that  freedom  might 
not  perish  from  the  earth. 

In  today’s  great  struggle,  hearts  stoutened  with  the  courage 
you  gave  them,  souls  strengthened  with  your  spirit,  and  wills  im- 
bued with  your  indomitable  determination,  the  Sons  of  the  South 
are  hourly  exemplifying  the  noblest  attributes  of  American  man- 
hood, and  are  winning  a victory  that  is  destined  to  be  the  greatest 
and  noblest  in  the  long  history  of  mankind,  for  they  are  rolling 
back  the  tides  of  cruelty,  oppression  and  wrong. 

God  has  let  your  days  be  long  in  the  land.  He  has  brought 
you  to  this  hour  that  you  might  see  with  your  own  eyes  the  dark- 
ness recede  and  the  morning  light  break  across  the  hills  as  barbar- 
ism and  tyranny  are  scourged,  mortally  wounded,  back  to  their 


22 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


lairs.  He  has  permitted  you  to  lift  up  your  eyes  and  see  the  flags 
of  the  Allied  Nations  waving  proudly  in  the  breezes  in  all  the 
grace  and  beauty  of  their  symbolism,  floating  victoriously  and  de- 
fiantly o’er  land  and  sea,  and  blessing  with  the  rippling  of  their 
folds  a world  in  which  Freedom,  Justice,  Decency  and  Peace  shall 
dwell  forevermore. 

Well  Done,  Good  and  Faithful  Soldiers 

And  now,  as  we  come  to  the  close  of  this  solemn  hour  in  your 
final  reunion,  take  with  you,  Venerable  Veterans  of  the  Confed- 
eracy, from  the  beauty  of  this  hallowed  place,  and  from  the  sweet- 
ness of  this  hour,  to  strengthen  and  bless  you,  to  be  your  stay  and 
comfort,  the  knowledge  that  the  Sons  and  Daughters  of  the  South, 
and  true  Americans  everywhere,  stand  today  in  tribute  to  you  and 
the  ideals  which  you  nourished. 

Your  people  remember,  with  a gratitude  which  shall  never 
wane,  the  bravery  and  sacrifices  you  made  during  the  days  of  The 
Sixties,  and  they  recall  with  loving  appreciation  the  courage  and 
patience  with  which  you  threw  off  the  oppressor’s  yoke  and  re- 
builded  your  shattered  civilization  at  the  end  of  that  bloody  strug- 
gle. They  are  grateful  that  you  have  preserved  the  blessings  of 
Anglo-Saxon  civilization  for  the  happiness  and  contentment  of 
countless  generations  to  come. 

May  the  great  God  of  Peace,  the  God  who  comforted  Jefferson 
Davis  in  the  hour  of  trial,  the  God  who  sustained  Robert  E.  Lee 
in  the  day  of  battle,  and  the  God  Stonewall  Jackson  worshipped 
in  his  tent  ,the  God  who  has  blessed  you  during  the  years  of  your 
long  lives,  stay  close  beside  you,  and  walk  with  you  in  friendly 
companionship  the  rest  of  the  way  and  bring  you  to  the  Crown  of 
Life. 


When  from  out  Heaven’s  blue  skies  you  hear,  sweet  and  low, 
like  bells  at  evening  pealing,  the  summons  of  your  warrior  com- 
rades to  come  and  join  them,  and  to  pitch  your  tents  on  Fame’s 
eternal  camping  ground,  be  assured,  beloved  and  honored  Soldiers 
of  the  South,  you  will  hear,  too,  the  voice  of  the  Great  Commander 
saying : 

Well  done,  thou  good  and  faithful  soldiers,  enter  thou 
now  into  the  joys  of  thy  Lord. 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


23 


ROBERT  E.  LEE 

By  Marshall  Wingfield 

(An  address  delivered  at  the  annual  Robert  E.  Lee  Banquet  in  St. 
Louis,  in  1944,  by  Marshall  Wingfield,  Commander-in-Chief  of  the  Sons 
of  Confederate  Veterans.  The  banquet  was  sponsored  by  Camp  Sterling 
Price,  No.  145,  S.C.V.) 


One  hundred  and  thirty-seven  years  ago  Napoleon  bestrode 
the  world  like  a Colossus;  Aaron  Burr  was  tried  for  treason;  the 
importation  of  slaves  was  abolished;  Fulton’s  steamboat  made  its 
first  successful  run,  and  an  embargo  was  passed  which  forbade 
any  ship  to  enter  or  leave  any  port  of  the  United  States. 

But  there  was  no  embargo  on  the  port  of  souls,  and  so  there 
came  to  Stratford  in  Virginia,  the  soul  of  one  who  was  destined 
to  be  the  inspiration  of  mankind  as  long  as  the  world  loves  honor. 
A fifty-one  year  old  soldier,  “Light  Horse  Harry”  Lee,  and  Anne 
Hill  Carter  who  had  been  his  second  wife  for  fourteen  years,  named 
the  second  of  their  five  children  Robert  Edward. 

A word  about  Stratford  may  not  be  out  of  place  here.  The 
house  stands  in  Westmoreland  County,  about  a mile  from  the 
south  bank  of  the  Potomac.  It  was  built  by  Thomas  Lee,  grand- 
son of  Richard  Lee,  the  emigrant,  and  given  the  name  of  the  Lee 
estate  in  England.  It  has  been  called  the  most  impresisve  pile  of 
brick  on  this  continent.  Not  for  size,  of  course,  but  for  historical 
significance.  In  one  of  its  rooms  were  born  two  signers  of  the 
Declaration  of  Independence,  — Richard  Henry  Lee,  who  moved 
the  Resolution  in  Congress  to  declare  the  colonies  free,  and  Francis 
Lightfoot  Lee,  his  brother. 

The  law  of  heredity  declares  that  there  is  a sense  in  which 
all  men  are  not  born  free  and  equal ; that  the  sins  of  the  fathers 
are  visited  upon  the  children  “unto  the  third  and  fourth  genera- 
tion” ; that  to  be  born  in  certain  families  is  to  enter  life  handi- 
capped by  downward-pulling  tendencies ; that  to  be  born  into 
certain  other  families  is  to  enter  life  with  a distinct  advantage. 

Robert  E.  Lee,  whose  137th  birthday  we  now  celebrate,  enter- 
ed into  life  with  the  cumulative  moralities  which  kings  and  princes 


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ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


cannot  confer  and  which  untoward  circumstances  cannot  take 
away.  Robert  E.  Lee  entered  life  not  with  the  advantage  of 
hereditary  rank,  but  with  those  cumulative  virtues  which  give  a 
patent  of  nobility  that  no  college  of  heralds  and  arms  can  ever 
bestow.  He  entered  life  with  the  challenge  of  a noble  ancestry. 
Sir  William  Draper  writing  of  the  British  Army,  said  that  for 
years  the  strictest  care  was  taken  to  fill  the  commissions  with 
such  gentlemen  as  had  the  glory  of  their  ancestors  to  support. 
Robert  E.  Lee  had  the  honor  of  his  ancestors  to  support.  He 
drew  from  his  father  and  mother  a code  which  made  it  treason 
to  manhood  to  fear  anything  but  dishonor,  and  disgrace  to  quail 
before  anything  but  cowardice.  He  was  taught  to  love  truth  for 
truth’s  sake,  and  to  hold  that  place  and  power  are  not  so  de- 
sirable as  to  be  purchased  at  the  price  of  honor.  It  was  this 
idealism  which  caused  him  to  decline  the  command  of  the  Federal 
Army  which  Francis  P.  Blair  offered  him  in  April  1861,  and 
led  him  to  exclaim,  “How  can  I draw  my  sword  upon  Virginia, 
my  native  state !” 


Heredity  gave  Lee  a great  body.  Men  liked  to  look  upon  him. 
Not  Pericles  nor  Washington  had  a nobler  physique.  He  could 
assume  no  attitude  that  was  not  graceful.  A famous  Englishman 
who  visited  Lee  while  he  was  encamped  near  Fredericksburg, 
wrote : “General  Lee  is  the  most  perfect  animal  form  I ever  saw. 
He  is  also  the  most  manly  and  entire  gentleman  I ever  saw.  Ad- 
ded to  his  beauty  of  form  and  countenance,  are  his  perfect  man- 
ners. Many  men  have  been  great  without  looking  the  part.  Lee  is 
great,  and  his  very  physique  proclaims  it.  I have  seen  many  of 
the  great  men  of  my  time,  and  Robert  E.  Lee  is  incomparably  the 
greatest  looking  of  them  all.” 

Lee  was  the  product  of  a civilization  competent  to  produce 
him.  The  civilization  which  existed  in  the  South  before  the  Civil 
War,  was  nourished  in  the  bosom  of  an  agriculture  which  poured 
its  wealth  into  the  lap  of  the  world.  And  notwithstanding  the 
jeers  and  sneers  of  urban  society  for  things  rural,  the  voice  of 
history  declares  that  most  of  the  world’s  great  men  grew  up  close 
to  the  soil.  In  the  quiet  fields  and  woods  of  Westmoreland  County, 
Lee  captured  a quality  of  life  which  is  all  too  elusive  in  the  stir- 
ring life  of  cities.  And  the  serenity  of  soul  which  came  to  him 
then  he  kept  to  the  end,  even  in  the  midst  of  war  shock  and  under 
the  exciting  sounds  of  battle. 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


25 


While  heredity  and  environment  must  be  taken  into  the  record 
in  any  accounting  for  Lee,  these  forces  certainly  are  not  the  whole 
explanation  of  his  exceptional  personality.  The  son  of  a noble 
ancestry  and  of  a brilliant  civilization,  may  be  so  weak-willed  as 
to  lose  the  benefits  of  both.  Lee  appropriated  his  fine  heritage 
by  the  exercise  of  a great  purpose.  It  is  within  the  realm  of  the 
will  that  man  comes  to  true  greatness.  It  was  by  the  power  of 
a great  purpose  that  Lee  came  to  the  peaks  of  great  achieving. 


Lee’s  fine  body  and  distinguished  family  both  had  their  perils. 
He  might  have  surrendered  to  pride  in  heredity,  brilliant  marriage 
and  a great  estate,  but  he  willed  it  otherwise.  Instead  of  taking 
the  leisure  which  he  might  have  considered  his  native  right,  he 
applied  himself  to  a profession.  He  was  not  snobbishly  interested 
in  his  pedigree.  When  a genealogist  proposed  to  trace  out  his 
lineage  he  replied  very  simply : “The  money  would  be  better 
spent  in  helping  the  poor.”  Nor  was  Lee  conscious  of  his  fine 
body.  He  took  his  graces  for  granted. 


Men  shape  circumstances,  and  circumstances  shape  men.  Lee 
came  to  national  notice  at  a later  period  in  life  than  any  other 
great  American.  It  is  not  likely  that  he  would  have  come  to 
national  notice  at  all  had  it  not  been  for  the  War  of  the  States. 
Nullification  had  been  considered  a settled  issue  for  thirty  years. 
But  nothing  is  ever  a settled  issue  in  a democracy.  And  so  the 
Southern  States  seceded.  As  a native  Southerner,  I submit  that 
love  of  freedom  was  behind  secession.  And  I also  submit  that 
a broader  view  of  freedom  would  have  saved  the  country  from  secession. 
I refer  to  that  view  of  freedom  which  was  held  by  “The  Tentmaker 
of  Tarsus”  who  declared,  “Though  I am  free,  I bring  myself  under 
bondage  that  I may  gain  the  more  freedom.” 


It  is  clear  from  our  vantage  point,  that  a permanently  divided 
union  would  have  abridged  the  freedom  which  we  enjoy  today 
as  citizens  of  states  that  are  united.  We  had  to  forego  a freedom 
from  something  in  order  to  have  a larger  freedom — the  freedom  for 
something.  When  freedom  is  for  something,  as  well  as  from  somthing, 
it  is  always  richer  and  finer.  We  are  never  wiser  than  when  we 
curtail  our  own  liberties  in  order  to  win  a larger  freedom.  That 
was  the  lesson  America  learned  after  the  war  had  put  Yankee 
Doodle  on  the  pension  list  and  Dixie  on  crutches. 


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ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


The  men  in  blue  went  home  to  cities  and  farms  that  had  not 
been  invaded.  They  returned  as  victors.  Five  of  their  army 
officers  went  on  to  the  White  House.  That  is  a danger  which  fol- 
lows every  war.  The  brilliant  soldier  is  often  pushed  into  the 
place  of  the  chief  executive,  though  military  genius  certainly  does 
not  argue  fitness  for  the  presidency. 

The  men  in  gray  went  back  to  devastated  farms  and  ruined 
cities,  to  begin  all  over  again.  What  did  their  “good  gray  chief- 
tain’’ do?  Benjamin  Morgan  Palmer  said  in  New  Orleans  at  a 
memorial  service  held  while  Lee  was  being  buried  in  Virginia, 
“There  is  a grandeur  in  misfortune  when  borne  by  a noble  heart 
without  complaining  or  breaking  and  that  grandeur  was  the  crown 
of  Lee.”  Lee  might  have  had  an  imposing  home  in  England, 
and  an  ample  annuity  from  an  admiring  member  of  the  British 
peerage ; but  he  said,  “I  cannot  desert  my  people.”  He  might 
have  had  a large  annual  income  by  merely  lending  his  name 
to  an  American  business  concern;  but  he  said,  “I  cannot  accept 
money  which  I have  not  earned.”  He  resolved  to  stay  with  his 
people  and  to  give  them  the  benefit  of  his  example.  Lee’s  true 
greatness  appeared  in  the  post-war  years  of  collapse  and  frustra- 
tion. Waterloo  was  the  end  of  Napoleon,  but  Appomattox  was 
the  beginning  of  Lee. 

After  Appomattox,  Lee  proved  that  nothing  is  so  unconquer- 
able as  the  soul  which  defies  mischance  and  disaster.  The  soldier 
who  became  a college  president  built  better  than  he  knew.  He 
believed  that  the  future  belonged  to  educated  people.  President 
Jefferson  had  said  that  people  could  be  trusted  if  they  were  in- 
formed. How  to  inform  them — how  to  keep  information  uncolored 
by  partisanship  and  undistorted  by  special  interests — was  the  ques- 
tion which  vexed  Jefferson,  and  which  still  vexes  us. 

In  disaster  Lee  continued  to  lead  the  people  of  the  South.  He 
refused  to  defend  himself,  or  to  discuss  the  past,  or  to  harbor 
bitterness.  It  was  his  conviction  that  now  allegiance  to  the  united 
country  was  the  only  honorable  and  intelligent  course.  His  post- 
war years  were  free  from  dramatics  and  heroics.  One  may  look  at 
them  steadily  and  then  say  with  Milton’s  “Samson  Agonistes”, 

“Nothing  is  here  for  tears,  nothing  to  wail, 

Or  knock  the  breast,  no  weakness,  no  contempt, 

Dispraise  or  blame.” 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


27 


Too  proud  to  supplicate,  save  at  the  Throne  of  God,  too  brave 
to  bow  the  head  under  the  bludgeonings  of  fate,  Lee  set  to  work 
with  battered  and  broken  tools  to  help  rebuild  the  shattered  for- 
tunes of  his  people.  And  under  the  inspiration  of  his  example, 
his  fellowmen  have  so  wrought,  that  from  the  ashes  of  disaster 
and  the  dust  of  desolation  “the  South  has  been  raised  from  the 
dead,  though  the  prints  of  the  nails  are  still  in  its  hands  and  the 
scar  of  the  spear  thrust  is  still  in  its  side.” 

Southern  chivalry  is  frequently  alluded  to  by  the  stranger  with 
derision.  But  it  was  more  than  a name.  It  was  a spirit, — the 
spirit  of  those  gentler  humanities  without  which  no  man  can 
rightly  lay  claim  to  the  title  of  gentleman.  Some  one  has  said  : 
“Chivalry  is  written  large  in  the  history  of  this  Republic.  It  was 
chivalry  which  faced  the  unknown  West  with  fearless  hearts  and 
carved  an  empire  out  of  the  heritage  of  the  Montezumas  ; it  stayed 
the  heart  of  Taylor  and  Bragg  on  the  blazing  heights  of  Buena 
Vista;  it  buoyed  the  spirit  of  Scott  and  Lee  before  the  walls 
of  Mexico;  it  kept  the  faith  at  Valley  Forge  and  Yorktown;  it 
met  undismayed  the  red  storm  of  fire  and  blood  at  Chancellors- 
ville  and  the  Wilderness ; it  marched  up  the  stony  ridge  at  Gettys- 
burg as  if  on  a holiday  excursion ; it  did  not  draw  back  from  the 
mortal  trenches  at  Petersburg.” 

There  are  those  who  admit  the  chivalry  of  the  deeds  of  Valley 
Forge,  Yorktown,  Buena  Vista  and  the  Alamo,  but  who  deny  it 
to  the  stirring  deeds  of  Southern  men  in  the  War  of  the  States, 
on  the  grounds  that  the  latter  were  performed  in  a base  cause. 
Meaning,  of  course,  that  the  deeds  were  done  in  order  to  hold 
a people  in  bondage.  How  long  will  supposedly  enlightened  men 
believe  that  the  War  of  the  States  was  fought  on  the  issue  of 
slavery?  If  there  had  been  no  war,  the  institution  of  slavery 
would  soon  have  been  outlawed  by  the  developing  conscience  of 
mankind.  From  conscientious  scruples  alone,  many  slaveholders 
had  liberated  their  slaves  before  the  outbreak  of  the  war,  and 
yet  they  were  as  ardent  champions  of  the  Southern  cause  as  any 
slaveholder.  Let  men  who  profess  to  be  intelligent  have  done 
with  the  error  that  the  War  of  the  States  was  “a  slaveholder’s 
war.”  It  was  a war  for  States  Rights.  It  was  a conflict  between 
the  Federal  and  the  State  governments,  between  the  tyranny  of 
centralization,  which  has  come  again,  and  the  democracy  of  sov- 
ereign states.  It  was  a contest  for  power.  Nor  was  the  War  of 


28 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


the  States  the  first  conflict  between  these  two  opposing  forces. 
We  must  not  forget  that  these  two  ideas  strove  together  from 
the  very  time  the  nation  was  founded,  and  once,  at  least,  with 
almost  fatal  results. 

There  was  never  a time  from  1787  to  1860,  when  the  strife 
between  the  Union  and  the  States  was  quiescent.  This  strife 
began  at  the  birth  of  the  nation.  It  was  intensified  by  the  forma- 
tion and  adoption  of  the  Constitution  of  1787.  It  was  further 
aggravated  by  the  struggle  of  1820,  relative  to  the  admission  of 
Missouri  into  the  Union.  The  fierce  contest  regarding  the  Tariff 
in  1832,  the  issue  of  the  Mexican  War,  and  the  repeal  of  the 
Missouri  Compromise, — all  these  added  further  fuel  to  the  fire. 
The  question  of  slavery  was  seized  upon  by  those  who  were  al- 
ready irritated,  and  thus  a multitude  of  currents  converged  to 
form  the  flood  which  swept  away  the  voluntary  union  of  the  States. 

From  the  maelstrom  of  the  Civil  War  we  soon  shall  have 
naught  but  written  story.  The  last  of  those  who  fought  its  battles 
will  soon  have  folded  their  tents  and  departed.  The  bitterness 
between  the  North  and  South  will  pass.  The  valor  of  our  fathers 
will  live  forever.  The  years  will  rust  the  hostile  guns  and  level 
the  old  trenches  and  rifle  pits,  but  through  all  these  changes, 
there  shall  stand  in  immutable  splendor  the  name  of  Robert  E. 
Lee,  as  secure  in  the  firmament  of  history  as  the  stars  are  in  the 
heavens.  And  as  the  silent  procession  of  the  ages  shall  pass  into 
the  quiet  halls  of  history,  our  children,  and  children’s  children, 
will  gain  inspiration  from  this  man  who  looms  majestic  from  the 
ashes  of  disaster.  And  when  that  relentless  Spirit  of  the  Hour 
Glass  and  Scythe  which  we  call  Time,  shall  have  measured  off 
a thousand  years,  those  who  love  heroism  and  devotion  will  re- 
call the  good  grey  face  of  Robert  E.  Lee  who  placed  his  all  in 
the  scales  of  his  people  and  lost  all  save  honor.  The  time  will 
come  when  every  section  of  America  will  unite  in  the  exalted 
language  of  B.  H.  Hill,  and  declare  that  Lee  “was  a foe  without 
hate ; a friend  without  treachery ; a soldier  without  cruelty ; a 
victor  without  oppression  ; and  a victim  without  murmuring.  He 
was  a public  officer  without  vices;  a private  citizen  without  wrong; 
a neighbor  without  reproach ; a Christian  without  hypocrisy  and 
a man  without  guile.  He  was  Caesar,  without  his  ambition ; 
Frederick,  without  his  tyranny;  Napoleon,  without  his  selfishness 
and  Washington  without  his  reward.” 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


29 


The  time  will  come  when  we  shall  be  able  to  speak  of  the 
heroism  of  our  fathers  without  stirring  up  sectional  animosities. 
As  the  victories  of  Pompey  and  of  Caesar  were  the  common  re- 
nown of  Rome,  so  the  achievements  of  both  North  and  South 
shall  become  the  common  renown  of  America.  As  the  red  rose 
and  the  white  rose  are  now  blended  in  British  history,  so  the 
Blue  and  the  Grey  shall  be  blended  in  the  garment  of  American 
history.  The  Athenians  and  the  Spartans  erected  monuments  of 
perishable  wood  to  celebrate  victories  over  their  own  fellow- 
countrymen,  but  they  built  monuments  of  enduring  stone  to  com- 
memorate their  triumphs  over  foreign  foes.  The  Romans  never 
permitted  a triumph  to  any  victor  in  their  civil  wars.  If  the 
peoples  called  heathen  refused  to  perpetuate  the  hatreds  of  their 
civil  life,  shall  we  be  less  magnanimous? 

Regional  lines  and  sectional  differences  will  no  doubt  continue, 
but  they  will  continue  as  landmarks  of  that  diversity  which  is  the 
law  of  the  universe.  I have  heard  of  an  American  politician  who 
so  wanted  the  votes  of  all  the  people  in  the  audience  that  he 
shouted,  “I  know  no  North  or  South;  I know  no  East  or  West.” 
Whereupon  an  urchin  in  the  gallery  piped  out,  “Mister,  you  better 
go  home  and  study  your  goggerfy.”  It  is  not  likely  that  the  time 
will  ever  come  when  we  shall  be  able  to  love  all  sections  alike, 
any  more  than  we  shall  be  able  to  love  all  persons  alike.  But  why 
may  we  not  believe  that  the  highest  patriotism  is  the  patriotism 
which  loves  one’s  own  region  best? 

“God  gave  all  men  all  earth  to  love, 

But  since  our  hearts  are  small, 

Ordained  for  each  one  spot  should  prove 
Beloved  over  all.” 

And,  assuredly,  there  is  one  thing  which  we  may  devoutly  be- 
lieve, namely,  that  the  time  will  never  come  when  Americans  of 
other  sections  shall  think  it  treason  for  Southerners  to  pause  on 
Lee’s  birthday  to  look  once  more  on  the  bonnie  blue  flag  which 
was  borne  by  hands  that  now  are  folded,  blest  by  lips  that  now 
are  dust,  and  loved  by  hearts  that  now  are  still.  Our  fathers 
santcified  that  flag  by  the  noblest  blood  of  the  Anglo-Saxon  race. 
After  having  consecrated  it  with  the  baptism  of  blood  on  many 
a well-fought  field,  they  baptized  it  with  tears  at  Appomattox. 
And  by  their  blood,  and  by  their  tears,  we  who  are  their  sons 


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ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


and  daughters,  call  on  the  Most  High  to  witness  our  vow  that 
we  shall  never  become  so  engrossed  in  material  things  that  we 
shall  fail  to  pause  now  and  then  and  recall  the  good  grey  face  and 
the  vanished  years,  that  they  may  speak  to  us  once  more  of  a 
valor  that  should  never  die. 

As  long  as  time  shall  last,  we  shall  see  our  good  grey  chief- 
tain as  he  was  in  the  days  after  Appomattox.  We  shall  see  him 
as,  oppressed  by  ill-health  and  by  the  sense  of  defeat,  he  set  about 
rebuilding  his  shattered  South  with  all  the  constancy  and  resolu- 
tion he  had  shown  in  war.  We  shall  see  him  as,  in  the  early 
autumn  of  1865,  he  rides  out  of  Richmond.  The  victorious  Fed- 
eral Army  had  come  to  Virginia’s  Capitol.  Its  generals  rode 
through  the  streets  of  the  city  and  on  into  comparative  obscurity. 
But  now  another  horseman  comes.  Even  the  name  of  his  steed  is 
destined  to  outlive  some  of  the  conquering  generals.  “Traveler” 
is  bespattered  with  mud  for  the  autumn  rains  have  set  in.  His 
head  droops  as  if  to  express  the  sadness  which  his  rider  hides. 
Rectitude  and  self-respecting  griefs  are  written  in  the  furrows  of 
the  rider’s  face.  The  horseman’s  very  carriage  proclaims  that 
he  wears  invisible  badges  of  victory  and  carries  spoils  of  honor 
in  his  heart.  His  garments  are  worn  from  hard  service,  but  the 
majestic  composure  of  the  wearer  transforms  his  clothing  into 
royal  raiment.  His  leggings  are  mud-spattered,  but  to  the  eyes 
of  those  who  watch  him  ride  away,  these  old  leggings  are  part 
of  the  armor  of  a very  gallant  knight.  There  are  no  visible  ban- 
ners streaming  over  this  grey-bearded  horseman.  He  rides  not 
at  the  head  of  a victorious  army.  There  are  no  crowds  to  hail 
him.  He  rides  alone.  He  rides  alone  in  the  rain.  Whither 
bound  is  this  solitary  horseman?  He  is  bound  for  Lexington  to 
take,  at  $1500  per  year,  the  presidency  of  a little  college  which 
bears  the  name  of  Washington,  but  which,  through  all  the  com- 
ing years,  is  destined  to  wear  the  added  name  of  Lee.  Is  that 
as  far  as  this  lone  horseman  is  riding?  Ah,  no!  He  is  riding 
farther  than  Lexington.  He  is  riding  farther  than  the  confines  of 
Virginia  whose  boundaries  were  described  in  an  old  book  as  ex- 
tending “as  far  west  as  may  be  convenient.”  He  is  riding  farther 
than  the  shores  of  America.  He  is  riding  farther  than  the  fabled 
winged  horse,  Pegasus,  could  take  him.  He  is  riding  into  the 
hearts  of  all  people  who  love  honor.  He  is  riding  to  one  of  the 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


31 


high  hills  of  history,  so  that  man  might  look  up  and  learn  how 
to  win  honor  from  defeat  and  how  to  make  failure  glorious. 
This  vanquished  victor  of  the  stainless  soul  is  riding  forward  to 
take  an  undisputed  place  in  the  halls  of  universal  fame. 


32 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


ORIGIN  OF  SLAVERY  IN  AMERICA 

By  Mattie  F.  Allison 

(This  paper  on  the  Origin  of  Slavery  in  America  is  one  of  a number 
preserved  in  the  archives  of  the  Virginia  Clay-Clopton  Chapter,  U.  D.  C., 
Huntsville,  Ala.,  and  placed  in  the  Alabama  State  Department  of  Archives 
and  History  through  the  courtesy  of  Miss  Alice  McCravey,  of  Huntsville.) 

A search-light  back  through  the  temple  of  time  reveals  the 
fact  that  from  time  immemorial,  slavery  in  some  form  existed, 
but  that  is  not  within  my  province,  save  to  mention,  that  as  early 
as  1442  Antonio  Goncalvez  carried  a cargo  of  negroes  to  Portugal. 
Such  was  the  beginning  of  the  African  trade,  and  in  1445,  slave- 
marts  were  opened  in  Africa,  and  the  trade  took  on  an  activity 
that  lasted  for  centuries.  The  negro  slavery  of  modern  times  was 
a sequel  to  the  discovery  of  America.  The  same  year  that  marks 
the  meeting  of  the  first  Assembly  in  Virginia,  1619,  a portentous 
personage  appeared  on  the  soil  of  North  America — the  African 
slave.  A Dutch  vessel  sailed  up  the  James  River  and  offered  for 
sale  to  the  planters  twenty  negroes  captured  on  the  cost  of  Africa. 
They  were  purchased  and  put  to  work  on  the  tobacco  plantations. 
These  were  the  first  slaves.  To  the  men  who  watched  the  landing 
of  this  handful  of  negroes,  it  was  doubtless  rather  an  unimportant 
matter.  Yet  it  was  the  small  beginning  of  a system  that  was  des- 
tined to  exert  an  immense  influence  upon  our  country.  Indeed, 
it  may  be  likened  to  the  tiny  cloud  before  the  storm,  in  the  days 
of  the  prophets  of  old.  This  was  the  origin  and  commencement 
of  slavery  in  the  United  States.  It  is  significant  to  note  that  in 
the  year  that  Harvard  College  was  founded,  1636,  the  first  slave- 
ship  built  in  America,  was  launched  at  Marblehead,  Mass.  It  was 
used  for  transporting  to  this  country  slaves  captured  on  the  coast 
of  Africa.  Two  years  later  this  same  ship  brought  the  first  cargo 
of  negro-slaves  into  Massachusetts,  to  be  sold  to  the  settlers.  This 
was  the  beginning  of  an  extensive  trade  by  which  negroes  were 
carried  in  New  England  ships,  to  all  English  Colonies  and  their 
owners  grew  rich  in  the  traffic.  The  slave-trade  was  attended 
often  with  extreme  inhumanity.  The  vessels  which  transported 
the  negroes  from  Africa  to  America  were  overcrowded  to  such 
an  extent  that  a large  proportion  died  in  the  passage  over,  and 
the  treatment  of  the  negro  slave  after  his  arrival  and  sale  de- 
pended much  upon  the  character  of  his  master.  There  seems  to 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


33 


have  been  no  difference  of  opinion  as  to  the  right  to  sell  him,  as 
they  were  captives,  and  their  servitude  was  until  death.  The 
negro-trader  was  generally  held  in  odium.  Often  the  mother  was 
sold  from  her  children,  and  families  were  separated.  How  un- 
happy those  first  slaves  must  have  been,  torn  from  their  homes, 
taken  to  a strange  land,  with  a strange  language,  confronted  by  a 
race  of  different  color,  not  able  to  understand ; treated  often  with 
cruelty.  How  terrified  and  stupefied  they  must  have  been.  In 
the  northern  states  with  their  cold  climate,  commercial  pursuits 
and  small  farms,  the  negro  number  was  never  very  large.  Slavery 
established  itself  firmly  in  the  Southern  colonies,  where  the  great 
tobacco,  rice  and  cotton  plantations  created  a demand  for  labor. 
The  negro  seems  specially  designed  by  nature  for  Southern  field 
work,  his  black  skin  and  thick  skull  rendering  him  almost  imper- 
vious to  the  sun’s  heat.  The  negro  in  the  cotton  field  singing  is 
always  a picturesque  object.  In  the  South,  the  slaves  increased 
as  rapidly  as  rabbits  in  a burrow,  and  at  the  close  of  the  French 
War,  there  were  not  less  than  500,000  of  whom  8/9  were  south 
of  Mason  and  Dixon’s  line.  Just  for  remembrance,  I take  the 
following  notice  from  the  Boston  Times,  September  6,  1773 — “I  will 
sell  two  fine  male  slaves  to-morrow,  at  16  Anne  St.,  to  ye  highest 
bidder,  11  o’clock.”  In  the  Post  Boy  June  8,  1771  are  these  notable 
words : — “A  negro  woman,  or  wench — are  to  be  sold — inquire  of 
the  printer.”  In  the  Gazetteer  of  April  18,  1779,  was  the  notification 
of  the  proposed  sale  of  a black  boy,  sundry  horses,  and  “Tim 
Whiskey”,  a little  worse  for  wear,  the  former  being  named  last, 
as  least  important.  Again  in  the  Post  Boy  July  6,  1771,  much  in  the 
same  spirit,  is  advertized  a convenient  pew  in  Kings  Chapel  and 
a likely  negro  man.  Prior  to  that  date  was  a long  list  of  second 
hand  furniture,  a very  likely  looking  live  black  moose,  and  a big 
negro  man.  It  is  interesting  to  know  that  an  indictment  in  Wor- 
cester County,  1791,  against  a white  man  for  beating  a black  one, 
was  the  basis  of  action  in  the  Supreme  Court,  in  which  a resolution 
in  the  Declaration  of  Independence,  was  cited  with  triumphant 
effect  against  the  master  who  was  found  guilty  and  fined  40  shil- 
lings. This  resulted  in  practically  the  extinction  of  slavery  in 
Massachusetts.  It  never  recovered  from  the  blow.  At  that  time 
there  were  hundreds  of  slaves  in  New  Hampshire,  Connecticut 
and  Rhode  Island.  At  one  time  Lafette,  the  pirate,  captured  sev- 
eral cargoes  of  negroes,  bound  for  the  coast  of  Massachusetts  and 
sold  them  into  Louisiana.  As  late  as  a few  years  back  there  was 
an  old  negro  slave  in  Courtland,  Ala.,  whose  body  was  tattooed. 


34 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


He  came  from  Africa.  It  was  singular  that  while  slavery  was 
legalized  in  the  British  Colonies,  it  was  at  the  same  time,  a law 
in  England  (1772)  as  soon  as  a slave  set  foot  in  England,  he  was 
free.  If  he  returned  to  America  he  was  reclaimed.  The  word 
slavery  conjures  up  much  that  is  pleasant,  from  that  far-off  time. 
Old  memories  come  back  like  visions,  and  always  with  the  sweet- 
ness that  gilds  the  past.  One  of  these,  that  memory  holds  very 
dear,  and  dwells  on  with  love,  is  of  my  kind  old  Mammy.  She 
was  of  Indian  blood  and  had  the  high  cheek  bones,  bright  piercing 
eyes  and  coarse  straight  hair  of  her  race.  Only  hers  was  gray — 
hair  that  we  children  begged  eagerly  to  comb,  a privilege  which 
was  granted,  with  the  injunction  not  to  pull  hard.  In  my  day  she  was 
too  old  to  work,  and  spent  her  time  under  the  spreading  branches 
of  an  apple-tree,  on  which  climbed  a hop-vine,  knitting  an  endless 
number  of  socks  of  coarse  gray  yarn.  I never  knew  who  wore 
them.  I can  close  my  eyes  and  see  that  peaceful  picture  with 
startling  vividness.  We  clustered  around  her  like  bees  and  car- 
ried all  our  little  woes  to  her.  She  soothed  our  childish  grief  with 
unvarying  kindness,  for  she  loved  her  nurslings,  bad  though  we 
were.  Under  that  dark  skin  beat  a heart,  honest  and  true.  No 
one  ever  sang,  or  ever  will  again  like  Mammy.  We  used  to  sit 
entranced  under  the  spell  of  her  wierd  old  songs.  We  all  prom- 
ised her  that  when  we  grew  up  and  married,  and  there  were  little 
one,  one  should  bear  her  name.  The  childish  promise  was  never 
fulfilled.  As  far  as  I know  Mammy  Phillis  never  had  a namesake. 
Her  faithfulness  ended  only  with  death.  An  incident  that  is  mirth- 
provoking  instead  of  tearful  was  of  this  same  period.  Among  my 
Father’s  house-hold  servants  was  a strong  strapping  young  negro, 
whose  name  was  Christopher  Columbus,  called  Kit,  for  short,  (he 
was  long  afterwards  a well  known  town  character).  He  had  been 
guilty  of  some  grave  disobedience,  and  needed  the  ministrations 
of  a hickory  or  birch,  wielded  by  a strong  hand.  This  power  was 
vested  in  the  person  of  Marshall  Franks,  who  was  town-whip  per.  My 
Father  sent  Kit  to  him  with  a sealed  note,  containing  instructions, 
telling  him  to  wait  for  an  answer.  On  the  way,  Kit,  who  was  a 
smart  negro,  “began  to  smell  a rat”,  met  Warren,  an  ignorant 
negro  boy  my  Father  had  recently  purchased,  and  gave  him  the 
note,  with  the  order.  Kit  waited  in  hiding  close  by  and  Warren 
went  in  and  got  the — answer.  Upon  being  questioned  later,  at 
home,  Kit’s  defense  was:  “You  see  Marse  William,  I was  tuk  with 
a powful  sickness,  peered  to  me  like  I was  gwyne  die,  dere  in  the 
street.  I seed  Warren  and  I gin  it  to  him  and  Lord,  Marse  Wil- 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


35 


liam,  Warren  sure  got  it  bad.”  I have  heard  my  Father  laugh 
heartily  in  telling  this,  and  he  afterward  published  it.  I know  the 
Chapter  are  wondering  what  connection  these  two  pictures  from 
a far  away  past,  have  to  do  with  my  subject,  and  rightly  they  do 
not  belong  here.  An  over-powering  memory  that  would  not  be 
stilled,  prompted  the  writing. 


MATTIE  F.  ALLISON. 


36 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


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Memorial  to  Heyward  Shepherd,  Freedman,  placed  by  the  United  Daughters 
of  the  Confederacy  at  Harper’s  Ferry,  West  Virginia,  near  the  spot  where  he  lost 
his  life  in  the  John  Brown  Raid  in  defense  of  his  employer’s  property. 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


37 


MONUMENT  TO  NEGRO,  HEYWARD  SHEPHERD 
ERECTED  BY  DAUGHTERS  OF  CONFEDERACY  AT 
HARPER’S  FERRY,  WEST  VIRGINIA.  IN  1931. 

(One  of  the  guests  at  the  banquet  given  to  the  Confederate  Veterans 
and  Sons  of  Veterans  in  Montgomery  during  the  Reunion  held  in  Mont- 
gomery, Sept.  27-28,  1944,  proposed  that  a monument  should  be  erected  to 
Negro  slaves  faithful  to  their  masters  and  their  masters’  families.  Mrs.  L. 
M.  Bashinsky,  one  of  the  distinguished  guests  at  the  banquet,  arose  and  in- 
formed the  gentleman  that  the  Daughters  of  the  Confederacy  had  already 
discharged  that  obligation  and  explained  that  in  1931  a boulder  was  un- 
veiled at  Harper’s  Ferry,  West  Virginia,  to  the  memory  of  Heyward 
Shepherd  and  other  Negroes  faithful  to  their  duties  in  the  troubled  crisis 
of  the  War  Between  the  States.  The  Editor  of  this  magazine  approached 
Mrs.  Bashinsky  at  the  conclusion  of  the  banquet  and  asked  her  for  the  ad- 
dress which  she  had  made  as  President-General  of  the  U.D.C.  at  the  unveil- 
ing of  the  monument.  The  address  was  located  in  an  issue  of  the  publica- 
tion Confederate  Veteran  of  November  1931,  and  is  herewith  reproduced 
for  the  information  of  our  white  and  colored  citizens.  In  the  Minutes  of 
the  General  Convention  held  in  Jacksonville,  Fla.,  in  the  Fall  of  1931,  Mrs. 
Bashinsky  in  her  report  as  President-General  of  the  organization  gave  the 
history  of  the  movement  that  culminated  in  the  erection  and  unveiling  of 
the  monument.  She  explained  that  eleven  years  previously,  at  the  Ashe- 
ville, N.  C.,  Convention,  Mrs.  Roy  W.  McKinney,  President-General, 
recommended  the  placing  of  this  boulder  at  Harper’s  Ferry.  The  boulder 
was  procured  and  with  the  expectation  of  placing  it  on  the  Baltimore  and 
Ohio  Railroad  property  was  inscribed  to  that  effect  but  the  railroad  of- 
ficials never  gave  their  consent  to  the  Daughters  to  place  the  monument 
at  the  locality  where  Shepherd  received  his  fatal  wounds.  Through  the  in- 
tervening years  Mrs.  Bashinsky  having  learned  that  Dr.  Matthew  Page 
Andrews  was  the  first  to  suggest  this  memorial,  wrote  to  him  asking  him 
to  interview  the  Mayor  and  leading  citizens  of  the  town  of  Harper’s  Ferry, 
with  the  view  to  interesting  them  in  placing  the  Shepherd  memorial  there. 
Finally  through  the  Mayor,  Mr.  James  Ransom,  with  the  unanimous  ap- 
proval of  the  Council,  a lot  was  provided  near  the  scene  of  the  tragedy. 
The  small  triangular  plat  was  given  to  the  Daughters  of  the  Confederacy 
by  Dr.  Walter  E.  Dittmeyer,  son  of  the  Union  sympathizer.  This  change 
of  location  necessitated  some  changes  in  the  wording  on  the  face  of  the 
boulder,  all  of  which  was  reincised.  All  arrangements  of  the  dedicatory 
program  were  referred  to  Dr.  Andrews  who  initiated  the  idea  of  the  mon- 
• ument  and  the  occasion  gave  universal  staisf action.) 


38 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Address  by  Mrs.  L.  M.  Bashinsky,  President  General,  U.  D.  C.,  at 
the  dedication  of  the  Faithful  Slave  Memorial,  Harper's  Ferry,  W . V a., 
October  19,  1931. 

In  a happy  sense  this  is  an  outstanding  day  in  the  history  oi 
the  United  Daughters  of  the  Confederacy,  since  it  marks  the  con- 
summation of  efforts  extending  through  several  years — efforts  that 
find  fruition  and  culmination  in  the  exercises  of  this  hour. 

We  are  sometimes  asked,  “Why  look  back?”  “Why  remem- 
ber?” We  answer  in  the  language  of  the  great  statesman:  “Look- 
ing backward  is  looking  forward.  Those  never  look  forward  who 
never  look  backward.”  The  command  “to  remember”  is  written 
large  in  the  Book  of  Books  from  the  terrific  thunder  of  Sinai  to 
the  seraphic  visions  of  Patmos. 

Indeed,  memorials  as  an  aid  to  memory  are  as  old  as  time 
from  the  most  beautiful,  the  radiant  bow  of  promise — “when  I 
bring  a cloud  over  the  earth,  the  bow  shall  be  seen  in  the  cloud, 
and  I will  remember  my  covenant” — to  the  most  sacred,  the  Chris- 
tian Eucharist,  “This  do  in  remembrance  of  Me.” 

We  are  told  that  Memnon,  at  the  rising  of  the  sun,  sang  to 
the  Libyan  Sands  of  the  unreturning  Brave,  and  we  know  that 
stones  from  the  bed  of  the  Jordan  erected  as  a memorial  on  its 
banks  testified  to  the  passage  over  the  river  dry-shod  of  the  Is- 
raelites from  their  Wilderness  wanderings  into  the  Land  of  Prom- 
ise. 


It  is  fitting,  then,  that  we  should  gather  here  in  this  pic- 
turesque town,  amid  all  the  lavish  natural  beauty  which  encom- 
passes it,  to  pay  tribute  to  the  memory  of  Heyward  Shepherd,  a 
colored  man,  a freed  man,  who  gave  his  life  in  defense  of  his  em- 
ployer’s property,  and  in  memory  of  many  others  of  his  race  who 
were  loyal  and  true  during  a period  that  tried  men’s  souls. 

“He  that  loseth  his  life  shall  find  it”  is  an  expression  of  the 
philosophy  which  inspired  Heyward  Shepherd  to  sacrifice  life  it- 
self in  defense  of  a great  ideal,  that  of  fidelity  to  a trust.  In  Holy 
Writ  we  read:  “Whatsoever  things  are  pure,  whatsoever  things 
are  honorable,  whatsoever  things  are  true,  whatsoever  things  are 
just,  whatsoever  things  are  lovely,  whatsoever  things  are  of  good 
report,  if  there  be  any  merit,  if  there  be  any  praise,  think  on  these 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


39 


things.”  We  are  here  today  to  “think  on  these  things.”  Heyward 
Shepherd’s  conduct  was  honorable,  just,  and  true,  and  merits  the 
praise  we  bring  him. 

I do  not  envy  the  man  his  composure  who  can  stand  unmoved 
in  presence  of  the  memories  that  this  simple  ceremony  is  calcu- 
lated to  evoke.  Memories  that  carry  us  back  to  that  tragic  era, 
1859,  when  at  this  place  was  delivered  the  blow  which  so  aggra- 
vated the  passions  of  men  that  it  hastened  the  sounding  of  the 
tocsin  of  war  in  the  sixties. 

John  Brown  and  his  friends  believed  the  Negroes  would  flock 
to  their  call  in  multitudes  to  burst  the  shackles  of  slavery  and 
bring  the  inevitable  and  irrepressible  conflict  to  a quick  and  de- 
cisive end.  Shortly  before  that  fatal  night,  John  Brown  had  a 
secret  conference  with  Fred  Douglass,  the  most  distinguished 
Negro  of  his  age,  hoping  to  enlist  his  sympathy  and  induce  him 
to  encourage  the  Negroes  to  join  the  standard  of  Brown  and  open 
a far-flung  race  war  that  would  engulf  the  South  in  a veritable 
maelstrom  of  inferno.  Douglass  shrank  with  horror  from  the 
proposal  and  predicted  that  any  such  effort  would  end  in  failure. 
As  has  so  frequently  happened  in  history,  the  real  object,  that  is, 
in  a narrow  sense,  the  immediate  aim  and  purpose  for  which  the 
blow  was  struck,  was  never  realized,  because  the  methods  adopted 
were  based  on  error  and  misunderstanding. 

I have  sometimes  wondered  if  it  could  be  that  those  who  en- 
couraged that  enterprise  at  Harper’s  Ferry  were  entirely  ignorant 
of  the  horrors  of  a race  war  in  Haiti,  that  lasted  from  1791  to 
1804?  Long,  horrible  years  they  were,  when  the  whites  were  com- 
pletely exterminated  and  Haiti,  the  richest  colony  in  the  posses- 
sion of  France,  was  plundered  and  pillaged  and  all  vestages  of 
civilization  burned  and  destroyed. 

Why  was  it  that  a race  war  failed  to  materialize  in  the  South, 
when  it  spread  like  wild  fire  in  Haiti?  The  only  explanation  lies 
in  the  differences  between  the  white  people  and  the  Negroes  in 
the  South,  who  merit  praise,  and  those  in  Haiti,  both  white  and 
colored,  who  deserved  condemnation.  The  destiny  of  a man  and 
also  the  destiny  of  a nation  is  largely  determined  by  natural  in- 
herited characteristics.  There  is  a vast  difference  between  the 
Anglo-Saxon  and  the  Latin. 


40 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


In  the  fierce  gladiatorial  combats  in  the  Roman  arena,  a sym- 
pathetic, sportsman-like  hand  was  seldom,  if  ever,  extended  to  the 
defeated  contender,  whose  destruction  was  demanded  by  the  spec- 
tators, by  the  inexorable  sign  of  “thumbs  down”  and  thus  sealed 
his  doom. 

On  the  other  hand,  it  is  natural  for  the  Anglo-Saxon  to  revere 
human  life  and  to  sympathize  with  the  downtrodden,  and  despite 
the  bitter  propaganda  and  flamboyant  literature  of  that  period, 
the  fact  remains  that,  with  but  few  exceptions,  the  colored  people 
were  well  fed,  well  housed,  and  well  cared  for  in  the  South,  were 
treated  humanely,  were  taught  the  great  truths  of  God’s  Holy 
Word,  and  became  ardent  believers  in  their  Lord  and  Saviour. 
Provision  was  made  for  them  to  worship  in  all  the  churches,  and 
their  quarters  rang  with  the  rhythmic  music  of  their  spirituals, 
their  hymns  of  devotion  and  religious  fervor  filling  the  evening 
hours  with  their  “Swing  low,  Sweet  Chariot,  coming  fer  to  carry 
me  home.” 

And  the  “black  mammy” — how  devoted  was  she  to  her  white 
“chilluns,”  and  how  devoted  the  white  children  were  to  their 
“black  mammies.”  I speak  from  experience,  for  ours  never  left 
us  until  I,  the  youngest  child,  was  married  and  the  home  “broken 
up,”  the  older  generation  of  colored  folks  having  passed  to  the 
Great  Beyond.  These  old  mammies  formed  a necessary  and  es- 
sential element  in  the  family  life  of  the  South.  They  took  part  in 
the  birthday  festivities  of  the  children,  became  their  confidants 
in  their  love  affairs,  carried  the  love  missives,  were  present  at  the 
weddings,  and  felt  proud  and  elated  when  their  daughters,  in  turn, 
became  the  attendants  of  the  children  of  their  white  “chillun.” 
Now,  I ask  you,  how,  under  such  conditions  and  with  such  exist- 
ing relationships,  could  the  sons  of  these  “mammies”  be  prevailed 
upon  to  use  “spikes  and  staves”  against  their  white  masters  and 
friends?  Fred  Douglass  was  right.  It  could  not  be  done. 

In  contrast  with  these  conditions,  it  is  related  that  in  Haiti 
the  white  people  were  entirely  indifferent  to  the  obligations  and 
responsibilities  which  civilization  and  conscience  demand.  They 
loved  to  revel  in  ease  and  luxury  and  did  not  shrink  from  merci- 
lessly exploiting  their  slaves  that  they  might  extract  the  wealth 
needed  for  lives  of  self-indulgence.  They  had  no  concern  what- 
ever for  the  spiritual  welfare  of  their  slaves,  who  were  permitted 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


41 


to  revert  to  paganism  and  the  revolting  practices  of  “voodo”  rites. 

In  his  history  of  Haiti,  H.  Davis  stated:  “In  fiendish  cruelty 
there  seems  to  have  been  but  little  choice  between  white  and  black. 
The  French  burned  captured  negroes  alive,  broke  their  bodies  on 
wheels  of  torture,  or  buried  them  up  to  their  necks  in  sand/’  Des- 
tiny wills  that  men  “reap  what  they  sow/’ 

Who  today  is  so  ignorant  that  they  would  charge  the  Anglo- 
Saxons  of  the  South  with  being  capable  of  committing  such  atro- 
cious cruelties  as  these  just  cited?  And  who  would  dare  accuse 
our  Negroes  with  acts  of  vengeance  as  fiendinsh  as  those  of  the 
Haitian  Negroes? 

Yet,  listen:  “The  Haitian  Negroes  came  originally  from  the 
same  African  countries  as  those  brought  by  the  New  England 
States  and  sold  to  the  South.  They  were  identical  in  race  and 
blood  and  originally  of  the  same  moral  fiber.  Now,  if  in  Haiti  they 
were  goaded  to  acts  of  fiendishness,  it  was  because  their  white 
masters  of  a higher  intelligence  had  failed  them  in  kindliness  and 
had  made  no  effort  to  lift  them  above  the  level  of  their  primitive, 
pagan  superstitions  and  practices.  These  super-refined  and  exquis- 
itely polished  Creoles  “reaped  what  they  had  sown.” 

In  1859,  our  nation  lived  in  an  atmosphere  surcharged  with 
passion  and  hatreds.  Many  people  lost  their  sense  of  proportions, 
and  ignorance  of  the  real  circumstances  induced  some  to  believe 
that  the  colored  people  would  welcome  an  opportunity  to  betray 
their  friends  and  masters.  The  effort  failed  and  for  logical  reasons. 
The  Southern  people  had  inherited  the  system  of  slavery,  but  they 
accepted  the  inheritance  with  the  weight  of  all  the  obligations  and 
responsibilities  that  civilization  and  Christianity  impose  upon  the 
human  conscience. 

Time  carries  us  back  to  sanity,  not  only  cures  all  ills,  but 
restores  the  bonds  of  broken  friendships  and  brings  into  relief 
the  true  perspective  of  remote  events  and  reestablishes  the  sense 
of  proportions.  There  are  lessons  in  multitudes  for  those  who 
observe  the  pointings  of  the  finger  of  destiny,  but,  unfortunately, 
men  so  often  fail  to  profit  from  lessons  so  profound  and  wise. 
One  of  the  lessons  transmitted  as  the  result  of  John  Brown’s  ef- 
fort stands  out  preeminently.  It  is  this : That  the  character  of 


42 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


the  Negro,  his  loyalty  and  his  faithfulness,  is  a reflection  of  the 
example  set  him  by  “Ole  Master”  and  “Old  Miss.”  Because  of 
the  shortcomings  of  their  superiors  in  Haiti,  the  Negroes  there  did 
not  scruple  to  avenge  themselves  in  terrible  fashion.  But,  in  the 
South,  where  they  were  treated  with  kindly  consideration  and 
trained  in  the  eternal  verities  of  Christianity,  a feeling  of  such 
trust  and  confidence  existed  between  the  white  and  colored  that 
when  the  war  began,  the  soldiers  shouldered  arms  and  went  to  the 
front  with  full  confidence  that  the  women  and  children  were  safe 
under  the  protection  of  the  Negroes  who  would  protect  their  de- 
fenseless homes  and  families.  The  Negroes  knew  that  a bitter 
war  was  being  fought  which  would  vitally  affect  their  destinies, 
yet  even  this  did  not  blind  them  to  their  sense  of  duty,  and  they 
served  and  protected  the  women  and  children  of  the  South  with 
unwavering  loyalty  and  devotion,  qualities  which  we  memorialize 
today. 


We  rejoice  in  the  continual  progress  of  the  race;  we  share 
in  their  pride  in  the  creation  of  their  prosperity,  which  forms  an 
important  asset  to  the  wealth  of  our  nation ; we  sympathize  with 
their  aims  and  ambitions  as  directed  by  men  of  the  type  of  Dr. 
Booker  T.  Washington  and  Professor  R.  R.  Moton,  and  rejoice  in 
the  accomplishment  of  such  splendid  institutes  as  Tuskegee  and 
Hampton. 


But  in  a more  intimate  sense  and  closer  to  our  hearts  remains 
the  old  Negro  “Mammy,”  who  with  her  humility  and  sweet  deco- 
rum has  become  a real  institution. 


Again  I speak  from  personal  experience.  The  mammy  born 
in  anti-bellum  days,  who  nursed  our  children,  has  never  left  us. 
She  shares  our  joys  and  sorrows,  and  is  a trusted  confidante  in  our 
family  affairs.  She  treats  my  son,  a giant  of  a man,  with  hair 

streaked  with  silver,  as  though  he  were  a boy  in  rompers,  and 

now  and  then  shows  his  wife  and  children  her  greatest  treasure, 

the  first  little  shoes  which  she  was  first  to  put  on  his  baby  feet. 

You  know  I feel  sorry  for  a child  who  has  never  had  a real  “Mam- 
my” ! Old  and  decrepit,  unable  to  do  any  work,  she  occupies  a 
little  rose-covered  cottage  in  our  yard,  where  she  will  remain  un- 
til she  is  called  to  her  eternal  home. 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


43 


Seventy-two  years  have  passed  since  that  tragedy  at  Harper’s 
Ferry.  Seventy-two  years  of  constructive  thought  and  effort  have 
brought  us  to  this  glad  day  in  a people’s  history. 

“A  people  sane  and  great, 

Forged  in  strong  fires, 

In  war  made  one, 

Telling  old  battles  over  without  hate.” 

Today  the  Flag  of  the  Union  proudly  floats  above  an  undi- 
vided and  indivisible  people;  more  than  one  hundred  million  peo- 
ple turn  their  eyes  where  the  stars  shine  in  their  field  of  azure, 
more  resplendent  than  a tropical  night ; more  than  a hundred  mil- 
lion voices  proudly  and  reverently  sing: 

“And  star-spangled  banner,  O long  may  it  wave 

O’er  the  land  of  the  free  and  the  home  of  the  brave !” 

Our  section  is  true  to  the  national  flag,  that  flag  which  our 
fathers  first  lifted  to  the  breezes — to  that  flag  that  has  never 
known  defeat,  as  true  as  the  truest.  That  was  demonstrated  in 
the  Spanish-American  War,  when  Fighting  Joe  Wheeler  doffed 
his  uniform  of  gray  and,  resplendent  in  blue,  led  the  American 
forces,  the  sons  of  the  blue  and  the  sons  of  the  gray,  in  Cuba; 
proven  again  in  the  great  World  War,  when  the  sons  of  the  South, 
true  to  the  spirit  of  their  fathers,  served  no  less  courageously,  no 
less  sacrificially,  under  the  Stars  and  Stripes  on  the  battle-rent, 
shell-torn  fields  of  France.  Yes, 

The  old  South  is  true  to  the  Union, 

A World  War  has  written  the  test; 

But  deep  in  her  heart  lies  another, 

The  Holy  Grail  of  her  quest. 

While  we  are  true  to  the  Stars  and  Stripes,  it  is  also  true  in 
the  highest  and  purest  sense  that  we  are  loyal  to  another  banner, 
the  Stars  and  Bars.  Our  love  for  this  flag  is  like  that  of  a mother 
who  slips  away  noiselessly  to  a darkened  room — opens  a drawer 
and  takes  from  its  depths  the  little  garments  of  her  sainted  child ; 
holds  them  caressingly  in  her  trembling  hands ; her  tearful  eyes 
bedew  them — then  she  reverently  lays  them  away  and,  with  a sob 
in  her  heart,  turns  to  meet  duties  of  the  day.  In  pledging  our 


44 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


allegiance  to  the  Stars  and  Stripes,  we  do  not  agree  to  forget  this 
other  flag,  under  whose  folds  marched  armies  clad  in  gray  whose 
heroic  deeds  added  new  honor  to  American  manhood  and  a brighter 
luster  to  American  fame. 

As  a people  we  are  deeply  grateful  that  within  our  national 
borders  all  is  peace.  May  gentle  Peace,  wedded  to  stalwart  Hon- 
or, depart  from  us  no  more  forever.  God  hasten  the  time,  by 
prophets  sung,  when  “nation  shall  rise  against  nation  no  more/’ 
nor  “man’s  inhumanity  to  man  make  countless  thousands  mourn” ; 
when  every  war  horse  shall  be  hitched  to  a plow,  when  every  spear 
shall  become  a pruning  hook,  and  every  sword  shall  be  converted 
into  an  implement  of  peaceful  husbandry,  causing  the  earth  to 
smile  in  verdure  where  once  it  was  drenched  in  blood.  That  glad 
day  will  be  the  final  triumph  of  the  Prince  of  Peace,  when  the 
mighty  angel  shall  say:  “I  have  gone  up  and  down  through  the 
earth,  and  the  earth  sitteth  still  and  is  at  rest.  I heard  no  tumult 
of  war,  neither  noise  of  battle.” 

Today  we  dedicate  this  bowlder  in  memory  of  Heyward  Shep- 
herd and  to  the  faithful  of  his  race.  It  is  history  in  stone.  It 
commemorates  the  loyalty,  courage,  and  self-sacrifice  of  Heyward 
Shepherd  and  thousands  of  others  of  his  race  who  would,  like 
him,  have  suffered  death  rather  than  betray  their  masters  or  to 
be  false  to  a trust. 

It  is  a cheap  and  blatant  praise  that  does  not  seek  to  translate 
into  the  conduct  of  the  present  the  ideals  of  the  past,  and  memo- 
rials are  meaningless  unless  we  endeavor  to  express  in  thought 
and  deeds  those  lofty  ideals  of  fidelity,  loyalty,  courage,  and  self- 
sacrifice  which  we  today  commemorate  in  others. 

May  this  bowlder  stand  through  the  coming  years  as  a silent 
challenge  to  men  and  women  to  bring  to  the  service  of  their  coun- 
try and  generation  a higher  measure  of  responsibility  and  a deeper 
and  truer  conception  of  duty. 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


45 


A REPLY  TO  THE  CONQUERED  BANNER 

By  Sir  Henry  Houghton,  Bart.,  England. 

It  will  be  seen  by  this  that  the  sympathy  of  people  of  other 
lands,  and  especially  our  Mother  Country,  was  not  altogether  on 
one  side.  To  this  day  great  respect  is  shown  those  who  fought 
on  the  Southern  side,  and  far  more  of  consideration  expressed  now 
that  we  have  gone  so  far  away  from  the  prejudice  and  passion  of 
those  days.  Recently,  while  in  London,  I had  the  privilege  of 
being  the  guest  of  Lord  Kinnaird,  a man  as  well  distinguished  for 
his  Christianity  as  for  his  splendid  success  in  business  life.  An- 
other gentleman  present,  speaking  of  the  war,  turned  to  me  and 
said,  “Give  me  the  history  of  that  war” ; to  which  I replied  that  it 
might  be  done  in  one  sentence:  “The  people  of  New  England 

brought  slaves  from  Africa  and  traded  them  to  us  in  the  South  for 
molasses,  and  sugar  and  cotton,  and  then  came  and  fought  us  and 
took  them  away  from  us.”  This  seemed  to  satisfy  my  questioner, 
and  I hope  it  will  not  be  denied  or  severely  criticised  by  my  reader. 
Amen. 

Gallant  nation,  foiled  by  numbers ! 

Say  not  that  your  hopes  are  fled ; 

Keep  that  glorious  flag  which  slumbers, 

One  day  to  avenge  your  dead. 

Keep  it,  widowed,  sonless  mothers ! 

Keep  it,  sisters,  mourning  brothers ! 

Furl  it  with  an  iron  will; 

Furl  it  now  but  keep  it  still — 

Think  not  that  its  work  is  done. 

Keep  it  till  your  children  take  it, 

Once  again  to  hall  and  make  it, 

All  their  sires  have  bled  and  fought  for ; 

All  their  nobles  hearts  have  sought  for — 

Bled  and  fought  for  all  alone. 

All  alone ! ay  , shame  and  story ! 

Millions  here  deplore  the  stain ; 

Shame,  alas ! for  England’s  glory, 

Freedom  called,  and  called  in  vain ! 

Furl  that  canner  sadly,  slowly, 

Treat  it  gently,  for  ’tis  holy; 

Then  once  more  unfurl  it  gladly — 

Conquered  banner ! keep  it  still ! 

(From  War  Songs  and  Poems  of  the  Southern  Confederacy,  1861-1865,  collected  and 
retold  by  H.  M.  Whaton,  D.  D.,  Private  in  General  Lee’s  Army,  published  in  1904.) 


46 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Sam  Davis  Monument 
Pulaski,  Tennessee 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


47 


SAM  DAVIS 


(The  facts  presented  below  were  written  by  a member  of  the  Virginia 
Clay-Clopton  Chapter  of  the  Daughters  of  the  Confederacy,  Huntsville, 
Alabama,  and  preserved  in  the  collections  of  the  Chapter  by  the  Secretary, 

The  author  failed  to  sign  her  name  but  the  facts  are  well  known  to  history. 

The  poem  interpreting  the  spirit  of  Sam  Davis  was  written  by  John  Trot- 
wood  Moore,  and  read  by  the  author  at  the  unveiling  ceremonies  of  the 
Sam  Davis  Monument  in  Pulaski,  Tenn.) 

Sam  Davis,  a young  Confederate  soldier  from  Tennessee  join- 
ed the  army  in  1861  as  a member  of  Captain  Coleman’s  Scouts  and 
soon  became  one  of  his  most  trusted  men.  In  September  of  1863, 
he  with  several  men  were  detached  to  go  to  Nashville  and  vicinity 
to  ascertain  the  strength  of  the  Federal  forces.  Young  Davis  was 
captured  as  a spy  near  Pulaski  in  November  and  taken  to  the 
headquarters  of  the  Federal  General  Dodge  where  he  was  search- 
ed. Papers  were  found  on  his  person  and  stitched  in  his  saddle 
containing  descriptions  of  the  fortifications  at  Nashville  and  other 
points.  There  was  also  an  exact  report  of  the  Federal  Army  in 
Tennessee.  The  information  was  of  such  a character  that  General 
Dodge  knew  the  information  had  been  gained  from  some  one  in 
his  own  forces.  He  tried  every  means  to  make  Davis  tell  who 
gave  him  the  information  but  the  boy  soldier  was  firm.  His  an- 
swer was : “General  Dodge,  I know  the  danger  of  my  situation 
and  am  willing  to  take  the  conesquences.”  He  was  tried  by  court 
martial  and  condemned  to  be  hung,  Friday,  November  27,  1863. 
When  the  sentence  was  read  to  him  he  showed  no  fear  and  to  the 
end  showed  himself  a hero.  The  night  before  the  execution  he 
wrote  his  mother  a letter  bidding  her  good-bye. 


The  gallows  was  on  a hill  in  full  view  of  the  square.  Young 
Davis  rode  to  the  gallows  on  his  coffin.  A few  minutes  before 
his  execution  an  officer  of  General  Dodge’s  staff,  Captain  Chick- 
asaw, was  seen  galloping  towards  the  gallows.  He  jumped  from 
his  horse  and  went  to  Davis  and  said : “It  is  not  too  late  yet.  Give 
me  the  name  of  the  traitor  and  you  are  a free  man.” 


Davis  turned  upon  him  and  said : “If  I had  a thousand  lives 
I would  lose  them  all  before  I would  betray  my  friends  or  the 
confidence  of  my  informer.” 


48 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Turning  to  the  Chaplain  he  gave  him  a few  keepsakes  for  his 
mother,  then  said  to  the  provo  marshal : “I  am  ready,”  and  stepped 
upon  the  trap.  The  body  of  the  noble  young  man  was  buried  in 
Maplewood  at  Pulaski  but  a few  days  later  a friend  and  neighbor, 
John  Kennedy  and  a younger  brother,  came  in  a two  horse  wagon 
and  carried  the  body  to  his  home  near  Smyrna,  Tenn.,  where  he 
had  been  born  in  1842  and  where  he  was  buried.  He  was  identi- 
fied by  the  clothes  he  wore,  a suit  of  home-spun  gray  made  by  his 
mother.  The  Daughters  of  the  Confederacy  of  Pulaski  have  erect- 
ed a beautiful  monument  to  the  memory  of  this  gallant  young 
Southerner,  located  in  the  public  square  of  that  city  facing  his  be- 
loved Southland  for  which  he  gave  his  young  life. 

SAM  DAVIS 

By  John  Trotwood  Moore 

(A  distinguished  Alabamian  who  later  located  in  Tennessee  and  estab- 
lished the  Tennessee  State  Department  of  Archives  and  History.) 

“Tell  me  his  name  and  you  are  free,” 

The  General  said,  while  from  the  tree 
The  grim  rope  dangled  threat’ningly. 

The  birds  ceased  singing — happy  birds, 

That  sang  of  home  and  mother — words, 

The  sun  kissed  his  cheek — dear  sun ; 

It  loves  a life  that’s  just  begun! 

The  very  breezes  held  their  breath 
To  watch  the  fight  twixt  life  and  death. 

And  O,  how  calm  and  sweet  and  free. 

Smiled  back  the  hills  of  Tennessee! 

Smiled  back  the  hills,  as  if  to  say, 

“O,  save  your  life  for  us  to-day.” 

“Tell  me  his  name  and  you  are  free,” 

The  General  said,  “and  I shall  see 
You  safe  within  the  rebel  line — 

I’d  love  to  save  such  life  as  thine.” 

A tear  gleamed  down  the  ranks  of  blue — 

(The  bayonets  were  tipped  with  dew), 

Across  the  rugged  cheek  of  war 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


49 


God’s  angels  rolled  a teary  star. 

The  boy  looked  up — ’twas  this  they  heard  : 
“And  would  you  have  me  break  my  word?” 

A tear  stood  in  the  General’s  eye ! 

“My  boy,  I hate  to  see  thee  die — 

Give  me  the  traitor’s  name  and  fly !” 

Young  Davis  smiled,  as  calm  and  free 
As  he  who  walked  on  Galilee : 

“Had  I a thousand  lives  to  live, 

Had  I a thousand  lives  to  give, 

I’d  lose  them,  nay,  I’d  gladly  die 
Before  I’d  live  one  life  a lie !” 

He  turned — for  not  a soldier  stirred — 
“Your  duty  men — I gave  my  word.” 

The  hills  smiled  back  a farewell  smile, 

The  breezes  sobbed  o’er  his  hair  awhile, 
The  birds  broke  out  in  glad  refrain. 

The  sunbeams  kissed  his  cheek  again — 
Then,  gathering  up  their  blazing  bars, 

They  shook  his  name  among  the  stars. 

O Stars,  that  now  his  brothers  are, 

O Sun,  his  sire  in  truth  and  light, 

Go  tell  the  list’ning  worlds  afar 
Of  him  who  died  for  truth  and  right ! 

For  martyr  of  all  martyrs  he 
Who  dies  to  save  an  enemy ! 


50 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


“HOUSTON  COUNTY  IN  THE  GREAT  BEND  OF  THE 

TENNESSEE” 

By  Oliver  D.  Street 

(In  1904  the  late  Judge  Oliver  D.  Street  read  a paper  befor  the  Ten- 
nessee Valley  Historical  Society  which  he  later  presented  to  the  Alabama 
State  Department  of  Archives  and  History  for  permanent  preservation. 

This  paper  is  printed  in  this  issue  of  the  Alabama  Historical  Quarterly 
because  of  its  unique  historical  value.  Judge  Street  was  one  of  the  Trus- 
tees of  the  Department  of  Archives  and  History  in  its  early  years  and 
contributed  much  to  its  growth  and  to  public  sentiment  in  its  behalf.  This 
“Narrative  of  the  Establishment  by  the  Legislature  of  Georgia  in  1784 
of  a new  County  in  the  Great  Bend  of  the  Tennessee  River”  brings 
to  attention  an  episode  in  Alabama  history  of  great  interest.  Judge 
Street  has  documented  his  article  with  footnotes  and  substantiated 
from  government  and  other  records  every  statement  he  has  made.) 

In  1784,  Georgia  was  a sovereign  and  independent  common- 
wealth, owing  no  duty  to  and  claiming  to  rights  against  the 
other  States,  except  those  scarcely  more  than  moral,  prescribed 
by  the  loose  compact  known  as  the  Articles  of  Confederation. 
Indeed,  a degree  of  rivalry,  fear  and  jealousy  existed  among  the 
several  States  which  it  is  now  difficult  to  understand.  Each  re- 
garded the  other  as  essentially  a foreign  nation,  as  a rival  in  com- 
merce and  as  a possible  armed  enemy  in  the  future.  It  was,  there- 
fore, with  much  dread  and  many  misgivings  that  one  State  wit- 
nessed the  territorial  expansion,  or  the  increase  of  population  and 
wealth  of  a neighbor.  Upon  no  point  was  this  mutual  jealousy 
and  distrust  greater  than  upon  that  of  territorial  rights  and  boun- 
daries. 

At  the  time  of  which  we  write,  Georgia  claimed  all  the  terri- 
tory between  her  present  boundary  and  the  Mississippi  River,  and 
as  far  northward  as  the  southern  line  of  the  present  State  of  Ten- 
nessee. This  claim  was  not,  however,  undisputed.  South  Caro- 
lina contended  with  much  warmth  that  a large  part  of  what  is 
now  North  Alabama  belonged  to  her  by  virtue  of  the  colonial 
charter  which  defined  her  limits.  It  was  under  such  conditions 
that  the  white  man  made  his  first  appearance  as  a factor  in  the 
history  of  that  part  of  the  Tennessee  Valley  lying  in  Alabama. 
It  was  in  1783,  that  a company,  consisting  of  William  Blount,  his 
brothers,  John  and  Thomas,  Gen.  Joseph  Martin,  Gen.  Griffith 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


51 


Rutherford,  Col.  John  Sevier,  Gov.  Richard  Caswell,  and  Col.  John 
Donelson,  all  of  North  Carolina1  was  formed  for  the  purpose  of 
acquiring  title  to  all  the  lands  lying  in  the  present  State  of  Ala- 
bama and  north  of  Tennessee  River.  Their  plan  involved  the  pro- 
curing of  a grant  of  the  desired  tract  from  either  Georgia  or  South 
Carolina  (they  were  indifferent  which)  and  its  immediate  coloni- 
zation and  settlement.  They  calculated  with  confidence  that  in 
the  obscure  character  of  the  rival  claims  of  Georgia  and  South 
Carolina,  the  State  under  whose  authority  the  region  was  first 
actually  occupied  would  prevail  in  the  dispute,  and  thus  their  title 
in  either  event  be  made  good.  Actual  occupation  has  always  been 
regarded  among  nations  as  the  strongest  title  to  new  countries ; 
and  thus  these  land  adventurers  viewed  the  present  case.2 

But  the  desired  lands  were  still  in  the  undisturbed  occupancy 
of  the  Indians — not  a white  settler  within  their  entire  limits.  The 
first  step  necessary,  therefore,  was  to  extinguish  the  Indian  title. 
This  was  accomplished  by  General  Martin  in  the  early  fall  of  1783, 
in  consideration  of  a small  quantity  of  merchandise  paid  to  the 
C’herokees,  the  aboriginal  proprietors  of  the  particular  piece  of 
ground  in  question. 

The  preliminaries  being  then  disposed  of,  the  speculators  pro- 
ceeded to  make  their  contemplated  assault  upon  the  Legislature 
of  Georgia,  then  consisting  of  a single  House.  On  February  7, 
1784,  the  individuals  composing  this  company  presented  to  the 
Legislature  a petition,  setting*  out  that  they  had  “made  a purchase 
of  lands  on  the  Tennessee”  and  urging  the  expediency  of  laying 
out  a new  county,  “to  include  all  that  tract  of  land  lying  on  the 
Tennessee  River  which  is  included  by  a line  drawn  from  the  south 
bank  of  said  river,  where  the  northwest  boundary  of  the  State 


1Several  of  these  gentlemen  lived  in  what  is  now  Tennessee,  but  then  a part 
of  North  Carolina. 

2On  October  26,  1783,  William  Blount  wrote  to  Martin,  “I  am  told  that  a 
certain  dispute  has  arose  between  the  States  of  Georgia  and  South  Carolina  by 
the  latter  claiming  the  right  to  back  lands  as  far  West  as  the  Mississippi.  Now 
if  South  Carolina  has  any  back  land,  the  Bend  of  Tennessee  must  be  a part  of  it. 
This  dispute  between  the  two  States  will,  in  my  opinion,  be  very  favorable  to  our 
Designs  of  obtaining  the  Georgia  Title,  or  the  South  Carolina  Title  and  either 
will  answer  our  purpose  equally  well,  for  we  shall  surely  settle  the  Country  be- 
fore the  Dispute  can  be  determined.”  Publications  of  Southern  History  Associa- 
tion, (1903)  Vol.  vii  p 264. 


52 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


crosses,  and  running  west  till  it  crosses  said  river  Tennessee  again, 
to  the  south  bank  thereof,  then  up  said  south  bank  of  said  river 
to  the  beginning.” 

The  task  of  piloting  the  scheme  through  the  tortuous  paths 
of  legislation  was  entrusted  to  the  crafty  hands  of  William  Blount. 
The  dispute  between  Georgia  and  South  Carolina,  instead  of  em- 
barrassing the  plans  of  the  speculators,  was  skillfully  employed  by 
Blount  in  their  favor.  It  was  represented  by  him  that  priority  of 
settlement  would  greatly  strengthen  Georgia’s  claim  to  the 
disputed  territory,  and  that  it  would  probably  settle  it  decisively 
in  her  favor  and  would  obviate  the  danger  of  future  armed  con- 
tests with  South  Carolina  touching  the  matter. 

The  argument  proved  convincing  and  on  February  20,  1784, 
the  committee  to  whom  this  petition  was  referred  reported  that 
“after  having  received  all  the  information  they  could  obtain  on 
that  subject,  they  were  of  the  opinion  it  would  be  necessary  in 
order  to  prevent  future  contests,  to  take  measures  as  soon  as  may 
be  done  with  propriety,  to  settle  the  said  tract  of  country.”  They, 
therefore,  recommended  “that  seven  commissioners  be  appointed 
and  vested  with  the  powers  necessary  to  ascertain  the  quantity, 
quality  and  circumstances  of  the  aforesaid  lands,  and  report  the 
same,  with  their  proceedings,  to  the  legislature  for  their  consider- 
ation.” It  was  further  provided  that  these  commissioners  might 
issue  warrants  of  survey  for  not  more  than  one  thousand  acres  to 
any  one  person  and  at  a price  of  not  less  than  twelve  and  one-half 
cents  per  acre.  The  surveys,  when  executed,  with  the  plats  of  the 
same,  were  to  be  returned  to  the  surveyor-general’s  office,  prelim- 
inary to  the  issuing  of  a patent.  This  report  was  agreed  to,  and 
on  the  following  day  Lachlin  McIntosh,  Jr.,  William  Downes, 
Stephen  Heard,  John  Morrell,  all  of  Georgia,  and  John  Donelson,  Joseph 
Martin,  and  John  Sevier,  all  of  North  Carolina,  were  appointed  such 
commissioners.  They  were  also  constituted  Justices  for  said  district 
and  upon  them  was  conferred  the  power  of  appointing  militia  offi- 
cers who  should  be  commissioned  by  the  Governor.  They  were 
thus  invested  with  civil  and  military  authority  over  the  Great  Bend 
and  with  the  power  of  disposing  of  the  public  domain  therein.  It 
was  to  all  intents  and  purposes  the  establishment  of  a new  coun- 
ty, or  district,  as  it  was  then  called,  and  was  the  earliest  semblance 
of  civil  government  erected  by  an  English  speaking  people  in  the 
present  State  of  Alabama. 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


53 


The  men  who  were  engaged  in  this  enterprise  were  the  most 
prominent  of  their  day  in  Georgia  and  North  Carolina.  McIntosh 
was  a brigadier-general  of  militia,  had  served  under  Washington 
in  the  Revolutionary  War  and  was  at  the  time  a member  of  Con- 
gress. William  Blount  became  subsequently  a member  of  the 
United  States  Senate  and  Governor  of  Tennessee.  Martin  was  a 
noted  pioneer,  and  Indian  fighter  and  Agent.  Gen.  Rutherford, 
at  the  opening  of  the  Revolution  was  a member  of  the  Provincial 
Congress  and  Council  of  Safety,  and  in  1776  was  commissioned  a 
brigadier-general  in  the  American  army.  John  Sevier  was  successively  a 
Brigadier-general,  governor  of  the  ‘‘State  of  Franklin”,  six  times 
governor  of  Tennessee,  and  three  times  elected  to  Congress.  Rich- 
ard Caswell  was  a member  of  the  Colonial  Assembly  of  North 
Carolina,  delegate  to  Congress,  governor,  major-general  in  the  Rev- 
lution,  United  States  Senator  and  presiding  officer  of  the  Conven- 
tion which  ratified  the  Federal  Constitution.  John  Donelson  was 
a noted  pioneer,  one  of  the  founders  of  Nashville,  and  his  daughter 
became  the  wife  of  President  Jackson.  Thus  we  see  that  the 
beauty  and  the  natural  wealth  of  our  loved  Tennessee  Valley  did 
not  fail  at  an  early  date  to  appeal  to  the  ablest  men  of  the  time. 


Morrell  and  McIntosh  failed  or  refused  to  act,  and  Thomas 
Napier  was  appointed  in  the  former’s  place  by  the  Governor.  He 
also  failing,  the  Executive  Council  appointed  Thomas  Carr.  It  does 
not  appear  that  anyone  was  appointed  in  McIntosh’s  place.  So 
the  Board  that  acted  appears  to  have  been  constituted  as  follows : 
Thomas  Carr,  Stephen  Heard,  William  Downes,  Joseph  Martin,  John 
Donelson,  and  John  Sevier. 

In  the  fall  of  1784,  a majority  of  the  Board,  namely,  Heard, 
Martin,  Donelson  and  Sevier,  met  and  determined  that  in  March 
of  the  following  spring  the  commissioners  should  assemble  at  the 
mouth  of  Elk  River  and  formally  organize  the  new  county,  and 
grant  warrants  of  survey  for  lands  to  be  located  in  the  Great  Bend. 
They  also  recommended  that  William  Blount,  John  Donelson, 
William  Downes,  John  Sevier,  Joseph  Martin.  Charles  Robertson, 
Valentine  Sevier,  Jr.,  and  Stephen  Heard  be  appointed  by  the 
Legislature  of  Georgia  justices  of  the  peace  for  the  “said  district 
of  the  Tennessee”,  which  was  done  on  February  22,  1785. 

In  the  month  of  March,  according  to  the  previous  under- 
standing, Col.  Donelson  with  a company  of  men,  including  John 


;54 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Peyton  and  David  Henry,  penetrated  a pathless  wilderness  from 
Nashville  (which  had  been  settled  only  five  years  previously)  to 
the  mouth  of  Elk  River,  the  appointed  place  of  meeting-,  expecting 
to  meet  there  the  other  commissioners.  But  finding  none  of  them 
there,  after  tarrying  for  a brief  period,  he  left  five  men,  among 
them  Peyton,  with  a note  to  the  other  commissioners,  and  return- 
ed to  Nashville  with  the  rest  of  his  Company.  He  was  constrained 
to  this  course  because  at  this  time  the  mouth  of  Elk  River  was  a 
great  resort  for  unfriendly  Indians  who  came  there  to  trade  with 
the  French  from  the  Wabash.  A few  men  without  horses  might 
secret  themselves,  but  it  was  difficult  for  his  mounted  company 
to  do  so.  Their  protracted  presence  would  almost  surely  bring 
about  a clash  with  the  Indians,  and  this  he  wished  above  all 
things  to  avoid  at  this  time.  Peyton  and  his  companions  waited 
near  a week  longer,  and  the  other  commissioners  still  not  coming, 
they  returned  to  Nashville  and  reported  to  Col.  Donelson. 

The  failure  of  the  other  commissioners  to  attend  at  the  ap- 
pointed time  was  doubtless  due  to  the  advice  of  Blount.  He  ex- 
pected to  negotiate  treaties  with  the  Cherokees  and  Chickasaws 
in  April  or  May,  1785,  which  he  hoped  would  facilitate  their  plans, 
and  wrote  to  the  commissioners  suggesting  a postponement  of  their 
meeting  until  after  the  negotiation  of  such  treaties.3  The  conse- 
quence was  that  another  meeting  of  the  commissioners  did  not 
occur  until  in  the  fall  of  1785.  In  October  1785,  Sevier,  Downs, 
Heard,  Martin,  and  Carr  of  the  Commissioners  met  at  Jonesbor- 
ough,  Tenn.,  and  resolved  to  proceed  at  once  down  the  Holston 
and  Tennessee  Rivers  in  discharge  of  the  duties  committed  to 
them.  Martin  was,  however,  called  away  to  South  Carolina  on 
business  with  the  Indians  respecting  the  negotiation  of  the  Cher- 
okee treaty  concluded  at  Hopewell,  on  Keowee,  on  November  28, 
1785.  Col.  Heard,  falling  sick,  was  also  compelled  to  quit  the 
party,  so  that  three  only  now  remained.  These,  however,  pro- 
ceeded on  their  way  and  were  joined  by  Donaldson  at  Col.  Hutch- 
ins’ in  Hawkins  county. 

Having  engaged  a considerable  number  of  men  to  join  them 
at  the  mouth  of  the  French  Broad  and  to  accompany  them  as 
guard  upon  the  promise  of  1000  acres  of  land  to  each,4  Carr,  Don- 
elson, Downs  and  Sevier  descended  the  Holston  and  Tennessee 


‘Publications  of  Southern  History  Association,  vol.  vii  p 267. 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


55 


Rivers  to  the  Chickamauga  towns  of  the  Cherokees,  just  within 
the  present  limits  of  Alabama,  where  they  had  talks  with  the  In- 
dians and  opened  a land  office  for  the  sale  of  the  lands  in  the  Great 
Bend.  The  spot  where  this  business  was  transacted  was  prob- 
ably at  the  Long  Island  town,  on  Bridgeport  island.  Thomas 
Carr  was  appointed  Chairman  of  the  Board;  William  Downes, 
“Entry  Taker”;  and  John  Donelson,  surveyor.  They  proceeded 
to  issue  land  warrants  to  all  whom  they  had  employed  to  accom- 
pany them,  and  such  others  as  desired  to  purchase,  formally  or- 
ganized the  new  county,  named  it  Houston,  and  elected  Valentine 
Sevier,  Jr.,  as  its  representative  in  the  Georgia  Legislature.  Sevier 
was,  therefore,  the  first  person  chosen  to  represent  any  part  of  the 
State  of  Alabama  in  a legislative  body.  They  also  issued  a land 
warrant  to  each  of  the  commissioners  for  1000  acres4 5  but  none-  of 
the  warrants  issued  at  this  time  ever  passed  to  a grant.  A com- 
mittee of  Congress  subsequently  decided  that  they  were  all  in- 
valid, as  they  no  doubt  were,  on  account  of  the  failure  of  the  hold- 
ers to  comply  with  the  law  under  which  they  were  issued.  Don- 
elson appointed  as  deputy  surveyors,  James  M.  Lewis,  Zacariah 
Cox.  and  Maj.  Isaac  Taylor,  but  no  surveys  were  made  until  the 
following  year. 


6Beside  those  already  mentioned,  warrants  were  issued  as  follows : 


“In  the  River  Island  Surveys 


Walter  Childs, 
Francis  Bacon, 


Charles  Carr, 
Thomas  Carr,  Jr., 


1000  acres  ) ( Walter  C.  Carr, 

1000  acres  ) ( William  Bacon, 

In  the  High  Rocks  Surveys 

1000  acres  ) ( Thomas  Ellis, 

1000  acres  ) ( Thomas  C.  Childs, 

In  Little  River  Surveys 


1000  acres 
1000  acres 


1000  acres 
1000  acres 


Peter  Wruther,  1000  acres  ) ( Godfrey  Zimmerman, 

William  Stilth,  1000  acres  ) ( William  H.  Bacon, 

In  Elk  River  Surveys  and  at  the  Mouth  of  Elk. 

Robert  Middleton,  1000  acres  ) ( Rice  Collins, 


1000  acres 
1000  acres 

1000  acres” 


4Among  those  accompanying  the  commissioners  on  this  expedition  were  Zac- 
ariah Cox,  George  Dardin,  Sr.,  George  Dardin,  Jr.,  George,  Thomas,  and  James 

Gallohan,  James  Scott,  William  Nelson,  Joseph  McConnell,  Charles  Robertson, 
Alexander  Kelly,  John  Woods,  Alexander  Cunningham,  William  Fisher,  Abraham 
Utler,  John  Corvin,  David  Mitchell,  James  M.  Lewis. 


56 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


It  had  been  one  of  the  purposes  of  this  expedition  to  establish 
a settlement  in  the  Great  Bend,  but  the  Indians  appearing  hostile 
and  restless,  it  was  decided  to  postpone  that  part  of  the  enterprise 
till  spring,  when  they  would  return  with  an  increased  company. 
Accordingly,  after  a stay  of  two  weeks,  the  Board  adjourned  to 
meet  again  at  the  mouth  of  Elk  River  on  April  1,  1786.  It  was 
agreed  that  Lewis,  one  of  the  Deputy  Surveyors,  should  meet  the 
Board  there,  while  Cox  and  Taylor  should  go  to  run  the  line  be- 
tween Georgia  and  North  Carolina.6  The  importance  of  the  early 
establishment  of  this  line  had  been  strongly  urged  upon  the  com- 
missioners by  William  Blount.7 

Upon  the  breaking  up  of  the  Board,  some  of  the  commission- 
ers returned  to  their  homes,  while  others  went  to  report  their 
proceedings  to  the  legislature  of  Georgia.  All  the  copies  of  this 
report,  of  which  at  one  time  there  were  several,  seem  to  be  lost. 
This  is  greatly  to  be  deplored,  as  it  no  doubt  set  forth  with  par- 
ticularity all  that  was  then  known  of  this  country,  the  character 
of  its  soil,  topography,  climate  and  inhabitants.  It  is  gathered 
from  the  records  of  the  legislature,  however,  that  this  report  show- 
ed that  the  commissioners  had  made  divers  appointments,  had  sold 
considerable  land,  had  granted  an  indulgence  of  three  years  to  the 
purchasers  and  had  taken  bonds  therefor  in  a large  amount. 

On  his  way  home,  Col.  Donelson,  who  appears  to  have  been 
the  most  active  spirit  in  this  enterprise,  was  unfortunately  killed 
by  the  Indians.  The  remaining  commissioners  never  met  again 
in  the  Great  Bend,  but  held  several  meetings  within  the  settled 
limits  of  Georgia,  at  which  they  wound  up  their  business.  Valen- 
tine Sevier,  Jr.,  repaired  to  the  place  of  sitting  of  the  legislature, 
but  was  refused  recognition.  In  the  spring  of  1786,  however,  Cox 
and  Taylor  executed  their  commissions  to  ascertain  and  mark  the 
Northern  boundary  of  Georgia  (now  Alabama),  and  Lewis  on  April 


6Now  the  line  between  Alabama  and  Tennessee. 

7On  Oct.  26,  1783,  Blount  wrote  Gen.  Martin,  “A  number  of  people  have  here 
entered  lands  which  I am  sure  they  know  lays  without  the  limits  of  the  State  and 
in  the  Bent  within  the  limits  of  our  purchase.  And  expect  to  get  grants  from 
this  State.  I hope  care  will  be  taken  to  have  the  line  of  this  State  (i.e.  North 
Carolina)  well  known,  that  the  Persons  making  surveys  without  the  limits  may 
not  be  aple  to  plead  Ignorance.  It  would  seem  to  me  that  every  person  I have 
seen  here  (i.e.  Hillsborough,  N.  C.)  envied  us  the  Purchase  and  wished  to  own  a 
Part  of  the  Bent  of  Tennessee.” 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


57 


1st,  with  two  other  men,  Turner  Williams  and  Argalus  Jeter,  went 
to  the  mouth  of  Elk  River,  the  time  and  place  appointed  for  the 
reassembling  of  the  commissioners,  and  awaited  their  coming  till 
the  4th,  but  they  not  appearing,  he  returned  to  Nashville. 

At  the  ensuing  session  of  the  legislature,  on  February  6,  1786, 
a bill  was  brought  in  “for  laying  out  a county  on  the  Tennessee” 
and  was  read  the  first  time,  but  appears  never  to  have  proceeded 
any  further.  On  the  10th  the  report  of  the  “commissioners  of  thv 
district  of  Tennessee”  was  read  and  referred  to  a committee  con- 
sisting of  Messrs.  Tew,  Fort,  and  C.  Crawford.  Four  days  later 
they  submitted  a report,  but  its  contents  can  not  now  be  ascer- 
tained. No  further  steps  were  taken  until  July,  when  Mr.  Porter 
introduced  a resolution  declaring  it  to  be  “expedient  in  order  to 
prevent  disputes  in  future  to  settle  the  country  in  the  Bend  of  the 
Tennessee.”  The  committee  to  which  this  resolution  was  referred, 
reported  on  August  1st  that  “by  the  communications  which  had 
been  made  to  the  committee,  it  appeared  that  a number  of  persons 
from  neighboring  states  were  about  to  make  settlement  on  the 
lands,  which,  if  carried  out,  would  call  for  the  immediate  interpo- 
sition of  government,”8  and,  therefore,  recommended  the  establish- 
ment of  a new  county.  The  House  accordingly  ordered  such  a bill 
to  be  brought  in,  and  on  August  7th,  Mr.  Walton  presented  a bill 
entitled  “An  Act  for  laying  out  a district  in  the  Bend  of  the  Ten- 
nessee”, which  was  read  the  first  time.  On  the  next  day  it  was 
read  the  second  time,  and  on  the  12th  was  read  the  third  time, 
when  on  motion  it  was  rejected  by  a vote  of  26  to  23.  But  it  was 
expressly  resolved  that  no  title  should  be  weakened,  or  the  powers 
of  the  commissioners  impaired  by  the  rejection  of  said  bill,  but 
that  everything  in  respect  to  said  Tennessee  business  should  stand 
precisely  upon  the  same  footing  as  if  said  bill  had  not  been  brought 
in.  Donelson,  the  surveyor  for  the  district  being  dead,  it  was  fur- 
ther resolved  that  John  Linsey,  Esq.,  should  stand  appointed  in 
his  place. 


8The  threatened  settlement  here  referred  to  was  doubtless  an  enterprise  at  the 
head  of  which  was  Col.  Wade  Hampton,  of  South  Carolina,  who  had  procured  land 
warrants  from  South  Carolina  and  was  threatening  to  locate  them  on  lands  in  the 
Great  Bend  and  to  settle  the  country.  His  contention  was  that  there  was  a strip 
of  country  several  miles  wide,  belonging  to  South  Carolina,  lying  between  the 
boundaries  of  Georgia  and  North  Carolina.  Zacariah  Cox,  who,  as  we  have  seen, 
accompanied  the  commissioners  in  1785,  was  in  reality  an  agent  of  Col.  Hampton. 
Haywood’s  Civil  and  Political  History  of  Tennessee,  (1891),  p 173. 


58 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Two  days  later  it  was  resolved  “that  each  of  the  commission- 
ers appointed  on  the  Tennessee  business,  who  have  actually  at- 
tended their  duty,  should  be  entitled  to  five  thousand  acres  of 
land  in  the  district,  as  a gratuity  and  full  compensation  for  their 
trouble,  and  that  they  might  have  warrants  of  survey  for  the 
same.”  Accordingly,  on  September  22nd  following  land  warrants 
were  issued  to  the  commissioners  for  five  thousand  acres  each,  but 
whether  any  of  them  were  ever  located  it  is  uncertain ; certain  it 
is  that  none  of  them  ever  passed  to  a grant.  No  further  legislative 
action  seems  to  have  been  taken  by  Georgia  in  this  matter.  No 
title  to  any  lands  in  the  Groat  Bend  was  ever  perfected  under 
these  proceedings.  The  entire  enterprise  appears  to  have  collapsed 
with  the  death  of  Donelson.9 

It  is  interesting  to  speculate  upon  the  consequences  which 
might  have  followed  had  the  three  votes  by  which  this  bill  was 
defeated  been  cast  differently.  It  would  almost  certainly  have  re- 
sulted in  the  prompt  establishment  of  another  strong  settlement 
in  the  wilderness,  like  those  in  Kentucky  and  at  Nashville.  It 
would  have  added  another  chapter  of  murder  and  savage  treachery 
to  the  story  of  Indian  warfare.  It  would  have  developed  other 
backwoods  heroes  to  rival  the  deeds  of  Boone,  Mansker,  Sevier, 
Campbell,  and  Robertson.  It  would  have  hastened  the  settlement 
of  North  Alabama  nearly  a half  century.  It  would  have  resulted 
in  creating  a feeling  of  pride  on  the  part  of  the  new  settlement 
for  the  mother  State  which  might  have  proved  strong  enough  to 
have  kept  forever  the  Great  Bend  within  the  confines  of  the  State  of 
Georgia — Or  they  might  have  thought  when  Tennessee  became  a 
State  in  1796,  that  their  welfare  would  be  best  promoted  by  uniting 
their  fortunes  with  hers.  It  is  therefore  easily  within  the  range 
of  possibilities  that  had  a new  county  been  established  at  that 


^Between  1817  and  1859,  bills  for  the  relief  of  the  commissioners  or  their 
representatives  were  several  times  before  Congress,  and  it  is  from  the  committee 
reports  on  these  claims  that  this  narrative  has  been  drawn.  They  are  Doc.  No.  274 
in  vol.  iii  Public  Lands  p 370;  House  Report  No.  224,  26th  Congress  1st  session; 
Private  Land  Claims,  Part  I p 86 ; House  Report  No.  86,  15th  Cong.  1st  Sess; 
House  Report  No.  31,  15th  Cong.  2nd  Sess;  House  Report  No.  2,  16th  Cong.  1st 
Sess.;  House  Report  No.  62,  16th  Cong.  1st  Sess;  House  Report  No.  42,  19  Cong. 
2nd  Sess ; Senate  Mis.  Doc.  No.  79,  34th  Cong.  1st  Sess ; Senate  Report  No.  301, 
35th  Cong.  1st  Sess;  House  Report  No.  83,  35th  Cong.  2nd  Sess.  I am  indebted  to 
Mr.  Thomas  M.  Owen,  of  Montgomery,  Ala.  for  the  loan  of  most  of  these  docu- 
ments. 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


59 


time  in  the  Great  Bend,  there  would  have  been  no  State  of  Ala- 
bama, or  if  so,  that  her  boundaries  would  have  been  greatly  dif- 
ferent from  what  they  are. 

This  was  by  no  menas  the  last  attempt  by  private  parties  to 
obtain  the  title  to  the  lands  embraced  in  the  Alabama  portion  of 
the  Tennessee  Valley.  Two  far  more  serious  attempts  made  in 
1789  and  1795,  became  known  as  the  “Yazoo  Frauds”.  In  fact,  the 
last  was  successful,  for  the  Supreme  Court  of  the  United  States 
in  1880  decided  that  a grant  made  by  the  Georgia  Legislature  in 
1795  to  “The  Tennessee  Company”  was  valid  and  passed  an  ir- 
revocable legal  title  to  the  company,  notwithstanding  its  passage 
was  secured  by  bribery.  The  strong  military  arm  of  the  United 
States  prevented  all  that  part  of  North  Alabama  “from  the  Ten- 
nessee line  extending  south  to  latitude  34°  10"  north”,  and  from 
Bear  Creek  on  its  western  boundary,  running  east  one  hundred  anci 
twenty  miles”,  from  passing  into  private  hands  at  the  inconse- 
quential price  of  two  and  a quarter  cents  per  acre.  Several  of  the 
parties  concerned  in  the  movement  for  the  establishment  of  Hous- 
ton County  were  also  interested  in  these  two  subsequent  enter- 
prises. Thus  we  see  that  at  a time  when  the  entire  western  country 
abounded  in  unoccupied  lands  of  magnificent  fertility  and  extent, 
none  seems  to  have  proven  quite  so  strong  an  attraction  to  the 
alert  land  speculators  as  our  own  Tennessee  Valley. 


60 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


CHANGING  ALABAMA 


By  Mary  S.  Butler 


(Miss  Butler  is  a teacher  in  the  public  schools  of  Selma,  a former 
President  of  the  Alabama  Branch,  National  League  of  American  Pen 
Women,  has  written  numerous  school  plays  and  produced  historical  pa- 
geants in  Selma  and  elsewhere.) 

Global  war  has  brought  drastic  changes  to  every  state  in  the 
Union,  but  perhaps  none  has  felt  it  any  more  than  Alabama. 
From  the  former  sleepy  shores  of  the  Gulf,  where  now  the  riveters 
and  welders  in  the  ship-yards  make  the  Heavens  ring,  to  the  bust- 
ling Muscle  Shoals  on  the  blue  Tennessee,  there  is  an  ever-moving 
current  of  change  sweeping  the  state. 

Sinister  changes?  Not  altogether,  Let  us  look  at  some  of 
them. 

Alabama's  population  in  1940  was  2,832,248,  showing  an  in- 
crease of  186,713  since  1930.  Alabama  has  grown  in  many  ways, 
but  perhaps  the  greatest  growth  has  not  been  in  population,  but 
in  its  economic  and  social  outlook.  War  has  shown  to  the  rest 
of  the  world  our  splendid  possibilities.  Is  it  any  wonder  that 
Mobile,  with  its  naturally  deep  harbor  and  its  proximity  to  the 
Panama  Canal,,  was  chosen  as  the  site  of  one  of  the  government’s 
largest  ship-yards?  Is  it  surprising  that  Childersburg,  only  one 
hundred  miles  from  the  huge  nitrate  supply  of  the  Tennessee  Val- 
ley, is  turning  out  millions  of  tons  of  gun-powder  and  other  am- 
munition? Birmingham,  in  the  midst  of  its  iron,  coal,  and  lime, 
is  one  of  the  greatest  steel  producers  in  the  nation.  Among  the 
valuable  mineral  resources  which  the  War  has  enhanced  in  value 
is  Alabama’s  vast  deposits  of  bauxite,  from  which  aluminum  is 
made,  sulphur,  lead,  zinc,  and  bituminous  coal.  Our  big  pine  for- 
ests have  contributed  magnificently  to  the  nation’s  supply  of  lum- 
ber, and  our  Alabama  cotton  is  going  into  millions  of  war-time 
products. 

But  let  us  take  a look  at  the  social  side  of  all  this  war-time 
prosperity  which  has  come  to  our  state.  Ask  any  citizen  of  Mont- 
gomery, Selma,  Anniston,  Dothan,  or  any  Alabama  city  in  which 
there  is  located  an  Army  air-field  or  post,  if  life  in  his  community 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


has  changed,  and  he  will  emphatically  reply,  “Yes.” 


First,  there  is  the  crowded  condition  of  homes,  schools,  stores, 
eating-places,  theaters,  buses,  trains  and  street-cars.  Families  are 
living  in  such  congested  situations  that  there  is  little  privacy ; 
children  have  no  place  to  play,  and  the  nerve  strain  and  irritability 
which  is  a concomitant  is  reflected  in  the  faces  of  people  on  the 
streets.  Gone  is  the  day  of  leisure,  when  neighbors  all  knew  each 
other  and  took  an  interest  in  every  small  occurrence  in  the  town. 
The  days  of  the  placid,  peaceful  flow  of  uneventful  life  seem  to  be 
a dream  of  the  past. 


Mothers,  who  have  never  left  their  homes  to  earn  a penny, 
have  gone  to  work,  lured  by  the  fantastic  prices  paid  for  labor, 
leaving  their  children  to  Negro  nurses  or  day  nurseries.  Juvenile 
delinquency  is  an  attendant  evil, — but  this  short  article  is  no  proper 
vehicle  for  this  subject,  which  is  a volume  in  itself.  Alabama  is 
having  her  share  of  trouble  with  her  children  and  youth, — which 
leads  to  the  next  great  change  in  our  state, — the  condition  of  our 
schools. 


Jane  Addams,  widely  known  and  loved  social  worker,  once 
said,  “America’s  future  will  be  determined  by  its  homes  and  schools. 
The  child  becomes  what  it  is  taught;  hence  we  must  watch  what 
we  teach  it  and  how  we  live  before  it.”  Alabama  teachers,  along 
with  those  of  all  the  states  in  the  Union,  are  leaving  their  school- 
rooms by  the  thousands,  literally,  and  last  year  Alabama  lost  3,600 
of  hers.  This  means  that  our  schools  are  rapidly  losing  ground, 
and  our  most  precious  crop,  our  children,  are  being  taught  by  any- 
one that  a harried  superintendent  can  pick  up.  Alabama,  with  2.2 
percent  of  the  nation’s  population,  has  only  1.1  percent  of  the  na- 
tion’s wealth.  This  means  that  there  is  not  enough  money  for 
schools,  and  that  unless  the  federal  government,  which  is  already 
feeding  thousands  of  our  school  children,  comes  to  our  aid,  Ala- 
bama will  not  have  enough  teachers  to  man  her  schools.  Teachers 
in  this  state  received  a salary  increase  of  nineteen  cents  a day  last 
fall,  while  the  cost  of  living  went  up  26  percent  in  the  same  season. 
Last  September  there  were  221  vacant  schoolrooms,  in  spite  of  the 
3,100  emergency  certificates  granted.  Alabama  cannot  afford  to 
let  her  schools  drop  below  pre-war  levels.  The  problems  of  a 
post-war  world  must  be  settled  by  our  youth  and  children  of  today, 


62 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


and  they  will  need  more  and  better  educations  than  they  are  re- 
ceiving now. 


But  changes  in  our  educational  set-up  are  not  greater  than 
changes  in  other  phases  of  our  state  life.  Money  is  pouring  into 
business,  but  there  seems  little  thought  g'iven  to  the  post-war  de- 
pression which  is  as  sure  to  follow  as  night  follows  day.  Governor 
Sparks  has  appointed  a commission  to  study  the  problems  which 
will  arise,  particularly  those  of  unemployment.  There  is  hope  thar 
our  industries  can  convert  to  peace-time  work,  but  can  even  a frac- 
tion of  the  thousands  of  war  workers  find  work  in  Alabama  after 
the  war?  Positively  not.  In  our  industrial  cities  of  Birmingham. 
Gadsden,  Anniston,  Mobile  and  Childersburg,  there  must  be  two 
or  three  hundred  thousand  workers.  Alabama,  which  is  primarily 
an  agricultural  state,  cannot  absorb  these  industrial  workers.  There 
are  not  enough  factories  in  this  state  to  employ  one-hundredth  01 
them. 


The  war-time  industries  which  have  been  introduced  into  the 
state  have  caused  the  greatest  change  in  the  lives  of  the  people. 
Farm  boys  who  have  earned  only  a dollar  a day  at  most  are  earn- 
ing ten;  Negroes  who  were  paid  twenty-five  cents  an  hour  are 
drawing  fabulous  wages.  Women,  both  white  and  black,  are  mak 
ing  more  money  than  they  have  ever  imagined.  What  effect  hae 
this  had  upon  the  population?  Farms  and  dairies  abandoned,  neve'* 
to  be  worked  again ; homes  wrecked  by  crowded  conditions  and 
juvenile  delinquency;  Alabama’s  colored  labor  impudent  and  dis- 
contented, probably  never  willing  to  return  to  pre-war  wages.  For 
Alabama  is  bound  to  grow  away  from  her  agricultural  tradition-? 
and  become  more  and  more  an  industrial  state. 

Tabor  trouble  has  already  raised  its  ugly  head  in  this  state 
When  one  of  our  Congressmen  dared  to  vote  for  the  Smith-Con 
nally  Bill,  which  would  regulate  the  strike  menace,  all  labor  union 
members  were  ordered  by  their  national  bosses  to  vote  agains" 
this  honest  man.  This  insidious  venom  was  contested  in  the  May 
primaries  recently;  if  Tabor  had  won  out  in  this  contest,  the’" 
Alabama  would  have  bidden  farewell  forever  to  her  age-old  tradi 
tions. 


These  afore-mentioned  changes  are  not  more  drastic  than  the 
other  political  changes  one  encounters.  Alabama  has  long  been 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


63 


considered  one  of  the  staunchest  supporters  of  the  “Solid  South’’. 
The  Democratic  Party  in  Alabama,  which  has  produced  great  lead- 
ers like  Oscar  Underwood,  the  Bankheads,  Thomas  Kilby,  B.  B. 
Comer  and  dozens  of  others,  has  seen  the  time  come  when  it  is 
seriously  considering  pulling  out  of  the  “Solid  South”,  to  bring  an 
end  to  the  New  Deal,  and  to  restore  to  power  the  old  American 
spirit  of  free  enterprise.  The  stiff  fight  put  up  in  Congress  by  our 
Senator  John  Bankhead  against  Farm  Subsidies  is  but  a straw  in 
thp  wind,  showing  how  Alabama  is  feeling  about  national  politics. 

However,  not  all  the  changes  in  Alabama  are  bad  ones.  We 
have  seen  our  great  plantations  cut  into  smaller  farms ; our  tenant 
farmers  have  improved  their  condition  and  are  getting  away  from 
the  one-crop  system.  Alabama  is  raising  fine  herds  of  dairy  cattle 
and  blooded  horses.  Cotton  is  no  longer  King  in  this  state.  We 
have  reaped  many  benefits  in  a financial  way  from  this  terrible 
war.  Our  squalid  Negro  tenements  in  many  cities  have  been  re- 
placed by  neat  government  apartments ; the  general  condition  of 
our  Negroes  has  been  improved ; our  poor  whites  have  had  money 
to  buy  luxuries,  and  all  over  Alabama  may  be  seen  evidences  of 
her  great  wealth. 

Changes, — social,  economic,  educational, — yes,  even  cultural, 
mark  the  present  history  of  Alabama.  Change  may  be  helpful ; 
only  stagnation  means  death.  If  Alabama  can  grasp  her  opportun- 
ity and  rise  on  this  upsurge  of  prosperity,  her  future  may  be  very 
bright.  If  she  can  turn  her  powder-mills  into  plastic  factories,  her 
steel  into  automobiles,  her  warships  into  carriers  of  world  com- 
merce, she  will  be  well  on  her  way  to  surmounting  a world  de- 
pression after  the  War. 

Yes,  a changing  Alabama  has  great  possibilities,  if  her  citizen- 
ship is  educated  and  enlightened.  If  a state  can  pour  billions  into 
a war  effort,  she  can  surely  pour  millions  into  better  schools,  good 
roads,  libraries,  hospitals,  and  welfare  institutions  for  her  citizens 
in  peace  times.  Wake  up,  Alabama,  and  grasp  your  opportunity! 


64 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


DEMOCRATIC  PARTY  REGULATIONS  EXPLAINED 

By  Gessner  T.  McCorvey,  Chairman 
State  Democratic  Executive  Committee 

(It  is  the  policy  of  the  Alabama  Historical  Quarterly  to  carry  in  each 
issue  at  least  one  article  of  current  historical  importance.  This  issue  con- 
tains a letter  to  the  Editor  of  the  Mobile  Press  Register  by  Mr.  McCorvey 
in  response  to  inquiries  made  of  the  Chairman  of  the  Executive  Committe 
concerning  the  Party  rules  relating  to  elections  in  the  State  of  Alabama. 
This  particular  item  was  chosen  for  presentation  herewith  because  of  the 
political  situation  not  only  in  Alabama  but  throughout  the  nation  respecting 
the  voters  rights  and  privileges,  his  moral  obligations  as  an  elector  and 
especially  the  rules  of  the  Democratic  Party  in  this  State  during  the 
/ecent  campaign  for  National.  State  and  local  offices.) 

September  2nd,  1944. 


To 

The  Editor  of  the  Mobile  Press  Register, 

Mobile,  Alabama. 

Dear  Sir : — 

Replying  to  your  several  inquiries  submitted  to  me  in  writing, 
relative  to  prospective  action  to  be  taken  by  the  State  Democratic 
Executive  Committee  of  Alabama,  my  forecasts  as  to  the  General 
Election,  etc.,  I must  state  that  I can  only  answer  your  inquiries 
for  myself,  and  although  I have  been  honored  by  my  fellow  mem- 
bers on  our  State  Committee  with  the  Chairmanship  of  our  Com- 
mittee, I have  no  authority  to  speak  for  or  bind  any  other  mem- 
ber of  our  Committee.  However,  I have  no  hesitancy  in  stating 
what  my  own,  personal,  views  are,  and  what  action,  in  my  opinion, 
our  Party  should  take.  With  this  understanding  I will  answer 
your  several  inquiries  as  follows : 

1.  As  to  what  position  the  State  Democratic  Executive  Com- 
mittee will  take  towards  Democrats  who  voted  in  our  Democratic 
Primaries  and  then  vote  the  Republican  ticket  in  the  General  Elec- 
tion in  November,  in  my  opinion  our  State  Executive  Committee 
will  do  in  the  future  as  it  has  done  in  the  past,  and  invite  all  white 
electors  to  return  to  our  Party  and  become  members  of  the  Demo- 
cratic Party,  although  I feel  confident  that  our  State  Executive 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


65 


Committee  will  bar  as  candidates  in  our  next  Democratic  Primary 
Elections  any  electors  who  fight  the  nominees  of  our  Party  in  the 
General  Election  of  1944.  May  I add  that  for  many  years  our 
Party  has  provided  different  qualifications  for  voters  and  for  can- 
didates. We  invite  all  white  electors  to  become  members  of  our 
Party  and  permit  them  to  vote,  but  when  it  comes  to  permitting 
an  elector  to  be  a candidate  in  our  Democratic  Primaries,  then  we 
require  such  prospective  candidate  to  take  an  oath  to  the  effect 
that  he  did  not  vote  a Republican  ticket  or  any  ticket  other  than 
the  Democratic  ticket  in  the  last  General  Election,  and  further 
that  he  did  not  openly  and  publicly  oppose  the  election  of  the 
nominees  of  the  Democratic  Party,  or  any  of  them.  I think  our 
State  Executive  Committee  will  follow  this  course  in  the  future. 

2.  In  answer  to  your  inquiry  as  to  whether  or  not  the  State 
Democratic  Executive  Committee  will  read  out  of  the  Party  any 
voter  who  participated  in  our  Democratic  Primaries  and  who  failed 
to  vote,  at  all,  in  the  General  Election,  I will  state  that  this  inquiry 
is  covered  in  my  answer  to  your  first  question. 

3.  Replying  to  your  inquiry  as  to  whether  or  not  I,  as  Chair- 
man, fear  a wide-spread  bolt  in  the  November  election,  I beg  to 
advise  that  I do  not  expect  any  such  bolt.  There  will,  of  course, 
be  some  Democrats  who  will  not  vote  in  the  General  Election  in 
November,  and  a comparatively  few  who  will  “kick  over  the 
traces”  and  vote  the  Republican  ticket,  but  I don’t  believe  that 
any  very  substantial  number  of  the  thoughtful  men  and  women 
of  our  State  who  participated  in  our  Democratic  Primary  and  de- 
liberately cast  a ballot  on  which  was  written  a pledge  to  support 
all  the  nominees  of  that  Primary,  will  violate  this  pledge  with 
impunity.  On  every  ballot  cast  in  our  Primary  Election,  and  on 
every  voting  machine  used  in  that  Primary,  there  was  plainly 
written  this  pledge : 

“By  casting  this  ballot  I do  pledge  myself  to  abide  by  the 
result  of  this  primary  election  and  to  aid  and  support  all 
the  nominees  thereof  in  the  ensuing  General  Election.” 

Sections  350  and  352  of  Title  17  of  the  Alabama  Code  makes  it 
mandatory  that  this  pledge  be  placed  on  each  ballot  cast.  A great 
many  Democrats  firmly  believe  that  there  would  have  been  little, 
if  any,  thought  of  Roosevelt  for  a fourth  term  except  for  the  war 


66 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


conditions.  Many  thoughtful  citizens  who  were  never  admirers 
of  President  Roosevelt,  and  who  thought  that  the  two-term  tra- 
dition should  be  maintained,  are  voting  for  Mr.  Roosevelt  this 
time  because  they  very  sincerely  feel  that  it  would  be  a serious 
mistake  for  the  American  people  to  repudiate  President  Roosevelt 
during  the  pendency  of  the  war  which  is  being  so  magnificently, 
splendidly,  effectively  and  successfully  prosecuted,  without  the 
slightest  hint  from  the  President’s  most  bitter  enemies  that  he, 
as  Commander  in  Chief,  has  been  guilty  of  any  political  interfer- 
ence in  its  prosecution.  I think  the  argument  a sound  one,  that  if 
the  American  people  should  repudiate  Roosevelt,  and  if  the  Eng- 
lish people  should  repudiate  Churchill,  then  our  enemies  such  as 
Hitler,  Goebels,  Goering  and  Himmler,  and  the  Japanese  gang'  of 
war  lords  in  control  of  that  country,  could  go  before  their  people 
with  some  semblance  of  sincerity  and  claim  that  neither  the  Amer- 
ican people  nor  the  British  people  were  behind  “those  war  mongers 
Roosevelt  and  Churchill A Such  propaganda  on  the  part  of  the  lead- 
ers of  our  enemies  would  undoubtedly  prolong  the  war  and  cost 
countless  thousands  of  additional  casualties  among  our  boys.  While 
our  enemies  are  now  doing  all  that  they  can,  and  we  now  have 
them  with  their  backs  to  the  wall,  yet,  I don’t  think  there  is  any 
doubt  that  they  would  hold  out  much  longer,  and  resist  more 
strongly,  if  they  sincerely  thought  that  the  people  of  our  country 
and  the  people  of  England  were  not  whole-heartedly  behind  our 
leaders  in  the  prosecution  of  this  war.  This,  alone,  in  my  opin- 
ion, makes  it  all  important  that  the  Democratic  Party  be  returned 
to  power. 


In  my  opinion  the  great  majority  of  the  Democrats  in  Ala- 
bama and  throughout  the  South  are  going  to  take  the  position 
that  we  owe  our  allegiance  to  the  Democratic  Party  and  we  will 
faithfully  support  its  nominees.  I think  only  a very  few  are  going 
“to  take  a walk”.  I believe  that  the  Southern  people  are  finally 
waking  up  to  the  fact  that  by  the  South  presenting  a united  front 
at  our  National  Conventions  we  can  regain  in  the  councils  of  our 
Party  the  prestige  which  we  formerly  enjoyed.  We  of  the  South 
undoubtedly  brought  about  the  defeat  of  Henry  Wallace  as  our 
Vice-Presidential  nominee,  and  no  man  more  unfriendly  to  the 
South  could  possibly  have  been  nominated  than  Wallace.  Fur- 
thermore, at  our  recent  Chicago  Convention  our  Southern  Dele- 
gates succeeded  in  having  two  planks  placed  in  our  platform  which 
I consider  a victory  for  our  section.  These  planks  were  as  follows : 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


67 


“We  favor  Federal  aid  to  education  administered  by  the 
States  without  interference  by  the  Federal  Government.” 

We  have  been  fearful  that  if  the  Federal  aid  to  education  was 
administered  by  the  Federal  Government,  the  first  requirement 
would  be  the  abolition  of  our  segregation  laws,  just  as  the  Federal 
Government  has  required  the  doing  away  with  segregation  laws 
in  connection  with  certain  Federal  contracts,  etc. 

The  other  plank  in  our  platform  which  should  be  particularly 
helpful  to  the  South  is  the  plank  reading  as  follows  : 

“We  favor  nondiscriininatory  transportation  charges  and 
declare  for  the  early  correction  of  inequalities  in  such 
charges.  ” 

Anyone  who  has  studied  the  transporation  freight  structure  under 
which  the  South  has  been  struggling  since  the  Civil  War,  fully 
appreciates  the  tremendous  disadvantage  under  which  Southern 
Industry  has  had  to  operate.  I firmly  believe  that  by  the  proper 
cooperation  between  our  Southern  Delegates  we  can  in  the  future 
get  our  Party  to  take  many  more  steps  toward  aiding  our  section. 

Most  of  the  thoughtful  men  and  women  of  Alabama  who  were 
unwilling  to  support  the  nominees  of  the  Democratic  Primaries, 
unless  these  nominees  should  turn  out  to  be  candidates  they  were 
willing  to  support  in  the  General  Election,  stayed  out  of  our  Pri- 
maries so  as  to  be  free  to  vote  the  Republican  ticket  or  an  Inde- 
pendent ticket  without  violating  their  pledge.  No  man  or  woman 
had  any  right  or  any  business  participating  in  our  Democratic 
Primary  without  being  bound  by  the  conditions  we  imposed  when 
inviting  them  to  become  a member  of  our  Party.  They  could 
stay  out  of  our  Primary  and  then  with  a clear  conscience  vote  as 
they  pleased  in  the  General  Election. 

4.  In  reply  to  your  inquiry  as  to  what  constitutes  the  princi- 
pal objection  in  the  South  to  the  re-election  of  the  Democratic 
ticket,  I will  state  that  in  my  opinion  the  principal  objection  would 
be  the  manner  in  which  the  present  administration  has  handled 
the  racial  issue.  However,  just  read  the  Republican  platform  with 
its  advocacy  of  a permanent  Fair  Employment  Practice  Commis- 
sion, the  abolition  of  our  poll  tax  laws,  the  doing  away  with  all  of 


68 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


our  segregation  statutes,  etc.,  and  then  tell  me  what  in  the  name 
of  common  sense  these  objectors  think  or  hope  they  can  accom- 
plish on  this  racial  proposition  by  stringing  along  with  our  Re- 
publican friends.  Many  Northern  people,  both  Democrats  and 
Republicans,  advocate  the  doing  away  with  our  segregation  laws 
and  other  regulations  which  we  of  the  South  know  to  be  abso- 
lutely essential  to  the  well-being  of  both  races,  and  while  these 
folks  think  that  they  are  helping  out  our  colored  friends,  yet,  as  a 
matter  of  fact,  we  all  know  that  they  are  only  making  living  con- 
ditions in  the  South  more  cliff ciult  and  more  unsatisfactory  for 
both  races.  Ours  is  the  only  section  of  the  world  where  two  en- 
tirely different  races  have  been  able  to  live  together  side  by  side 
in  great  numbers  in  peace  and  harmony  for  many  generations, 
and  if  we  are  just  let  alone  we  will  continue  to  have  nothing  but 
the  best  of  relations  between  the  two  races.  I recently  read  a 
statement  from  what  I considered  a reliable  source,  that  more  ne- 
groes were  killed  in  the  horrible  race  riot  in  Chicago  a few  years 
ago  than  were  killed  in  all  of  the  lynchings  which  have  taken  place 
in  all  of  the  Southern  States  during  the  three-quarters  of  a cen- 
tury since  the  Civil  War  ended,  and  yet  some  of  these  Northern 
people  seem  to  think  that  they  know  better  than  the  Southern 
people, — both  white  and  black, — how  we  can  best  get  along  and 
live  together.  They  are  simply  ill-advised,  ignorant  meddlers  who 
know  absolutely  nothing  about  the  problems  they  are  trying  to 
handle  with  totally  unworkable  theories.  I wish  all  of  them  could 
see  and  realize  how  nicely  and  satisfactorily  the  two  races  get 
along  together  when  they  just  leave  us  alone.  No  right-thinking 
Southern  white  man  or  white  woman  is  going  to  be  unfair  or  un- 
just to  his  colored  neighbors,  and  all  that  we  ask  of  these  people 
in  other  sections  of  the  country  is  to  let  us  live  in  peace  and  har- 
mony and  to  stop  meddling  and  interfering  with  a proposition  that 
they  know  absolutely  nothing  about.  No  matter  how  good  their 
intentions  may  be,  they  are  doing  nothing  but  harm  when  they 
undertake  to  trample  under  foot  the  traditions  and  segregation 
practices  which  time  has  proven  to  be  the  only  proper  method  of 
handling  our  proposition. 


5.  Replying  to  your  inquiry  as  to  whether  or  not  the  State 
Committee  has  any  means  of  checking  on  how  Democrats  who 
voted  in  the  Primary  vote  in  the  General  Election,  I beg  to  ad- 
vise that  no  method  of  making  such  a check  is  afforded.  In  fact, 
we  have  rather  severe  criminal  statutes  controlling  in  such  cases 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


69 


where  an  effort  is  made. to  see  how  an  elector  voted,  except  in  the 
case  of  a contest.  In  event  the  State  Executive  Committee  of  our 
Party  wished  to  punish  any  Democrat  who  voted  for  the  Repub- 
lican ticket  in  the  General  Election,  the  only  way  that  a check  of 
this  kind  could  be  made  would  be  to  require  that  before  any  sus- 
pected elector  could  be  permitted  to  vote  in  our  next  Prmary  Elec- 
tion, such  elector  would  first  have  to  make  affidavit  as  to  whether 
or  not  he  supported  the  Democratic  ticket  in  the  preceding  General 
Election.  As  above  stated,  we  have  only  required  such  an  affidavit 
as  to  candidates  and  have  not  applied  such  a harsh  rule  to  electors, 
as  it  has  been  our  desire  to  keep  in  the  Democratic  Party  all  quali- 
fied white  electors. 


6.  I think  if  the  National  Administration  continues  to  meddle 
with  our  racial  problems  in  the  South  that  Governor  Sparks  is 
correct  in  taking  the  position  that  we  will  be  caused  much  grief 
and  I can  conceive  that  matters  could  get  to  the  point  where  there 
would  be  danger  of  the  South  abandoning  its  traditional  allegiance 
to  the  Democratic  Party.  However,  I don’t  think  we  have  as  yet 
come  to  this  point.  I believe  that  with  a better  understanding  of 
conditions  in  our  section,  the  Democrats  in  other  sections  will  be- 
gin to  realize  that  in  their  efforts  to  do  away  with  our  segregation 
laws  they  are  doing  nothing  but  harm,  and  are  not  being  helpful 
to  anyone.  As  the  situation  appears  to  me,  those  of  us  who  en- 
tertain the  views  which  we  hold  as  to  the  absolute  necessity  of  our 
segregation  statutes  would  have  nowhere  to  go  if  we  wished  to 
abandon  the  Democratic  Party.  We  could  certainly  hope  for  no 
relief  along  these  lines  from  the  Republican  Party.  Even  a glance 
at  the  very  radical  racial  platform  adopted  by  the  Republican 
Party  shows  conclusively  that  we  have  nothing  to  expect  from 
that  source.  I have  never  thought  that  I could  get  anywhere 
trying  “to  reform  the  other  fellow’s  party” , but  am  firmly  convinced 
that  I can  accomplish  far  more  trying  to  reform  my  own  party, 
where  I certainly  would  have  much  more  weight  and  influence 
than  if  I went  over  into  the  enemy’s  camp  and  tried  to  tell  them 
how  to  run  things.  I don’t  think  that  the  third  party  agitation 
will  get  anywhere.  For  many  years  we  have  had  third  parties  to 
flash  on  the  political  scene  from  time  to  time,  but  I don’t  think 
any  of  them  survived  more  than  one  election.  Personally,  I be- 
lieve strongly  in  the  two-party  system  which  gives  a sufficient 
check  to  prevent  wholesale  abuses.  We  certainly  would  not  wish 
to  follow  in  the  foot-steps  of  some  of  our  Republics  to  the  South, 


70 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


where  they  have  six  or  eight  different  Parties.  Such  a situation 
brings  about  untold  unrest  and  lack  of  stability  in  Government, 
and  in  my  opinion  the  thing  for  the  people  of  the  South  to  do  is  to 
stand  by  the  Democratic  Party,  give  it  our  whole-hearted  support 
and  allegiance,  go  to  our  Democratic  National  Conventions  and 
unite  in  a manner  that  we  have  never  united  before,  and  insist 
upon  and  demand  that  redress  which  we  feel  we  are  entitled  to 
from  our  own  Party.  There  is  no  doubt  in  my  mind  but  that  Ala- 
bama will  go  overwhelmingly  Democratic  in  November.  With 
all  of  the  fight  which  was  made  on  Roosevelt  by  the  Wilkie  people 
in  1940,  here  in  Mobile  County  the  Democratic  ticket  swept  Mo- 
bile County  by  a vote  of  11,477  for  Roosevelt  to  1,890  for  Wilkie, 
a majority  of  more  than  six  to  one  for  the  Democratic  ticket.  The 
State  as  a whole  did  almost  as  well  by  the  Democratic  Party,  the 
vote  throughout  the  entire  State  being  250,726  for  Roosevelt  against 
42,184  for  Wilkie. 

Of  course,  much  has  been  done  by  our  Party  that  I do  not 
approve  of,  but  I believe  in  doing  my  fighting  zvithin  my  party,  and  not 
without  it.  I very  earnestly  and  very  sincerely  believe  that  if  the 
Southern  people  will  unite  and  present  a solid  front  at  our  National 
Conventions,  as  I had  hoped  they  would  do  at  our  last  Convention, 
we  can  bring  about  a greatly  changed  situation  in  the  treatment 
accorded  to  us  by  our  National  Administration.  We  can  certainly 
expect  nothing  from  the  Republican  Party  in  return  for  our  having 
voted  against  them  for  three-quarters  of  a century,  whereas  the 
Democratic  Party  owes  us  an  everlasting  debt  of  gratitude  as  we 
have  been  the  back-bone  of  that  party  for  several  generations  and 
have  really  prevented  it,  on  several  occasions,  from  passing  into 
oblivion.  With  united  effort  I feel  confident  we  can  remedy  many 
of  the  matters  which  are  now  giving  us  trouble. 

Respectfully  submitted, 

GESSNER  T.  McCORVEY, 

Chairman, 

State  Democratic  Executive  Committee  of  Alabama. 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


71 


A HISTORY  OF  THE  OLD  FRENCH  GUN  OF  DEMOPOLIS 

By  Bessie  Patterson  Wilburn 


(One  of  the  most  interesting  rooms  in  the  World  War  Memorial  Build- 
ing is  that  one  holding  mementoes  of  Alabama’s  French  contacts.  Our 
State  was  first  explored  by  the  Spanish  under  DeSoto  in  1540.  In  1699 
during  the  reign  of  Louis  XIV  the  Gulf  Coast  was  settled  by  a French 
colony  led  by  two  French  Canadian  brothers,  Pierre  LeMoyne,  Sieur  Iber- 
ville and  John  Baptist  LeMoyne,  Sieur  Beinville.  The  next  interesting 
episode  connected  with  our  contacts  was  the  settlement  of  Demopolis  by 
the  Vine  and  Olive  Colony  in  1818,  follows  of  Napoleon  Bonaparte  who 
fled  from  France  after  his  fall  to  escape  death  and  imprisonment.  Another 
interesting  episode  was  the  visit  of  General  LaFayette  in  1825.  The  walls 
of  this  French  Room  are  lined  with  beautiful  paintings  portraying  scenes 
of  the  settlement  of  Demopolis  by  the  Vine  and  Olive  Colony  presented 
to  the  State  by  Thomas  W.  Martin.  In  the  glass  cabinets  in  the  room 
are  some  of  the  beautiful  white  satin  dresses  worn  by  women  who  came 
with  their  husbands  to  Demopolis.  From  time  to  time  descendants  of  these 
Colonists  present  items  they  have  inherited  for  the  collection.  Very  recently 
a quaint  old  gun  was  placed  in  the  French  collection  by  Mrs.  Bessie  Pat- 
terson Wilburn.  The  following  article  by  Mrs.  Wilburn  gives  the  history 
of  the  gun.) 

Of  the  number  of  the  exiled  Bonapartists  who  settled  Demop- 
olis in  the  Alabama  Canebrake,  the  leader,  and  easily  the  most 
distinguished  of  the  group,  was  Count  Charles  Lefebvre-Desnou- 
ettes,  a warm  personal  friend  as  well  as  favorite  general  of  Napo- 
leon Bonapart.  He  was  also  a family  connection  of  Napoleon’s 
as  the  latter  had  used  his  influence  to  wed  his  cousin,  the  sister  of 
the  Paris  banker  La  Fitte  (who  helped  finance  Napoleon’s  cam- 
paigns) to  the  Count  Desnouettes. 

The  Count  was  perhaps  as  highly  esteemed  by  Napoleon  as 
any  of  his  officers,  as  was  evidenced  by  his  many  acts  of  personal 
favor.  On  the  long  and  fatiguing  march  to  Russia  and  the  dis- 
astrous retreat  from  Moscow  the  beloved  Desnouettes  was  ever 
the  chosen  general  to  ride  in  the  personal  carriage  with  his  im- 
perial master.  General  Desnouettes  was  aid-de-camp  to  Bona- 
part at  the  battle  of  Saragossa.  For  his  conspicuous  gallantry  at 
Austerlitz  he  was  made  a commander  of  the  Legion  of  Honor. 
In  fact  so  much  was  Napoleon  attached  to  Desnouettes  that  when 
forced  to  abdicate  the  throne  and  depart  for  Elba,  while  address- 
ing his  sorrowful  and  weeping  officer  Fontainebleau,  the  deposed 


72 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Lady’s  gun  given  by  Countess  Desnouettes  to  her  husband,  Count  Charles 
Lefebvre-Desnouettes,  when  he  left  France  with  the  Vine  and  Olive  Colony  which 
settled  Demopolis,  Ala.,  in  1818.  This  gun  was  made  by  Morizeau,  of  Paris. 
When  Gen.  Desnouettes  left  Alabama  to  return  to  Europe  he  sold  his  houshold 
effects  and  gave  many  parting  gifts  to  members  of  the  Colony.  This  gun  was 
purchased  by  Nathan  Lipscomb,  a native  of  South  Carolina  and  good  friend  of 
Desnouettes  and  it  afterwards  became  the  property  of  his  daughter,  Elizabeth 
Lipscomb  Stewart  who  later  gave  it  to  her  granddaughter,  Bessie  Patterson,  now 
Mrs.  H.  H.  Wilburn,  of  Demopolis. 

Emperor  said,  “I  cannot  take  leave  of  you  all,  but  will  embrace  ten, 
Desnouettes  in  behalf  of  all.”  Napoleon,  with  tears  dimming  his 
eyes,  encircled  the  General  in  his  arms,  while  Desnouettes,  entirely 
unarmed,  wept  aloud. 

The  Countess  Desnouettes  did  not  accompany  her  husband 
into  exile  after  Napoleon’s  downfall;  she  intended,  however,  to 
later  join  the  County  in  the  wilds  of  North  America,  where  the 
banished  French  would  find  a refuge  from  the  wrath  of  the  Bour- 
bons. So,  on  General  Desnouettes’  departure  from  France,  his 
wife  entrusted  him  with  the  care  of  a very  valuable  gun  that  had 
been  made  in  Paris  for  her,  the  Countess  thinking  at  the  time, 
that  she  would  shortly  be  with  her  husband  in  America,  where 
she  would  have  need  of  the  gun  as  protection  from  Indians  and 
the  wild  beasts  of  the  American  forest. 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


73 


This  “lady’s  gun”  was  very  handsome  with  its  hand  carved 
fruit  wood  stock  and  heavy  padding  covered  with  a beautiful  soft 
leather.  The  bushing  was  encrusted  with  gold,  and  the  long  single 
barrel  bore  the  words : MORIZBAU , Paris,  doubtless  the  maker’s  mark. 

The  Countess  was  never  to  use  this  splendid  firearm  in  Ala- 
bama, however,  for  various  circumstances  having  prevented  her 
from  joining  Desnouettes,  she  evoked  the  aid  of  her  influential 
family  in  obtaining  a pardon,  and  permission  for  her  distinguished 
husband’s  return  to  the  Continent.  She  was  successful,  and  Des- 
nouettes, having  sold  his  plantation  and  selling  and  giving  to 
friends  his  household  effects,  bid  farewell  to  his  friends  in  Ala- 
bama and  set  sail — not  for  his  beloved  France — but  for  Belgium 
where  the  Bourbons  had  granted  permission  for  the  Desnouettes 
family  to  reside.  But  this  illustrious  fugitive  was  never  to  See 
again  his  native  France ; for  his  ship,  the  ill-fated  “Albion”,  foun- 
dered within  sight  of  the  Irish  Shore  and  Desnouettes  and  all  on 
board  perished. 

In  later  years  a monument  to  the  memory  of  Count  Charles 
Lefbvre-Desnouettes  was  erected  by  the  French  at  St.  Ardresse 
near  E’Havre,  France. 

Among  the  goods  sold  by  General  Desnouettes  on  leaving  De- 
mopolis  was  the  Paris  gun  that  he  had  brought  from  France  for 
the  Countess.  The  gun  was  purchased  by  Nathan  Lipscomb,  a 
native  South  Carolinian  and  good  friend  of  Desnouettes. 

Nathan  and  his  brother  William  Lipscomb  migrated  from  Ab- 
beville District,  South  Carolina,  prior  to  April  9,  1817,  to  join  their 
brother  Abner  Smith  Lipscomb  at  the  old  Spanish  Fort  of  St. 
Stephens,  where  the  latter  had  settled  in  the  Mississippi  Territory 
in  1811,  six  years  before  St.  Stephens  was  to  become  the  provision- 
al Capital  of  Alabama  Territory.  Abner  Lipscomb,  who  had  stud- 
ied law  in  the  office  of  John  Bowie  and  of  John  C.  Calhoun,  the 
great  statesman,  in  Abbeville  District,  South  Carolina,  entered 
politics  and  while  a member  of  one  of  the  1818  meetings  of  the 
Alabama  Territorial  Legislature  proposed  the  name  of  “Marengo” 
— in  honor  of  Napoleon’s  victory  at  Marengo  in  1800 — for  the  new 
county  that  had  been  settled  on  the  “White  Bluff”  of  the  T'ombig- 
bee  River  by  the  French  Emigrants  the  year  before.  These  Exil- 
ists  had  bestowed  the  Greek  word  “Demopolis”  upon  their 


74 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


town ; but  when  the  survey  was  made  it  was  found  that 
the  ?‘City  of  the  People”  was  outside  of  the  French  grant  and  the 
settlers  were  forced  to  remove  a short  distance  eastward  where  a 
new  town  was  begun  and  was  called  Aigleville.  In  this  town  Gen- 
eral Desnouettes  built  a log  cabin  which  was  his  “Sanctuary”, 
and  in  it  he  exhibited  a collection  of  swords  and  pistols  which  he 
had  taken  in  battle  in  Europe.  These  firearms  were  arranged 
around  the  base  of  a bronze  bust  of  Napoleon ; and  the  rough  log 
walls  of  the  interior  of  the  Sanctuary  were  draped  with  the  beloved 
flags  of  France. 

Mr.  Jesse  Whitfield  of  Demopolis  made  a survey  in  recent 
years  of  the  old  Aigleville  section,  and  presented  me  with  a map 
showing  the  exact  location  of  the  Desnouettes  cabin.  It  has  been 
the  desire  of  my  heart  for  many  years  that  this  spot  be  preserved 
by  a marker. 

Abner  S.  Lipscomb  soon  became  the  first  Chief  Justice  of  the 
State  of  Alabama  and  left  St.  Stephens.  Nathan  Lipscomb,  who 
operated  the  first  saw  mill  in  south  Alabama,  near  Bashi,  Clarke 
County,  and  across  the  Tombigbee  River  from  St.  Stephens,  soon 
sold  his  holdings  when  Murrell’s  gang  began  to  terrorize  that  sec- 
tion, and  with  his  brother  William  brought  their  families  to  Ma- 
rengo County. 

Drinking  water  was  very  scarce  in  the  black  lime  land  surround- 
ing Demopolis,  so  both  of  the  Lipscomb  brothers  sought  and  found 
abundant  flowing  springs  a few  miles  south  of  Demopolis  where 
the  sand  elevations  began  to  out-crop.  Each  of  the  brothers  built 
large  substantial  houses  (which  are  still  standing)  near  the  springs 
they  had  discovered  only  a few  miles  apart. 

Incidentally,  Nathan  had  live  silk  cocoons  and  slips  of  the  mul- 
berry tree  sent  from  South  Carolina  to  his  plantation,  but  for  some 
reason  the  silk  growing  experiment  was  a failure.  This  species  of 
mulberry  is  yet  found  growing  in  the  Demopolis  section. 

Nathan  Lipscomb  was  residing  in  his  home  near  his  spring 
when  Count  Desnouettes  left  Demopolis,  and  at  the  sale  of  the 
General’s  effects  bought  the  gun  which  had  been  brought  to  Amer- 
ica for  Countess  Desnouettes.  The  story  of  the  gun  Nathan  learn- 
ed from  the  Count.  A mahogany  candlestick  was  presented  to 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


75 


him  by  Desnouettes  at  the  same  time.  The  fate  of  the  candlestick 
is  unknown;  but  the  gun  Nathan  presented  to  his  wife,  the  former 
Elizabeth  Merriwether  of  South  Carolina,  with  instructions  to  shoot 
on  sight — not  Indians — but  the  deer  that  came  in  increasing  num- 
bers to  the  pool  of  water  below  the  spring,  where  they  drank  with 
the  cattle  in  the  evenings.  There  is,  however,  no  tradition  that 
Elizabeth  Lipscomb  ever  killed  a deer  with  the  beautiful  French 
gun! 

The  gun  became  the  property  of  Nathan  and  Elizabeth’s 
daughter,  Elizabeth  Lipscomb  Stewart.  It  stayed  for  many  years 
in  an  attic  while  children  pried  off  the  gold  plate  of  the  bushing, 
and  rats  and  mice  played  havoc  with  the  padding,  and  rust  cor- 
roded the  barrell. 

Mrs.  Stewart  at  length  gave  the  gun  to  her  young  grand- 
daughter, Bessie  Patterson,  now  Mrs.  H.  H.  Wilburn,  of  Demopo- 
lis ; she  related  the  history  of  the  gun  as  it  has  been  recorded  in 
this  article.  Elizabeth  Stewart  also  gave  her  granddaughter  in- 
structions that  the  gun  must  remain  always  in  the  family. 

It  is  now  being  loaned  to  the  Alabama  Department  of  Ar- 
chives and  History  with  reservation  that  it  may  be  withdrawn 
upon  request  of  Mrs.  Wilburn  or  her  descendants. 

One  of  my  earliest  memories  was  hearing  the  story  of  the 
French  settlement  of  Demopolis  told  by  my  Grandmother,  Eliza- 
beth Lipscomb  Stewart;  as  I grew  older  I read  every  printed  ac- 
count of  the  Marengo  colony  I could  find. 

For  the  history  of  Count  Lefebvre-Desnouettes  as  given  in  the 
above  article,  I used  the  facts  as  told  by  J.  W.  Beeson  in  the  “De- 
mopolis Express”  of  1895,  and  “French  Military  Adventure  in  Ala- 
bama” by  Thomas  Martin.  Other  facts  and  dates  are  taken  from 
old  Lipscomb  files,  and  family  Bibles,  Alabama  Historical  Quar- 
terly, Summer  Issue  1930,  and  data  given  me  by  my  Grandmother 
Elizabeth  Lipscomb  Stewart. 


76 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Rock  Springs  Baptist  Church,  Chambers  County,  Alabama 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


77 


HISTORY  OF  ROCK  SPRINGS  BAPTIST  CHURCH, 
CHAMBERS  COUNTY,  ALABAMA 

By  Anne  Elisabeth  Newman 


(The  Alabama  Historical  Quarterly  has  been  carrying  a series  of  ar- 
ticles on  “The  Oldest  Church  in  my  County.”  These  articles  were  pre- 
pared by  their  authors  in  various  parts  of  the  State  at  the  request  of  the 
Editor  of  this  magazine  and  have  proven  of  great  interest  not  only  locally 
but  very  generally  because  in  some  cases  the  list  of  interments  in  the 
churchyard  of  the  old  community  have  been  included  in  the  article. 
There  is  a great  disposition  on  the  part  of  our  people  to  trace  their  an- 
cestry where  records  can  be  found.  Many  of  the  old  headstones  in  Ala- 
bama cemeteries  carry  records  even  of  Revolutionary  soldiers  who  came 
to  Alabama  with  their  families  in  our  pioneer  period.  The  Department  of 
Archives  and  History  has  a list  of  all  Revolutionary  soldiers  buried  in  this 
State  and  it  is  found  that  at  least  600  Revolutionary  heroes  are  buried 
within  the  borders  of  Alabama.  The  Daughters  of  the  American  Revo- 
lution have  marked  a number  of  graves  and  are  very  active  in  assembling 
information  about  them.) 

“For  none  of  us  liveth  to  himself  and  no  man  dieth  to  him- 
self.” This  verse  from  Romans  14:7  was  the  fext  of  the  sermon 
preached  by  Reverend  Francis  Calloway  on  April  24,  1839  to  a lit- 
tle group  of  worshippers  gathered  in  a home  aboiU  two  miles 
north  of  what  is  now  Rock  Springs  Church.  After  the  sermon 
Brethren  William  Lacy  and  Francis  Calloway,  the  two  ministers 
present,  formed  a presbytery  and  asked  Brother  Britton  Stamps 
to  act  as  clerk.  They  organized  a church  consisting  of  the  follow- 
ing charter  members:  Richard  B.  Head,  Andrew  Patterson,  Sarah 
Youngblood,  James  Neighbors,  Ruth  Lindsey,  Abigail  Lindsey, 
Abner  Webb,  Martha  McClure,  Sarah  Lindsey,  Elizabeth  Head, 
Clarry  Lindsey,  and  Sarah  Buckalew.  After  the  organization 
Brother  William  Lacy  and  his  wife  joined  by  letter,  and  a month 
later  he  was  called  to  be  the  first  pastor. 

The  church  was  named  Mount  Paran  at  first,  but  on  July  24, 
1841,  its  name  became  Rock  Springs,  for  a building  had  been  erected 
about  half  a mile  southeast  of  the  present  site,  near  a spring  issu- 
ing from  a rock.  Here  nature  had  prepared  an  ideal  setting  for  a 
baptismal  scene  of  reverence  and  beauty,  as  people  stood  about 
the  encircling  hillsides  or  sat  upon  the  rocks  and  witnessed  the 
ordinance  in  the  pool  below. 


78 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


-In  1850  the  church  began  worship  in  its  new  building  up  on 
the  road  at  the  present  location.  On  January  17,  1857  Henry  M. 
Ford  and  wife  Sarah  Ann,  for  the  sum  of  fifty-two  dollars  sold 
sixteen  acres  of  land  to  Rock  Springs  Church,  which  land  still 
provides  an  ever-enlarging  cemetery  and  the  surrounding  woods. 
The  deacons  representing  the  church  at  the  time  of  the  transaction 
were:  James  Anderson,  Senior,  William  Davis,  Abner  Webb,  Sam- 
uel Newman,  and  Philip  S.  Milford.  In  1880  a building  committee 
reported  carefully  detailed  specifications  for  a new  building,  which 
was  finished  and  occupied  in  1881.  Mr.  Lawrence  McRae  had 
charge  of  the  erection  of  the  building  and  carried  out  his  respon- 
sibility scrupulously.  Old  minutes  record  the  cost  of  material, 
labor,  etc.,  to  have  been  $1326.86.  This  building  is  the  house  of 
worship  used  to-day. 

The  split  between  the  Missionary  and  Anti-Missionary  Bap- 
tists occurred  December  26,  1840.  After  long  consideration  of  the 
matter  of  foot-washing  and  fasting,  the  church  at  Rock  Springs  in 
1843  agreed  “to  attend  to  it  twice  every  year  immediately  after  the 
communion.”  This  action  of  the  church  was  later  revoked. 

On  August  5,  1891  G.  W.  Newman  gave  about  one-fourth  of 
an  acre — all  land  inside  the  enclosure  of  the  graveyard — to  relatives 
and  friends  of  the  dead  who  are  buried  at  Old  Rock  Springs,  to 
“be  kept  and  used  for  a public  graveyard  forever  hereafter.” 

An  interesting  note  from  the  minutes  of  1883  is  a recommen- 
dation of  the  deacons  that  each  member  pay  five  cents  a month 
for  church  expenses,  and  that  each  member  give  something  to  the 
support  of  the  pastor. 

Included  in  the  Decorum  was  the  rule  that  “no  male  member 
shall  be  allowed  to  leave  the  house  in  time  of  conference  unless 
by  permission  of  the  moderator.”  And  also  in  the  Decorum  : “It 
shall  be  the  duty  of  each  member  present  at  our  communion  to 
take  their  seats  in  order  whether  they  partake  of  the  elements  or 
not,  but  if  they  refuse  twice  in  succession  they  shall  make  the 
cause  known  to  the  deacons  privately  and  on  failing,  the  deacons 
shall  report  them  to  the  church.” 

A custom  now  discontinued  was  inviting  visiting  brethren  and 
sisters  to  seats  with  them  at  the  regular  Saturday  conferences. 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


79 


Sending  a committee  from  the  church  to  visit  a male  member  if  he 
had  been  absent  twice  from  regular  conference  without  having  giv- 
en explanation  is  no  longer  practiced.  There  still  lives  an  old  report 
that  Brother  Murdock  McRae  for  eighteen  years  did  not  miss  a 
Saturday  meeting  and  conference.  Then  came  a day  when  he  was 
absent.  One  of  the  brethren  in  the  church,  knowing  something 
was  wrong,  hurried  to  Brother  McRae’s  home  and  found  him  with 
a broken  arm.  Another  custom  no  longer  continued  is  roll  call 
at  each  monthly  conference. 

Reflecting  the  history  of  the  times  is  mention  of  the  reception 
of  slaves  into  the  membership.  They  are  designated  by  their  first 
names  and  as  being  the  property  of  the  members  who  owned  them. 
They  also  were  subject  to  discipline.  In  the  minutes  of  May  16, 
1857  is  this  entry : “Resolved  that  it  is  the  sense  of  this  church 
that  it  is  the  duty  of  members  to  bring  up  their  families  both 
bond  and  free  to  our  regular  church  meetings  both  Saturday  and 
Sabbath  but  that  we  regard  it  as  a matter  which  should  be  left  to 
the  conscience  of  each  individual  member.” 

Records  include  numerous  cases  of  offenses  for  which  mem- 
bers were  disciplined  and  were  excluded  if  satisfactory  acknowledg- 
ments were  not  made  to  the  church.  The  following  list  is  repre- 
sentative : selling  spiritous  liquors ; dancing,  or  allowing  it  to  be 
carried  on  at  one’s  residence ; telling  lies  ; fighting ; drawing  one’s 
coat  to  fight,  and  getting  mad  and  wanting  to  fight ; keeping  a 
disorderly  house  (where  fiddling,  dancing,  and  gambling  were  car- 
ried on)  ; running  horse  races  and  betting  on  them  ; drinking  too 
much  spiritous  liquors;  profane  language ; unchristian  conduct; 
fornication;  adultery  and  bastardy;  card-playing;  slandering;  ob- 
taining property  under  false  pretenses ; abusing  his  wife ; quitting 
wife  or  husband ; selling  and  proposing  to  sell  property  that  did 
not  belong  to  him ; denying  the  faith ; forging  notes ; breaking  the 
Sabbath ; being  unsound  in  the  faith ; moving  away  leaving  his 
church  subscription  not  paid  and  other  matters  unsettled ; not 
believing  in  future  rewards  and  punishments.  The  church,  find- 
ing one  brother  “dissembling  and  refractory,  thought  it  most  for 
the  glory  of  God  and  the  good  of  His  cause  to  exclude  him,  there- 
fore withdrew  fellowship  from  him.”  Other  practices  not  tolerated 
by  the  church  were  resorting  to  dram  shops,  and  the  purchasing 
of  lottery  tickets.  Time  after  time  in  the  regular  conferences  a 
committee  was  appointed  to  investigate  some  rumor  about  a mem- 


80 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


ber  or  to  see  an  offending  one  and  “cite”  him  to  the  church  con- 
ference or  “labor  with”  him. 

These  are  the  clerks  who  have  served  Rock  Springs  Church : 
Abner  Webb,  John  J.  Hussey,  William  Davis,  J.  C.  Webb,  W.  J. 
Johnson,  Webster  McRae  (for  a short  time,  and  the  incumbent 
O.  G.  Moore,  who,  with  almost  thirty-eight  years  of  service  to  his 
eternal  credit,  continues  his  faithful  work  in  this  office. 

Twenty-two  pastors  have  shepherded  Rock  Springs  Church. 
They  are  respectively:  William  Lacy,  William  A.  Hunter,  A.  B.  A. 
Simmons,  John  R.  Humphries,  H.  Williams,  James  M.  Russell, 
John  F.  Bledsoe,  John  Cumbee,  R.  A.  J.  Cumbee,  G.  E.  Brewer, 
C.  P.  Sisson,  W.  M.  Blackwelder,  W.  C.  Bledsoe,  A.  S.  Smith,  J. 
L.  Gregory,  C.  A.  Strickland,  L.  B.  Crantford,  A.  E.  Silvey,  C.  M. 
Cloud,  A.  C.  Yeargan,  J.  D.  Okeef,  B.  B.  McGinty. 

In  recent  years  Mrs.  Julia  Lamb  departed  this  life  at  the  age 
of  ninety-seven.  She  had  been  a member  of  Rock  Springs  Church 
eighty-one  years.  Mrs.  Laura  McKee,  now  in  her  eighty-eighth 
year,  has  been  a member  seventy-one  years.  She  recalls  the  great 
crowds  that  used  to  fill  the  building,  and  the  joy  that  the  people 
found  in  their  monthly  worship  services. 

Throughout  the  years  the  highest  tide  was  anticipated  during 
the  summer  “big  meeting,”  when  worship  and  evangelistic  ser- 
vices were  protracted  and  held  twice  a day  for  a week  or  more. 
This  was  a time  anticipated  and  enjoyed,  the  climax  of  the  year, 
a season  of  fellowship  and  hospitality,  as  well  as  of  spiritual  re- 
freshing. During  this  week  the  approach  of  evening  found  people 
from  divers  directions  winding  their  way  towards  the  church  to 
gather  there  at  “early  candlelight.” 

Reverend  Francis  Calloway,  who  preached  the  sermon  on  the 
day  when  Mount  Paran  Church  was  organized,  is  buried  in  the 
cemetery  of  Antioch  Baptist  Church,  Chambers  County.  His  grave 
should  be  a sacred  shrine  to  interested  visitors.  In  the  Rock 
Springs  cemetery  rest  many  faithful  leaders  whose  affections  were 
set  on  their  church.  Their  lives  were  centered  in  it ; they  helped 
to  carve  out  the  glory  and  dignity  with  which  it  has  stood  as  a 
burning  and  shining  light  in  the  community  for  over  a hundred 
vears. 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


81 


JEREMIAH  AUSTILL 

The  autobiography  of  one  of  Alabama’s  most  distinguished  pioneer  citizens. 

(This  valuable  paper  was  presented  to  the  Alabama  State  Department 
of  Archives  and  History  in  1912  by  R.  T.  Irvin,  of  Mobile.  It  had  prob- 
ably come  into  Mr.  Irvin’s  hands  through  Judge  Henriosco  Austill,  son  of 
Jere  Austill.  It  was  through  Judge  Austill  that  a very  beautiful  oil  por- 
trait of  his  father  was  preesnted  to  the  Department  and  hangs  on  the 
walls  of  the  World  War  Memorial  Building  in  Montgomery.  Judge  Austill 
came  to  Clarke  County  with  his  father  in  1813  and  took  part  in  succeeding 
years  in  the  perilous  border  warfare  of  that  day.  He  was  only  nineteen 
years  of  age  when  he  participated  in  the  famous  Canoe  Fight  with  Sam 
Dale  and  others.  In  his  mature  years  he  became  an  extensive  planter, 
raising  huge  cotton  crops.  Descendants  reside  in  South  Alabama,  Vir- 
ginia and  other  sections  of  the  country.  He  died  in  1881.) 


My  father,  Evan  Austill,  was  married  to  Sarah  Files,  in  Pen- 
dleton District,  S.  C’.,  in  1793,  and  I was  born  the  10th  of  August, 
1794,  and  the  Cherokees  being  at  war  with  the  United  States  until 
the  year  1798,  when  a treaty  was  held  at  the  Ocony  Stations, 
whereupon  Silas  Dinsmore  was  appointed  Chief  Agent,  and  my 
father  as  an  assistant  and  mechanic,  to  teach  the  Indians  civiliza- 
tion ; whereupon  the  Agency  was  established  near  the  center  of  the 
Nation,  upon  the  Otenally  River,  the  main  branch  of  the  Alabama 
River,  to  which  place  they  moved  in  the  same  year,  and  in  1804, 
I was  sent  to  Col.  Rhode  Easley’s  to  school,  at  the  high  school  of 
the  Appelachy,  Ga.  But  as  the  Colonel  was  rarely  at  home,  his 
servants  treated  me  very  badly,  as  well  as  a half-breed  of  my  age. 
My  father  came  and  carried  us  both  back  to  the  Nation;  when  at 
the  age  of  eleven  years  old,  he  carried  me  to  Pendelton,  S.  C.,  near 
the  same  place,  in  charge  of  George  Reed,  a very  strict  Presby- 
terian, where  I remained  one  year,  and  returned  to  the  Agency. 
At  the  age  of  twelve  years,  my  father  employed  an  Englishman 
to  teach  me  and  three  of  my  sisters  one  year,  which  finished  my 
schooling.  I then  went  to  my  Uncle’s,  David  Files,  in  Jackson 
County,  Georgia,  and  remained  in  his  store  for  several  months, 
returning  home  went  to  work  on  his  farm  until  1809.  My  father 
determined  to  move  to  Alexandria,  La.  We  started  about  the  first 
of  December,  by  way  of  the  Mussel  Shoals,  thence  down  the  Ten- 
nessee to  the  Natchez  Trace,  down  which  we  proceeded  within 
twenty  miles  of  the  cotton  gin  on  the  Bigbee,  where  we  were 
water  bound  from  excessive  rains.  For  several  days  we  could  not 
move  either  way,  until  we  nearly  starved  out,  we  then  returned  to 


82 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Colbert,  on  the  Tennessee,  to  procure  provision.  The  winter  re- 
mained so  wet,  and  the  water  so  high,  we  were  compelled  to  re- 
main until  April  of  1810.  In  the  meantime,  Jim  Vann,  a celebrated 
Chief,  or  leading  man  of  the  Nation,  was  murdered,  who  had  been 
opposed  to  the  sale  and  removal  of  the  C'herokees  across  the  Miss- 
issippi. My  father  concluded  the  sale  would  then  be  made,  hence 
we  returned  to  the  Nation  where  we  had  lived,  and  made  crop  of 
corn  and  other  provisions.  But  as  there  was  no  prospect  of  an 
early  sale  of  the  County,  and  in  the  interval,  James  McGaffin,  just 
from  St.  Stephens,  Ala.,  stopped  a week  with  us,  and  such  was  his 
praise  of  Clarke  County,  my  father  was  induced  to  pack  up  and 
move  to  new  Clarke,  which  had  been  but  recently  bought  from 
the  Choctaws.  It  was  indeed  all  one  could  desire,  the  production 
of  the  virgin  soil  was  all  one  could  ask,  the  range  unsurpassed, 
and  game  in  abundance. 


An  incident  occurred  on  our  way  down  through  the  Creek 
nation  to  Montgomery,  just  what  is  now  Wetumpka,  we  were 
stopped  by  a large  body  of  warriors,  alleging  that  it  was  against 
their  law  for  any  one  to  move  through  their  Nation.  A council 
was  held  to  determine  whether  we  should  be  murdered,  or  all  our 
stock,  horses  and  effects  taken  from  us.  During  the  council,  an 
Indian  countryman  came  from  Tuckabatche,  and  informed  them 
that  my  father  had  obtained  leave  from  Double  Head  to  come  that 
way  from  the  Cherokee  Nation,  whereupon  we  were  allowed  to 
pass  on,  and  Quarles  remained  with  us  until  we  reached  Dales 
Ferry.  Test  we  might  be  disturbed  on  the  way — for  the  Indians 
were  very  hostile  at  that  time  — . We  started  with  sixty  head  of 
fine  cows  and  calves,  and  on  reaching  the  long  leaf  pine,  the  cows 
were  taken  with  the  murrin,  and  all  died  except  one  cow  and 
twenty-one  calves,  and  we  settled  on  the  dividing  ridge  between 
the  river  five  miles  below  what  is  now  Suggsville,  and  in  the 
spring  of  1813,  we  rented  land  enough  to  make  a supply  of  corn 
and  other  crops.  In  June,  it  became  evident  that  the  Creek  In- 
dians were  preparing  for  war,  whereupon  the  settlers  in  the  neigh- 
borhood assembled  and  built  a stockade  or  fort,  six  hundred  yards 
South  of  Father’s  house,  into  which  about  seven  hundred  souls 
moved  in,  and  we  had  very  little  space  left.  Soon  after,  we  learned 
some  two  hundred  and  fifty  Indians  were  on  their  way  down  to 
Pensacola  for  ammunition,  taking  Jim  Cornal’s  wife,  a white  wo- 
man, prisoner,  burning  up  his  possessions  and  corncrib,  giving  the 
place  the  name  of  Burnt  Corn.  Whereupon,  the  citizens  of  Clarke 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


83 


and  Washington  Counties  raised  a force  of  about  two  hundred  or 
more  mounted  men,  under  the  command  of  Col.  James  Castin  and 
Major  Woods,  with  Capt.  Samuel  Dale,  McFarlin,  Murrell,  who 
crossed  the  Alabama,  and  marched  on  to  Burnt  Corn,  there  taking 
the  road  to  Pensacola,  after  proceeding  some  ten  miles  down  into 
the  fork  of  Burnt  Corn  Creek,  where  they  met  some  one  hundred 
and  fifty  or  two  hundred  pack  horses  with  all  the  Indians  in  the 
rear  ascending  the  ridge.  A charge  was  ordered,  but  on  entering 
among  the  pack  horses,  found  the  Indians  retreating  back  on  either 
side  into  the  cane,  and  instead  of  pursuing  them,  most  of  the  men 
dismounted,  each  to  secure  a pack  horse.  The  Commander  dis- 
covered the  Indians  ascending  each  stream  in  the  cane  to  sur- 
round them,  the  Colonel  ordered  his  men  to  fall  back,  when  the 
Indians  discovered  the  confusion,  they  raised  the  war  whoop  and 
charged  on  the  Commander,  producing  a panic,  and  fled.  The  Col- 
onel could  not  check  the  men,  leaving  several  men  on  foot  who 
were  pursued  and  killed.  Thus  ended  the  Burnt  Corn  battle. 

At  that  time  I was  confined  with  ague  and  fever,  father  being 
absent  in  Georgia  when  the  war  broke  out.  Soon  after  that  he 
returned  alone,  traveling  through  the  woods  south  of  the  towns 
and  highways,  swimming  the  Conecue  and  the  Alabama  Rivers, 
to  the  great  joy  of  all,  and  was  immediately  elected  Captain  of  the 
Fort.  I had  been  reading  medicine  from  the  time  of  our  forting 
under  Dr.  Lorry,  dressing  and  operating  in  surgery  under  his  in- 
structions, to  all  that  were  wounded,  up  to  the  last  of  September, 
when  I had  sufficiently  recovered  to  join  an  expedition  in  search 
of  the  Indians  who  were  committing  destruction  to  everything  up 
Bassetts  Creek,  being  absent  several  days.  Soon  after  our  return, 
some  Indians  approached  the  Fort  and  killed  one  of  the  soldiers, 
who  was  a short  distance  from  the  Fort.  Col.  Haynes,  U.  S.  Mar- 
shal, desired  to  send  dispatches  to  General  Claiborne,  at  the  ar- 
senal above  Mobile,  for  aid,  whereupon  I volunteered  to  carry  the 
same,  leaving  about  twelve  o’clock.  I crossed  the  river  at  Car- 
ney’s Bluff,  and  reached  headquarters  at  eight  o’clock  next  morning, 
and  instead  of  sending  aid,  he  advised  the  abandonment  of  the 
Fort,  and  ordered  Col.  Carron,  who  had  come  to  our  aid  with  cav- 
alry, to  escort  us  to  St.  Stephens,  where  he  would  make  his  head- 
quarters. About  two-thirds  left  accordingly,  leaving  my  Father 
and  forty-nine  others  able  to  bear  arms,  men,  boys  and  negroes, 
to  fight  it  out.  Two  weeks  later,  Claiborne  sent  Col.  Carson  back 
to  our  aid,  with  two  hundred  men,  when  Capt.  Dale  proposed  an 


84 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


expedition  upon  the  Alabama,  and  was  joined  by  Capt.  Jones, 
making  up  in  all  seventy-two  men.  We  struck  the  river  above 
Gainestown,  where  we  procured  two  canoes,  where  we  spent  the 
night  in  the  cane,  without  fire,  12th  vok,  1813.  The  next  morning, 
Dale,  with  all  but  eight  men,  started  up  the  East  bank,  leaving 
me  in  command  of  the  boats,  to  keep  parallel  with  the  land  forces. 
On  reaching  Bagley’s  farm,  a halt  was  made,  and  Dale  came  on 
board  and  crossed  to  the  farm  and  searched  the  same,  finding 
plenty  of  fresh  tracks.  Returning,  Dale  started  up  for  Randon’s 
plantation,  where  I was  to  meet  him.  Soon  after  starting,  I dis- 
covered a boat  descending  with  ten  Indians  in  it,  who  seeing  us, 
tacked  about.  We  immediately  gave  chase,  and  gained  fast  upon 
them ; half  a mile  above,  they  ran  up  Randon’s  creek  into  the  cane, 
soon  after  Dale  and  Jones  met  a party  of  Indians  in  the  cane  cross- 
ing the  creek,  Dale  killed  the  one  in  front,  the  Indians  dropped 
their  packs,  and  a fire  was  kept  up  for  a few  minutes,  and  Indians 
fled  in  the  cane.  As  the  firing  ceased,  I pushed  on  up  to  the  land- 
ing, soon  after  the  land  party  arrived.  This  was  at  Randon’s 
Landing,  below  Cornel’s  Landing  or  Ferry.  Capt.  Jones  crossed 
over  with  his  men  and  all  of  Dale’s  Company.  But  twelve  men, 
to  say,  Dale,  May,  Creagher,  Smith,  Brady,  myself  and  six  others, 
were  roasting  potatoes  and  beef  taken  up  at  the  creek  where  the 
fight  took  place,  and  just  as  we  were  taking  our  potatoes  out  of 
the  fire,  a large  body  of  Indians  were  discovered  branched  off  on 
either  side  to  surround  us.  We  ran  to  the  bank  of  the  river,  and 
neither  of  the  canoes  had  returned,  the  small  one  was  on  the  way 
over,  but  then  we  discovered  a large  canoe  descending  with  eleven 
Indians  in  it.  We  ascended  the  bank  some  twenty  yards,  as  we 
were  in  a three  acre  field,  and  commenced  firing  on  the  Indians 
in  the  boat,  which  was  returned  by  them  for  several  rounds,  when 
two  of  them  leaped  out,  and  made  for  the  shore  about  sixty  or 
eighty  yards  above  us,  and  above  the  mouth  of  a small  creek. 
Smith  and  myself  ran  up  to  kill  them,  we  were  followed  by  Creagh- 
er, who  found  us  up  to  the  waist  in  mud.  being  very 

heavy,  we  had  to  stand  on  the  slope  of  the  bank.  I slipped  and 
fell  into  the  river  in  pursuit  of  one  of  them,  both  carrying  their 
guns  above  water.  Smith  killed  one  of  them,  and  the  other  sprung 
up  and  pointed  his  gun  at  Smith,  as  he  ascended  the  bank,  passing 
over  my  gun.  I was  after  him,  but  ere  I got  my  gun,  he  was  in 
the  canoe.  I pursued  him  some  forty  yards  for  an  open  place  to 
shoot  him,  and  was  in  four  feet  of  a place  to  fire,  a gun  was  fired 
within  thirty  feet  of  me,  the  load  passed  just  over  my  head.  I turn- 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


85 


ed  to  fire  on  the  offender,  and  Creagher  had  just  ascended  the 
bank  of  the  creek,  as  I was  hopping  in  the  canoe,  supposing  me  to 
be  an  Indian;  by  this  means  my  Indian  escaped.  We  returned  to 
Smith,  and  descended  the  river  on  the  turn  of  the  bank  to  our 
squad.  Dale,  in  the  meantime,  called  to  Capt.  Jones  to  send  over 
the  large  canoe  to  capture  the  Indian  boat,  and  eight  men  started 
over,  but  when  within  fifty  yards,  the  man  in  front  rose  up  so  as 
to  see  the  number  who  were  lying  down  loading  their  guns.  He 
sung  out  to  the  paddler  to  back  out,  as  there  were  too  many  In- 
dians in  the  boat,  whereupon  they  retreated  back.  The  small  boat 
having  reached  us,  paddled  by  a negro,  (old  Caesar)  during  the 
interval,  I ordered  Brady  to  ascend  the  second  bank  and  see  if 
land  party  of  Indians  were  closing  in  upon  us,  he  crawled  up,  but 
seeing  no  Indians,  he  rose  upon  a pile  of  rails,  whereupon  some 
seven  guns  were  discharged  at  him,  shooting  the  breach  of  his 
gun  off ; with  one  bount  he  was  in  our  midst,  swearing  it  was  too 
hot  up  there  for  him.  Dale  then  proposed  to  Smith  and  myself  to 
board  the  boat.  Dale  leaped  down  some  ten  feet,  Smith  and  my- 
self following.  We  entered  the  boat  in  the  same  order,  placing 
me  in  bow;  we  ran  out  some  twenty  yards  below  the  Indians, 
and  they  rose  up.  We  all  attempted  to  fire,  Dale’s  rifle  and  my 
own  missed  fire  from  the  wetting  of  our  priming  getting  into  the 
boat,  Smith  missed  from  the  rolling  of  our  boat.  Dale  then  ordered 
Ceaser  to  paddle  up  in  a hurry,  upon  approaching  the  boat,  the 
Chief  and  myself  exchanged  blows  with  our  guns,  I caught  the 
end  of  his  and  drew  him  up  to  me,  in  reach  of  Smith  and  Dale, 
who  brought  him  down,  Dale  breaking  his  barrel  into.  Smith 
caught  the  muzzle  end,  and  fought  out  the  battle  with  it,  Dale 
getting  Smith’s  gun  with  which  he  made  his  blows,  I used  the 
Chief’s.  Just  as  we  were  running  up  broadside,  I had  two  on  me 
at  a time,  until  Dale  got  in  the  Indians’  boat,  and  placing  himself 
opposite  to  Smith,  on  reaching  the  last  two,  one  of  them  knocked 
me  down  with  a war  club,  falling  across  their  boat  and  holding 
on  to  the  club  I recovered  my  feet,  one  in  each  boat ; a scuffle 
ensued  for  the  club,  which  I gained,  and  knocked  him  overboard, 
the  one  in  my  rear  having  been  killed  by  Dale  and  Smith ; so  ended 
the  battle.  We  then  started  back,  old  Caesar  paddling,  Smith 
holding  the  boats  together,  while  Dale  and  myself  threw  the  In- 
dians overboard,  there  being  still  eight  in  the  boat,  and  when 
about  half  out,  a ball  passed  through  the  boat,  and  on  looking  up, 
saw  three  Indians  on  the  second  bank  just  above  our  nine  men 
then  under  the  first  bank,  the  second  one,  taking  rest  on  a stump, 


86 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


we  stood  up  sideways,  his  ball  struck  the  water  short  of  the  boat, 
and  the  last  took  his  seat  with  a large  bored  rifle,  I could  see  along 
his  barrel,  and  felt  sure  he  would  hit  me ; I drew  myself  up  and 
stopped  breathing,  his  ball  passed  within  an  inch  of  my  abdomen, 
much  to  my  relief.  As  we  were  approaching  the  same  shore,  the 
Indians  retired  to  the  main  body  of  two  hundred  and  eighty  In- 
dians. We  received  our  nine  companions,  and  crossed  over  to  the 
West  without  the  Indians  knowing  it.  We  ascended  the  river 
bank  until  we  reached  the  public  road,  and  returned  to  the  Fort. 
I was  much  bruised  from  the  top  of  my  head  to  my  fingers  ends, 
warding  off  the  blows,  and  for  several  days  later,  was  unable  to 
use  my  left  arm,  but  during  the  fight  did  not  feel  the  blows,  not 
one  word  was  spoken  after  my  first  blow  by  either  of  us  until  all 
was  over,  and  the  only  weapons  saved  was  the  Chief’s  gun  barrel 
and  the  war  clubs.  The  barrel  was  much  bent  over  their  heads. 

Early  in  December,  General  Claiborne  arrived  with  his  army, 
and  was  joined  with  volunteers  under  Sam  Dale,  of  our  Fort. 
Proceeding  to  the  Alabama  River,  where  several  Indians  were  kill- 
ed, we  crossed  on  a raft,  and  built  a fort  at  Claiborne,  as  a place 
of  deposit.  There  we  were  joined  by  C.  I.  Russell,  with  the  Third 
Regiment,  thence  we  marched  up  the  public  road  within  a few 
miles  of  the  big  swamp  creek  and  built  a stockade  for  the  wagons 
and  cannon,  leaving  thirty  men  as  a guard.  Turning  off  to  the 
left,  we  crossed  big  swamp  creek,  and  reached  within  six  miles 
of  the  Holy  Ground,  where  we  spent  a very  cold  night  without 
fire,  but  an  Indian  crossed  our  trail  fire-hunting,  and  before  he 
could  be  captured,  he  dropped  his  light  and  fled  to  the  town,  where 
he  gave  warning,  and  before  sunrise,  the  women  and  children  and 
their  effects  had  been  carried  across  the  river,  and  at  daylight,  our 
army  crossed  a point  of  three  hundred  yards,  breaking  ice  an  inch 
thick.  Scouts  were  seen  on  the  opposite  bank  where  we  formed 
for  battle,  and  ere  we  advanced  fifty  yards,  the  Indians  opened 
fire  upon  the  whole  length  of  our  line,  a charge  was  ordered,  and 
a continuous  fire  was  kept  up  until  we  reached  the  towns,  where 
they  made  a stand  for  a short  time,  then  they  fled  up  and  down 
and  across  the  river.  We  camped  near  the  towns,  which  we  rifled 
and  burned  that  evening.  The  next  morning  our  men  were  fired 
at  across  the  river,  whereupon  Russell  offered  fifty  dollars  to  any 
one  that  would  would  swim  over  for  a canoe,  a soldier  swam  over 
and  brought  one,  I entered  it  and  carried  over  Pushmatahaw  and 
five  of  his  men,  who  lay  down  on  the  bank  until  I carried  six  sol- 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


87 


diers,  when  we  marched  up  the  bank  into  the  cane  to  give  the  In- 
dians battle,  but  they  fled  in  the  cane.  We  found  a quantity  of 
plunder  piled  up  in  the  cane,  our  Indians  and  soldiers  loaded  them- 
selves with  booty,  I appropriated  one  pair  beaded  garters.  We 
then  some  thirty  canoes,  and  returned  over  the 

river.  The  army  marched  that  day  up  to  Bell  Weatherford’s  farm, 
the  next  morning  we  marched  back  to  our  Fort.  Passing  a farm, 
we  surprised  three  Shawnees  and  killed  them,  and  that  night  we 
reached  the  Fort,  thence  back  to  Claiborne,  without  a single  ration 
of  bread  or  meat— nine  days.  I had  saved  two  ears  of  corn  which 
I parched,  and  gave  half  to  others  of  my  companions.  On  our  re- 
turn to  Claiborne,  rations  were  issued,  and  before  anything  could 
be  cooked,  three-fourths  of  the  army  was  drunk,  and  all  of  the 
Indians  but  one  were  stretched  on  the  ground.  Several  of  the 
volunteers  died  after  returning  home.  Some  days  later.  Col.  Rus- 
sell started  upon  the  West  side  with  the  Third  Regiment,  and  two 
Companies  of  volunteers,  my  Father  commanded  one  of  them. 
The  two  companies  were  mounted,  and  a schooner  was  sent  up  the 
Alabama  to  meet  them  at  Cahaba,  the  old  town,  the  land  force 
taking  one  week’s  rations  with  them.  But  before  reaching  Cahaba 
were  out  of  provisions.  They  remained  there  four  days  waiting  for 
the  schooner,  after  eating  one  poor  horse.  Russell  sent  Lieutenant 
Wilcox,  with  two  others,  down  the  river  to  turn  the  schooner  back, 
and  to  fire  a swivel  to  let  the  land  party  know 

where  they  were.  The  schooner  had  passed  Cahaba  before  land 
force  reached  there.  Lieutenant  Wilcox  landed  on  his  way  down, 
and  soon  after  saw  an  Indian  swimming,  and  just  at  his  boat.  He 
ran  down  and  dispatched  other  Indians,  fired  and  killed  the  Lieu- 
tenant; George  Foster,  of  his  party,  ran  in  the  cane  and  made  his 
escape.  A few  minutes  after,  the  schooner  dropped  down  and 
rescued  the  body  of  Wilcox,  this  gave  rise  to  the  name  of  the 
County.  Soon  after  the  battle  at  the  Holy  Ground,  General  Jack- 
son  attacked  the  Horseshoe  upon  the  Tallapoosa — where  most  of 
the  upper  towns  were  fortified — nearly  all  the  Indians  were  killed. 
Jackson  then  marched  down  and  built  the  Fort  of  his  name.  Soon 
after,  Weatherford  surrendered,  and  peace  was  made  with  the  In- 
dians, whereupon  the  people  of  Georgia  commenced  moving  upon 
the  Alabama.  I determined  to  select  a location,  and  went  up  with 
eight  others  to  settle  about  the  Tallapoosa.  I made  a location  on 
the  bluff  where  Montgomery  now  stands.  At  the  same  time,  Col. 
Fisher,  of  St.  Stephens,  induced  a man  by  the  name  of  Jones,  wife 
and  two  daughters,  to  occupy  a Mail  Stand,  on  the  road  above 


88 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Murder  Creek,  near  a small  creek,  with  a view  of  resuming  the 
transportation  of  the  mail,  and  upon  my  return,  I reached  within 
five  miles  of  Jones — leaving  the  road  some  half  mile,  camped  for 
the  night,  lest  the  Indians  might  be  on  my  track,  as  it  was  known 
that  small  parties  were  still  out.  The  next  morning,  just  after 
sunrise,  I crossed  the  creek,  proceeded  fifty  yards,  ascended  an 
abrupt  elevation  of  ten  feet,  in  full  view  of  the  stand  twenty  yards 
off.  At  that  instant,  Jones  cried  “Murder!”  and  I saw  four  In- 
dians holding  him  down  on  his  back,  and  another  elevating  his 
tomahawk  to  split  his  head,  and  with  a flash  of  mind,  I looked 
back  and  called  out  “Come  on”,  and  charged  upon  the  Indians, 
who  let  go  Jones,  and  fled  for  the  swamp  some  three  hundred 
yards.  I passed  Jones  in  hot  pursuit,  as  he  was  rising  up,  and 
he  said,  “Ah,  damn  you,  you  run  now,  do  you.”  I pursued  on 
until  they  approached  the  swamp.  I then  drew  up  and  looked 
back  and  abused  my  Company  for  not  coming  up.  Three  of  the 
Indians  fired  on  me  as  they  entered  the  cane,  without  effect.  I 
remained  there  some  ten  minutes,  talking  all  the  time,  that  they 
might  believe  that  I was  not  alone.  On  my  return,  Jones  and  his 
family,  whom  the  Indians  had  not  seen,  being  after  water,  had 
packed  up  their  clothing  and  were  on  the  way  to  Claiborne.  I 
remained  with  them  for  some  ten  miles,  I then  left,  and  reached 
Claiborne  that  night.  The  next  day  Jones  arrived,  and  said  to 
me  he  would  stop  until  he  reached  the  Mississippi.  Soon  after, 
the  Government  forbid  all  persons  from  settling  upon  public  land 
without  a special  permit.  My  uncle,  Col.  D.  Files,  was  then  open- 
ing a store  at  St.  Stephens,  and  urged  me  to  abandon  my  contem- 
plated location  at  Montgomery,  and  act  as  clerk  for  him  ; this  was 
in  the  latter  part  of  1815,  where  I remained  until  the  month  of 
November,  when  John  Hillard  died  in  Mobile,  to  whom  my  Uncle 
had  given  a letter  of  credit  for  twenty  thousand  dollars,  and  had 
just  arrived  with  a stock  of  goods.  On  receipt  of  the  news,  I 
mounted  a horse  and  reached  Mobile  at  sunrise,  discharged  the 
goods,  and  opened  the  store  and  sold  about  three-fourths  of  the 
stock  up  to  the  first  of  June.  I then  shipped  the  balance  to  St. 
Stephens.  Soon  after  my  Uncle  was  appointed  paymaster  to  settle 
the  debts  incurred  during  the  war,  with  a draft  on  New  Orleans 
for  the  money.  I set  out  for  New  Orleans,  and  arrived  there  by 
steamer  the  28th  July,  drew  the  money,  bought  a bill  of  groceries, 
and  on  the  first  day  of  August  was  taken  with  yellow  fever,  and 
would  certainly  have  died  but  for  Dr.  Carr,  who  insulted  me  very 
highly,  and  I discharged  him,  and  my  friends  called  in  a German 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


89 


doctor — and  from  one  hundred  and  eighty  pounds  I was  reduced 
to  less  than  one  hundred,  and  did  not  leave  until  the  8th  of  Sep- 
tember, and  it  is  more  than  probable  that  I would  have  been 
robbed  and  murdered  on  my  return.  Two  butchers  and  a Creole, 
hearing  that  I was  to  bring  a considerable  amount  of  money  on 
my  return,  waylaid  the  road  fifteen  miles  above  Mobile  for  some 
time,  being  disappointed,  they  robbed  a stranger  coming  down 
to  the  city  of  six  hundred  dollars.  The  Creole  was  taken  upon 
suspicion,  and  turned  State’s  evidence.  The  butchers  escaped,  so 
ended  the  case. 

I remained  with  my  Uncle  till  the  first  of  April,  1818.  I set 
out  on  sail  for  New  York,  taking  on  some  seven  hundred  bales  of 
cotton,  a storm  came  on  when  passing  the  bar,  and  was  driven 
high  and  dry,  had  the  cargo  taken  out  and  reshipped,  in  going 
through  the  channel  were  fired  into  by  a whom 

we  were  approaching  to  speak  to.  We  tacked  about.  Some  days 
after,  came  very  near  being  captured  by  a pirate,  and  but  for  a 
finer  looking  vessel  approaching,  which  was  captured,  and  we 
escaped  and  arrived  in  New  York  the  8th  of  May,  1818.  The  cot- 
ton was  sold  at  thirty-two  to  thirty-five  cents.  I purchased  a 
stock  of  goods,  and  shipped  out  for  Files  and  Austill.  Then  came 
on  to  Baltimore,  to  settle  some  bills  of  my  Uncle,  and  meeting 
with  Major  K we  went  down  and  spend  a day  with  the  officers 

at  Fort  McHenry.  The  next  day  the  Major  and  myself  returned 
to  Philadelphia,  settled  some  bills  there,  thence  back  to  New  York, 
where  I remained  until  the  12th  of  December.  I then  returned 
by  Charleston  to  Augusta,  where  I obtained  a horse,  and  reached 
Claiborne  the  5th  January,  1819,  to  which  place  my  Uncle  had 
moved  our  store.  In  1820,  we  sold  our  stock  at  auction,  having 
previously  sold  by  wholesale  to  merchants  at  Ca- 

haba,  Montgomery  and  Greensboro,  all  of  whom  failed,  as  cotton 
fell  from  twenty  cents  to  seven  or  eight  cents,  causing  a general 
bankruptcy.  My  Uncle  had  been  appointed  Marshal  for  South 
Alabama,  and  on  the  20th  of  October,  died  of  the  same  year,  leav- 
ing me  much  involved  in  debt. 

I was  married  on  the  9th  of  March,  to  Martha  Hayse,  daugh- 
ter of  Captain  James  Hayse,  at  Burnt  Corn,  the  same  year,  and 
she  died  on  the  first  of  November,  1820.  My  father  died  on  the 


90 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


18th  of  October,  1818,  from  disease  contracted  in  Florida,  in  pur- 
suit of  Indians,  who  had  killed  two  families  in  what  is  now  part 
of  Butler  County,  he  being  Captain  of  a Cavalry  Company  at  that 
time.  After  my  wife’s  death,  I sold  my  farm  at  Burnt  Corn,  and 
paid  off  some  seven  thousand  dollars  of  my  liabilities,  and  returned 
two  negroes  given  to  my  wife  by  Captain  Hayse.  I transferred 
my  interest  in  my  Father’s  estate  to  my  Mother,  and  of  three  fine 
horses  I owned.  They  all  died  in  the  space  of  three  days,  of  dif- 
ferent diseases.  Tolliver  Livingston  was  appointed  Marshal  for 
the  unexpired  term  of  my  Uncle,  who  being  a cripple,  appointed 
me  Deputy,  to  discharge  the  duties  of  Marshal,  which  place  I 
filled  until  the  fall  of  1823,  when  the  Judge  appointed  me  Clerk  of 
the  District  Court  at  Mobile.  I then  settled  there,  and  was  ap- 
pointed weigher  of  cotton,  which  was  then  weighed  with  English 
a slow  process.  I soon  after  had  the  calipers  made, 
by  which  I could  weigh  seven  hundred  bales  or  more  in  the  day. 
Soon  after  the  planters  commenced  sending  their  cotton  to  sell, 
which  increased  so  much  that  I was  compelled  to  resign  the  clerk- 
ship, going  then  entirely  into  commission  business.  In  all  this 
time,  I bought  a negro  woman  for  my  Aunt,  and  supported  the 
family  for  two  years.  In  1825  a Volunteer  Company  of  Irish  was 
made  up,  called  the  Irish  Greens,  and  elected  me  their  Captain. 
And  after  being  well  organized  and  uniformed,  the  yellow  fever 
killed  all  of  the  Company  but  six  or  seven,  and  broke  up  the  Com- 
pany in  1826;  and  in  1827,  the  first  Hook  and  Ladder  Company 
was  formed,  and  I was  made  Foreman  of  the  same,  which  place 
I occupied  until  February,  1829,  when  Thomas  Rhodes  and  my- 
self contracted  to  carry  the  mail  to  New  Orleans,  by  land  to  Pas- 
cagoula, and  thence  by  water  to  New  Orleans.  We  were  to  build 
the  road  for  four  thousand  dollars,  and  carry  the  mail  for  fourteen 
thousand  per  annum.  The  contract  was  entered  into  in  1828,  we 
completed  the  road  and  commenced  carrying  the  mail  in  the  fall 
of  the  same  year.  But  from  the  increase  of  the  passengers,  and 
softness  of  the  road  during  winter,  caused  several  failures,  and 
our  boat  did  not  answer  the  purpose.  Well,  I determined  to  go 
and  have  a new  boat  built  at  Pittsburg,  proceeding  by  the  way  of 
Washington,  which  place  I reached  in  time  to  witness  General 
Jackson’s  inauguration  as  President,  and  such  was  the  crowd  that 
not  a vacant  bed  could  be  had  within  ten  miles  of  the  city.  After 
trying  in  vain,  I hired  a chair  to  sleep  in  by  the  fire.  About 
eleven  o’clock  at  night,  Col.  Dinsmore  came  in  from  a large  book 
sale  and  discovered  me,  and  rousing  up,  gave  me  half  his  bed 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


91 


whilst  I remained.  After  the  inauguration,  I drew  eight  thousand 
dollars  on  account  of  the  contract,  and  to  my  astonishment,  found 
the  stages  engaged  for  three  days  ahead.  A day  after,  however, 
a steamer  left  for  Baltimore.  I succeeded  in  getting  on  board,  and 
found  so  many  that  no  more  than  one  half  could  even  lie  down 
that  night.  The  next  day  we  reached  Baltimore,  finding  a number 
desiring  to  take  the  same  route.  We  had  a hard  race  for  the  of- 
fice, I reached  it  first,  and  entered  my  name  and  a friend,  making 
five,  with  three  of  the  city.  The  Governor  of  Ohio  and  his  suite, 
six  in  number,  slipped  off  to  the  contractor,  and  were  taken  ere 
it  came  round  for  the  first  three.  Seeing  the  trick,  I got  in  the 
stage  and  shoved  two  of  the  suite  overboard,  and  called  in  my 
friends.  The  result  was,  the  Governor  got  out  with  the  balance 
of  his  suite,  the  first  three  got  in,  and  off  we  drove. 


92 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


LIFE  OF  MARGARET  ERVIN  AUSTILL 


(Margaret  Eades  who  has  left  this  hitherto  unpublished  account  of 
her  experiences  as  a young  girl,  daughter  of  a pioneer  and  witness  of 
many  of  the  bloody  scenes  of  the  Creek  Indian  War  of  1813-14,  married 
Jeremiah  Austill,  whose  autobiography  also  appears  in  this  issue  of  the 
Quarterly.  Mrs.  Austill  died  in  1890  having  borne  several  children  whose 
descendants  still  live  in  South  Alabama  and  other  sections  of  the  country. 

The  magazine’s  object  in  presenting  from  time  to  time  personal  reminis- 
cences of  life  in  Alabama,  is  to  inspire  the  present  and  future  generations 
to  emulate  the  qualities  of  courage  and  moral  fortitude  exemplified  in  the 
lives  of  their  ancestors,  the  founders  and  builders  of  this  great  State.) 

My  father,  John  Eades,  was  a native  of  Georgia,  my  mother. 
Jenny  Fee,  was  born  in  Ireland,  in  the  County  Atmah.  Fathei 
and  Mother  first  met  in  Augusta,  Georgia,  where  they  were  mar- 
ried in  1802.  They  then  left  Augusta  and  bought  a farm  in  Wash- 
ington County  on  the  Uchee  Creek,  where  they  lived  happily  and 
made  money  rapidly.  Father  had  a saw  mill  and  cotton  gin,  about 
the  first  one  that  was  put  up  in  the  County.  I well  remember 
the  mode  of  packing  cotton  in  that  early  day.  A round  bag  was 
fixed  in  a round  hole  in  the  floor  of  the  gin  house,  which  hung 
down  some  ten  feet.  A big  negro  man  jumped  in  with  an  iron 
crowbar,  two  hands  threw  in  the  cotton,  and  the  packer  did  the 
work  by  jambing  it  hard  with  an  awful  grunt  every  lick.  I was 
dreadfully  afraid  to  go  near  the  big  bag  with  Hie  negro  inside 
shaking  it. 


Oh,  it  was  a sad  day  when  Father  determined  to  move 
to  Louisiana,  but  so  it  was,  that  on  a bright  morning  in  the  spring 
of  1811,  the  wagons  were  loaded  and  three  families  were  assembled 
at  my  Father’s  house.  My  Uncle,  Daniel  Eades,  his  wife  and  one 
daughter,  Mr.  Billy  Locklin  and  wife,  and  about  one  hundred 
slaves,  men,  women  and  children,  and  with  much  weeping  at  part- 
ing from  dear  old  friends,  the  drivers  cracked  their  whips  and  off 
we  rolled,  much  to  my  delight.  But  my  sister,  five  years  older 
than  myself,  was  weeping  bitterly.  I was  all  talk,  she  said  to  me 
“Do  hush,  you  too  will  rue  the  day.”  Childlike,  I reveled  in  a 
bustle  and  change.  Well,  the  first  night  we  camped  at  Sweetwater 
Iron  Works,  where  Father’s  sister,  Mrs.  Jenkins,  came  to  bid  us 
good-bye.  She  was  a jolly  old  soul, — was  Aunt  Priscilla.  She 
spent  the  night  with  us  in  camp,  after  breakfast  next  morning  she 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


93 


drew  out  a flask  of  rye  rum  from  her  pocket,  saying  “John  and 
Daniel,  I drink  to  all,  good  luck  attend  you,  but  the  next  thing  I 
hear  will  be  that  you  all  have  been  scalped  by  the  savages,  so  be 
on  your  guard,  for  war  will  surely  come,  and  that  soon.  Farewell, 
may  the  Lord  guide  you  through  the  wilderness.”  Our  party 
traveled  on  through  the  Cherokee  Nation  without  the  least  trouble. 
The  Indians  were  kind  and  friendly,  but  as  soon  as  we  entered 
the  Creek  or  Muskogee  Nation,  we  could  see  the  terrible  hatred 
to  the  white,  but  as  we  advanced,  we  were  joined  by  many  movers, 
which  gave  us  more  security.  At  night  the  wagons  were  all  fixed 
round  the  encampment,  the  women  and  children  and  negroes  in 
the  center,  the  men  keeping  guard  with  guns,  so  we  made  a for- 
midable appearance  of  defense.  One  night  after  a fearful  day,  the 
Indians  had  followed  us  for  miles,  we  camped  in  an  old  field.  Just 
as  supper  was  announced,  a most  terrific  earthquake  took  place, 
the  horses  all  broke  loose,  the  wagon  chains  jingled,  and  every 
face  was  pale  with  fear  and  horror.  The  Indians  came  in  num- 
bers around  us  looking  frightened,  and  grunting  out  their  prayers. 
The  trees  lapped  together,  and  Oh,  the  night  was  spent  in  terror 
by  all,  but  next  day  some  of  the  Indians  came  to  us,  and  said  it 
was  Tecumseh  stamped  his  foot  for  war.  Then  the  rain  set  in, 
not  a day  without  rain  until  we  crossed  the  Alabama,  there  were 
no  roads,  and  mud  and  water  large  creeks  to  cross  with  slender 
bridges  made  by  the  Indians,  which  they  demanded  toll  at  a high 
price  for  every  soul  that  crossed  a bridge,  and  often  rather  than 
pay,  the  men  would  make  their  negroes  cut  trees  and  make  a 
bridge,  which  gave  the  Indians  great  anger,  and  they  would  threat- 
en us  with  death.  No  doubt  we  would  have  been  killed  had  it  not 
been  for  Uncle  Daniel  Eades,  who  had  been  stolen  from  the  Fort 
in  Georgia  by  the  very  people  that  threatened  us.  He  was  a little 
boy,  only  a year  old  when  the  Indians  took  him  from  the  nurses 
and  carried  him  to  the  Nation,  and  gave  him  as  a present  to  their 
big  Medicine  Man,  who  raised  him  and  taught  him  his  craft  in 
roots  and  herbs.  He  would  talk  to  them  and  defy  them,  he  would 
go  to  his  wagon  and  draw  out  Grandfather’s  long  sword  that  he 
wore  in  the  Revolution,  brandish  the  sword,  and  speak  to  them 
in  their  own  language,  telling  them  they  were  fools,  that  they 
were  nothing,  and  could  never  whip  the  whites,  but  that  their 
Nation  would  be  destroyed.  They  would  listen  to  him,  and  raised 
their  blankets  around  their  shoulders  and  move  off,  doggedly  shak- 
ing their  heads.  Well,  finally  we  crossed  the  Alabama  River  at 
Dale’s  Ferry,  we  then  were  in  Clarke  County,  bound  for  Louisiana, 


94 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


expecting  to  cross  the  Tombigbee  next  day  at  Carney’s  Ferry. 
That  night  we  camped  at  this  place,  some  of  the  neighbors  came 
to  see  us,  Mr.  Joel  Carney,  Mr.  Henry  B.  Slade,  Mr.  George  S. 
Gullet,  and  every  one  begged  Father  and  all  the  travelers  with  him 
to  stop  here  until  they  could  recruit  their  teams  that  were  com- 
pletely broken  down.  They  said  we  could  never  get  through  the 
swamp  on  the  other  side  of  Bigbee,  and  after  a consultation,  all 
consented  to  remain  until  they  could  make  corn  to  fatten  their 
teams.  Father  bought  this  place,  which  was  only  a claim  with  a 
small  log  cabin  on  it.  Daniel  Eades  rented  the  Sun  Flower  Bend, 
Billy  Locklin  built  a cabin  on  Salt  Creek,  and  put  up  a saw  and 
grist  mill  on  the  creek  in  a very  short  time,  the  first  saw  mill  that 
was  built  in  Clarke  County.  So  Father  put  some  hands  to  cutting 
cane  and  planted  corn.  He  had  brought  a whip  saw  with  him, 
he  put  up  large  logs  of  pine  on  a scaffold,  and  with  two  negroes, 
one  on  top  and  one  at  the  bottom.  They  sawed  planks  for  flooring, 
for  every  family  then  lived  in  cabins  on  ground  floors.  Father 
kept  on  building  and  making  us  comfortable,  but  when  the  corn 
was  gathered,  Uncle  Daniel  Eades  said,  “Well,  John,  it  is  time  to 
be  off,  let  us  hurry  up  and  be  gone,  the  waters  are  low,  the  roads 
good,  the  teams  fat,  and  all  well.  This  is  no  country  for  us,  let 
us  travel.”  Father  said,  “Daniel,  I am  getting*  fixed  up  here,  the 
water  is  splendid,  the  land  good  enough,  and  you  have  made  a fine 
crop  of  corn,  we  have  wild  game  plenty  for  the  shooting,  and  I 
can’t  see  that  we  could  do  better.”  “John,”  he  replied,  “You  will 
never  make  a fortune  here,  so  come  with  me,  I hate  to  leave  you, 
but  here  I will  not  stay.”  But  Father  would  not  leave,  so  Uncle 
Daniel  left,  and  we  only  had  one  year  of  peace,  for  the  Indians 
came  down  upon  us  with  vengeance.  Uncle  Daniel  came  back 
for  us,  said  everything  he  could  to  get  Father  to  go  with  him,  but 
all  in  vain,  so  he  left  us  to  battle  through  the  fearful  war.  One 
morning,  Mother,  Sister,  and  myself  were  at  home  alone  except 
the  servants,  Father  had  gone  to  the  plantation,  when  a man  rode 
up  to  the  gate  and  called  to  Mother  to  fly,  for  the  Creek  Indians 
had  crossed  the  Alabama,  and  were  killing  the  people.  Mother 
said,  “Where  shall  I fly  to,  in  God’s  name?”  He  said,  “There  are 
a number  of  people  coming  to  cross  the  Bigbee  to  get  into  the 
Choctaw  Nation,  they  will  be  along  in  a few  moments,  but  where 
is  Captain  Eades?”  “Down  at  the  river,”  said  Mother.  “Well,” 
he  said,  “Run,  down  there  and  go  over  the  river,”  so  we  took  our 
bonnets,  Mother  took  her  silver,  and  we  left  the  house  in  a run. 
Our  cook,  a tall  black  handsome  woman,  said  “Missus,  I will  stay 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


95 


at  home  and  take  care  of  things  and  take  you  something  to  eat 
if  I can  find  you,  the  devils  are  afraid  of  me,  you  know.”  Mother 
said,  “Hannah,  you  will  be  murdered.”  Hannah  was  a natural 
curiosity,  she  was  black,  or  rather  blue-black,  with  clear  blue  eyes, 
which  gave  her  a peculiar  appearance.  As  we  traveled  through 
the  Nation  the  Indians  often  came  to  the  camp  and  demanded 
bread,  they  would  say  “bread,  gimme  some,  gimme  all,”  Mother 
would  say  to  Hannah  to  give  them  bread,  she  would  say,  “I  had 
rather  give  them  shot  and  powder,”  then  she  would  stretch  her 
blue  eyes  and  throw  chuncks  of  fire  at  them,  and  make  them  scam- 
per off,  saying  “Och,  och,”  their  grunt  when  frightened. 

Well  we  ran  as  fast  as  we  could,  and  met  Father  about  a mile 
from  home  with  horses,  he  had  heard  the  news  too.  Mother  sent 
the  horses  on  to  help  a family  by  the  name  of  Carter  to  get  to  the 
river,  they  had  a large  family  of  small  children.  Father  told  us 
that  people  were  gathering  at  Carney’s  Bluff,  and  were  at  work 
there  building  a Fort,  all  hands,  negroes  and  whites.  When  we 
arrived  at  the  river  it  was  a busy  scene,  men  hard  at  work  chop- 
ping and  clearing  a place  for  a Fort,  women  and  children  crying, 
no  place  to  sit  down,  nothing  to  eat,  all  confusion  and  dismay, 
expecting  every  moment  to  be  scalped  and  tomahawked.  We  all 
sat  round  until  night,  people  coming  in  continually,  for  this  part 
of  Clarke  was  thickly  settled,  I went  to  Mother  and  told  her  I was 
tired  and  sleepy,  she  untied  her  apron  and  spread  it  down  on  the 
ground,  and  told  me  to  say  my  prayers  and  go  to  sleep,  so  I laid 
me  down,  but  could  not  sleep,  the  roots  hurt  me  so  badly.  I told 
Mother  I had  rather  jump  in  the  river  than  lie  there,  she  quietly 
replied,  “Perhaps  it  would  be  best  for  us  all  to  jump  in  the  river,” 
then  made  me  lie  still.  I had  thought  Mother  would  take  me  on 
her  lap  if  I was  so  willing  to  die.  With  superhuman  exertion,  the 
-Fort  was  finished  in  one  week,  the  tents  all  comfortable,  the  streets 
full  of  soldier  boys  drilling,  drums  beating,  pipes  playing,  but  no 
Indians  yet.  Our  scouts  were  out  all  the  time.  The  brave  fellows 
had  a hard  time  tramping  through  swamps  and  canebrakes,  but 
Oh,  after  the  war  did  set  in  in  Thirteen,  we  were  in  great  peril 
all  the  time. 

One  night  our  sentinels  were  hailed  by  Jere  Austill,  they 
came  and  awoke  Father,  who  went  out  immediately  and  let  him 
in.  He  told  Father  that  the  Fort  Sinquefield  had  stampeded,  the 
people  all  making  for  our  Fort  or  St.  Stephens,  and  the  people  in 
his  Father’s  Fort,  near  Suggsville,  were  in  the  act  of  breaking  up 


96 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


too,  but  they  had  concluded  to  send  him  down  to  the  arsenal  for  a 
Company  of  Regulars,  and  if  they  could  get  them,  they  would 
hold  the  Fort.  Mother  roused  the  cook,  and  gave  Jere  a nice  sup- 
per at  midnight,  Father  put  him  over  the  river  and  saw  the  Gen- 
eral, told  his  business,  and  was  glad  to  hear  the  order  for  the 
Company  to  come  back  with  him,  but  Jere  begged  to  be  excused, 
said  “Send  the  soldiers,  but  I must  travel  alone.” 

We  fared  very  well  in  the  Fort,  thanks  to  Hannah,  the  faith- 
ful servant  that  stayed  at  home.  She  made  the  garden,  milked 
the  cows,  churned  the  butter,  raised  chickens,  and  came  every 
other  day  to  the  Fort  with  a large  basket  on  her  head.  Mother 
would  say,  “Hannah,  you  are  a jewel,  what  would  we  do  without 
you,  thanks  to  your  blue  eyse.”  So  often  she  said  she  saw  moc- 
casin tracks  in  the  path.  Time  passed  on  with  fear  and  trembling 
with  the  grown  folks,  but  we  children  engaged  every  moment.  I 
was  in  every  tent  in  the  day,  some  laughable  things  would  occur. 
There  was  a Mrs.  Smith,  quite  an  original,  she  was  a very  good 
woman,  but  violent  tempered.  The  boys  took  great  delight  in 
teasing  her,  she  often  threw  hot  water  on  them,  one  day  the  car- 
penters were  at  work  building  a block  house  to  mount  a cannon 
on  the  top,  two  of  the  men  became  outrageously  mad  with  each 
other,  and  Garner,  a great  bully,  who  was  always  kicking  up  a 
fuss,  drew  a broadax  on  a defenseless  man,  screaming  lie  would 
split  him  open.  The  man  took  to  his  heels  and  Garner  after  him, 
threw  tents  over  women  and  children,  finally  the  man  ran  through 
Mrs.  Smith’s,  and  Garner  after  him,  full  tilt,  the  old  lady  grabbed 
up  a three-legged  stool,  saying  “ dead”,  but  I let  him 

have  it,  one  corner  of  the  stool  struck  Garner  on  the  temple,  and 
down  he  went,  blood  spurting  from  his  nose.  She  thought  she 
had  killed  him  dead.  She  ran  over  to  Mother’s  tent  and  said, 
“Where  is  Captain  Eades?  By  the  Lord  I have  killed  Garner, 
and  he  must  put  me  over  the  river,  for  Garner’s  folks  will  string 
me  up  if  they  catch  me.”  She  ran  to  meet  Father,  and  he  took  her 
to  the  river  and  set  her  over  in  the  canebrake.  She  said,  “Now 
you  go  back,  and  if  Garner  is  dead,  you  come  to  the  bluff  and 
whistle  on  your  thumbs,  then  by  the  Lord  Old  Betsy  Smith  is  off 
to  the  Choctaw  Nation.”  When  Father  returned,  Garner  had  been 
brought  around,  and  after  that  became  a very  quiet  and  peaceful 
man,  never  bragged  or  bullied  more  during  the  war. 

After  we  had  been  in  the  Fort  six  months,  the  Indians  became 
very  hostile,  crossed  the  Alabama  and  burned  houses,  corn,  de- 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


97 


stroyed  cattle,  and  killed  people  that  were  at  home  in  spite  of  all 
that  could  be  done  by  the  scouts.  Every  family  was  obliged  to 
go  into  a Fort.  There  was  an  old  widow  named  Cobb,  who  had 
two  sons  old  enough  to  be  in  the  service,  but  she  told  them  to  stay 
at  home  and  make  corn,  she  was  not  afraid  of  Indians,  but  one 
day  while  the  boys  were  plowing  in  the  field,  they  saw  Indians 
jumping  over  the  fence,  the  boys  stripped  the  gear  off  the  horses, 
mounted  in  a moment,  and  flew  to  the  house,  calling  their  Mother. 
She  ran  out  to  meet  them,  and  just  as  she  passed  her  chimney 
corner,  she  saw  her  dye  tub  with  indigo  blue,  she  just  turned  the 
whole  contents  into  her  lap,  jumped  up  behind  her  son  and  gal- 
loped to  our  Fort  from  Choctaw  Bluff,  eight  miles.  When  they 
arrive,  they  were  all  blue,  from  head  to  foot.  That  was  the  only 
thing  they  saved  was  the  thread  that  was  in  the  blue  dye.  The 
women  in  the  Fort  all  joined  and  soon  made  a piece  of  cloth  of  the 
blue,  for  all  had  spinning  wheels  and  looms  in  the  Fort,  for  it  was 
the  only  way  that  clothes  were  obtained  in  those  days.  The  day 
Fort  Mims  fell  was  a sad  day  to  all  the  country.  Every  heart 
nearby  became  paralyzed  with  fear,  and  our  men  that  had  been 
so  brave,  became  panic  striken,  and  their  families  pleading  to  be 
taken  to  Fort  St.  Stephens.  Father  and  dear  old  Captain  Foster 
spoke  to  them  in  vain,  they  stampeded,  some  families  took  to  the 
canebrakes,  some  to  St.  Stephens,  some  down  the  river  to  Fort 
Stoddard,  where  the  arsenal  is  now.  Just  as  Father  and  Mother, 
with  Sister  and  myself  were  in  the  act  of  getting  into  the  canoe 
to  cross  the  Bigbee,  for  not  a soul  was  left  in  the  Fort,  a young 
man  came  running  down  the  bluff  calling  to  Father  not  to  leave 
him,  for  God’s  sake,  to  be  murdered,  for  the  Indians  were  coming. 
“Oh,  don’t  leave  me,  I shall  die  if  you  do.”  Mother  was  standing 
on  the  bank  until  we  were  safely  seated,  for  the  canoe  was  a small 
one,  could  only  carry  four  persons.  Father  told  the  man  that  it 
was  impossible  for  him  to  take  him  in  that  his  family  must  be 
saved  first.  The  poor  fellow  cried  out,  “Oh,  God,  I shall  be  killed.” 
Mothe  rsaid,  “Oh,  dear  husband,  take  the  coward  in,  I will  wait 
here  until  you  come  after  me,”  and  she  actually  pushed  him  in, 
and  with  her  foot  sent  the  canoe  flying  off,  and  sat  down  on  the 
sand  quietly  waiting  Father’s  return.  As  soon  as  the  boat  struck 
shore,  the  fellow  made  tracks  for  the  Choctaw  Nation.  In  a few 
days,  after  the  excitement,  all  the  people  returned  and  pledged 
themselves  to  remain  and  hold  the  Fort.  In  the  meantime,  the 
young  folks  were  courting  and  making  love,  although  they  were  in 
a Fort  expecting  to  lose  their  scalps  at  any  moment.  Mr.  George 


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ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


S.  Gullet  became  engaged  to  my  sister,  Mary  Eades,  and  then 
implored  our  parents  to  allow  the  marriage,  because  he  could  be 
of  so  much  help  to  us,  could  take  care  of  Sister,  and  then  Father 
would  only  have  Mother  and  me  to  take  care  of,  so  they  consented 
that  the  marriage  should  take  place  in  the  Fort.  Mother  sent 
Hannah  word  that  she  must  get  up  a large  wedding  supper,  and 
manage  to  get  it  to  the  Fort.  Hannah  came  down  in  a complete 
upsetment,  “Name  of  de  Lord,  Missus,  what  I gwine  do  for  all  de 
silibubs  and  tings  for  Miss  Mary’s  wedding?”  Mother  said,  “Never 
mind,  Hannah,  make  plenty  chicken  pies,  I can  buy  turkey  from 
the  Choctaws,  save  cream,  make  plenty  of  potato  custards  and 
huckleberry  tarts.  We  will  have  coffee  enough  for  all  the  Fort, 
so  go  right  at  the  work.”  “Well,  well,  did  I ever  tink  to  see  de  day, 
did  I ebber,  my  Lord,  Miss  Mary  must  be  crazy.  But  she  set  to 
work  with  a will.  Invitations  were  general  to  the  whole  inhabi- 
tants of  the  Fort,  they  were  married,  and  a jolly  wedding  it  was. 
One  old  man  sat  down  to  the  long  table,  looked  over  at  Mother, 
and  she  said,  “Help  your  self,  sir.”  I thank  you,  Madam,  I will 
with  presumption.”  I laughed,  and  being  a little  girl,  was  sent  off 
from  the  table. 

Not  long  after  the  wedding  we  had  a respite,  the  Indians  were 
driven  back,  and  all  returned  joyfully  to  their  houses.  Very  few 
had  been  destroyed  this  side  of  Choctaw  Bluff,  but  we  could  hear 
of  fearful  murders.  Men  would  venture  too  far,  and  again  and 
again  we  were  forced  to  return  to  the  Fort  until  at  last  General 
Jackson  came  to  our  rescue  and  finished  the  war.  All  the  gallant 
young  men  joined  his  army.  My  Father  carried  his  provisions  up 
the  Alabama  in  his  barge,  even  as  high  as  Fort  Jackson  above 
Wetumpka.  Sam  Dale,  Jere  Austill,  and  many  others  were  with 
Jackson  fighting  like  heroes  for  many  months,  and  after  the  In- 
dians gave  up,  they  went  with  Jackson  to  Pensacola  and  Mobile, 
some  went  to  New  Orleans.  Austill  was  very  sick  at  the  Battle 
of  New  Orleans,  but  one  of  his  cousins  was  killed  there,  he  was  a 
Files.  About  the  last  of  Fourteen  all  the  people  were  gay,  money 
was  plenty,  and  the  people  were  pouring  in  by  thousands.  The 
County  was  filled  with  young  men  looking  for  land,  school  teach- 
ers getting  up  schools.  The  largest  school  in  the  territory  was  at 
St.  Stephens,  there  I was  sent  with  many  a poor  little  waif  to 
learn  grammar.  Our  teacher  was  Mr.  Mayhew,  from  North  Caro- 
lina, a splendid  teacher  and  good  man. 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


99 


POEMS 

FOR  THEM  NO  POPPIES 

(A  contemporary  sonnet) 

By  Mary  S.  Butler,  Selma,  Alabama 

For  them  no  poppies  blow; 

No  song  of  lark  on  nearby  thorn; 

No  whisper  of  the  neighboring  corn  ; 

No  friendly  sound  of  scythe  or  hoe. 

For  them,  O restless  desert  sand, 
Forever  shifting,  day  and  night, 

Keep  motion  in  a lonely  land, 

Neath  Libyan  sky,  now  dark,  now  light. 

Warm  sun,  shine  gently  on  each  cross 
That  marks  fond  parents’  filial  loss. 

Soft  breezes  from  the  ancient  sea. 

Go  forth  and  sing  their  elegy. 

And,  white  stars  gleaming  overhead, 
Stand  guard  above  our  gallant  dead ! 


EMBLEMS 

I taught  my  son  to  love  his  Flag ; 

To  make  his  wishes  on  a star ; 

I told  him  life  was  beautiful ! 

But  that  was  Peace  and  this  is  War. 

A flag  was  draped  upon  his  bier ; 

They  sent  to  me  the  medalled  dross ; 

And  now  I know  what  price  is  Peace : 
Renunciation,  and  a cross. 

— Lucille  Key  Thompson 


GOOD-BYE  SON,  BE  A GOOD  SOLDIER 

They  said  I was  brave 

Because  dry-eyed  I watched  him  go. 

But  I know — And  by  this  token 
It  is  not  so  ...  . Inside  I’m  broken. 

— Lillie  Mae  H.  Box 


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ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


I WILL  LOOK  UNTO  THE  HILLS 

I do  not  ask  for  power  to  see  what  is  withheld, 
Nor  yet  to  have  my  sorrows  all  dispelled. 

Only  that  I might  have  the  patience  of  the  hills 
To  bear  whatever  comes  to  me.  If  ills 
Befall  me,  Lord,  this  darksome  day. 

Let  me  remember — others  too,  have  gone  this  way 
The  way  is  long — Ah  yes,  the  steps  are  steep ! 

Give  me  courage,  Lord,  and  let  me  keep 
My  vision  clear  to  see  through  every  ill 
The  fall  of  sunlight  on  a hill. 

— Lillie  Mae  H.  Box 


V-MAIL  FROM  MOTHER 

By  Martha  Lyman  Shillito 

Look  to  the  nearest,  brightest  star 
Somewhere  out  there,  wherever  you  are 
Safe  hid  within  the  glowing  heart 
In  words  too  tender  to  impart 
You’ll  find  my  treasured  memories 
To  bind  our  hearts  across  the  sea. 

Beyond  some  valley  of  despair, 

Climb  to  the  highest  hill  and  share 
My  hour  of  happy  interlude 
Of  faith  and  humble  gratitude 
That  each  night  you  may  read  anew 
My  constant  love  and  need  of  you. 

“COLOUR  BEARERS” 

We  have  never  forgotten  those  boys  in  grey, 
Nor  the  boys  who  wore  the  blue. 

Though  they  crossed  their  swords  in  battle  fray, 
Each  were  soldiers  brave  and  true ! 

But  time  has  erased  the  bitter  sting 
And  healed  the  Country’s  wound, 

And  united,  our  prayers  and  our  praises  ring 
For  the  boys  in  the  khaki  brown ! 

— Bithylle  Wright  Neill 
Margerum,  Alabama. 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


101 


“MEMORIAL  DAY” 

Tread  softly  here 

And  reverently  bow  your  head. 

This  hallowed  ground  is  dear. 

Here  sleep  our  Soldier  Dead ! 

A laurel  wreath  we  have  laid 
Against  each  simple  cross. 

They,  with  their  life,  have  paid ; 

Tis  ours  to  mourn  their  loss. 

May  honors  to  them  never  cease. 

They  died  to  keep  us  free. 

May  each  one  find  eternal  Peace 
At  that  last  Reveille ! 

With  choice  wreaths  for  our  Soldier  dead, 
Forget  not,  living  ones  need  bread ! 

— Eithylle  Wright  Neill 
Margerum,  Alabama. 


“OXALIS” 

A little  plant  so  widely  known 
And  loved,  the  whole  world  over, 

Resembling  close  in  shape  and  form 
The  three  round  leaves  of  clover. 

Shamrock,  sorrel,  oxalis, — 

It  is  given  many  a name ; 

Pink,  white  or  yellow  flowers, 

All  love  it  just  the  same. 

It  greets  us  in  the  garden; 

In  the  woodland ; from  a pot. 

Spreading  cheer  for  every  one, 

No  matter  what  its  lot. 

And  when  the  evening  draws 
The  sable  curtains  over  day, 

It  is  then  the  lovely  Oxalis 
Folds  her  leafy  hands  to  pray! 

And  in  that  attitude  of  prayer 
She  sleeps  all  through  the  night, 

But  wakens  joyfully  to  greet 
The  early  morning  light. 

— Eithylle  Wright  Neill 
Margerum,  Alabama. 


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ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


“WHITE  IRIS” 

Tone  White  Iris  by  the  cemetery  wall, 

Lifting  up  your  lovely  head 
Standing  brave  and  tall ; 

A fitting  symbol  for  our  dead, 

Guardian  over  all. 

You  lift  your  standards  to  the  sky, 

A tribute  to  the  risen  Lord ; 

Spread  perfume  with  each  zephyr’s  sigh, 

Your  incense,  to  the  One  adored. 

Not  one  can  pass  you  by. 

White  Iris,  sing  your  praise  to  God  ; 

Your  lonely  vigil  keep, 

For  there  is  something  precious  in  the  sod 
Wherein  our  loved  ones  sleep ! 

— Eithylle  Wright  Neill 
Margerum,  Alabama. 


THE  GULF  THAT  SEPARATES 

Man  visions  high-flung  viaducts  of  steel 
And  stone:  behold  a miracle  is  wrought! 

Great  stony  piers  and  climbing  arches  feel 
Their  way  through  a resisting  torrent,  taught 
By  man’s  strategic  mind.  There  is  the  sound 
Of  riviters,  of  pounding  drills,  a thud 
Of  hammers  echoing  in  fierce  rebound, 

Spanning  the  chasm,  conquering  the  flood. 

So  moves  the  world  of  man  in  endless  transit, 

Always  another  bridge  to  plan  and  build ; 

Vistas  obscuring  life’s  inevitable  sunset, 

When  night  grows  dark  with  fond  dreams  unfulfilled. 
I build  no  bridge,  for  only  God  can  see 
The  gulf  that  separates  my  love  from  me. 

— Anne  Southerne  Tardy 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


103 


NO  -WELCOME  SONG 

Is  it  then  “Good-Bye? 

And  you  will  go  away? 

Into  the  dreamy  past,  while  I . . . 

I must  stay? 

Nights  of  silver  sweetness, 

Whirr  of  vibrant  wings, 

All  of  life’s  completeness, 

A bird  sings : 

Fireflies,  dew  falling, 

A brisk  wind  from  the  west, 

Must  you  go?  Some  one  calling? 

0 stay,  and  rest ! 

1 sing  no  welcome  song, 

To  this  bold  new-comer, 

My  heart  goes  right  along 
With  you,  sweet  summer. 

— Anne  Southerns  Tardy 


THE  DAHLIA 

The  dahlia  is  the  queen  of  flowers,  tall, 

Majestic,  radiantly  towering 

Above  the  flowers  that  bloom  in  early  Fall. 

Acknowledged  sovereign,  her  subjects  fling 
Their  loveliness  in  homage  at  her  feet, 

A splash  of  color — yellow — purple — red. 

In  silent  recognition  of  complete 
Allegiance,  she  bows  her  stately  head. 

The  colors  of  the  Autumn  sunset  were 
Distilled  to  tint  her  coronation  gown, 

And,  tipped  with  diamonds,  her  gorgeous  sheaf 
Of  fringes  glitter  in  the  morning  stir 
Of  nature.  Regally  she  wears  her  crown 
With  one  regret,  her  glory  is  so  brief. 

— Myrtle  B.  Bains 

Montgomery  Advertiser 
Centennial  Edition 
October  22,  1919 


104 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


THE  SONG  THEY  SANG  ON  FOURTH  OF  JULY  IN  OLD 

MONTGOMERY 

The  poem  printed  below  was  sung  at  the  Independence  Day 
celebrations  in  Montgomery  on  July  4,  1823.  It  was  written  by 
Charles  Shaiv,  one  of  the  first  lawyers  and  teachers  in  the  town.  The 
verse  is  worth  preserving,  if  for  no  other  reason  than  that  it  re- 
flects the  friendly  sentiments  of  Americans  of  that  day  to  Greece 
struggling  against  Turkish  rule  and  the  Spaniards  in  their  war 
against  the  Holy  Alliance  of  the  monarchs  of  Europe. 

It  was  sung  to  the  tune  of  the  “STAR  SPANGLED  BAN- 
NERS better  known  in  those  days,  as  the  air  of  “Anacreon  in 
Heaven,”  an  old  English  drinking  song. 

“When  the  Birthday  of  Freedom  rolls 
around  with  the  year. 

What  heart  beats  not  high  in  its  glad 
celebration ; 

From  despot  abroad  or  at  home 
naught  to  fear, 

While  one  kindred  soul  inspires  our 
whole  nation. 

No  guardian  need  we, 

On  the  land  or  the  sea, 

To  protect  our  own  rights — We  are 
born  to  be  free. 

Beneath  our  own  oaks,  and  our 
own  pines  we’ll  repose, 

While  our  soldiers  and  sailors 
repel  all  our  foes. 

Shall  Honor  forget  the  names  of 
the  brave, 

Who  for  man  and  his  rights  so  bravely 
contended  ? 

Their  names  shall  not  sleep  in  obliv- 
ion’s grave — 

On  Washington’s  scroll  to  Heaven, 

They’re  ascended. 

There  a galaxy  bright 

On  the  globe  they  throw  light, 

And  spangled  with  glory  the  robe  of  the  night. 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


105 


“On  the  plains  of  fam’d  Greece  see 
the  bannered-Cross  rise. 

And  high  o’er  the  Crescent  resplendently 
streaming ! 

Her  heroes  of  old  look  down  from  the  skies 
On  the  fields  where  their  swords  once  o’er 
tyrants  were  gleaming. 

Like  Spartans  of  old 
Her  fair  daughters  bold 

Cheer  her  sons  to  renown — clad  in  fleece  of  gold 
“So  Constantine’s  banner  fix’d  bright  in  the  air, 

A Cross  in  the  Heavens — God’s  sign  of  salvation.” 


106 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


BOOK  REVIEWS 


Tuskegee  and  the  Black  Belt  by  Anne  Kendrick  Walker.  The  Dietz 
Press.  1944.  $3.00. 

Anne  Kendrick  Walker  is  well  known  to  Alabamians  as  an 
historian,  particularly  through  her  widely  popular  Backtracking  in  Bar- 
bour County.  This  fact,  with  the  added  fact  that  her  most  recent  vol- 
ume is  dedicated  to  an  historian  (Mrs.  Marie  Bankhead  Owen) 
indicates  something  of  the  quality  of  the  book.  Tuskegee  and  the  Black 
Belt  offers  an  historical  approach  to  race  relationships  in  the  South  and 
the  social  evolution  of  the  Negro.  In  her  short,  well  written  volume, 
Miss  Walker  offers  no  radical  program  of  political  reform  and  no 
conservative  program  of  economic  repression.  As  a matter  of  fact, 
she  offers  no  practical  program  at  all.  Her  book,  consequently, 
is  something  new  in  the  vast  library  of  recent  books  about  racial 
problems.  But  Miss  Walker,  as  a student,  has  read  history  with 
understanding  and  is  a liberal.  She  has  read  that  democracy  is  an 
expanding  ideal  in  modern  history,  not  an  a priori  fact.  She  has 
read  that  the  troubles  of  white  people  and  colored  people  are  so 
closely  knit  that  the  historian  must  write  about  both  when  writing 
about  one. 


If  Tuskegee  has  a single  theme,  it  is  “the  practice  of  friendship 
and  justice  among  the  two  races.”  The  quotation  is  not  drawn 
from  the  body  of  the  book,  but  from  the  Introduction — the  finely 
humanitarian  speech  made  by  Governor  Chauncey  Sparks  on  Foun- 
ders Day  at  Tuskegee  in  1943.  But  although  she  did  not  coin  the 
phrase,  Miss  Walker  is  most  concerned  with  these  practices  of 
friendship  and  justice,  their  beginning,  their  growth,  and  their 
trend. 

The  tone  of  the  volume  is  set  by  the  Art  Section  at  the  very 
beginning,  consisting  of  twenty-nine  plates.  This  is  largely  com- 
posed of  scenes  from  Negro  life  reproduced  from  the  paintings 
and  lithographs  of  Alabama  artists.  The  fact  that  Kelly  Fitzpat- 
rick, Anne  Goldthwaite,  Mildred  Nungester  and  others  are  well 
represented  indicates  not  only  the  aesthetic  value  of  the  plates  but 
their  realistic  integrity. 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


107 


Tuskegee  is  divided  into  three  parts.  Part  1 includes  some  con- 
sideration of  provisions  for  early  education  in  the  South  and  a de- 
tailed account  of  the  history  of  Tuskegee  Institute.  Here  the 
author  does  some  of  her  finest  writing,  with  portraits  of  Booker  T. 
Washington,  Professor  Carver,  Dr.  Moton,  and  Dr.  Patterson. 
They  stand  out  from  her  pages  against  the  background  of  Tus- 
kegee life  as  the  remarkable  men  they  were.  Miss  Walker’s  skill 
with  picturesque  and  significant  detail  is  well  known  to  her  read- 
ers. Booker  T.  Washington,  is  there  with  all  his  gift  of  oratory 
and  vision,  but  also  with  the  nervous  tic  that  wried  his  smile  and 
his  maddening  habit  of  calling  on  people  day  or  night  if  he  wanted 
to  work. 


Having  shown  that  exigencies  of  the  War  Between  the  States 
led  to  the  beginning  of  one  of  the  finest  of  the  “practices  of  friend- 
ship and  justice  among  the  two  races,”  the  author  proceeds  to  prob- 
lems that  arose  after  World  War  1.  Here  she  quotes  the  articulate 
of  both  races,  radical  as  well  as  conservative.  The  chapter  headings 
indicate  her  approach.  “The  Negroes’  Bill  of  Grievances”  and  “The 
White  Man’s  Woes”  include  a long  list  of  greater  and  lesser  com- 
plaints : segregation,  inadequate  leadership,  disfranchisement,  eco- 
nomic discrimination.  To  these  and  many  more  Miss  Walker  acts 
as  arbiter  rather  than  pleader.  Whenever  she  presents  a problem, 
she  also  presents  a counter-problem,  a gloss,  or  a modifying  com- 
ment. It  is  the  line  of  history  and  justice  she  is  indicating. 

In  all  that  formidable  list  the  author  never  loses  her  calm, 
sane  detachment  of  her  sense  of  justice.  It  is  a skillful  technique 
she  uses.  There  is  accusation  of  no  one,  only  a marshalling  of  facts 
and  opinions  to  show  that  both  races  have  troubles  and  that  the 
welfare  of  one  is  the  welfare  of  the  other.  By  quotations  and  facts 
she  also  shows  that  neither  incendiary  nor  reactionary  has  stopped 
the  flow  of  history  toward  the  achievement  of  freedom  for  non- 
white races  (yellow  and  red,  as  well  as  black). 

Part  111  is  largely  given  over  to  Negro  accomplishments  in 
art,  music,  and  literature,  as  well  as  the  use  of  Negro  materials 
by  white  artists.  The  list  itelf  and  the  discussion  offer  a nice  bal- 
ance to  the  Art  Section  at  the  beginning  of  the  volume  and  return 
the  reader  to  the  original  tone.  Part  111  also  gives  some  consid- 
eration to  the  future  of  the  Negro  race,  the  effects  of  migration,  of 
disease,  of  admixture  of  races,  and  other  complicated  physical  and 
psychological  factors. 


108 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Miss  Walker  offers  no  geo-political  program,  no  cut-and-dried 
solution.  But  she  ends  with  emphasis  on  the  fact  that  the  prob- 
lem of  race  relationships  is  no  longer  a Southern  problem.  It  is 
national  and  international.  It  involves  not  only  Negroes  but  all 
non-white  races.  She  leaves  little  doubt  in  the  reader’s  mind  that 
the  solution  of  the  problems  will  be  part  of  the  evolution  of  the 
stream  of  history.  She  leaves  even  less  doubt  in  the  reader’s  mind 
that  the  basis  for  sound  race  relationships  must  be  found  in  the 
“practice  of  friendship  and  justice  among  the  two  races.” 

— Emily  Calcott. 


The  Fatal  River — The  Life  and  Death  of  La  Salle  by  Frances  Gaither. 

Henry  Holt  & Co. 

This  book  of  Mrs.  Gaither’s  is  neither  her  first  nor  her  last 
effort  and  has  probably  not  proved  her  most  popular  nor  widely 
read.  It  is  a chonicle,  a biography,  or  as  her  publishers  term  it  a 
dramatic  narrative,  which  among  the  general  public  would  attract 
fewer  readers  and  admirers  than  her  last  novel  Follow  the  Drinking 
Gourd. 

There  is  nothing  that  stamps  it  as  essentially  modern  or  time- 
ly. It  is  of  the  type  that  can  be  read  today  or  a decade  hence  and 
prove  as  interesting  and  as  valuable  at  the  one  time  as  at  the 
other.  Unfortunately,  in  view  of  the  ceaseless  procession  of  books 
surging  through  the  press  and  shoving  one  another  off  the  book 
counters,  it  is  a question  if,  in  another  decade,  it  will  be  remem- 
bered, since  it  falls  short  of  being  a masterpiece.  It  is  true  that 
many  authors  write  for  the  immediate  present  and  do  not  aim  or 
expect  to  survive  as  standard  or  classic.  But  it  is  to  be  regretted 
that  after  so  much  labor  and  thought  with  such  excellent  results 
such  a piece  of  literature  should  be  shelved. 

For  Mrs.  Gaither  does  expend  thought  and  time  and  effort  in 
gathering  her  material.  All  her  books  have  a factual  or  historic 
or  atmospheric  basis  which  require  wide  reading,  deep  research 
and  careful  assimilation  before  they  attain  their  final  form.  When 
possible  she  has  visited  the  localities  described,  saturated  her  mind 
with  distinctive  characteristics  and  caught  the  local  color — all  of 
which  give  a sense  of  reality  and  authenticity.  Where  she  has 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


109 


not  been  able  to  see  with  the  physical  eye,  it  is  evident  that  her 
mind’s  eye  has  framed  a vivid  picture. 

In  this  book,  The  Fatal  River,  the  story  opens  in  the  French 
city  of  Rouen  and  she  portrays  the  streets,  the  church  spires  pierc- 
ing the  fog,  the  wharves  and  the  leaning,  gabled  houses  with  such 
a realistic  even  loving  touch  that  one  is  inclined  to  believe  that 
she  has  seen  them.  She  and  her  husband,  Rice  Gaither  also  a 
writer,  spent  several  months  in  France  years  ago  and  it  is  a prob 
ability  that  she  rambled  through  these  same  streets,  entered  the 
cathedral,  and  stored  away  memories  to  be  brought  out  eventually 
in  some  as  yet  unthought-of  volume. 

The  Fatal  River,  so  named  by  Joutel,  one  of  La  Salle’s  faithr 
ful  companions,  is  of  course  the  Mississippi  and  the  chief  character 
he  who  was  born  Robert  Chevelier,  who  after  his  childhood  school- 
ing was  to  become  Brother  Ignatius  of  the  Jesuit  Order.  But  the 
restless  adventurous  heart  broke  its  clerical  bonds  and  he  sailed  to 
Canada.  There  to  conceal  his  disaffection  to  the  church  he  took 
the  name  of  Rene  (or  as  some  books  give  it  Rene  Robert)  adding 
the  name  of  his  father’s  property  near  Rouen,  Rene  de  la  Salle  and 
still  later  by  the  grace  of  King  Louis  XIV  becoming  Sieur  de  La 
Salle.  But  to  the  world  at  large  he  is  simply  La  Salle  whom  the 
historian  McMaster  terms  “one  of  the  greatest  explorers  of  our 
country.” 

The  story  of  this  eager,  daring,  adventurous  youth  and  the 
sad,  weary  man  he  became  before  his  quest  is  ended,  together 
with  his  many  expeditions,  achievements,  disasters,  disappoint- 
ments and  death  are  more  or  less  well  known  to  any  reader  of 
history,  but  Mrs.  Gaither  creates  an  atmosphere  and  furnishes  set- 
tings that  are  vivid  and  convincing.  The  account  moves  clearly 
and  without  confusion. 

The  bibliography  accompanying  the  study  shows  the  surpris- 
ing amount  of  original  material  still  in  existence : letters,  diaries, 
documents,  etc.,  from  which  the  author  was  able  to  draw  and 
which  give  to  her  account  the  accuracy  and  sequence  that  make 
her  book  so  readable.  On  the  other  hand,  however,  one  wonders 
if  in  the  matter  of  detail  and  repetition  the  narrative  does  not  be- 
come a bit  over-loaded  and  retarded  and  the  reader  proportionately 
weary. 


110 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


She  makes  vivid  those  early  years  spent  in  travel  back  and 
forth  through  the  Great  Lakes,  struggling  with  storms  and  the 
hard  Canadian  winters,  building  forts  and  establishing  outposts 
and  negotiating  with  the  Indians — some  friendly  and  others  hostile 
and  held  in  check  only  by  gifts  and  tactful  dealings. 

The  heart-breaking  loss  of  boats,  desertion  of  his  companions, 
machinations  of  jealous  priests  and  fur  dealers,  false  reports,  doubt- 
ing epistles  from  the  King  in  France  and  crowning  sorrow — perfidy 
of  his  own  brother,  the  Abbe  Jean  Chevelier — these  are  the  matters 
that  fell  on  his  troubled  heart  and  made  his  friends  urge  him  and 
his  enemies  believe  him  destined  to  abandon  his  original  purpose 
of  tracing  his  great  river  to  the  Gulf. 

This  second  stage  of  La  Salle’s  explorations — the  finding  and 
tracing  the  river  below  the  point  previously  reached  by  Marquette 
and  Joliet  was  little  less  arduous  and  unhappy  than  the  first  farther 
north.  Although  by  this  time  having  sanction  of  the  king  to  estab- 
lish a settlement  and  take  the  country  in  the  name  of  France, 
here  again  he  was  sadly  hampered,  especially  by  Beaujeau,  the 
captain  of  the  largest  of  the  three  vessels  that  had  sailed  with  him 
from  the  mother  country. 

Some  writers  claim  that  LaSalle  was  difficult  to  deal  with 
since  he  was  often  silent,  secretive  and  severe.  But  a man  who 
could  transform  hostile  and  suspicious  savages  into  faithful  friends 
must  have  been  endowed  with  unusual  tact  and  patience.  He  evi- 
dently expected  greater  understanding  and  cooperation  from  white 
men  and  those  his  own  countrymen.  But  it  was  his  sad  fortune 
to  meet  in  great  measure  with  jealousy  and  opposition.  And  this 
attitude  reached  its  climax  in  his  treacherous  murder  by  one  of  his 
own  men  among  the  tall  grasses  on  their  weary  way  back  to  the 
northern  country. 

It’s  a sad  story,  but  his  was  a resolute  soul  driven  by  a burn- 
ing ambition  and  one  feels  that  he  might  have  taken  for  his  motto 
the  words  of  the  French  poet  Corneille:  “A  vaincre  sans  peril  on 
triomphe  sans  gloire” — “To  conquer  without  danger  is  to  triumph 
without  glory.” 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


111 


Miss  Susie  Slagle's  by  Augusta  Tucker.  Book  Review  by  ‘Medicus”. 

Johns  Hopkins  Medical  School  and  a Mobile  author — Augusta 
Tucker — combine  in  this  volume  to  present  a most  readable  novel. 
The  author  writes  with  perfect  ease  and  is  sure  of  her  material,  since 
she  lived  and  studied  and  observed  years  before  she  gave  her  pic- 
ture to  the  public.  And  that  small  world  that  centers  in  Baltimore 
around  the  famous  school  and  was  built  up  and  is  still  permeated 
by  the  spirit  of  the  great  four,  Doctors  Osier,  Welch,  Halstead 
and  Kelly,  is  a world  to  be  respected  if  not  revered. 

More  specifically  this  story  centers  in  the  boarding  house  of 
Miss  Susie  and  one  is  reminded  of  Dr.  Holmes’  breakfast  table, 
save  that  here  it  is  not  so  much  conversation  as  action  that  gives 
importance  to  the  young  men  who  gather  about  Miss  Susie’s 
board. 

Miss  Susie  herself  is  a fine  character  whose  generous  table 
and  quiet  influence  have  been  famous  through  two  generations  of 
medical  students.  Her  knowledge  of  human  nature,  intuition,  wis- 
dom and  love  are  all  clearly  and  beautifully  portrayed.  Only  a 
little  less  strong  and  influential  are  the  love  and  intuition  of  her 
man-cook  and  butler,  Hizer. 

The  story  carries  a group  of  young  men  through  their  years 
of  study  and  training,  their  aspirations,  their  discouragements  and 
for  some  of  them  their  loves.  And  these  loves  are  clean  and  beau- 
tiful. Indeed,  though  medical  students  are  supposed  to  be  a wild 
lot,  there  is  in  this  book  nothing  sordid  or  vulgar  or  salacious. 

The  author  proves  her  breadth  of  sympathy  and  understanding 
in  treating  of  a Jewish  student  and  his  problem,  of  negroes  in  the 
hospital  wards,  of  the  poor  in  the  slums  and  of  German  Otto 
across  the  street  from  the  hospital. 

Augusta  Tucker’s  characters  are  clearly  drawn  and  she,  like 
Miss  Susie,  is  a discerning  reader  of  character.  She  brings  out 
very  sharply  the  respect  and  loyalty  of  the  students  towards  their 
instructors,  even  though  they  discuss  them  frankly  and  with  hu- 
mor. But  they  find  them  surprisingly  and  helpfully  human.  And 
the  devotion  of  these  masters  to  the  great  cause  of  science  and 
the  welfare  of  humanity  is  without  question. 


112 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


^ There  are  certain  high  points  that  touch  the  heart:  the  negroes 
singing  to  their  people  in  the  wards  at  Christmas,  the  dinner  with 
the  Jewish  family  and  in  particular  the  account,  as  the  book  closes, 
of  the  spiritual  beauty  and  sweetness  of  Miss  Susie  as  she  calls 
together  before  she  dies  her  “boys.”  The  love  and  devotion  and 
deep  respect  of  these  same  “boys”,  students  and  professors  alike, 
is  plain.  There’s  a fineness  and  gentleness  in  some  of  them  whom 
she  had  helped  over  difficult  emotional  crises  and  had  molded  into 
wholesome  manhood  and  a spirit  befitting  the  perfect  physician. 

But  now,  having  said  this  much  in  praise,  one  must  question 
the  author’s  judgment  in  certain  respects.  She  is  of  that  school 
that  paints,  not  in  broad  strokes  but  in  the  cumulation  of  small 
details.  One  could  refurnish  Miss  Susie’s  parlor  to  the  least  item 
and  this  might  be  excusable  since  it  was  Miss  Susie’s  and  revealed 
her  quaint  taste  and  her  respect  for  the  memory  of  her  parents. 

But  the  minute  itemizing  of  Jefferson  Market  on  Christmas 
Eve  seems  a debatable  matter.  Anyone  who  has  sauntered  with 
interest  through  a great  city  market  at  any  time  and  into  the 
larger  delicatessen  shops  will  recognize  the  accuracy  of  her  de- 
scription. She  lists  everything  from  pork  to  pickles,  from  cheese 
to  cranberries,  from  sauerkraut  to  sage.  But  with  it  all,  one  asks 
“Is  it  Art?” 

So  too  her  book  might  become  a guide  to  Baltimore  as  she 
names  the  streets  and  gives  an  opportunity  for  Nan  Rogers  and 
Elbert  Riggs  to  view  and  study  from  a high  place  the  important 
buildings  and  monuments  of  the  city. 

But  the  most  serious  deflection  from  recognized  standards  of 
fiction  writing  seems  to  this  critic  to  be  the  combining  of  the  story 
with  medical  records — case  histories  in  brief.  It  is  easy  to  believe 
that  to  some,  probably  to  many  of  her  headers,  descriptions  of  the 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


113 


dissecting  room  and  the  appearance  of  cadavers  would  be  displeas- 
ing if  not  painful.  The  probings  and  resultant  specimens  of  au- 
topsies, operations  on  a woman’s  internal  structure,  and  the  easy 
discussion  (though  not  in  Miss  Susie’s  presence)  of  syphilis,  can- 
cer and  other  matters  anatomical  and  pathological,  could  easily 
leave  the  reader  either  faint  or  furious. 

And  so — reading  with  these  mixed  emotions,  one  can  but 
wonder  if  even  in  these  uninhibited  times  a good  novel  can  be  all 
things  to  all  men : a guidebook,  a market  guide,  a medical  treatise, 
a character  study  and  a love  story.  And  thus  wondering  the  critic 
repeats  the  question  “Is  it  Art?” 

(This  review  won  the  award  in  1944,  and  was  written  by  Mrs.  Mary  Heath 
Lee,  President  of  the  Tuesday  Study  Club  of  Fairhope,  Alabama) 


114 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Genealogical  Inquiries 

Two  parties  who  wish  information  on  the  Z uber  family,  of 
Lowndes  County,  are  Mrs.  Willie  Brown,  1602  Avenue  L,  Lub- 
bock, Tex.,  and  Lt.  Col.  Paul  E.  Zuber,  Medical  Replacement 
Training  Camp  Center,  Camp  Pickett,  Va. 

Eleanor  H.  White,  born  1816,  and  Benjamin  H.  Lamb,  born 
1811,  were  married  in  December  1834,  in  Greene  County.  They 
may  have  also  lived  in  Dallas  County.  Any  information  appreci- 
ated. James  B.  Boyles,  Jr.,  Batesville,  Miss. 

Information  on  the  Cousins  or  Cozens  family.  Green  Cousins 
was  for  many  years  a preacher  in  the  Lafayette  Circuit  and  in 
Chambers  County.  There  were  also  a Thomas  Bartholomew  and 
Morris  Cousins.  Mrs.  Stella  E.  McCain,  219  S.  Park  Ave.,  El 
Dorado,  Ark. 

Lancelot  Wright  came  from  the  vicinity  of  Richmond,  Va., 
to  near  Hackneyville,  Tallapoosa  County,  in  1835.  He  owned  land 
in  this  county,  was  a Mason,  and  died  about  1863.  H.  G.  Jarvis, 
Box  392,  Route  3,  Sylacauga. 

William  Carroll  Tedford  was  born  in  Alabama  in  1814  or  1815. 
Information  on  a Tedford  family  is  desirable.  Rev.  L.  C.  Ted- 
ford, Marion  Baptist  Church,  Marion  Ark. 

The  name  of  the  wife  of  Isaac  Suttle,  father  of  John  Thomas 
Suttle,  the  latter  born  in  Bibb  County,  in  1831.  Any  assistance 
on  this  Suttle-Settle  family  appreciated.  Mrs.  Felix  Irwin,  401 
Water  St.,  Corpus  C'hristi,  Tex. 

Wallace  Putnam  Reed,  born  1849,  and  his  sister,  Clara  A. 
Reed  or  Somerville,  lived  in  Wilcox  County,  where  she  was  born 
February  14,  1854.  Any  data  acceptable.  Mrs.  Murza  Mann  Lau- 
der, Apt.  510,  7000  South  Shore  Drive  Hotel,  Chicago  49,  111. 

Information  on  the  Poellnitz  family,  of  Linden,  Marengo  Coun- 
ty. Mrs.  Francis  E.  Dantzler,  111  Powell  Ave.,  Winona,  Miss. 


SPRING  ISSUE,  1944 


115 


James  Ligon,  sheriff  of  Colbert  County,  married  Mary  Ganne- 
way,  before  the  War  of  Secession.  Miss  Frank  Mahan,  Tylertown, 
Miss. 

Information  on  Roderick  and  George  W.  Joyner,  who  lived  in 
Huntsville  or  Athens  in  1830.  G.  B.  Joyner,  Leesburg,  Fla. 

Caroline  Cole  Hutchinson  was  the  daughter  of  Thomas  Cole 
who  married  Elizabeth  Horn.  Elizabeth  Horn  had  a brother,  Eli. 
Does  anyone  know  the  names  of  the  parents  of  Elizabeth  and  Eli 
Horn?  Mrs.  J.  S.  Perry,  118  N.  4th  St.,  Temple,  Texas. 

Daniel  C.  Coleman,  born  in  S.  C.  1798,  came  to  Clarke  County 
and  married  Mary  Till,  born  in  Alabama  in  1804,  died  in  1840. 
Parentage  of  Daniel  C.  Coleman  wanted.  Mrs.  W.  T.  Harris, 
Rich,  Miss. 


CONTENTS 


State  Officials  122 

State  Senators  and  Representators 135 

Judicial  Appointments  133 

County  Officials  : 138 

Number  of  Regiments  and  in  What’ Counties  239 

State  Militia  239 

Attorneys  and  Counsellors  at  Law  ... . 325 


EDITORIAL 


This  issue  of  the  Alabama  Historical  Quarterly,  Number  2,  of 
Volume  6,  is  devoted  to  the  publication  of  the  Civil  and 
Military  Appointments  in  Alabama  Territory,  1818,  and  in 
the  State  of  Alabama,  1819-1822.  These  appointments  include 
those  made  by  Governor  William  Wyatt  Bibb,  Territorial  Gov- 
ernor, 1817-1819,  and  Governor  Thomas  Bibb,  1820-21,  who  as  Pres- 
ident of  the  Senate  succeeded  his  brother  following  his  accidental 
death.  Israel  Pickens,  the  third  Governor,  made  the  appointments 
recorded  through  1822.  In  addition  to  the  civil,  military  and 
judicial  appointments  made  by  the  Governors,  the  names  are  given 
of  the  first  State  Legislative  Representatives  both  in  the  House 
and  Senate.  There  is  included  also  a list  of  the  first  lawyers  of 
the  State. 

In  compiling  this  volume  great  care  has  been  taken  to  repro- 
duce the  original  records,  and  therefore  no  effort  has  been  made  to 
correct  spelling,  punctuation  or  other  clerical  errors.  Frequently 
a family  name,  or  the  name  of  an  individual  is  spelled  two  or  more 
ways,  so  that  further  research  would  be  necessary  to  determine 
the  correct  spelling.  This  work  has  been  compared  several  times 
with  the  original  entries,  and  is  generally  accurate,  although  the 
old  handwriting  proved  difficult  in  a few  instances. 

The  originals  of  these  records  are  in  the  Department  of  Ar- 
chives and  History,  along  with  all  other  records  of  this  character. 
The  Department 'has  made  a card  index  of  the  Civil  and  Military 
Appointments  from  these  manuscripts  up  to  1869  and  the  index 
will  be  brought  up  to  date  as  soon  as  clerical  assistance  and  time 
will  permit.  The  record  presented  herewith  applies  to  the  follow- 
ing Counties:  Autauga,  Baldwin,  Blount,  Butler,  Cahawba  (now 

Bibb),  Clark,  Conecuh,  Cotaco  (now  Morgan),  Dallas,  Franklin, 
Greene,  Henry,  Jackson,  Jefferson,  Lauderdale,  Lawrence,  Lime- 
stone, Madison,  Marengo,  Marion,  Mobile,  Monroe,  Montgomery, 
Perry,  Pickens,  St.  Clair,  Shelby,  Tuscaloosa,  Washington  and 
Wilcox. 

In  order  to  present  this  material  which  is  not  only  of  historical 
but  of  biographical  interest,  the  Quarterly  for  lack  of  space  cannot 
produce  its  usual  miscellaneous  historical  material.  The  next  two 
issues  will  be  given  over  to  Revolutionary  soldiers  buried  in  Ala- 
bama and  Census  Returns  for  1820. 


The  Editor  of  this  magazine  cannot  refrain  from  paying  a 
proper  tribute  to  the  splendid  work  being  done  in  the*  division  of 
civil  records  by  the  State  Archivist.  Miss  Frances  M.  Hails, 
a native  of  Montgomery,  who  has  been  with  the  Department  in 
that  capacity  for  twenty-three  years.  The  mass  of  State  archives 
stored  on  the  ground  floor  in  the  World  War  Memorial  Building- 
covers  its  Territorial  period,  1817,  to  the  present  time.  This  ma- 
terial proves  of  great  value  not  only  for  business  reasons  but  for 
historical  and  biographical  needs.  Before  the  present  war  necesi- 
tated  the  abridgment  of  travel  the  records  of  the  Department  of 
Archives  and  History  and  its  great  collection  of  old  bound  news- 
papers, were  in  use  by  adult  students  and  research  workers  from 
half  the  States  in  the  Union.  Numerous  historical  books  have 
been  written  from  this  material.  The  State  officials  consult  the 
records  as  their  needs  require  and  in  one  box  receipts  were  found 
that  saved  the  State  repaying  a bill  of  $150,000.  Miss  Hails,  the 
Archivist  is  so  familiar  with  this  vast  collection  of  material  which 
goes  into  millions  of  items,  that  she  can  in  a moment  produce  any 
record  that  is  needed.  It  has  been  the  policy  of  the  Department  of 
Archives  and  History  to  make  careful  and  appropriate  selections 
of  its  staff  and  in  its  long  history  of  forty-four  years  very  few 
changes  in  personnel  have  taken  place.  For  that  reason  the  head 
of  each  division  is  an  expert  and  it  gives  the  Editor  of  this  maga- 
zine who  is  also  the  Director  of  the  Alabama  State  Department 
of  Archives  and  History,  great  pleasure  to  make  this  acknowledg- 
ment of  the  painstaking  work  and  fine  personal  qualities  of  the 
State  Archivist,  Frances  Matthews  Hails. 


REGISTER 

OF 

GUBERNATORIAL  APPOINTMENTS 
CIVIL  AND  MILITARY 


Territory  of  Alabama 
Feb.  9,  1818  — Nov.  14,  1819 


State  of  Alabama 


Dec.  14.  1819  — Oct.  4,  1822 


ALABAMA  TERRITORY 
PUBLIC  OFFICES 

Appointments  by  William  Wyatt  Bibb,  Governor  of  Alabama 

Territory 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Offices) 

1818 

Feby.  9 — John  Hanes,  Adjutant  General. 

Feby.  9 — Jack  F.  Ross,  Treasurer. 

Feby.  9 — Samuel  Pickens,  Auditor  of  Public  Accounts. 

Feby.  14 — Henry  Minor,  Atty.  Genl.  Northern  District. 

Feby.  25 — Matthew  D.  Wilson,  Atty.  Genl.  Southern  District. 
March  13 — Joseph  Noble,  Atty.  Genl.  Middle  District. 

May  14 — Henry  Hitchcock,  Secretary. 

July  6 — Henry  Y.  Webb,  Judge. 

1819 

Sept.  28 — Beverly  Hughes,  Judge. 

December  11 — Thomas  A.  Rogers,  Secretary  of  State. 

December  11 — Samuel  Pickens,  Comptroller  of  Public  Accounts. 

December  16 — Joseph  Eastland,  Solicitor  for  the  5 judicial  Circuit. 

December  16 — John  Gayle,  Solicitor  for  the  1st  Judicial  Circuit. 

December  16 — Constantine  Perkins,  Solicitor  for  the  3rd  Judicial 
Circuit. 

December  16 — Peter  B.  Martin,  Solicitor  for  the  4th  Judicial  Cir- 
cuit. 

December  16 — Henry  Hitchcock,  Attorney  General  for  the  State. 

Abner  S.  Lipscombe,  Judge  of  the  first  Judicial. 
Circuit. 

Reubin  Saffold,  Judge  of  the  second  Judicial  Circuit. 
Henry  Y.  Webb,  Judge  of  the  third  Judicial  Circuit. 
Richard  Ellis,  Judge  of  the  fourth  Judicial  Circuit. 
Clement  C.  Clay,  Judge  of  the  fifth  Judicial  Circuit. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


123 


Executive,  State  and  Judicial  Register  of  the  Civil  and  Military 

1819-1822 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

1819 

Nov.  9 — William  W.  Bibb,  Governor;  Died  10  July,  1820. 

1821 

Nov. — Israel  Pickens,  Governor. 

Dec.  11 — Thomas  A.  Rogers,  Secretary  of  State;  Died  22  Sept. 

1821. 

Dec.  11- — Samuel  Pickens,  Comp.  P Account 
Dec.  11 — Jack  F.  Ross,  Treasurer. 

Dec.  11 — Henry  Hitchcock,  Attorney  General. 

Dec.  11 — Carter  B.  Harrison,  Adjutant  General. 

Dec.  11 — William  Peacock,  Quarter  Master  Genl. 

Dec.  11 — Abner  S.  Lipscomb,  Judge  1st  Circuit. 

Reuben  Saffold,  Judge  2nd  Circuit. 

Henry  Y.  Webb,  Judge  3rd  Circuit. 

Richard  Ellis,  Judge  4th  Circuit. 

Clement  C.  Clay,  Judge  5th  Circuit. 

1821 

Sept.  29 — James  J.  Pleasants,  Secretary  of  State,  vice  Thos.  A. 
Rogers. 

Dec.  11 — John  C’.  Perry,  Treasurer. 

Dec.  11— Samuel  Pickens,  Comptroller  Pub.  Actts. 

Dec.  11 — Anderson  Crenshaw,  Judge  6th  Circuit. 

Dec.  11 — John  Gayle,  Solicitor  1st  Circuit;  Resigned  31  Oct.  1821. 
Constantine  Perkins,  Solicitor  3rd  Circuit, 

Peter  Martin,  Solicitor  4th  Circuit. 

Joseph  Eastland,  Solicitor  5th  Circuit. 


124 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Dec.  14 — Benjamin  Fitzpatrick,  Solicitor  6th  Circuit. 

Dec.  14 — Aldridge  S.  Greening,  Solicitor  7th  Circuit  ; Vice  Jno. 
Gayle. 

Judicial 

(When  Commissioned,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

1819 

Dec.  16 — James  Jackson,  Justice  Cty.  Court  Autauga. 

William  D.  Picket,  Justice  Cty.  Court  Autauga. 

John  A.  Elmore,  Justice  Cty.  Court  Autauga. 

John  Armstrong,  Justice  Cty.  Court  Autauga. 

Gaston,  Justice  Cty.  Court  Autauga. 

1820 

Dec.  11 — John  Matthews.. 

Dec.  11 — Jourdan  Abbot. 

Dec.  11 — John.  G.  Graham. 

Dec.  11 — Roddy  Smith,  Cahawba. 

Aggrippa  Atkins,  Justice  city.  Court  Cahawba. 

Gabriel  Benson,  Justice  cty.  Court  Catawba;  Resigned. 
John  Kates. 

John  Smith,  Justice  cty.  Court  Cahawba;  refused  to  ac- 
cept. 

Young  Goodwin,  Justice  cty.  Court  Cahawba;  refused 
to  accept. 

Dec.  11 — Andrew  M.  Lusk,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Cahawba. 

Dec.  11 — -Charley  A.  Dennis,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Cahawba. 

Dec.  11 — Samuel  W.  Davidson,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Cahawba. 

Dec.  11 — -Thomas  Mattock,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Clarke. 

Lemuel  J.  Alston,.  Justice  cty.  Court,  Clarke. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


125 


Samuel  B.  Shields,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Clarke;  Resigned 
Dec.  9,  1821. 

Robertus  Lovie,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Clarke;  Resigned 
Dec.  9,  1821. 

Dec.  11— Ira  Porter,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Clarke. 

Dec.  18 — Jamison  Andrews,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Clarke. 

Dec.  18 — Wiliam  L.  Parris,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Clarke. 

Samuel  Burnet,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Conecuh. 

Aleixander  Travis,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Conecuh;  Res. 
Dec.  9. 

Bartlett  Walker,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Conecuh. 

Garret  Longmire,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Conecuh. 

John  W.  Devereaux,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Conecuh. 

1820 

Dec. — Andrew  Jones,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Conecuh. 

1819 

Dec.  11 — Tallefero  Livingston,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Butler. 

John  Cook,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Butler;  Resg.  9 Dec. 
Manuel  Womack,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Butler. 

1820 

Dec. — James  Duncan,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Butler;  Resg.  14  Nov. 
1821. 

Dec. — James  Sneed,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Butler. 

Dec.  11 — John  Coleman,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Butler. 

Dec.  11 — Henry  B.  Slade,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Baldwin;  removed. 
Lewis  Sewell,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Baldwin  ; removed. 
Thomas  J.  Strong,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Baldwin;  removed. 
Howell  Dupree,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Baldwin;  removed. 
Joseph  Mims,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Baldwin. 


126 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Dec.  18 — Lud  Harris,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Baldwin. 

James  W.  Peters,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Baldwin. 

William  Coolidge,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Baldwin. 

Harry  Wheat,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Baldwin. 

Dec.  11 — Horatio  Philpot,  Justice  cty.  Court,  C'otaco. 

Green  B.  Dorsey,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Cotaco. 

William  S.  Goodkid,  Justice  cty.  Court,  C’otaco. 

Robert  Tapscot,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Cotaco. 

Joseph  Sikes,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Cotaco. 

Dec.  1820 — William  Priddy,  Justice  cty.  Court,  Cotaco. 

Stephen  Box,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Blount. 

Henry  McPherson,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Blount  . 
William  Rins,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Blount. 

Little  B.  Vaughan,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Blount. 

Nash,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Blount. 

William  Aylett,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Dallas;  Res.  Oct 
26,  1820. 

Gilbert  Shearer,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Dallas. 

Randal  Duckworth,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Dallas. 

John  Read,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Blount;  Removed. 

Jonas  Brown,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Dallas  ; Resg.  June 
2,  1821. 

1820 

Dec.  18 — David  McCord,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Dallas;  Vice  Wm. 
Aylitt. 

1821 

July  7 — Daniel  Lering,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Dallas;  Vice  J.  Read. 
July  7 — Stephen  Steel,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Dallas;  Vice  J.  Brown. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


127 


1819 

Dec.  11 — William  Lucas,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Franklin. 

David  C.  Roan,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Franklin. 

Henry  Cox,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Franklin. 

Theophilis  W.  Cockburn,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Franklin. 
John  Cook,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Franklin. 

Shelby  Corrine,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Greene. 

William  O’Rear,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Greene. 

Patrick  May,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Greene. 

William  Bell,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Greene. 

John  F.  White,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Greene. 

1820 

Dec.  11 — Lewis  Stephens,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Greene. 

John  C.  Watson,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Henr\  . 

John  Fannin,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Henry. 

Matthew  Watson,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Henry. 

S.  Smith,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Henry. 

John  Wright,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Henry. 

1820 

Dec.  11 — Darby  Hinly,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Jefferson. 

Dec.  11 — Moses  Ayers,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Jefferson. 

Moses  Kelly,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Jefferson;  Resigned. 

* 

David  Murphy,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Jefferson;  Resigned. 
David  Owen,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Jefferson  ; Resigned. 
Robert  Lacey,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Jefferson;  Resigned. 
William  Wood,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Jefferson;  Resigned. 

1820 

Dec.  — Thomas  Owen,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Jefferson. 

Win,  Reese,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Jefferson. 


128 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Washington  Allen,  Justice  Cty  Court,  Jefferson. 

Joseph  Kirby,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Jackson. 

Hezekiah  Bayliss,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Jackson. 

Richard  Easley,  Justice  Cty  Court,  Jackson. 

George  W.  Thompson,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Jackson. 
Ephraim  Bridges,  Justice  Cty  Court,  Jackson. 

1819 

Dec.  16 — John  Mosely,  Justice  Cty  Court,  Lawrence;  Now  accepted 
Hugh  A.  Anderson,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Lawrence. 

John  Dukes,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Lawrence. 

Robert  M.  White,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Lawrence. 

William  Sharp,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Lawrence. 

Beverly  Reese,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Lawrence. 

Nicholas  Davis,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Limestone. 

1820 

Dec.  — James  W.  Walker,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Limestone. 

Dec.  Benjamin  Fox,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Limestone. 

Dec.  Jesse  Coe,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Limestone. 

Dec.  John  D.  Carroll,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Limestone;  Resg. 

Oct.  24,  1830. 

Dec.  16 — James  Blockart,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Limestone. 

Hugh  McVay,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Lauderdale. 

Craig,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Lauderdale. 

John  Coffee,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Lauderdale;  Resg.  Nov. 
20,  1820. 

Tate,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Lauderdale. 

Ingram,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Lauderdale. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


129 


1820 

Dec.  — James  Files,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Lauderdale. 

Dec.  John  D.  Terrell,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Marion. 

Lemuel  Bond,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Marion. 

Dec.  16 — John  Smith,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Marion. 

Samuel  McGowan,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Marion. 

Robert  Moon,  Justice  Cty  Court,  Marion. 

Thomas  Lawson,  Justice.  Cty.  Court,  Marion. 

William  Leverton,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Marion. 

1821 

Jabez  Fitzgerald,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Marion. 

George  White,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Marion. 

LeRoy  Pope,  Justice  Cty.  /Court,  Madison;  Resigned. 
David  Moon,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Madison. 

John  W.  Withers,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Madison;  Resigned. 
Charles  Betts,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Madison. 

Robert  David,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Madison. 

Apr.  18 — John  M.  Leake,  Appointment  Received  July  18,  1821  ; 
Vice  L.  Pope. 

Apr.  20 — Henry  Stokes,  Justice  Cty  Court,  Madison;  Vice  J.  W. 
Whithers. 

1819 

Dec.  16 — John  Lockart,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Marengo. 

Henry  Pierson,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Marengo. 

Adron  Compton,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Marengo. 

Ephraim  Kates,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Marengo;  Resigned. 

William  Barton,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Marengo;  Resigned 
25th. 


130 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


1820 

Dec.  Shelby  Corzine,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Marengo. 

Isaac  Perkins,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Marengo. 

Dec.  18 — James  Perkins,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Monroe. 

1819 

Dec.  16 — Wiliam  Wingate,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Monroe. 

Laurens  Wood,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Monroe. 

James  L.  Goree,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Monroe. 

Thomas  Wiggins,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Monroe. 

Elisha  Robbins,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Monroe. 

1820 

Dec.  18 — Samuel  Fee,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Monroe. 

Dec.  18 — Benj.  Evans,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Monroe. 

Dec.  18 — Philip  McClosky,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Mobile. 

1819 

Dec.  19 — Henry  O.  Chamberlain,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Mobile. 

Cyrus  Sibley,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Mobile;  Resigned  Sept 
8,  1820. 

William  Coolidge,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Mobile. 

Harry  Grennison,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Mobile;  Resigned 
Nov.  16,  1820. 

Edward  Hale,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Mobile. 

Dec.  18 — Nicholas  Pope,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Mobile. 

William  Sontag,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Mobile. 

John  Goldthwait,  Justice  Cty  Court,  Montgomery. 

Henry  D.  Stone,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Montgomery. 
Seymore  Powell,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Montgomery. 
Eleazer  Jeter,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Montgomery. 

Andrew  Townsend,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Montgomery. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


131 


1820 

Dec.  Wm.  Leprade,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Montgomery. 

James  McLemore,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Montgomery. 

Wm.  Graham,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Montgomery. 

John  Durdan,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Perry;  Resigned  Mar. 
14,  1820. 

Traverse  Trailor,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Perry;  Resigned. 
Nathan  Reed,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Perry;  Resigned. 
Temple  Lee,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Perry. 

John  Johnston,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Perry. 

1821 

Mar.  1 — Thomas  A.  Perry,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Perry;  Vice  N. 
Reed,  Resigned. 

May  15 — E.  King,  Justice  Cty.  Court.  Perry;  Vice  T.  Trailor. 

May  15 — Lord,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Perry;  Vice  T.  A.  Perry. 

1820 

James  L.  Baird,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Perry. 

1819 

Dec.  11 — Thomas  W.  Smith,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Shelby. 

Samuel  Givens,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Shelby. 

Needham  Lee,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Shelby. 

Richard  Crowson,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Shelby. 

Thomas  McHenry,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Shelby. 

George  Shotwell,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  St.  Clair. 

John  Nash,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  St.  Clair. 

James  Thomison,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  St.  Clair. 

Phillip  Coleman,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  St.  Clair;  Resigned 
Dec.  21  . 


132 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Abraham  Whorton,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  St.  Clair.  . 

Dec.  21 — William  Hood,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  St.  Clair;  Vice  P. 
Coleman. 

Isaac  Patrick,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Tuskaloosa. 

Samuel  Nors worthy,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Tuskaloosa. 
Joshia  Kirsey,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Tuskaloosa. 

Garland  Hardwick,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Tuskaloosa. 
William  Parris,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Tuskaloosa. 

William  Godfrey,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Washington. 
George  Buchanan,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Washington. 
Dennison  Darling,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Washington. 
James  Taggart,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Washington. 
Thomas  McGee,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Washington. 
William  Carriel,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Wilcox. 

William  Black,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Wilcox;  Resigned. 
Joseph  Lawrie,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Wilcox. 

John  Speight,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Wilcox. 

H arry  Williams,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Wilcox. 

1820 

Dec.  James  A.  Tait,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Wilcox. 

1821 

Dec.  Jacob  Dansby,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Pickens. 

Dec.  Solomon  Marshal,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Pickens. 

Dec.  Thomas  Shannon,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Pickens. 

Dec.  James  Newman,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Pickens. 

Dec.  Ezekiel  Nash,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Pickens;  Removed. 

Feb.  12 — Aaron  Shannon,  Justice  Cty.  Court,  Pickens;  Vice  E. 
Nash. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


133 


Judicial 

Judges  of  the  County  Court,  appointed  14  June  1821  under  the  Act 
entitled  an  Actj  to  Repeal  in  Part  and  Amend  an  Act  entitled 
An  Act  to  Regulate  the  Proceedings  in  the  Courts  of  Law  and 
Equity  in  this  State. 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

Hugh  H.  Ralston,  Judge  County  Courts,  Mobile;  Re- 
signed. 

Thomas  Heald,  Judge  County  Courts,  Baldwin;  Dead. 

John  G.  Creagh,  Judge  County  Courts,  Clarke. 

Francis  H.  Gaines,  Judge  County  Courts,  Washington; 
Resigned. 

Nathaniel  • Dodson,  Judge  County  Courts,  Monroe. 

Samuel  Barnett,  Judge  County  Courts,  Conecuh;  Re- 
signed July  9,  1822. 

William  Watson,  Judge  County  Courts,  Henry;  refused 
to  accept. 

William  Lee,  Judge  County  Courts,  Butler. 

Reuben  Hill,  Judge  County  Courts,  Wilco^j 

Shelby  Crozine,  Judge  County  Cburts,  Marengo , re- 
signed March  20,  1822. 

William  Murfree,  Judge  County  Courts,  Greene. 

Edwin  D.  King,  Judge  County  Courts,  Perry;  Resigned. 
Jesse  Beene,  Judge  County  Courts,  Dallas;  Resigned. 
John  Ashley,  Judge  County  Courts,  Autauga. 

Nimrod  E.  Benson,  Judge  County  Courts,  Montgomery. 
Andrew  M.  Lusk,  Judge  County  Courts,  Bibb. 

Thomas  W.  Smith,  Judge  County  Courts,  Shelby. 
Polydore  Naylor,  Judge  County  Courts,  St.  Clair. 

Hann  R.  Field,  Judge  County  Courts,  Tuskaloosa. 
Thomas  W.  Farrar,  Judge  County  Courts,  Jefferson. 


134 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


William  B.  Wallace,  Judge  County  Courts,  Blount;  Re- 
signed. 

Robert  Tapscot,  Judge  County  Courts,  Morgan. 

John  L.  Fulton,  Judge  County  Court,  Franklin;  Resigned. 

William  Metcalf,  Judge  County  Court,  Marion;  Resigned. 

Francis  Flournoy,  Judge  County  Court,  Pickens;  Re- 
signed; Sol  Marshall. 

John  Mosely,  Judge  County  Court,  Lawrence. 

William  S.  Fulton,  Judge  County  Court,  Lauderdale. 

Nicholas  Davis,  Judge  County  Court,  Limestone;  Re- 
signed. 

Samuel  Chapman,  Judge  County  Court,  Madison;  Re- 
signed. 

James  Russell,  Judge  County  Court,  Jackson. 

1821 

Aug.  25 — Thomas  Murray,  Judge  County  Court,  Mobile;  vice  H. 
H.  Ralston,  resigned. 

William  Aylett,  Judge  County  Court,  Dallas;  vice  Jesse 
Beene,  resigned. 

A.  Coleman,  Judge  County  Court,  Limestone;  vice  N. 
Davis  not  accepting. 

Dec.  1 — Wm.  Aylett,  Judge  County  Court,  Dallas. 

Nathan  Sargent,  Judge  County  Court,  Dallas;  vice  W. 
Aylett. 

1822 

July  14 — Harry  Toulmin,  Judge  County  Court,  Washington;  vice 
Francis  H.  Gaines. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


135 


Legislature — First  General  Assembly. 
Senate. 


1819 

Sept.  Thomas  Bibb,  Prest.,  Limestone. 
Thomas  Casey,  Dallas. 

Littlepage  Sims,  Cahawba. 

John  D.  Terrell,  Marion. 

Burnet  Ware,  Shelby. 

David  Conner,  St.  Clair. 

Flemming  Hodges,  Lawrence. 

John  Gause,  MtGomery. 

Joseph  B.  Chambers,  Clarke. 

William  Trotter,  Washington. 

Thomas  Hogg,  Ttiskaloosa. 

William  Metcalfe,  Franklin;  Resigned. 
Joseph  Farmer,  Lauderdale;  Dead. 
Howel  Rose,  Autauga. 

Gabriel  Moore,  Madison ; Resigned. 
Jesse  W.  Garth,  Cataco. 

Gabriel  Hanby,  Blount. 

John  Watkins,  Monroe;  Resigned. 

John  Herbert,  Conecuh;  Resigned. 
Robert  B.  Harwell,  Baldwin;  Resigned. 
James  L.  Seaburry,  Mobile;  Resigned. 
Thomas  Ringgold,  Marengo,  Resigned. 


136 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Representatives 

(When  Elected,  Names,  Counties,  Remark 

1819 

Sept.  James  Dillet,  Speaker. 

Philip  Fitzpatrick,  Autauga. 

Charles  A.  Dennis,  Autauga. 

Thomas  Carson,  Baldwin. 

Isaac  Browne,  Blount. 

John  Brown,  Blount. 

Benjamin  Matterson,  Blount. 

William  Murrel,  Clarke. 

George  W.  Creagh,  Clarke. 

Melcijah  Vaughan,  Cotaco. 

John  McCarley,  Cotaco. 

William  Fee,  Conecuh. 

Thomas  Watts,  Conecuh. 

Jonathan  Jones,  Cahaba. 

James  Saffold,  Dallas. 

Edwin  D.  King,  Dallas. 

Anthony  Winston,  Franklin. 

Temple  Sergeant,  Franklin. 

Thomas  Gerrard,  Lauderdale. 

Jacob  Byler,  Lauderdale. 

Nicholas  Davis,  Limestone. 

James  W.  Evans,  Limestone. 

William  Whitaker,  Limestone. 

Louis  Dillehunty,  Lawrence. 

Samuel  Bigham,  Lawrence. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


137 


Samuel  Walker,  Madison. 

Epps  Moody,  Madison. 

James  G.  Birney,  Madison. 

Samuel  Chapman,  Madison. 

Griffins  Lampkins,  Madison. 

John  S.  Towers,  Madison. 

Frederick  Weedon,  Madison. 

Isaac  Millone,  Madison. 

Pascal  Harrison,  Monroe. 

George  W.  Owens,  Monroe. 

William  Bates,  Monroe. 

Samuel  Dale,  Monroe. 

John  Edmondson,  Montgomery.  1/ 
Larkin  Cleveland,  Montgomery. 
Joseph  Fitzpatrick,  Montgomery. 
McBee,  Marion. 

James  P.  Petry,  Mobile. 

John  Coats,  Marengo. 

Jesse  Wilson,  Shelby. 

Arthur  Taylor,  Shelby. 

James  Hardwick,  St.  Clair, 

Hardin  Perkins,  Tuskaloosa, 

James  Hill,  Tuskaloosa. 

Julius  Simms,  Tuskaloosa. 

James  Thompson,  Washington. 
John  F.  Everett,  Washington. 


[ 


138 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


COUNTY  OFFICIALS 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Offices,  When  Resigned  or  Removed) 

Autauga  County 

1819 

Jany.  1 — Joseph  A.  Howard,  Chief  Justice. 

Jany.  1— Howell  Rose,  J.  Q. 

Jany.  1 — Francis,  J.  Q. 

Jany.  1 — Robert  Gaston,  J.  Q. 

Jany.  21 — James  Jackson,  J.  Q. 

Jany.  1 — Jacob  P.  Houze,  Sheriff. 

Jany.  1 — Roddy  Smith,  J.  P. 

Jany.  1 — Agrippa  Adkinson,  J.  P. 

Jany.  21 — Jourdan  Abbott,  J.  P. 

Jan.  1 — John  Wilson,  Constable. 

Jany.  1 — Francis  Baker,  Constable. 

Jany.  13 — Joseph  Dillard,  Constable. 

Jany.  21 — Amos  Persons,  Constable. 

Feby.  15 — Bolling  Hall,  Clk.  Sup.  & Co.  Courts. 

Apl.  6 — Eli  Ely,  Assessor. 

June  3 — Benjamin  Pearce,  Ranger. 

June  3 — Benjamin  Pearce,  Ranger. 

June  2 — Benjamin  Pearce,  J.  P. 

June  2 — Benjamin  Pearce,  Constable. 

Sept.  11 — Wm.  Peacocks,  J.  Peace. 

Oct.  28— Eli  Ely,  Clerk  Cir.  Court. 

Oct.  28 — Benjamin  Pearce,  Clerk  County  Court. 

Oct.  28 — Jacob  P.  House,  Sheriff,  Resigned. 

1820 

Ap~.  17 — Warner  Williams,  Assessor. 

Apr.  17 — James  G.  Johnston,  Collector. 

Dec.  3 — Joel  Tatom,  Sheriff;  Vice,  J.  P.  House. 

Stephen  Searles,  Justice  of  Peace;  Resigned. 

Stephen  Pearce,  Justice  of  Peace;  Resigned. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


139 


Jourdan  Abbot,  Justice  of  Peace. 

Warner  Williams,  Justice  of  Peace. 

George  Gray,  Justice  of  Peace. 

Nov.  8 — Reuben  Aldridge,  Justice  of  Peace;  Resigned  14  March. 
Nov.  8 — Joseph  Collins,  Justice  of  Peace. 

Nov.  8 — William  Boyd,  Justice  of  Peace. 

Nov.  8 — Demsey  Owen,  Justice  of  Peace. 

Nov.  8 — John  Matthews,  Justice  of  Peace;  Vice,  S.  Searles. 
Dec.  1 — Mark  Howard,  Justice  of  Peace;  Resigned. 

Dec.  8 — Lewis  Lyons,  Justice  of  Peace. 

1821 

Jan.  21 — -Epaphrus  Burrows,  Justice  of  Peace. 

Mr  a.  21 — William  Morton,  Justice  of  Peace;  Resigned;  Vice,  E. 
Pearce,  Resigned. 

Apr.  13 — Alexander  Graham,  Justice  of  Peace. 

May  29 — John  Oden,  Justice  of  Peace. 

May  29 — Henry  M.  Thunderburk,  Justice  of  Peace. 

Sept.  11 — William  Hester,  Justice  of  Peace;  Vice,  S.  Pearce. 

Nov.  21 — Mack  Johnson,  Justice  of  Peace;  Vice,  M.  Howard,  Re- 
signed. 

Nov.  23 — James  B.  Matthews,  Justice  of  Peace;  Vice,  W.  Morton. 
Nov.  33 — John  D.  Wilson,  Justice  of  Peace. 

1821 

Dec.  6 — William  Davis,  Justice  of  Peace. 

1822 

Mar.  14 — John  Little,  Justice  of  Peace. 

Mar.  14 — James  Aldridge,  Justice  of  Peace;  vice,  R.  Aldridge. 
1820 

William  Jackson,  Constable. 

Isaac  Heath,  Constable. 


140 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


John  H.  Hickman,  Constable. 

Nov.  8 — David  Bates,  Constable;  Resigned. 

Nov.  8 — John  Oden,  Constable. 

Dec.  1 — Duncan  Sellars,  Constable. 

1821 

Sept.  12 — Lewis  Aldridge,  Constable;  Vice,  David  Bates. 

Seventh  Regiment  — Autauga  County  Militia 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Offices,  When  Resigned  or  Removed) 
1819 

Feb.  1 — Joseph  H.  Howard,  Colonel. 

Feb.  1 — Rose,  Lieut.  Col. 

Feb.  1 — Chas.  A.  Dennis,  Major. 

Feb.  1 Adjutant. 

Feb.  1 — Quar.  Master. 

Feb.  1 — Surgeon. 

Feb.  1 — Jacob  P.  House,  Capt. ; Beat  No.  Bat.  1. 

Feb.  1 — , Lieut.;  Beat  No.  Bat.  1. 

Feb.  1 — Jacob  Dust,  Ensign;  Beat  No.  Bat.  1. 

Feb.  1 — Lensford  Long;  Beat  No.  2,  Bat.  1. 

Feb.  1 — , Lieut.;  Beat  No.  2,  Bat.  1. 

Feb.  1 — , Ensign;  Beat  No.  2,  Bat.  1. 

Feb.  2 — John  Huddleston,  Capt.;  Beat  No.  3,  Bat.  1. 

Feb.  2 — , Lieut.;  Beat  No.  3,  Bat.  1. 

Feb.  2 — , Ensign;  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  2. 

Feb.  2 — , Capt.;  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  2. 

Feb.  2 — Phillip  Coker,  Lieut.;  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  2. 

Feb.  2 — Arthur  Adkins,  Ensign;  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  2. 

Feb.  2 — Benton  Rucker,  Cap.;  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  2. 

Feb.  2— James  Low,  Lieut.;  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  2. 

Feb.  2 — Coleman  Allan,  Ensign;  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  2. 


Feb.  2 — Persons,  Capt.;  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  2. 

Feb.  2 — James  Aldredge,  Lieut.;  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  2. 

Feb.  2 — , Ensign;  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  2. 

1819 


Oct.  8 — Amos  Persons,  Cap. ; Beat  No.  4,  Batt.  2. 
Oct.  8 — Jos.  Holloway,  Lieut.;  Beat  No.  4,  Batt.  2. 
Oct.  8 — Jacob  Stoudemire ; Beat  No.  4,  Batt.  2. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


141 


Baldwin  County 

(When  Comm,,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

1818 

Feb.  24— Henry  B.  Slade,  Chief  Justice  C.  C. 

1819 

July  30 — Nicholas  Pope,  Justice  Quorum. 

Feb.  25 — Robert  Lewis,  Sheriff  & Ranger. 

Feb.  25 — Jenkins,  Justice  of  the  Peace. 

July  25 — Edward  Stedham,  Constable. 

Nov.  28 — Littleton  Crabtree,  Constable. 

Nov.  28 — 'David  Graves,  Coroner. 

Feb.  24 — Theophilus  Toulmin,  Assessor  & Collector. 
Nov.  28 — Theophilus  Toulmin,  Assessor  & Collector 
Feb.  24 — James  Jenkins,  Constable. 

Mar.  29 — Thomas  Carson,  Treasurer. 

July  27 — Joseph  Mims,  Justice  Quorum. 

1818 

Mar.  4 — John  Donnelly,  Surveyor. 

1819 

Feb.  25 — Thomas  J.  Strong,  Justice  Quorum. 

Feb.  24 — James  Jenkins,  Constable. 

1819 

Oct.  27— Mills  Lewis,  Sheriff. 

Oct.  27 — Powell  Baly,  Clerk  Circuit  Ct. 

Oct.  27 — James  Danerly,  Clerk  Inf.  Ct. 

1820 

Mar.  2 — James  P.  Bates,  Clk.  Cir,  Court. 

Mar.  2 — James  P.  Bates,  Clk.  Cty  Court. 


142 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Jan.  21— Miles  Lewis,  Sheriff. 

1819 

June  6 — John  Daily,  Coroner. 

June  6 — John  Daily,  Auctioneer. 

June  6 — James  P.  Bates,  Notary  Public. 

June  6 — John  Daily,  City  Surveyor. 

June  6 — James  P.  Bates,  Treasurer. 

June  6 — Theophilus  Toulmin,  Assessor. 

June  6 — Theophilus  Toulmin,  Collector. 

1821 

Jan.  19 — Edmund  Freeman,  Sheriff. 

Jan.  19 — Thomas  Heald,  Clk.  Cir.  Court. 

Jan.  19 — Thomas  Heald,  Clk.  Cty.  Court. 

Feb.  16 — William  Cooledge,  Notary  Public. 

Feb.  16 — Benj.  Randall,  Notary  Public. 

Feb.  16 — Grown  J.  Mills,  Notary  Public. 

Aug.  9 — John  Pierce,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  9 — Lazarus  J.  Briars,  Justice  Peace. 

Sept.  29 — Theophilus  L.  Toulmin,  Justice  Peace. 
Sept.  29 — Joseph  Johnston,  Justice  Peace. 

1820 

Aug.  14 — John  Davis,  Justice  Peace. 

1821 

May  20 — J.  W.  B.  Randal,  Justice  Peace. 

Sept.  1 — John  F.  John,  Justice  Peace. 

1821 

Jan.  22 — John  Bliss,  Justice  Peace. 

Jan.  22 — Joshua  Wingate  Wing,  Justice  Peace. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


143 


Jan.  22 — William  Coolidge,  Justice  Peace. 

1819 

Aug.  9 — Stephen  Stapleton,  Constable. 

Sept.  29 — Littleton  Crabtree,  Constable. 

1821 

Dec.  15 — William  Coolidge,  Clk.  County  Court,  Elected  6 Aug. 
1821. 

Dec.  15 — Edmund  Freeman,  Sheriff  Cir.  Court,  Elected  6 Aug., 
1821. 

Dec.  15 — William  Coolidge,  Clk.  Cir.  Court,  Elected  6 Aug.,  1821. 

Seventh  Regiment  — Baldwin  County  Militia 

(Date  of  Appointment,  Names,  Office,  Removal  or  Resignation) 

1818 

May  13 — Theophilus  Toulmin,  Maj.  Commandant. 

July  28 — James  P.  Bates,  Capt.  Bt.  No.  1,  Bat.  1. 

1818 

May  13 — John  Jenkins,  Lt.  Bt.  No.  2. 

June  26 — David  Graves,  Ensign  Bt.  No.  2. 

1819 

.Feb.  11 — Alex  Mims,  Capt.  Bt.  No.  3,  Bt.  1. 

1818 

May  13 — James  Johnston,  Adjt. 

Blount  County 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Office) 

1818 

Feb.  23 — Mcses  Kelly,  C'  ief  Justice. 

Feb.  23 — Isaac  Brown,  Justice  Quorum. 


144 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


May  11 — Gabriel  Hanby,  Justice  Quorum. 

May  11 — John  Cochran,  Justice  Quorum. 

May  12 — David  Murphree,  Justice  Quorum. 

May  23 — Andrew  Greer,  Sheriff. 

Nov.  21 — Marston  Mead,  Justice  Peace. 

July  22 — Wm.  D.  T.  Culberton,  County  Surveyor. 
1819 

May  10 — Moses  Ayres,  Justice  Peace. 

1818 

Nov.  14 — John  Wood,  Coll.  & Assessor  for  1819. 

1819 

Mar.  26 — Isaac  Brown,  Justice  Peace. 

Feb.  23 — Elijah  Henderson,  Constable. 

1818 

Feb.  23 — Thomas  B.  Tunstall,  Clk.  Sup.  & Cy.  Courts. 
July  22 — William  Lacy,  Justice  Peace. 

Nov.  16 — Samuel  Crofts,  Justice  Peace. 

Nov.  16— John  Barton,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 

Nov.  16 — William  Dunn,  Justice  Peace. 

Nov.  16 — Tobias  Derrick,  Justice  Peace. 

1819 

July  23 — Darby  Henly,  Justice  Peace. 

1818 

Feb.  23 — John  Cochran,  Justice  Peace. 

Feb.  23 — Martin  Murphree,  Justice  Peace. 

Feb.  23 — Littleberry  Vaughn,  Justice  Peace. 

May  12 — Duncan  Johnson,  Justice  Peace. 

May  12 — John  M.  Harrison,  Justice  Peace. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


145 


May  12 — John  M.  Morris,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 
May  12 — Jonathan  York,  Justice  Peace. 

May  12 — Stephen  Box,  Justice  Peace. 

May  12 — William  Binnon,  Justice  Peace. 

May  12 — Henry  McPherson,  Justice  Peace. 

Feb.  23 — Patrick  Scott,  Constable. 

Feb.  23 — William  Brown,  Constable. 

Feb.  23 — Joshua  Lindsey,  Constable. 

Feb.  23 — Armstead  Barry,  Coroner. 

Feb.  23 — John  Brown,  Treasurer. 

Feb.  23 — Thomas  Owen,  Ranger. 

May  12 — James  McWilliams,  Constable. 

May  12 — Obed  Childress,  Constable. 

May  12 — John  Fry,  Constable. 

May  12 — George  Roberts,  Constable. 

May  12 — John  Mclnly,  Constable. 

May  12 — William  Walker,  Justice  Peace. 

1819 

Apr.  28 — John  Gallbraith,  Clk.  Cir.  Court. 

Apr.  28 — Joseph  H.  Mead,  Clk.  Cty.  Court. 

Apr.  28 — William  Galbraith,  Sheriff. 

Apr.  26 — Joel  Goode,  Assessor. 

Apr.  26 — Daniel  McPherson,  Collector. 

Apr.  26 — David  Averry,  Coroner. 

Apr.  26 — George  Robert,  Auctioneer. 

Apr.  26 — Jeremiah  Chaney,  Surveyor. 

Apr.  26 — John  Box,  Treasurer. 


146 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


1821 

Afar.  26 — Josiah  T'edwill,  Justice  of  Peace. 

Apr.  20 — William  Crowder,  Justice  of  Peace. 

Apr.  20 — William  Cunningham,  Justice  of  Peace. 

Oct.  25 — Thomas  A.  Williams,  Justice  of  Peace. 

Oct.  25 — -Henry  McPherson,  Justice  of  Peace. 

1822 

Mar.  21 — John  Parker,  Justice  of  Peace. 

Sixth  Regiment  — Blount  County  Militia 

(When  appointed,  Names,  Office) 

1818 

May  15 — Littleberry  Vaughn,  Major. 

1819 

July  23 — Absalom  Russell,  Capt. ; Beat  No.  1,  Bat.  No.  1. 

1818 

May  15 — Robert  Crawford,  Lieut.;  Beat  No.  1,  Bat.  No.  1. 
Dec.  23 — James  Russell,  Ensign;  Beat  No.  1,  Bat.  No.  1. 

1819 

July  23 — John  Hartgroves,  Capt.;  Beat  No.  2,  Bat.  No.  1. 

July  23 — Alvis  Dunn,  Lieut.;  Beat  No.  2,  Bat.  No.  1. 

1818 

May  15 — Thos.  Maxwell,  Ensign;  Beat  No.  2,  Bat.  No.  1. 

May  15 — Stephen  Reeder,  Capt.  ; Beat  No.  3,  Bat.  No.  1. 

May  15 — Basil  Crawford,  Lieut.;  Beat  No.  3,  Bat.  No.  1. 

May  15 — James  McWilliams,  Ensign;  Beat  No.  3,  Bat.  No.  1. 
May  15 — Thomas  Janey,  Lieut.;  Beat  No.  4,  Bat.  No.  1. 

May  15 — Abner  D.  Griffin,  Ensign;  Beat  No.  4,  Bat.  No.  1. 
May  15 — Levi  Reed,  Capt.;  Beat  No.  5,  Bat.  No.  2. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


147 


May  15 — Elijah  Self,  Lieut. ; Beat  No.  5,  Bat.  No.  2. 

May  15 — Wm.  McGowen,  Ensign;  Beat  No.  5,  Bat.  No.  2. 

1819 

May  10 — Thomas  McDonald,  Capt. ; Beat  No.  6,  Bat.  No.  2. 

May  10 — Wm.  Jordan,  Lieut.;  Beat  No.  6,  Bat.  No.  2. 

May  10 — Joel  Blackburn,  Ensign;  Beat  No.  6,  Bat.  No.  2. 

1818 

May  15 — Jesse  Ellis,  Lieut.;  Beat  No.  7,  Bat.  No.  2. 

May  15 — Daniel  Stephens,  Ensign;  Beat  No.  7,  Bat.  No.  2. 

May  15 — Joseph  S.  Black,  Capt.;  Beat  8,  Bat.  2;  Resigned  Oct. 
11,  1819. 

May  15 — Manoah  Vaughn,  Lieut.;  Beat  8,  Bat.  2;  Resigned  Oct. 
11,  1819. 

May  15 — George  McPherson,  Capt.;  Beat  No.  9,  Bat.  2. 

May  15 — Elijah  Hudson,  Lieut.;  Beat  No.  9,  Bat.  2. 

May  15 — Samuel  H.  Cochran,  adjutant. 

May  15 — Jacob  Tipton,  Capt.;  Company  of  Riflemen. 

May  15— Daniel  Nations,  Lieut. ; Company  of  Riflemen. 

May  15 — Andrew  Lochridge,  Ensign;  Company  of  Riflemen. 

1819 

Oct.  11 — Patrick  Scott,  Capt.;  Beat  No.  8,  Batt.  No.  2. 

(Jet.  11 — James  Scott,  Lieut.;  Beat  No.  8,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Oct.  11 — William  Moon,  Ensign;  Beat  No.  8,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Butler  County 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

1820 

Mar.  9 — Hillary  Herbert,  Clk.  Cir.  Court. 


148 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Mar.  9 — Nathan  Cook.  Clk.  City  Court. 

Alar.  9 — Jesse  Womack,  Sheriff;  failed  to  give  bond. 

Apr.  9 — Jesse  Womack,  Sheriff;  Pro.  Tern.,  vice,  J.  Womack. 
Alar.  2 — William  Graydon,  Assessor. 

Alar.  2 — Absolom  Carter,  Treasurer. 

Alar.  2 — -Josiah  Hill,  Collector. 

Alar.  2 — John  S.  Livingston,  Surveyor. 

Aug.  22 — Henry  Powell,  Coroner. 

Aug.  22 — Jesse  Womack,  Auctioneer. 

Aug.  22 — Samuel  Farrow,  Auctioneer. 

June  26 — Micajah  Wade,  Justice  Peace. 

June  22 — James  Wallace,  Justice  Peace. 

July  8 — Charles  Davenport,  Justice  Peace. 

July  8 — John  Womack,  Justice  Peace. 

July  24 — John  Graydon,  Justice  Peace. 

July  24 — Marcellus  Black,  Justice  Peace. 

July  24 — James  K.  Benson,  Justice  Peace. 

July  24 — Thomas  Elliotte,  Justice  Peace. 

1822 

Apr.  20 — James  W.  Ernest,  Justice  Peace 
June  26 — Isaac  Smith,  Constable. 

June  8 — Elisha  Wade,  Constable. 

July  24 — Peter  Martin,  Constable. 

July  24 — Nathan  Branceford,  Constable. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


149 


Cahawba  County* 

(Date  of  appointment.  Names,  Office,  When  Resignation  or 

Removal) 

1819 

June  11 — Gabriel  Benson,  Chief  Justice. 

1818 

Feb.  28 — John  Cates,  Justice  Quorum. 

Feb.  28 — James  Smith,  Justice  Quorum. 

Aug.  4 — Littlepage  Sims,  Justice  Quorum. 

Sept.  11 — Henry  W.  Stevens,  Justice  Quorum. 

Feb.  28 — Andrew  Henshaw,  Sheriff;  Resigned. 

Nov.  20 — Richard  Hill,  Justice  of  the  Peace. 

Nov.  20 — William  Tabor,  Justice  of  the  Peace. 

Nov.  20 — John  Wallace,  Justice  of  the  Peace. 

Nov.  20 — William  W.  Capshaw,  Justice  of  the  Peace. 

Feb.  28— Ezra  Tate,  C’lk.  Sup.  & Cty.  Court. 

Feb.  28 — George  Maberry,  Ranger;  Resigned  Aug.  4,  1818. 

Aug.  4 — Fleming  R.  Simmons,  Ranger. 

Nov.  20 — Andrew  Henshaw,  Col.  & Assessor  for  1819. 

Feb.  28 — Oliver  Cleaveland,  Coroner. 

Feb.  28 — John  Mahan,  Justice  Peace. 

Feb.  28 — William  Ratclif,  Justice  Peace. 

Feb.  28 — Thomas  Johnson,  Constable. 

Feb.  28 — James  Mahan,  Constable. 

Feb.  28 — Lewis,  Constable. 

Dec.  23 — William  McCullins/ Justice  Peace. 

Feb.  28 — William  Ratclif,  Treasurer;  Resigned  Aug.  4,  1818. 

Aug.  A — John  Wallace,  Treasurer. 

*Name  changed  to  Bibb  County  by  the  Legislature  Dec.  4, 
1820. 


150 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


July  12 — Jesse  Potter,  Justice  Peace. 

July  12 — Suttles,  Justice  Peace. 

Oct.  8 — John  Henry,  Sheriff. 

Oct.  28 — Andrew  M.  Lusk,  Clk.  C’ir.  Ct. 

Oct.  28— William  Radcliff,  Clk.  Cty.  Ct. 

Oct.  28 — John  Henry,  Sheriff. 

Oct.  28 — Ezra  M.  Tate,  Assessor. 

1820 

Mar.  17 — John  Jones,  Collector. 

Mar.  17 — Silas  McGuire,  Auctioneer. 

Mar.  17 — Asher  F.  Stone,  Notary  Public. 

Mar.  17 — Thompson  White,  Coroner. 

Mar.  17 — -Ansel  Sawyers,  Surveyor. 

May  3- — John  Hunt,  Justice  Peace. 

May  3 — Thomas  Hargas,  Justice  Peace. 

May  3 — Joseph  W.  Jones,  Justice  Peace. 

May  3 — John  Hunt,  Justice  Peace. 

May  3 — William  White,  Justice  Peace. 

May  3 — Samuel  Shadrick,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  29 — Noah  B.  Coker,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  29 — John  Suttles,  Justice  Peace. 

May  15 — John  Wilson,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned  20  Apr.,  1822. 
June  5 — William  Peeples,  Justice  Peace. 

June  5 — Edward  Lawrence,  Justice  Peace. 

June  15 — James  Mahan — Justice  Peace. 

June  13 — Thomas  Gibson,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned  4 May,  1822. 
1821 

June  7 — Jesse  Potters,  Justice  Peace. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


151 


1822 

Mar.  14 — Thompson  Coker,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  20 — Greenberry  Grisham,  Justice  Peace. 

May  4 — William  Pound,  Justice  Peace. 

1820 

May  3 — Jonathan  Trailkill,  Constable. 

May  3 — William  Foreshee,  Constable. 

May  3 — Aaron  Searcy,  Constable. 

May  3 — John  Hunnicut,  Constable. 

June  13 — John  Ford,  Constable. 

June  12 — Joseph  Varnel,  Constable. 

Sept.  19 — Fleming  R.  Simmons,  Constable;  Vice,  Joshua  Lewis. 

Twelfth  Regiment  — Cahawba  County  Militia 

1818 

Aug.  4 — Oliver  C.  Cleaveland,  Maj.  Com’at;  Resigned  Oct.  1, 
1819. 

Aug.  4 — William  Watkins,  Capt.,  Bt.  No.  1,  Bat.  No.  1. 

Aug.  4 — William  Lewis,  Capt.;  Bt.  No.  2,  Bat.  No.  1. 

Aug.  4 — John  Lovelady,  Capt.;  Bt.  No.  3,  Bat.  No.  1. 

Aug.  4 — Bryant  Watkins,  Adjutant. 

1819 

June  11 — John  D.  Jones,  Capt.;  4 Beat. 

June  11 — William  Armstrong,  Lieut. 

June  11 — Joel  Sulivant. 


152 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Clarke  County 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

1819 

Oct.  23 — James  Savage,  Clk.  C'ir.  Court. 

Oct.  23 — William  A.  Robinson,  Clk.  Cty.  Court. 

Oct.  23 — John  Barron,  Sheriff. 

1820 

Apr.  22 — Nathaniel  Alston,  Assessor. 

Apr.  22 — James  Adams,  Collector. 

Apr.  22 — Josiah  Wills,  Auctioneer. 

Apr.  22 — -Daniel  Campbell,  Auctioneer. 

Apr.  22 — Frederick  Campbell,  Auctioneer. 

Apr.  22 — David  Taylor,  Notary  Public. 

Apr.  22 — Samuel  E.  Fryerson,  Coroner. 

Apr.  22 — John  G.  C'reagh,  Treasurer. 

Apr.  22 — Thomas  Findlay,  Surveyor. 

George  Steed,  (Civille),  Justice  Peace. 
William  Walton,  (J),  Justice  Peace. 

Josiah  Jones,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  25 — William  Jackson,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  25 — Joel  Heard,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  25 — West  A.  Milton,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 
Apr.  25 — John  Spinks,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  25 — -Truehart  Tucker,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 
Apr.  28 — William  A.  Robertson,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  28 — Joseph  Mott,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  28 — Robert  Lee,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  28 — James  Danzey,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  28 — William  L.  Parris,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  28 — Walter  Bell,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  28 — William  Murrell,  Justice  Peace. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


153 


Apr.  28 — Thomas  Figures,  Justice  Peace. 

1821 

Jany.  12 — Edwards  Dolaney,  Justice  Peace. 

Feb.  26 — Horatio  Dade,  Justice  Peace;  Died. 

Mar.  31 — William  Pryor,  Justice  Peace. 

John  Gilbert. 

Danl.  Baugh. 

Elijah  Roper. 

Dabney  Edwards  ; Died. 

1§20 

Apr.  31 — Wvly  Davis,  Constable. 

Apr.  31 — Duncan  Leach,  Constable. 

Apr.  31 — Windsor  Spinks,  Constable. 

Apr.  31 — Bazel  Gray,  Constable. 

Apr.  31 — Evan  Higgins,  Constable. 

Apr.  31 — Edmund  Price,  Constable. 

Apr.  31 — Jabez  York,  Constable. 

Sept.  31 — Timothy  Kimble,  Town  Jackson. 

1821 

Apr  7 — Walter  Beall.  Precinct  Jackson. 

Lemuel  S.  Alston,  C.  Justice  C.C.,  by  Gov.  Holmes. 
William  Murril,  J.  Q.,  by  Gov.  Holmes. 

1818 

Mar.  12 — Joseph  B.  Chambers,  J.  Q. 

N.  Christmas.  J.  Q.,  by  Gov.  Holmes. 

1818 

Nov.  28— Samuel  B.  Shields,  J.  Q.  • 


154 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


1819 

Mar.  29 — Samuel  B.  Shields,  J.  P.  for  Jackson. 

Mar.  29 — Benjamin  Clemons,  Constable. 

1818 

Feb.  17 — Joseph  B.  Earle,  J.  P. 

July  7 — Jabez  York,  Constable. 

Nov.  27 — William  Hays,  Assessor  & Collector  for  1819. 

Nov.  27 — John  Files,  J.  P. 

Nov.  27— William  W.  Creah,  J.  P. 

1819 

% 

Feb.  5 — Wiliam  L.  Parris,  J.  P. 

Feb.  5 — Kennedy,  J.  P. 

1818 

Dec.  11 — Jesse  Landium,  Coroner. 

Feb.  21 — James  Magoffin,  C’lk.  Sup.  Court. 

First  Regiment;  — Clarke  County  Militia 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Office,  When  Resigned  or  Removed) 
Green  B.  Taylor,  Colonel. 

John  Bishop,  Lieut.  Colonel. 

Thomas  Figures,  Major. 

1819 

Feb.  10 — Edmund  Geeter,  Adjutant. 

Jan.  28 — George  Steed,  Capt. 

1819 

Apr.  15 — Gerard  W.  Creigh,  Capt.;  Beat  No.  3,  Bat.  No.  1. 

Apr.  15 — Robert  Alford,  Lieut.;  Beat  No.  3,  Bat.  No.  1. 

Apr.  15 — Thomas  Finlay,  Ensign;  Beat  No.  3,  Bat.  No.  1. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


155 


1819 

Jan.  28 — Robt.  Perkins,  Capt. ; Beat  No.  3,  Bat.  No.  2. 

Jan.  28 — Samuel  Curry,  Lieut.;  Beat  No.  3,  Bat.  No.  2. 

Jan.  28 — Joseph  Perkins,  Ensign;  Beat  No.  3,  Bat.  No.  2. 

1819 

Apr.  15 — Edmund  Jeter,  Capt.;  Company  Independent  Volunteers. 

Chas.  Gilmer,  Lieut.;  Company  Independent  Volunteers. 

George  Gilmer,  Ensign ; Company  Independent  Volun- 
teers. 

Conecuh  County 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Office,  When  Resigned  or  Removed) 
1818 

Feb.  28 — Samuel  Cook,  C.  Justice  C.  C. 

Feb.  28 — Joshua  Hawthorn,  J.  Q. 

Nov.  21 — James  Caldwell,  J.  Q. 

1819 

May  10— Chisly  Crosby,  J.  Q. 

May  10 — Alexander  Ottery,  J.  Q. 

1818 

Dec.  3 — Boutick  Walker,  J.  Q. 

1818 

Feb.  28 — Presly  Scurlock,  J.  P. 

Feb.  28 — John  Spear,  J.  P. 

Feb.  28 — Clark  Packson,  J.  P. 

Aug.  23 — John  Herbert,  J.  P. 

1819 

May  10 — William  Causey,  Constable. 

1818 

Dec.  3 — John  Cook,  J.  P. 


156 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


1819 

May  20 — Alkanan  Sawyer,  J.  P. 

May  20 — Curry,  Constable. 

May  20 — William  James,  J.  P. 

May  20 — Richard  Lockhart,  Constable. 

1818 

Feb.  28 — James  Cobb,  Constable. 

Feb.  28 — Chesly  Crosby,  Coroner  and  Ranger. 

Feb.  28 — Charlton  Thomson,  Treasurer. 

Nov.  20 — Radford  Cotton,  J.  P. 

Nov.  20 — Peter  A.  Steele,  Clk.  Sup.  & Co.  Court. 

Feb.  .8 — Ramson  L.  Deane,  Sheriff. 

Nov.  28 — Ramson  L.  Deane,  Assessor  & CoL  for  1819. 
Aug.  25 — Wm.  C.  Watson,  justice  Peace. 

Aug.  25 — J.  Wood,  Justice  Peace. 

1819 

Oct.  28 — Ransdson  L.  Dean,  Clk.  Ct.  Ct. 

Oct.  28 — Murdock  McPherson,  Clk.  Ct.  Ct. 

Oct.  28 — James  Caldwell,  Sheriff. 

May  11 — James  T.  Ferguson,  Assessor. 

May  11 — Robert  Longmire,  Collector. 

May  11  — John  E.  Graham,  Surveyor. 

May  11 — Garland  Burt,  Coroner. 

May  11 — Eldridge  S.  Greening,  Notary  Public. 

May  11 — John  Jerretson,  Notary  Public. 

May  11  — Charlton  Thompson, /Treasurer. 

May  11 — Alexander  Ferguson,  Auctioneer. 

May  11 — -Edwin  Robinson,  Auctioneer.  , 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


Apr.  25 — John  Brantley,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  25 — George  W.  Wilson,  Justice  Peace. 

May  18 — Abraham  Clark,  Justice  Peace. 

May  18 — Thomas  Armstrong,  Justice  Peace. 

May  18 — Micajah  Stinson,  Justice  Peace. 

May  18 — Anthony  Prester,  Justice  Peace. 

June  5 — John  Greene,  Justice  Peace. 

Joseph  P.  Clough,  Justice  Peace. 

Micajah  Herrington,  Justice  Peace. 

Elcaneh  Sawyer,  Justice  Peace. 

Hector  McNeil,  Justice  Peace. 

Josiah  Jones,  Justice  Peace. 

Richard  L.  Cotton,  Justice  Peace  ; Resigned. 

John  Mays,  Justice  Peace. 

Levi  T.  Mobley,  Justice  Peace. 

Major  Weatherford,  Justice  Peace. 

Philip  Nowland,  Justice  Peace. 

Jesse  Bagget,  Justice  Peace. 

1821 

July  12 — Darlin  R.  Jones,  Justice  Peace;  Died,  R.  L. Cotton. 
Apr.  25 — Elisha  Johnston,  Constable. 

Apr.  25 — Eli  Strickland,  Constable. 

May  18 — Travis  Straughn,  Constable. 

May  18 — Bennet  Lumpkin,  Constable. 

May  19 — Hyram  Carter,  Constable. 

May  18 — Normal  McQuaig,  Constable. 

May  18 — Robert  Browning,  Constable. 

May  18 — George  Speir,  Constable. 


158 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Mav  18 — Daniel  Ferguson,  Constable. 

First  Battalion,  Eleventh  Regiment — Conecuh  County  Militia 

i W hen  Appointed,  Names,  Office,  W hen  Resigned  or  Removed) 
1819 

May  20 — William  Lee,  Maj.  Commdt. 

Washington  Cummins  (Capt.). 

Field  Strawn  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  1. 

Whlliam  Walker  (Ensign). 

May  20 — Edwin  Robertson  (Capt.). 

1818 

Apr.  22 — Alex  Donald  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  2. 

Taskil  McAskil  (Ensign). 

Apr.  22 — John  Hobson  (Capt.). 

Apr.  22 — Samuel  Saulter  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  3. 

Apr.  22 — Joseph  Jones  (Ensign). 

Apr.  25  -Ward  Taylor,  Captain,  Beat  No.  4. 

Apr.  25— M.  Watson,  Captain,  Beat  No.  5. 

Apr.  25  J.  McClindon,  Lieutenant,  Beat  No.  5. 

Apr.  25 — B.  Selinggume,  Ensign,  Beat  No.  5. 

Apr.  25  S.  Smith,  Captain,  Beat  No.  6. 

Apr.  25 — WT.  Brown,  Lieutenant,  Beat  No.  6. 

Apr.  25 — \\  . Brown,  Ensign,  Beat  No.  6. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


159 


Cotaco  County* 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Office,  When  Resigned  or  Removed) 
1818 

Feb.  12 — James  Tomison,  C.  Justice  C.  C. 

Feb.  12 — Horatio  Philpot,  J.  Q. 

Nov.  16— Thomas  S.  Bibb,  J.  Q. 

Nov.  16 — John  McCarley,  J.  Q. 

Nov.  16 — John  Collins,  J.  P. ; Resg.  Feb.  4,  1819. 

Feb.  12 — William  White,  Constable. 

Nov.  16 — Smith,  J.  P. 

Nov.  16 — James  Wilcoxon,  J.  P. 

Nov.  16 — John  McCarley,  Jr.,  Constable. 

Feb.  12 — Edward  Richardson,  Clk.  Sup.  Co. 

Nov.  9 — Edward  Richardson,  Clk.  Co.  Court. 

Nov.  16 — Levi  Taylor,  J.  P. 

Nov.  16 — Cornelius  Bryant,  J.  P. 

Nov.  16 — William  Prudy  Sen.,  J.  P. 

1819 

July  14 — Thomas  Priddy,  Constable. 

July  28 — Stephen  Lovelady,  J.  P. 

July  30 — Curtis  Grey,  J.  P. 

July  30 — Smith  Dreskin,  J.  P. 

July  30 — Robert  Bale,  Constable. 

July  30 — Jonathan  Barton,  Constable. 

1818 

Oct.  19 — Washington  Grey,  Sheriff. 

Nov.  23 — John  T.  Rather,  Ass.  & Col.  for  1819. 

Feb.  12 — James  White,  Ranger. 

1819 

Oct.  26 — Wiley  Hudson,  Auctioneer. 


*Name  changed  to  Morgan  County  by  Legislature  of  1821. 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


160 

Oct.  26 — Washington  Gray,  Sheriff. 

Oct.  26 — John  Gillaspie,  Clk.  Cir.  Court. 

Oct.  26 — Thomas  McEldery,  Clk.  Inf.  Court. 

Oct.  28 — John  Gillespie,  Clk.  Cir.  Court ; Deceased. 
Oct.  28 — Thomas  McEllry,  Clk.  Cty.  Court. 

Oct.  28 — Washington  Gray.  Sheriff. 

1820 

Mar.  30— John  T.  Rather,  Assessor. 

Elisha  Easton,  Collector. 

John  Collins,  Coroner. 

Willie  Hudson,  Auctioneer. 


1822 

Jan.  22 — James  B.  Graham,  Clk.  Cty.  Ct. ; vice  J.  Gillespie,  Deed. 
May  1 — Dickson  Stanback,  Justice  Peace. 

May  1 — William  Dancey,  Justice  Peace. 

May  1 — John  Adams,  Justice  Peace. 

May  1 — John  Vest,  Justice  Peace. 

May  1 — Robert  J.  Putnam,  Justice  Peace. 

May  1 — Jonathan  Burleson,  Justice  Peace. 

May  1 — James  Anderson,  Justice  Peace. 

May  1 — Thomas  Skidmore,  Justice  Peace. 

May  1 — Elisha  Easton,  Justice  Peace. 

May  1— John  Lay,  Justice  Peace. 

May  1 — Robert  Stewart,  Justice  Peace. 

May  1 — Jetho  Durham,  Justice  Peace. 

May  1 — James  Thomason,  Justice  Peace. 

May  1 — John  Crocket,  Justice  Peace. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


161 


May  1 — James  Echol,  Justice  Peace. 

May  1 — Bartholomew  Laurence,  Justice  Peace. 
May  1 — Matthew  Cyrus,  Justice  Peace. 

May  1 — Malcom  Patterson,  Justice  Peace. 

June  18 — Joseph  Smith,  Justice  Peace. 

June  18 — Alexander  Wilson,  Justice  Peace. 

1821 

June  1 — Robt.  Matthews,  Justice  Peace. 

Nov.  21 — David  McClung,  Justice  Peace. 

Nov.  21 — Joseph  Inman,  Justice  Peace. 

1820 

June  18 — William  Owen,  Constable. 

June  18 — Levi  Taylor,  Constable. 

June  18 — Thornton,  Griffin,  Constable. 

June  18 — Abraham  Skidmore,  Constable. 

June  18 — John  Sharp,  Constable. 

June  18 — Jesse  Burns,  Constable. 

June  18- — Isaac  Langston,  Constable. 

June  18 — William  Elliston,  Constable. 

June  18 — Joshua  Davidson,  Constable. 

June  18 — Isaac  Langston,  Constable. 

June  18 — Jesse  Martin,  Constable. 

1822 

Jan.  25 — Joseph  Sykes,  Justice  Peace. 


162 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Dallas  County 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Office,  When  Resigned  or  Removed) 
1818 

Feb.  23 — Thomas  Craig,  J.  Q. 

Feb.  23— McCieod,  C.  Justice  C.  C. 

Aug.  4 — Alex  Outlaw,  J.  Q. 

Nov.  20 — John  Tubs,  J.  Q. 

1819 

Feb.  9 — Wille  Aylett,  J.  Q. 

Mar.  9— John  Read,  J.  Q. 

Feb.  9 — Thomas  White,  Treasurer. 

1818 

Feb.  14— Willis  Roberts,  Clk.  Sup.  & Co.  Court. 

Feb.  23— Alix  Cathey,  J.  P. 

Feb.  23 — Reuben  Davison,  Constable. 

Feb.  23 — George  Shirley,  Sheriff. 

Nov.  28— George  Shirley,  Assr.  & Coll,  for  1819. 

Feb.  23 — Arthur  C.  Wingate,  Coroner. 

Feb.  23 — John  Howard,  Ranger. 

Nov.  20 — Joseph  Grimes,  J.  P. 

Nov.  20 — Hardy  Bloodworth,  J.  P. 

Nov.  20— Will  Watkins,  J.  P. 

Nov.  20 — John  Eldry,  Constable. 

Nov.  20 — Richard  Tubs,  Constable. 

1819 


Mar.  9 — Curtis,  J.  P. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


163 


Mar.  9 — Matthew  McClellan,  Constable. 

May  24 — Robert  Grear,  J.  P. 

May  24 — Isham  Morgan,  J.  P. 

May  24 — Sami  Parsons,  Constable. 

June  2 — John  Nave,  J.  P. 

June  2 — David  Coll,  J.  P. 

June  2 — Jesse  Nave,  Constable. 

June  2 — Thomas  Speaks,  Constable. 

Oct.  28— John  Radcliff,  Clk.  Cir.  Ct. 

Oct.  28 — David  Dalton,  Clk.  Ctv.  Ct.,  Deceased. 

Oct.  28 — Joseph  Graham,  Sheriff. 

Oct.  28 — Saull  Davis,  Assessor. 

Oct.  28 — James  Hatcher,  Collector. 

Oct.  28 — William  Boswell,  Auctioneer. 

Oct.  28 — Elisha  Moreland,  Auctioneer. 

Oct.  28 — George  E.  Brooks,  Auctioneer. 

Oct.  28 — James  Battle,  Auctioneer. 

Oct.  28 — Robert  G.  Gordon,  Notary  Public. 

Oct.  28 — Nathan  Sargent,  Notary  Public. 

Oct.  28 — Oliver  C.  Brooks,  Coroner. 

William  Boswell,  Clk.  Cty.  Court. 

1820 

Apr.  9 — Richard  R.  Jones,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  9 — David  Merideth,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned  2 June,  1821. 
•Apr.  19 — Arthur  K.  Elliotte,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  19 — Harris  Brantley,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 

Apr.  24 — John  B.  Norris,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 

Apr.  24 — John  Baird,  Justice  Peace. 


164 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


May  8 — James  Bell,  Justice  Peace. 

May  8 — William  W.  Olds,  Justice  Peace. 

May  8 — John  Davis,  Justice  Peace. 

May  8 — John  Morgan,  Justice  Peace. 

May  8 — John  Hardy,  Justice  Peace. 

'Slay  8 — Stephen  Frederick,  Justice  Peace. 

June  14— John  Smith,  Justice  Peace. 

June  14 — Jeremiah  Reaves,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 

June  14 — David  H.  Burke,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 

June  14 — Elisha  Moreland,  Justice  Peace. 

June  27 — John  B.  Jones,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 

June  27 — James  Bell,  Justice  Peace. 

July  31 — -Thomas  Craig,  Justice  Peace. 

July  31 — Jacob  Jackson,  Justice  Peace. 

Dec.  13 — Joseph  Walker,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 

1821 

Jany.  27 — John  H.  Thorington,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  D.  H.  Burke. 
Jany.  27 — Nathan  Sargent,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  J.  B.  Norris. 

1820 

Apr.  9 — S.  H.  West,  Constable. 

Apr.  9 — William  M.  Robinson,  Constable;  Resigned. 

A.pr.  9 — William  Stobo,  Constable. 

May  8 — William  H.  Bell,  Constable;  Refused  to  Serve. 

May  8 — Howell  Nunley,  Constable. 

May  8 — John  Gamble,  Constable. 

June  14 — Matthew  Webster,  Constable. 

June  14 — John  H.  Thorington,  Constable. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


165 


June  28 — Russell  Jones,  Constable. 

Aug.  5 — Benjamin  L.  Saunders,  Constable;  Vice,  W.  M.  Robinson. 
Dec.  13 — Samuel  Kendal,  Constable;  Vice,  W.  H.  Bell. 

1821 

Nov.  20 — Bernard  Johnston,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  J.  B.  Jones. 

Oct.  24 — Francis  Ford,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  H.  Brantley. 

Dec.  15 — James  Craig,  Justice  Peace. 

1822 

June  3 — Leonard  Abercrombie,  Justice  Peace. 

June  3 — William  H.  Howell,  Justice  Peace. 

First  Battalion,  Thirteenth  Regiment,  Dallas  County  Militia 

July  30 — Thomas  Speaks,  Coroner. 

1818 

Aug.  5 — George  Shirley,  Maj.  Comm. 

Aug*.  5 — Read,  Adjutant. 

Aug.  5 — Joseph  Grimes  (Capt)  Beat  No.  1. 

Aug.  5 — Pleasandt  Bladston  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  1. 

Aug.  5— John  Howard,  Jr.  (Ensign). 

Aug.  5 — David  Mitchell  (Capt.)  Beat  No.  2. 

Aug.  5 — John  Moore  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  2. 

Aug.  5 — Alix  George  (Ensign)  Beat  No.  2. 

Aug.  5 — Richard  R.  Jones  (Capt.)  Beat  No.  3. 

Aug.  5 — Will  Williams  (Lieut.)  Beat  No.  3. 

Aug.  5 — John  Yates  (Ensign)  Beat  No.  3. 

Aug.  5 — Rich.  Tubs  (Capt.)  Beat  No.  4. 

Aug.  5 — Daniel  Tubs  (Lieut.)  Beat  No.  4. 

Aug.  5 — Moses  Brock  (Ensign)  Beat  No.  4. 

Aug.  5 — William  Waters  (Capt)  Beat  No.  5. 

Aug.  5 — Joseph  Elder,  (Lieut.)  Beat  No.  5. 

Aug.  5 — Joseph  Martins  (Ensign)  Beat  No.  5. 


166 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


1819 

Tune  1 — John  W.  Williamson  (Capt.)  Beat  No.  6. 

June  1 — John  Meadows  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  6. 

June  1 — Wm.  Jones  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  6. 

1818 

Nov.  20 — Joseph  Brittain  (Capt.)  Volunteer  Cavalry. 

Nov.  20 — Tho.  Welsh  (Lieut.),  Volunteer  Cavalry. 

Nov.  20 — Wm.  Broughton  (Ensign.)  Volunteer  Cavalry. 

Franklin  County 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Offices,  When  Resigned  or  Removed) 
1818 

Feb.  12 — Richard  Ellis,  C.  Justice  C.  C. 

Nov.  18 — Francis  Bullock,  J.  Q. 

Nov.  18 — James  Neely,  J.  Q. 

Nov.  18 — James  McDonald,  J.  Q. 

1819 

Nov.  18— Alex  W.  Mitchell,  J.  Q. 

Nov.  18— Me  Dixon,  J.  P, 

Nov.  18— Wm.  H.  Cook,  J.  P. 

Nov.  18 — Chas.  Neely,  Constable. 

Nov.  18 — Robert  McMichen,  Constable. 

Nov.  18 — Sami  Russell,  Constable. 

1818 

Aug.  4 — James  Smith,  J.  P. 

A.ug.  4 — John  Drake,  J.  P. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


167 


Aug.  4 — Joseph  Wafford,  J.  P. 

Aug.  4— John  Duke,  J.  P. 

Aug.  4 — William  Pruett,  Constable. 

Feb.  12 — James  Frazer,  Sheriff. 

Feb.  12 — Richard  Ellis,  Clk.  Sup.  Co. 

1819 

May  10 — Jas.  C.  Blackwell,  Constable. 

1818 

Feb.  12— Wm.  W.  Parkam,  Clk.  Co.  Co. 

Feb.  12 — Curtiss  Hooks,  Ranger. 

Nov.  23— John  Cook,  J.  P. 

Nov.  23 — Temple  Seargeant,  J.  P. 

Nov.  23 — Joshua  Goutcher,  J.  P. 

Nov.  23 — Anthony  White,  J.  P. 

Nov.  23 — James  A.  Weekley,  Ass.  & Col.  for  1819. 
Nov.  23 — James  Letcher,  Constable. 

Nov.  23 — Jno.  Olive,  Constable. 

Nov.  23 — Ro.  McMillan,  Constable. 

1819 

Oct.  28 — Jesse  Vanhoose,  Clk.  Cir.  Ct. 

Oct.  28 — Joseph  Wofford,  Clk  Cty.  Ct. 

Oct.  28 — James  Frazier,  Sheriff. 

1820 

Apr.  1 — William  H.  Duke,  Assessor. 

Apr.  1 — Robert  S.  McMicken,  Collector. 

Apr.  1 — Wilson  H.  McKissick,  Notary  Public. 
Apr.  1 — John  Brown,  Auctioneer. 


168 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Apr.  1 — Anthony  White,  Coroner. 

Apr.  26 — Joseph  T.  Cook,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  26 — Joshua  Brown,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  26 — William  H.  Cook.  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  26— John  Duke,  Justice  Peace;  Removed. 
Apr.  26 — Henry  S.  Sinnington,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  26 — Hance  McWhorter,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  26 — Anthony  White,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  26 — Philip  Cates,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  26 — Francis  Gholston,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  26 — Robert  Sibley,  Justice  Peace. 

Sept.  16 — Ebenezer  Rowland,  Justice  Peace. 

Sept.  16 — William  H.  Duke,  Justice  Peace. 

Sept.  16 — John  Harvey,  Justice  Peace. 

Sept.  16 — Levi  J.  Guest,  Justice  Peace. 

Edward  Pearsal,  Justice  Peace. 

Sept.  16 — Samuel  Bruton,  Justice  Peace. 

Sept.  16 — James  Hogan,  Justice  Peace. 

Sept.  16 — Abner  Hill,  Justice  Peace. 

Nov.  7 — Joshua  Gotcher,  Justice  Peace. 

Nov.  7 — John  Dugan,  Justice  Peace. 

Dec.  15 — Levi  J.  Gist,  Justice  Peace. 

1821 

Dec.  15 — Edward  Pearsal,  Justice  Peace. 

Feb.  26 — Anthony  White,  Prec.  1,  Russellville. 
Mar.  26 — Isaac  Anderson,  Prec.  1,  Russellville. 
May  29 — John  Harvey,  Prec.  1,  Russellville;  Died. 
Apr.  26 — William  McCree,  Constable. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


169 


Apr.  26 — Jarrad  Brandon,'  Constable. 

Apr.  26 — Garret  Ford,  Constable. 

Apr.  26 — Samuel  Smith,  Constable. 

Apr.  26 — John  P.  Masterson,  Constable. 

Sept.  16 — William  Smith,  Constable. 

Sept.  16 — Claiborne  William,  Constable. 

Sept.  16 — David  Enlow,  Constable. 

Sept.  16 — David  R.  Cole,  Constable. 

Apr.  17 — Ira  Olive,  Constable. 

Dec.  15 — David  R.  Cole,  Constable. 

1821 

June  7— Robert  McMicken,  Justice. 

June  14 — James  Cook,  Justice;  Dead. 

Dec.  10 — Benedict  Bacon,  Justice;  Vice,  J.  Cook. 

Dec.  10 — Bernard  McKiernan,  Justice. 

Dec.  10 — Ezekiel  Bates,  Justice. 

Feb.  11 — Thomas  L.  Duncan,  Justice;  Vice,  Jno.  Duke. 

Feb.  11 — George  Taylor,  Justice. 

Mar.  15 — Robert  Gillespie,  P.  of  Russellville. 

Tenth  Regiment  — Franklin  County  Militia 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Offices,  When  Resigned  or  Removed) 
1819 

July  30 — , Colonel. 

1818 

Aug.  4 — Thomas  C.  Hindman,  Lieut.  Col. 

Nov.  18 — William  A.  Greenway,  Major. 


170 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Nov.  18— Philip  Davis,  Adjutant. 

Nov.  18 — Andrew  Morison,  Quarter  master. 

Aug.  3 — John  Yocom  (Capt)  Beat  No.  1,  Bat.  No.  1. 

Aug.  3 — -John  Wilkens  (Lieut)  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Aug.  3 — Moses  Hatfield  (Ensign)  Beat  No.  1.  Batt.  No.  1. 
Aug.  3 — Sami.  Wyllie  (Capt)  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Aug.  3 — David  Kennedy  (Ensign)  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 
Aug.  3 — William  Wyllie  (Ensign)  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 
Aug.  3 — John  A.  Bullock  (Capt)  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Aug.  3 — Richard  Martin  (Lieut)  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Aug.  3 — Elijah  Sullivan  (Ensign)  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  1 
Aug.  3 — James  Newberry  (Capt)  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Aug.  3 — Washington  Brown  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  2. 
Aug.  3 — John  L.  Hinson  (Ensign)  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  2. 
Aug.  3 — John  Duke  (Capt)  Beat  No.  2.  Batt.  No.  2. 

Aug.  3 — James  Hardcastle  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  2. 
Aug.  3 — Wm.  Welch  (Ensign)  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  2. 

1818 

Aug.  3 — Richard  Byrd  (Capt)  Beat  No.  3,  Battt.  No.  2. 

Aug.  3 — James  Mallison  (Lieut)  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Aug.  3 — Amos  Conch  (Ensign)  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  2. 

1819 

July  13 — Geo.  L.  Beale  (Capt)  Cavalry  Batt.  No.  2. 

July  13— Ro.  McMiken  (Lieut.),  Cavalry  Batt.  No.  2. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


171 


Greene  County 

(When  C’omm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

1819 

Oct.  28 — Francis  T.  Gaines,  Clk.  Cty.  Court. 

Oct.  28 — James  Bates,  Sheriff. 

Oct.  28 — Roberts  Thomas,  Clk.  Ct.  Court. 

Apr.  7 — John  May,  Jr.,  Assessor. 

Apr.  7 — Benjamin  Baldwin,  Collector. 

Apr.  7 — Francis  T.  Gaines,  Notary  Public. 

Apr.  7 — Edward  Freeman,  Auctioneer. 

Apr.  7 — Anthony  D.  Kinnard,  Auctioneer. 

Apr.  7 — Pleasant  Wright,  Coroner. 

May  8 — Thomas  Timner,  Justice  Peace. 

May  8 — William  C.  Baskin,  Justice  Peace. 

May  8 — Durret  White,  Justice  Peace. 

May  8 — James  Murrell,  Justice  Peace. 

May  8 — Joseph  Hickman,  Justice  Peace. 

May  8 — James  Guideson,  Justice  Peace. 

May  8 — Thomas  L.  Mclntire,  Justice  Peace. 

May  8 — Benjamin  Needham,  Justice  Peace. 

May  8 — Benjamin  Baldwin,  Justice  Peace;  Removed. 

May  8 — Francis  Thomas,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 

May  8 — John  Fleming,  Justice  Peace. 

May  8 — John  M.  Pettigrew,  Justice  Peace. 

May  8 — Thomas  Baskins,  Justice  Peace. 

May  8 — Pleasant  Wright,  Justice  Peace. 

May  8 — Thomas  J.  xAmderson,  Justice  Peace. 

May  8 — John  McCracken,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned  14  Mar.  1822. 
1821 

Feb.  23 — Josiah  Bohannon,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned  14  Mar.  1822. 
Feb.  23 — R.  Williamson,  Justice  Peace. 


172 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Dec.  19 — John  W.  Rabb,  Justice  Peace. 

Dec.  19 — Hellen  Waldrop,  Justice  Peace. 

Dec.  19 — James  D.  Walker,  Justice  Peace. 

Dec.  19 — Absalom  Alston,  Justice  Peace. 

1822 

Mar.  14 — William  Gates,  Justice  Peace. 

Mar.  14 — Samuel  Witherspoon,  Justice  Peace. 

1820 

May  8 — Alexander  Steel,  Constable. 

May  8 — Malcom  McCloud,  Constable. 

May  8 — Matthew  Lefoy,  Constable. 

May  8 — John  Madison,  Constable. 

May  8 — Joseph  Middlebrooks,  Constable. 

May  8 — Jeremiah  Orear,  Constable. 

May  8 — John  S.  White,  Constable. 

May  8 — Jonathan  May,  Constable. 

Henry  County 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

Sept.  21 — -Archibald  Matthews,  Clk.  Cir.  Ct. 

Sept.  21 — Green  Beaucamp,  Clk.  Cty.  Ct. 

Sept.  21 — John  G.  Morgan,  Sheriff. 

Benjamin  Haney,  Justice  Peace. 

Jesse  Dennard,  Constable. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


Jackson  County 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

1820 

Apr.  12 — George  W.  Higgins,  Clk.  Cir.  Co. 

Apr.  12 — Stephen  Carter,  Clk.  Cty.  Co. 

Apr.  12— David  Griffith,  Sheriff. 

Apr.  12 — -Galbraith  Barton,  Assessor. 

Apr.  12 — Thomas  H.  Kirby,  Collector. 

Apr.  12 — George  McNevil,  Coroner. 

Aug.  4 — John  Looney,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  4 — Henry  Blevins,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 
Aug.  4 — Matthew  Babb,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  4 — David  Buzart,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  4 — Daniel  Payton,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  4 — John  Hammonds,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  4 — Thomas  Russell,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  4 — Benjamin  Langsford,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  4 — George  W.  Hopkins,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  4 — George  Gifford,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  4 — David  Parkhill,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  4 — Charles  Connelly,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  4 — John  McNavery,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  4 — John  Curr,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  4 — Alexander  W.  Dulaney,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  4 — William  Dotson,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  4 — Joseph  Elledge,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  4 — James  Bird,  Justice  Peace. 


174 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Aug.  4 — Jeremiah  H.  Cloud,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  4 — James  G.  Holmes,  Justice  Peace. 

Sept.  9 — William  Leg,  Justice  Peace. 

Sept.  9 — David  Harper,  Justice  Peace. 

Nov.  8 — John  Nelson,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  H.  Blevins. 
Aug.  4 — Joseph  Barkley,  Constable. 

Aug.  4 — Stephen  Newman,  Constable. 

Aug.  4 — James  McKey,  Constable. 

Aug.  4 — John  Blevins,  Sr.,  Constable. 

Aug.  4 — Gavin  Black,  Constable. 

Aug.  4 — Ezekiah  Harris,  Constable. 

Aug.  4 — Jesse  McCloud,  Constable. 

Aug.  4 — Charles  L.  Roach,  Constable. 

Aug.  4 — George  Dougherty,  Constable. 

Aug.  4 — Peter  Jones,  Constable. 

Sept.  9 — -Daniel  Meals,  Constable. 

Jefferson  County 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 
Oct.  28 — Andrew  Greer,  Clk.  Cir.  Ct. 

Oct.  28 — James  Dodds,  Clk.  cty.  Ct. 

Oct.  28— Levi  Reid,  Sheriff. 

June  28 — Stephen  M.  Owen,  Assessor. 

June  28 — Jonathan  York,  Collector. 

June  28 — Armstead  Barry,  Coroner. 

June  28-WVilliam  Brown,  Auctioneer. 

Dunkin  Johnston,  Justice  Peace. 

Nincan  Tannehill,  Justice  Peace. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


175 


Charles  C.  Humber,  Justice  Peace. 

Abraham  Russell,  Justice  Peace. 

Micajah  Linsey,  Justice  Peace;  Removed. 

William  Helms,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 

Wash.  Allen,  Justice  Peace. 

William  Robertson,  Justice  Peace. 

Isaac  Brown,  Justice  Peace. 

James  Draper,  Justice  Peace. 

Thomas  Gorde,  Justice  Peace. 

Armstead  Barry,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned  13  Apr.  1822. 
John  Brown,  Justice  Peace. 

Thomas  Holmes,  Justice  Peace;  Removed  4th  May,  1822. 
William  Edmundson,  Justice  Peace;  Died. 

James  Hall,  Justice  Peace;  Removed  27th  Mar.,  1822. 
Nov.  27 — Jonathan  York,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  Wm.  Edmundson. 

1821 

Feb.  13 — Thomas  Hutchinson,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  7 — Benjamin  Malleson,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  7 — W.  R.  Saddler,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  7 — Thomas  Hutcheson,  Justice  Peace. 

1822 

Feb.  2 — William  Saunders,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  Wm.  Holms. 
Feb.  2 — Samuel  Wear,  Justice  Peace;  Removed  4 May,  1822. 
David  S.  Hillhouse,  Constable. 

Joshua  Lindsay,  Constable. 

Owen  Franklin,  Constable 
Matthew  Davis.  Constable. 

Riley  Pearce,  Constable. 


176 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Edmund  Struson,  Constable. 

James  W.  Denton,  Constable. 

Daniel  McAriar,  Constable. 

Mar.  14 — Moses  Ayers,  Justice  Peace. 

Mar.  14 — David  Murphree,  Justice  Peace. 

Mar.  14 — James  Dorsey,  Justice  Peace. 

Mar.  14 — Duncan  Johnston,  Justice  Peace. 

Mar.  27 — William  Stenson,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  13 — Stephen  Reeder,  Justice  Peace. 

May  4 — George  C.  Boggs,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  Holmes. 

May  4 — Ely  Thompson,  Justice  Peace. 

Lauderdale  County 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Offices,  When  Resigned  or  Removed  ) 
1818 

Nov.  23 — John  McKinley,  Ch.  Justice  Co.  Co. 

Eeb.  12 — Joseph  Farmer,  J.  Q. 

Feb.  12—  McDonald,  J.  Q. 

Nov.  23 — Thomas  Childress,  J.  Q. 

Feb.  12 — Joseph  Farmer,  Treasurer;  Resigned  Sept.  29,  1819. 

Feb,  12 — James  Bumpas,  J.  P. 

Feb.  12 — Zedikiah  Tait,  J.  P. 

Feb.  12— And.  McMiken,  J.  P. 

Feb.  12— Alex  McDougal,  J.  P. 

Feb.  12 — Danl  Lance,  J.  P. 

1819 

July  12 — Ellkins  Hand,  Constable. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


177 


1819 

July  27 — Thomas  Bruce,  Constable. 

1818 

Feb.  14— Hugh  McVey,  Clk.  Sup.  Court. 


Feb.  12 — McDonald,  Constable. 

Feb.  12 — -William  Fanning,  Constable. 

Nov.  23 — Rains,  Constable. 

Nov.  23 — McDaniel,  Constable. 


Nov.  18 — George  Coalter,  Clerk  Co.  Court. 
Feb.  12 — James  Fyles,  Coroner. 

Feb.  12 — Joel  Rice,  Sheriff. 

Feb.  12 — Cheliey  B.  Roundtree,  Ranger. 

Nov.  23 — Zedekiah  Tait,  Ass.  & Coll,  for  1819. 

1819 

Sept.  27 — Bragwell  Farmer,  Treasurer. 

Oct.  28— Presley  Ward,  Clk.  Cir.  Ct. 

Oct.  28— William  Gerrard,  Clk.  Cty.  Ct. 

Oct.  28 — Charles  B.  Roundtree,  Sheriff 
Oct.  28 — William  M.  Crittenden,  Assessor. 

Oct.  28 — Thomas  Barnett,  Collector. 

Nov.  9 — James  Foiles,  Coroner. 

1820 

May  2 — Francis  Durrett,  Justice  Peace. 

May  2 — Lewis  Marshall,  Justice  Peace. 

May  2 — Alexander  McDoogle,  Justice  Peace. 
May  2 — William  Slough,  Justice  Peace. 

May  2 — Seaburn  Roundtree,  Justice  Peace. 


78 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


May  2 — -John  Jackson,  Justice  Peace. 

May  2 — Thomas  W.  Edwards,  Justice  Peace. 
May  2 — -William  Coke,  Justice  Peace. 

May  2- — -Daniel  Nance,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 
May  2 — John  P.  Cunningham,  Justice  Peace. 
May  2 — Joel  Burrow,  Justice  Peace. 

May  2 — John  Waddle,  Justice  Peace. 

Sept.  29 — Amos  Ives,  Justice  Peace. 

1821 

Mar.  21 — John  Harrison,  Justice  Peace. 

Mar.  21 — Samuel  Craig,  Justice  Peace. 

Mar.  21 — William  McKnight,  Justice  Peace. 

Mar.  21 — O.  Gwing  Kendrick,  Justice  Peace. 

Mar.  21 — -Huky  Brown,  Justice  Peace. 

Mar.  21 — Benjamin  Price,  Justice  Peace. 

Mar.  21 — -Valentine  Calahan,  Justice  Peace. 

Mar.  21 — Jos.  Baker,  Justice  Peace. 

Mar.  21 — Andrew  McMikjn,  Justice  Peace. 

Mar.  21 — John  Martin,  Justice  Peace. 

Mar.  21 — Edmund  Harrison,  Justice  Peace. 

May  20 — Mark  Shelton,  Constable. 

May  20 — Allen  Stewart,  Constable. 

May  20 — John  Deans,  Constable. 

May  20 — Henry  P.  Crittenden,  Constable. 

May  20 — Laban  Turbyville,  Constable. 

May  20 — Abner  Rose,  Constable. 


1822 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


179 


Mar.  21 — Isaac  Southworth,  Justice  Peace. 

Nov.  5 — Samuel  Birney,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  Dan.  Nance. 

Second  Battalion,  Sixteenth  Regiment,  Lauderdale  County  Militia 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Offices,  When  Resigned  or  Removed) 
Nov.  23 — George  Coalter,  Colonel. 

Nov.  23— Lieut.  Col. 

Nov.  23 — Major. 

Nov.  23 — Adjutant. 

Nov.  23 — Quartermaster. 

Nov.  23 — Surgeon. 

Aug.  23 — Joseph  Hudelston  (Capt.)  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Aug.  23 — Eben  Young  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Aug.  23 — Howard  Womble  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 
Aug.  23 — Lewis  Garner  (Capt.)  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Agu.  23 — Jno.  Collingsworth  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 
Aug.  23 — Joseph  Briggs  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Aug.  23 — William  Garrett  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Aug.  23 — Thomas  McBride  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  1. 
Aug.  23 — Daniel  McBride  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Aug.  23 — Matthias  Richardson  (Capt.)  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  2. 
Aug.  23 — Edward  Maxey  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Aug.  23 — John  Stronbough  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  2. 
Aug.  23 — John  Brown  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Aug.  23 — Joseph  Hughes  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Aug.  23 — Jesse  O.  Tate  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Aug.  23 — Lewis  Edwards  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Aug.  23 — Zachariah  Rose  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Aug.  23 — Alexander  Waddle  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No. 


ro 


180 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Lawrence  County 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Offices,  When  Resigned  or  Removed) 
1818 

Feb.  12 — William  Pettis,  Ch.  J.  Co.  Co. 

Feb.  12 — Thomas  Warren,  J.  O. 

Nov.  23 — James  McDaniel,  J.  O. 

Nov.  23 — Joseph  Moore,  J.  Q. 

Feb.  12 — William  McBroom,  Sheriff. 

Feb.  12 — George  Foot,  Clk  Sup.  Co. 

Feb.  12— Daniel  Wright,  Clk.  Co.  Co. 

Nov.  23 — John  Jones,  Constable. 

Nov.  23— William  G.  Doyle,  Col.  & Ass.  for  1819. 

Feb.  12 — John  Bryant,  Ranger;  Resigned  Oct.  10,  1819. 

Nov.  23— David  Black,  J.  P. 

Nov.  23 — Elijah  McDaniel,  J.  P. 

Nov.  23— Obadiah  Waller,  J.  P. 

Nov.  23 — Agram  Nedigra  Henricot,  J.  P. 

Nov.  23 — John  Patrick,  Constable. 

Nov.  23— Joel  D.  Harris,  J.  P. 

Nov.  23 — Brasswell  Farmer,  Treasurer;  Wrong  entry. 

1819 

Oct.  16 — Ira  Carlton,  Ranger. 

Oct.  28 — Jonathan  Benford,  Clk.  Cir.  Ct. 

Oct.  28 — Daniel  Wright,  Clk.  Cty.  Ct. 

Oct.  28 — , Sheriff. 

Mar.  30 — Ziah  Balch,  Assessor. 

Mar.  30 — Ugenio  Campbell,  Collector. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


181 


Oct.  20 — Theron  E.  Balch,  Treasurer. 

Oct.  20 — John  C.  Chopper,  Coroner. 

Oct.  20 — Ira  Callor,  N.  Public. 

Oct.  20 — Joel  D.  Harris,  Auctioneer. 

Oct.  20 — Reuben  Buckner,  Auctioneer. 

Sep.  2 — Davis  McAllister,  Justice  Peace. 

Nicholas  Eoyd,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned  14  Mar.  1822. 
Richard  Burris,  Justice  Peace. 

A.  M.  DeGraffenried,  Justice  Peace. 

Theron  E.  Balch,  Justice  Peace. 

John  Galliker,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 

Alex.  McC’lennehorn,  Justice  Peace. 

John  McBride,  Justice  Peace. 

Lindsey  Hargrove,  Justice  Peace. 

William  Stoval,  Justice  Peace. 

Hugh  Ware,  Justice  Peace. 

James  Brooks,  Justice  Peace. 

John  Easley,  Justice  Peace. 

Zadock  McVay,  Justice  Peace. 

William  Farris,  Justice  Peace. 

James  Dazel,  Justice  Peace. 

Samuel  Darner,  Justice  Peace. 

William  Simpson,  Justice  Peace. 

David  Knott,  Justice  Peace. 

John  Burdwell,  Justice  Peace. 

Benj.  Amorett,  Justice  Peace. 

Humphry  Warner,  Justice  Peace. 


1821 


182 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


May  29 — Abraham  Meek,  Justice. 

May  29 — John  H.  Cargill,  Justice. 

May  29 — Joseph  Matthews,  Justice. 

May  29 — Obidiah  Waller,  Justice. 

May  29 — Davis  Black,  Justice. 

Oct.  29 — J.  Y.  Higgins,  Justice;  Vice,  J.  Gallighan. 

Nov.  23 — Nicholas  Tilford,  Justice. 

1822 

Mar.  24 — Joseph  Rhodes,  Justice. 

Mar.  24 — George  Conway,  Justice. 

1820 

Sept.  2 — David  McBride,  Constable. 

Sept.  2 — Thomas  Alford,  Constable. 

Sept.  2 — Jonathan  B.  Burleson,  Constable. 

Sept.  2 — John  Foster,  Constable. 

Sept.  2 — Robert  Rogers,  Constable. 

Sept.  2 — James  McDaniel,  Constable. 

Sept.  2 — Aaron  Burlison,  Constable. 

Sept.  2 — Joel  D.  Harris,  Constable. 

Sept.  2 — William  Henry,  Constable. 

Sept.  2 — Samuel  Dutter,  Constable. 

Sept.  2 — William  Elam,  Constable. 

Eighth  Regiment  — Lawrence  County  Militia 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Offices,  Resigned  or  Removed) 

1818 

June  25 — William  Pettus,  Colonel. 

June  25 — James  Tittle,  Lieut.  Col. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1.944 


183 


June  25 — Benjamin  Jones  (Capt.)  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 

June  25 — Samuel  Parks  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 

June  25 — Elizah  Storrs  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 

June  25 — David  Thomson  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 

June  25 — Nimrod  Morris  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 

June  25 — Tollison  Hampton  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 
June  25 — Milton  McClouchan  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  1. 
June  25 — Abrm  R.  Crawford  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  1. 
June  25 — Alex  McNeill  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  1. 

June  25 — Washington  McGayley  (Major),  Battery  No.  2. 

June  25 — Robert  M.  White  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  2. 

June  25 — David  B.  Crawford  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  2. 
June  25 — Thomas  C.  Warren  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  2. 
June  25 — Joel  D.  Harris  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  2. 

June  25 — James  Evans  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  2. 

June  25 — Peter  Burngardner  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  2. 
June  25 — William  L.  Lugent  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  2. 
June  25 — Jacob  Norton  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  2. 

June  25 — Matthew  Roberts  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  2. 

1819 

July  7- — Elisha  Madden  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  4. 

July  7 — John  T.  Johnson  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  4. 

July  7 — Armistead  Johnson  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  4. 

July  7 — Samuel  Mitchell  (Capt.),  Volunteer  Co.  of  Cavalry, 

Batt.  No.  2. 

July  7 — Daniel  Ward  (Lieut.),  Volunteer  co.  of  cavalry,  Batt 
No.  2. 

July  7 — James  Searcy  (2  Lieut.)  Volunteer  Co.  of  Cavalry, 

Batt.  No.  2. 

July  7— Vinson  B.  Holmes  (Ensign),  Volunteer  Co.  of  Cavalry, 
Batt.  No.  2. 


184 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 

Limestone  County 

i When  Appointed,  Names.  Offices.  When  Resigned  or  Removed) 

1818 

Feb.  12 — Thomas  Bibb,  Ch.  J.  Co.  Co. 

Feb.  12 — John  Pettis,  J.  0. 

Feb.  12 — William  W.  Harris,  J.  O. 

Nov.  13 — Nicholas  Davis,  J.  O. 

Nov.  13 — Solomon  Marshal.  J.  Q. 

Nov.  11 — Ebenezer  Frazer,  Sheriff. 

Feb.  12 — William  Edmonson,  Clk.  Su.  & Co.  Court. 

Feb.  12 — Robert  E.  Walton.  Ranger. 

1819 

Mar.  1 — John  Smith,  J.  Q. 

July  13 — John  Logan,  Constable. 

Mar.  25 — Wilson  McKinney,  Constable. 

1818 

Nov.  13 — Randolph  Mitchell,  Ass.  & Coll,  for  1819. 

1819 

July  27 — Jesse  H.  Holloway,  J.  P. 

1818 

Nov.  12 — Joseph  Ruttledge,  J.  P. 

Nov.  12 — William  Hargrove,  J.  P. 

Nov.  12 — Thomas  Reddun,  J.  P. 

Nov.  12 — Joseph  Bell,  J.  P. 

Nov.  12 — Robert  Poluk,  J.  P. 

Nov.  12 — John  Gregory,  J.  P. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


185 


Nov.  12 — James  H.  Bell,  J.  P. 

Nov.  12 — Cornelius  Mylone,  J.  P. 

Nov.  12— Joseph  Powel,  J.  P. 

Nov.  12 — Edward  Smith,  J.  P. 

Nov.  12 — Rice  Tate,  J.  P. 

Nov.  13 — Ward,  Constable. 

Nov.  13 — John  Slaughter,  Constable. 

Nov.  13 — John  Milburn,  Constable. 

Nov.  13 — James  Jones,  Constable. 

Nov.  13 — William  Milone,  Constable. 

Nov.  12 — Cornelius  Slater,  J.  P. 

Nov.  12— Bond,  J.  P. 

Nov.  12 — Goodin,  J.  P. 

Nov.  12 — Benj.  Murril,  J.  P. 

Nov.  12 — John  A.  McKinney,  J.  P. 

Nov.  12 — James  Hodges,  Constable. 

Nov.  12 — Thomas  Williamson,  Constable. 
Nov.  12 — Joseph  Harrison,  Constable.  „ 

1819 

Oct.  20 — Scot  Bayne,  Constable. 

Oct.  28— William  T.  Gamble,  Clk.  Ct.  Ct. 
Oct.  28 — John  T.  Smith,  Clk.  Cty.  Court. 
Oct.  28 — James  Slaughter,  Sheriff. 

1820 

Oct.  28 — -Ouin  Merton,  Assessor. 

Oct.  28 — James  McDaniel,  Collector. 

Apr.  29 — Joel  Hill,  Coroner. 


186 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Apr.  29 — John  W.  Gray,  Auctioneer. 

Apr.  29 — 'William  Bell,  Auctioneer. 

Apr.  18 — Levi  Edmonson,  Constable. 

Calvin  Hind,  Justice  Peace. 

William  B.  Higgin,  Justice  Peace. 

Jonas  Loughmeaters,  Justice  Peace. 

Willoughby  Pugh,  Justice  Peace. 

John  Gregory,  Justice  Peace. 

James  Gordon,  Justice  Peace;  Died. 

James  B.  Walker,  Justice  Peace. 

Silas  Hines,  Justice  Peace. 

John  Young,  Justice  Peace. 

Joseph  L.  Bell,  Justice  Peace. 

Levi  W.  McParker,  Justice  Peace;  Removed. 

May  1 — Albert  Higgin,  Justice  Peace. 

James  Jones,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned  29  Aug.  1820. 
James  Hartgrove,  Justice  Peace. 

Henry  Abbernathy,  Justice  Peace. 

© 

George  Abel,  Justice  Peace. 

Freeman  Pettes,  Justice  Peace. 

Clayburn  Wright,  Justice  Peace. 

Thomas  Redus,  Justice  Peace. 

Alex  Tisford,  Prest  Athens. 

Wash.  Peays,  Prest.  Mooresville;  Expired. 

May  20 — Edward  Massey,  Justice  Peace. 

John  Bayne,  Justice  Peace. 

Joseph  Rutledge,  Justice  Peace. 

William  Hartgrove,  Justice  Peace. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


187 


1820 

July  8 — Zepheniah  Poston,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  James  Gordon. 
June  17 — Benjamin  Murrell,  Justice  Peace. 

June  17 — James  Anderson,  Justice  Peace. 

July  17 — Robert  Pollock,  Justice  Peace. 

July  17 — Alexander  Perry,  Justice  Peace. 

Sept.  22 — John  E.  Erwin,  Justice  Peace. 

Sept.  22 — Noah  Dulant,  Justice  Peace. 

Sept.  29 — John  W.  Gray,  Justice  Peace. 

Oct.  14 — Collin  Mitchell,  Justice  Peace. 

Oct.  14 — Nurel  M.  Crain,  Justice  Peace. 

1821 

Jany.  29 — Thomas  Gray,  Justice  Peace. 

Janv.  29 — Tho.  H.  May,  Justice  Peace;  Vice  : L.  W.  Parker. 
Feby.  7 — Archibald  Templeton,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  15 — John  Davis,  Justice  Peace. 

June  4 — Davis  Miller,  Justice  Peace. 

June  14 — Hugh  Keyes,  Prest  Mooresville  ; Vice,  W.  Keys. 

1820 

Apr.  — Peter  Williamson,  Constable. 

Apr.  18 — George  McKinney,  Constable. 

Apr.  18 — Moses  Ferguson,  Constable. 

Apr.  18 — Levi  Edmonson,  Constable. 

Apr.  18 — David  D.  Robinson,  Constable. 

Apr.  18 — Joseph  Carriel,  Constable. 

Apr.  18 — Barny  Adcock,  Constable. 

May  1 — Thomas  Martingale,  Constable. 


188 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


May  1 — -John  McWilliams,  Constable. 

May  1 — -Ansel  Whitfield,  Constable. 

May  29 — John  F.  Walker,  Constable. 

May  29 — James  Hodges,  Constable. 

June  17 — Isaac  Munswall,  Constable. 

Aug.  8 — William  Perry,  Constable. 

Sept.  22 — William  Gosher,  Constable;  Removed. 

1821 

Oct.  25 — Cornelius  Malone,  Constable  ; vice,  W.  Satcher  Almon. 

Organization  of  the  Twentieth  Regiment  — Limestone  County 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Offices,  When  Resigned  or  Removed) 

1819 

July  12 — Abner  Tatom,  Jr.,  Colonel. 

1818 

Nov.  13 — Nicholas  Perkins,  Lieut.  Col. 

Nov.  13 — B.  Lockhart,  Major. 

Nov.  13 — Adjutant. 

Nov.  13 — Waddy  Tate,  Surgeon. 

Nov.  13 — Thomas  Williams  (Capt.)  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Nov.  13 — Cornelius  Malone  (Lieut.).  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Nov.  13— William  Horton  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Nov.  13 — Chas.  McHolland  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Nov.  13 — William  Pilant  (Lieut.).  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Nov.  13 — James  Ellis  (Ensign),  Beat  No  1,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Nov.  13 — Samuel  French  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Nov.  13 — Adam  Nicar  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  L Batt.  No.  2. 

(Ensign). 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


189 


Nov.  13 — Richard  H.  Hale  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  2. 
Nov,  13 — Moses  McWhirter  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  3.  Batt.  No.  2. 
Nov.  13 — David  Hoke  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Organization  of  21st  Reg’t. 

Nov.  13 — James  W.  Exum,  Colonel. 

Nov.  13 — John  Maples,  Lt.  Col. 

Cornelius  Slater,  Major. 

Nov.  13 — , Adjutant. 

Nov.  13 — , Surgeon. 

(Capt.) 

(Lieut.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 
(Ensign). 

(Capt.) 

(Lieut.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 
(Ensign). 

(Capt.) 

(Lieut.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  1. 
(Ensign). 

(Capt.) 

(Lieut.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  2. 
(Ensign). 

(Capt.) 

(Lieut.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  2. 
(Ensign). 

(Capt.) 

(Lieut.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  2. 
(Ensign). 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 

Madison  County 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

XeRoy  Pope,  Ch.  T.  Co.  Comt. 

John  Withers,  J.  O. 

David  Moore,  J.  O. 

1818 

Feb.  — Chas.  Botts,  J.  Q. 

Nov.  12 — John  M.  Taylor,  J.  Q. 

Appointed  by  Governor  Holmes : 

Frances  E.  Harris,  Clk.  Sup.  Court. 

Henry  Minor,  Clk.  Co.  Comt. 

Bennet  Wood,  Treasurer. 

John  Martin,  Secretary  of  Sedler  of  Wts.  & Measures. 
Thomas  Austin,  Flour  inspector. 

Stephen  Neal,  Sheriff. 

1818 

June  12 — Willm.  McClung,  Constable. 

Joseph  E.  Stoelwell,  Constable. 

Aug.  7 — Joseph  Hamner,  Constable. 

Nov.  11 — Lewis  Meals,  Constable. 

Nov.  11 — -Wm.  A.  Maxwell,  Constable. 

Nov.  11 — Nathan  Baker,  Constable. 

Nov.  11 — Stephn.  Chiernault,  Constable. 

Nov.  11 — Nathan  Farmer,  Constable. 

John  Cox,  Constable. 

Jessie  Irwin,  Constable. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


191 


John  Preast,  Constable. 

James  McCasy,  Constable. 

William  Evans,  J.  P. 

Henry  King,  J.  P. 

George  Munroe,  J.  P. 

David  Grey,  J.  P. 

George  T.  Jones,  J.  P. 

Thomas  Love,  J.  P. 

Anthony  ,H.  Metcalfe,  J.  P. 

Jourdan,  J.  P. 

Jones,  J.  P. 

1818 

Nov.  12 — John  Boardman,  J.  P. 

Nov.  12 — John  Vinning,  Ass.  & Coll,  for  1819. 
Nov.  12 — John  Boardman,  Ranger. 

Feb.  11 — Samuel  Mead,  Notary  Public. 

Nov.  13 — John  James,  Constable. 

Nov.  14 — Thomas  Ice,  Constable. 

Nov.  14 — John  H.  Taylor,  J.  P. 

Nov.  21 — William  Watkins,  Justice  of  Peace. 

1819 

Mar.  1 — Hunter  Peele,  County  Surveyor. 

July  22 — Henry  Stokes,  Justice  of  Peace. 

July  6 — Allan  Urquhart,  Justice  of  Peace. 
July  6 — John  Horton,  Justice  of  Peace. 

July  6 — James  Allan,  Constable. 

May  10 — Grant  Taylor,  Constable. 


192 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


J ul  v23 — Daniel  Rather,  Town  Constable  for  1819. 

July  5 — Daniel  Rather,  Auctioneer. 

Sept.  30 — A.  D.  Yietch,  Auctioneer  for  Huntsville. 

Xov.  17 — Nathn.  Terry,  Constable. 

Oct.  28 — Lemuel  Mead,  Clk.  Cir.  Ct. 

Oct.  28 — Thomas  Brandon,  Clk.  C’ty.  Ct. 

Oct.  28 — Stephen  Neal,  Sheriff. 

1820 

Feb.  — James  Bibb,  Assessor. 

William  McBroom,  Collector. 

Mar.  2 — Daniel  Rather,  Coroner. 

Mar.  2 — Andrew  D.  Veitch,  Auctioneer. 

Mar.  2 — Daniel  Rather,  Auctioneer. 

Mar.  2 — Nicholas  Hobson,  Not.  Public. 

1821 

Apr.  7 — -Benjamin  B.  Pope,  President  of  Huntsville. 

Sept.  29 — Richard  B.  Purdom,  Notary  Public. 

1822 

April  15 — John  W.  Tilford,  President  of  Huntsville. 

April  21 — John  Martin,  Justice  of  Peace. 

April  21 — Thomas  Humes,  Justice  of  Peace. 

April  21 — Thomas  W.  Winn,  Justice  of  Peace ; Removed. 

April  21 — Robert  Bransford,  Justice  of  Peace;  Removed  March  2o. 
1821. 

April  21 — John  Grayson,  Justice  of  Peace. 

April  21 — Ezekiel  Craft,  Justice  of  Peace. 

April  21--John  Angel,  Justice  of  Peace. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


193 


April  21 — John  Burkner,  Justice  of  Peace. 

April  21 — George  F.  Jones,  Justice  of  Peace. 

April  21 — Janies  B.  Collier,  Justice  of  Peace,  Removed. 

April  21 — Wiliam  East,  Justice  of  Peace. 

April  21 — Thomas  Bell,  Justice  of  Peace.  Resigned. 

April  21 — Ezekiel  Eastland,  Justice  of  Peace. 

April  21 — John  Vining,  Justice  of  Peace. 

April  21 — John  Wright,  Justice  of  Peace. 

April  21 — William  H.  Clopton,  Justice  of  Peace. 

April  21 — Allen  Urquhar,  Justice  of  Peace,  Resigned. 

April  21 — Parker  Campbell,  Justice  of  Peace.  Resigned  14  Mar.  1822. 
April  21 — James  A.  Wall,  Justice  of  Peace. 

April  21 — George  M.  Whiter,  Justice  of  Peace. 

April  21 — James  S.  Hendricks,  Justice  of  Peace. 

April  21 — William  Blake,  Justice  of  Peace.  Removed  2 Apr.  1S22. 
April  21 — James  Erwin,  Justice  of  Peace. 

April  21 — John  W.  Looney,  Justice  of  Peace. 

April  21 — William  Easter,  Justice  of  Peace.  Removed  14  Mar.  1822. 
April  21 — Richard  Wallpool,  Justice  of  Peace. 

1822 

Apr.  21 — John  Sprowl,  Justice  Peace. 

April  21 — John  Hill,  Justice  of  Peace.  Resigned. 

April  21 — Jeremiah  P.  Horton,  Justice  of  Peace. 

April  21 — Littleberry  Leiseure,  Justice  of  Peace. 

April  21 — William  S.  Allen,  Justice  of  Peace. 

April  21 — Lemuel  Hutchins,  Justice  of  Peace.  Resigned. 

April  21 — David  Capshaw,  Justice  of  Peace. 

May  10 — John  M.  Leake,  Justice  of  Peace. 


194 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Mav  10 — William  H.  T.  Brown,  Justice  of  Peace.  Resigned  27 
Mar.  1822. 

May  10 — William  McBroom,  Justice  of  Peace.  Resigned. 

May  10 — James  G.  Carroll,  Justice  of  Peace. 

July  8 — William  Roundtree,  Justice  of  Peace. 

July  27 — Robert  W.  Roberts,  Justice  of  Peace. 

Sept.  12 — Randolph  Sullivan,  Justice  of  Peace. 

Oct.  24 — William  Harris,  Justice  of  Peace. 

1821 

Mar.  29 — John  Franklin,  Justice  of  Peace. 

Mar.  26 — John  S.  Smith,  Justice  of  Peace.  Vice  R.  Bransford. 
1821 

April  7 — James  Drake,  Justice  of  Peace. 

April  7 — John  Hogan,  Justice  of  Peace. 

April  15 — Robert  C.  Marye,  Prest.  Treasurer.  Comm.  Expired. 

Sept.  11 — -William  Kirkland,  Justice  of  Peace,  Vice  W.  Urquhart. 

Dec.  3 — -Richard  B.  Purdon,  Justice  of  Peace,  Vice  Wm.  Mc- 
Broom. 

Dec.  10 — Henry  Rigney,  Justice  of  Peace,  Vice.  John  Hill. 

1822 

Jan.  12 — Edward  W.  Parker,  President  of  Triana. 

Feb.  11 — Edmund  Duprey,  Justice  of  Peace.  Vice  T.  Bell. 

Mar.  14 — Richard  Shackleford,  Justice  of  Peace. 

Mar.  14 — Henry  Brown,  Justice  of  Peace. 

Mar.  27 — Nathaniel  Davis,  Justice  of  Peace,  Vice  Wm.  H.  Brown. 
Apr.  2 — -William  Wilkins,  Justice  of  Peace. 

1820 

Apr.  21 — John  K.  Dunn,  Constable. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


195 


Apr.  21 — James  Taylor,  Constable;  Removed. 
Apr.  21— John  C.  Grayson,  Constable. 

Apr.  21 — Lewis  Meals,  Constable. 

Apr.  21 — Wililam  Coffbey,  Constable. 

Apr.  21 — William  Gray,  Constable. 

Apr.  21 — Nathaniel  Terry,  Constable. 

Apr.  21 — Berkan  Goldan,  Constable. 

Apr.  21 — John  H.  Campbell,  Constable. 

Apr.  21 — Benjamin  McWhorter,  Constable. 
Apr.  21 — William  H.  Robertson,  Constable. 
Apr.  21 — William  Earnest,  Constable. 

Apr.  21 — Thompson  Harris,  Constable. 

Apr.  21 — Henry  H.  Rigney,  Constable. 

Apr.  21 — James  White,  Constable. 

Apr.  21 — James  B.  Nunnelly,  Constable. 

Aur.  21 — Willie  Elliotte,  Constable. 

Apr.  21 — Charles  Moorman,  Constable. 

Apr.  21 — David  S.  Williams,  Constable. 

June  17 — Samuel  T.  Pool,  Constable. 

Sept.  12 — John  Milan,  Constable. 

Oct.  24 — John  C.  Gibbins,  Constable. 

Oct.  24 — Holman  Southall,  Constable. 

Oct.  24 — Robert  Lewis,  Constable. 


196 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Fourteenth  Regiment  — Madison  County  Militia 

< When  Appointed,  Name,  Offices,  When  Resigned  or  Removed) 
1819 

July  6 — Griffin  Lampkin,  Colonel. 

July  6 — Thomas  Eldridge,  Lieut.  Col. 

July  30 — - Adair,  Major  2nd  Batt. 

Adjutant 

Quarter  master. 

15th  Reg’t. 

Nov.  11 — Surgeon. 

— (Capt.) 

(Lieut.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 
.—  (Ensign). 

1819 

Sept.  6 — John  Matthews  (Capt.)  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 

(Lieut.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 
--(Ensign). 

Oct.  2— Biddle,  (Capt.)  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  1. 

-(Lieut.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  1. 
(Ensign). 

(Capt.) 

— (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  4,  Batt.  No.  1. 
——(Ensign). 

(Capt.) 

(Lieut.),  Beat  No.  5,  Batt.  No.  1. 

(Ensign). 

-(Capt.) 

(Lieut.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  2. 
.(Ensign). 

Rogers,  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  2. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


197 


.—  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  2. 

(Ensign),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  2. 

(Capt.),  Beat  No.  3.  Batt.  No.  2. 

(Lieut.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  2. 

(Ensign),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  2 . 

— - (Capt.),  Beat  No.  4,  Batt.  No.  2. 

(Lieut.),  Beat  No.  4,  Batt.  No.  2. 

(Ensign),  Beat  No.  4,  Batt.  No.  2. 

(Capt.),  Beat  No.  5,  Batt.  No.  2. 

— (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  5,  Batt.  No.  2. 

(Ensign),  Beat  No.  5,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Houson,  Beat  No.  6,  Batt.  No.  2. 


1818 


Fifteenth  Regiment 


Nov.  11 — Samuel  Walker,  Colonel. 

1819 

July  29 — , Lieut.  Col. 

1818 

Nov.  12 — Nathan  Smith,  Major. 

Isaac  Wellborne,  Adjutant. 

Miller,  Quarter  master. 

Ephraim  B.,  Surgeon. 


1818 

Nov.  12 — John  Leonard  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 
1819 

Mar.  6 — Stephen  Biles  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 

(Ensign),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 


198 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


1818 

Nov.  15 — Henry  King-  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 

1819 

Feb.  20 — John  Mopley  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 

(Ensign),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 

1818 

Nov.  11 — James  Allan  (C’apt.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Nov.  11— Matthew  Pate  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  1. 

1819 

Feb.  13 — Archd  Campbell  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  1. 
1818 

Nov.  24 — Daniel  Millar  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  4,  Batt.  No.  1. 

1819 

Feb.  13 — Edwin  Keiton  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  4,  Batt.  No.  1. 
Feb.  13 — Daniel  B.  Turner  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  4,  Batt.  No.  1. 

1818 

Nov.  14 — Wade  Vining  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Nov.  17 — Horton,  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No. 

1819 

Nov.  13 — Parker  Phillips  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  2. 

18lfe 

Nov.  17 — -Elias  Wellborne  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  2. 


Nov.  15 — McDory  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No. 

Nov.  15 — Fowler  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No. 

Nov.  18 — Franks  (Capt),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Nov.  14 — Stilwell  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


199 


Nov.  14 — McPhell  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Nov.  20 — Cook  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Nov.  20 — Golding-  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  4,  Batt.  No.  2. 

(Ensign),  Beat  No.  4,  Batt.  No.  2. 

1819 


Oct.  4 — Edward  Dupuy  (Capt.),  Volunteer  Company. 

Marengo  County 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Offices,  When  Resigned  or  Removed) 
1818 

Feb.  28 — Michael  Kennard,  Chief  Justice. 

Feb.  28 — Josiah  Taylor,  J.  Q. 

Feb.  28 — Chas.  Lefebrie  Desnouettes,  J.  Q. 

Feb.  28— John  MaGrew,  J.  Q. ; Nov.  20,  1818. 

Nov.  21 — Henry  Pearson,  J.  Q. 

Nov.  21 — Ichabod  Watkins,  J.  Q. 

Feb.  28 — Pitkin  Barnes,  Sheriff. 

Nov.  21 — Wiliam  Barton,  J.  P. 

Nov.  21 — James  D.  Walker,  J.  P. 

Nov.  21 — James  Nail,  J.  P. 

1819 

Jan.  20 — John  Rhone,  J.  P. 

Apr.  14 — Joseph  Middlebrooks,  Constable. 

1818 

Sept.  11 — Phillipe  Pierce,  Constable. 

Nov.  28 — John  Mays,  Asss.  & Tax  Coll,  for  1819. 

Feb.  28— Walter  Childs,  J.  P. 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


200 

Feb.  28 — John  Kelly,  J.  P. 

Feb.  28 — Cotes,  J.  P. 

Feb.  28 — Lewis  Stephens,  J.  P. 

Feb.  28 — Shelby  Corgine,  Ranger  and  Coroner. 

Feb.  28 — Caleb  Russel,  Treasurer. 

June  14— William  Crear,  J.  P. 

Aug.  5 — Matthew  Brewer,  J.  P. 

1820 

Mar.  28 — Jacob  Linsey,  Cl.  Cir.  Court. 

Mar.  28 — William  Adams,  Cl.  Cty.  Court. 

Mar.  28 — Benjamin  Barton,  Sheriff. 

Mra.  28 — Archibald  McNeal,  Assessor. 

Mar.  28 — James  George,  Collector. 

Apr.  18 — Zachariah  Lundrum,  Coroner. 

Apr.  18 — Nicholas  S.  Parmenter,  Notary  Pub. 

Apr.  18 — George  Cunningham,  Auctioneer. 

July  24 — Nathan  H.  Boles,  Auctioneer. 

1822 

Feb.  4 — George  N.  Stewart,  Not.  Public;  Vice,  Parmenter. 
Mar.  24 — John  Lockhart,  Judge  Ctv  Ct.,  Vice,  S.  Crozine. 
July  8 — Michael  Kennard,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 

July  8 — Bassil  Meslier,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  8 — Lavender  Simmons,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  8 — Thomas  Davis,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  8 — Abraham  Bird,  Justice  Peace;  Removed. 

Aug.  8 — Edward  Williams,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  8 — Bowen  Bennet,  Justice  Peace. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


201 


Aug.  8 — Jesse  Birdsong-,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  8 — Garrison  Anderson,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  8 — Benjamin  W.  Johnston,  Justice  Peace. 

Sept.  22 — Wiliam  Ivons,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 

Sept.  22 — Alexander  McLeod,  Justice  Peace. 

1821 

Apr.  25 — Alford  Yarbrough,  Justice  Peace;  Vice.  W.  Ivons. 

May  6 — Mark  Porters,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  A.  Bird. 

Sept.  11 — William  B.  Bolles,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  M.  Kennard,  Re- 
signed. 

1822 

Mar.  16 — George  W.  Stewart,  Justice  Peace  ; Vice,  Bolles. 

July  8 — -Thomas  Shield,  Constable;  Resigned. 

Aug.  8 — Berimon  Adams,  Constable. 

Aug.  8 — Samuel  Wilson,  Constable. 

Aug.  8 — John  Curry,  Constable. 

Aug.  8 — Alexander  Anderson,  Constable. 

Sept.  22— Wyatt  P.  Johnston,  Constable. 

1821 

Sept.  11 — Nicholas  Paris,  Constable;  Vice,  Thos.  Shield. 

Organization  of  Ninth  Regiment  — Marengo  County  Militia 

(When  Appointed,  Name,  Office,  When  Resigned  or  Removed) 
1818 

Aug.  13 — Thomas  Ketchum,  Colonel. 

Aug.  13 — Walter  Childs,  Major,  2nd  Batt. 

Aug.  19 — Nathan  A.  Bolles,,  Adjutant,  n vr  r,. 


202 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Aug.  19 — David  Thomson,  Quartermaster. 

Aug.  19 — Pitkin  Barnes,  Surgeon. 

July  16 — -George  McCluskey  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 

July  16 — Stallion  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  1.  Batt.  No.  1. 

July  16 — Lyons  (Ensign),  Beat  No.,  Batt.  No.  1. 

| uh  16 — John  Madison  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 

July  16 — Isaac  Jones  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Juh  16 — Samuel  Cotton  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 

1819 

Apr.  16 — James  Lajoince  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Apr  16 — Beteau  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  1. 

1818 

July  16 — Rollin  Lugg  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  2. 

July  16 — Wilson  Perry  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  2. 

July  16 — John  Kirkham  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  2. 

July  16 — Alex  Birdsong  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  2. 

J ill}  16 — — - Anderson  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt!  No.  2. 

July  16 — Pleasant  White  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Apr.  16 — Cornelle  Roudet  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  1. 

July  16 — Leonard  Pearson  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  2. 

J ill}  16 — Edward  Early  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Jul}  16 — Reuben  Hildoth  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Morion  County 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Offices.  A '/hen  Resigned  or  Removed) 
1818 

Feb.  13 — Stephen  Harman.  J.  Q. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


203 


Nov.  18 — John  G.  Fulps,  J.  Q. 

Nov.  18 — Robert  Mason,  J.  Q. 

1819 

May  10 — Geo.  B.  Wiggins,  Ranger. 

1818 

Feb.  13 — William  Leach,  J.  P. 

Nov.  18 — James  Moore,  J.  P. 

Nov.  18 — Abner  Taylor,  J.  P. 

Nov.  18 — Colin  McKinney,  J.  P. 

Feb.  13 — Frederick  Weaver.  J.  P. 

Feb.  13— Isaac  Adair,  J.  P. 

July  21— Barny  M.  Flinn,  J.  P. 

1819 

Mar.  5 — Nathan  Morgan,  J.  P. 

1818 

Feb.  13 — Nicholas  Harris,  Constable. 

Feb.  13 — William  Spencer,  Constable. 

1819 

Jan.  13— Daniel  W.  Head,  J.  P. 

1818 

July  28 — , Sheriff. 

Feb.  13 — John  D.  Terrell,  Clk.  Sup.  Co. 

Feb.  13— John  F.  Neal,  Clk.  Co.  Co. 

Feb.  13 — Arch  V.  Alexander,  Coroner. 

1819 

July  10 — William  Coats,  Ass.  &:  Coll,  for  1819. 


204 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


July  28 — John  Fowlkes,  Treasurer. 

Oct.  28 — Andrew  Bowling,  Clk.  Oir.  Court. 

Oct.  28 — John  T.  Neal,  Clk.  Cty.  Court. 

Oct.  28 — James  Moore,  Sheriff;  Resigned. 

Oct.  28 — Bartlet  Sims,  Sheriff  ; Vice,  Jas.  Moore. 

June  24 — Archibald  Alexander,  Coroner. 

June  2-1 — Richard  Barry,  Notary  Public. 

Dec.  20 — Ezekiel  Marchbanks,  Sheriff ; Vice.  Removed. 

1821 

June  7 — William  Young,  Justice  Peace. 

June  7 — William  Davis,  Justice  Peace. 

Nov.  21 — Lemuel  Bean,  Justice  Peace. 

Nov.  21 — Daniel  Molloy,  Justice  Peace. 

Mar.  18 — Isaiah  Vanhoose,  Justice  Peace. 

Alar.  18 — Francis  Shoemaker,  Justice  Peace. 

First  Battalion,  Twenty-Second  Regiment  — Marion  County 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Offices,  When  Resigned  or  Removed) 
1819 

July  23 — , Major-Commandant. 

1818 

Nov.  14 — John  M.  Peebles,  Adjutant. 

Nov.  1-1 — ...  ._  , (Capt.),  Beat  No.,  Batt.  No.  1. 

_ (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  Batt.  No.  1. 

. (Ensign),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 
Abraham  P.  Gideon  (Capt.),  Beat  Na.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 
Richard  Hall  (Lieut),  Beat.  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


205 


James  Wise  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 

John  C.  Grizard  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Danl  Crenshaw  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  E 
Anthony  Nichols  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt  No.  1. 

1819 

July  23 — Nathl  Harlin  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  4,  Batt.  No.  1. 

July  23 — Allen  Russel  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  4,  Batt.  No.  1. 

July  23 — James  Merrill  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  4,  Batt.  No.  1. 

r (Capt.),  Beat  No.  5,  Batt.  No.  1. 

(Lieut.),  Beat  No.  5,  Batt.  No.  1. 

(Ensign),  Beat  No.  5,  Batt.  No.  1. 

(Capt.),  Beat  No.  6,  Batt.  No.  1. 

(Lieut.),  Beat  No.  6,  Batt.  No.  1. 

(Ensign),  Beat  No.  6,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Mobile  County 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Offices.  When  Resigned  or  Removed) 
Alvan  Robertson,  Chief  Justice;  App.  by  Gov.  Holmes. 
Cyrus  Sibley 
Chas.  Hall. 

1819 

July  30 — Sami  A.  Garrow,  J.  Q. 

July  30 — T.  Ludlow,  J.  Q.,  J.  P. 

Apr.  10— John  Bliss,  J.  P. 

Apr.  10 — Alfred  Gordon,  J.  P. 

Mar.  5 — H.  V.  Chamberlain,  Ass.  & Tax  Coll,  for  1819. 


206 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


1818 

Feb.  14 — Lewis  Judson,  County  Treasurer. 

Sami  Helms,  Constable. 

Timothy  McGraw,  Constable. 

1819 

Mar.  5— Joel  T.  Willis,  Clk.  Sup.  Co. 

Mar.  5 — Joel  T.  Willis,  Keeper  and  treasy.  Spanish  records,  died. 
1818 

June  22 — Hugh  H.  Rolston,  Clk.  Co.  Court. 

June  22 — Hugh  H.  Rolston,  Keeper  of  weights  and  measures. 

Nov.  24 — , Ranger. 

Mar.  13 — John  King,  Notary  Public;  Dead. 

1819 

Sept.  30 — Christopher  Heartt,  Auctioneer. 

Nov.  — Henry  V.  Chamberlain,  Harbor  Master. 

Nov.  — Richard  Dealy,  Pilot. 

1819 

Oct.  12 — Joel  T.  Willis,  Notary  Public;  Dead. 

Oct.  12 — Edward  Hall,  Justice  Peace. 

Nov.  23 — John  Whitehead,  Notary  Public. 

Oct.  28 — Robert  C.  Lane,  Clk.  Cir.  Ct. 

( let.  28 — Hugh  H.  Rolston,  Clk.  Cty.  Ct. 

Oct.  28 — D.  Duval,  Sheriff. 

1820 

Mar.  30 — Henry  Wheat,  Assessor. 

Mar.  30 — Henry  Wheat,  Collector. 

Mar.  30 — Ebenezer  Johnston,  Coroner. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


207 


Mar.  30 — R.  W.  Stibbling. 

Mar.  30 — Chris.  Heart,  Auctioneer. 

Mar.  30 — Jonathan  S.  Patten,  Auctioneer. 

Mar.  30 — Benjamin  I.  Randall,  Notary  Pub. 

Mar.  30— Edward  Hall,  Notary  Pub. 

Mar.  30 — John  Whitehead,  Notary  Pub. 

Mar.  17 — Addison  W.  Lane,  Not.  Public. 

John  E.  Brooks,  Port  Warden;  Deceased. 

Sept.  28 — William  L.  Sonntag,  Port  Warden;  Vice,  J.  E.  Brook.-. 

Charles  Leone,  T.  Sp.  Records ; Resigned. 

Nov.  9 — William  H.  Robertson,  Auctioneer. 

1821 

Feb.  16 — Thomas  M.  Daley,  B.  Pilot. 

Mar.  11 — Michael  McKinzey,  Notary. 

1822 

Mar.  14 — B.  B.  Breedin,  Notary. 

Mar.  14 — Lawrence  Haff,  Branch  Pilot  PT  of  Mobile. 

Mar.  14 — William  J.  Ingersoll,  Not.  Pub. 

May  2 — Samuel  Acre,  T.  Sp.  Record.* 

June  5 — Edwin  Lewis,  Justice  Peace. 

June  5 — Ebenezer  Johnston,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  19 — John  E.  Brooks,  Justice  Peace;  Died. 

Aug.  19 — Philip  McLusky,  Justice  Peace. 

1822 

Aug.  19 — Edward  Hall,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  19 — Richard  Tankersly,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  19 — John  Davis,  Justice  Peace. 


*Translator  of  Spanish  Records. 


208 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Aug.  19 — Benjamin  J.  Randall,  Justice  Peace  ; Resigned  Apr.  21. 


1821 

Peb.  16 — Thomas  J.  Manager.  Justice  Peace;  \ ice,  John  E.  Brooks, 
Dead. 

1822 

Feb.  26 — Daniel  Paul,  Justice  Peace. 

1822 

Jany.  15 — Beriman  B.  Breedin,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  Thos.  J.  Man- 
ager, Dec’d. 


1820 

Ala}'  12 — Elijah  Bee,  Constable. 

June  5 — 

Aug.  19 — James  Wilburn,  Constable. 

Aug.  19 — Daniel  Moore,  Constable. 

Aug.  19 — Timothy  Merrick,  Constable. 

Seventeenth  Regiment,  First  Battalion — Mobile  County  Militia 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Offices,  When  Resigned  or  Removed) 


1818 

May  13 — Deigo  McVoy,  Major  Comm. 

June  14 — Geo.  R.  Purkham,  Adjutant. 

Dec.  1.0 — C.  S.  Stewart,  Quarter  master. 

June  14 — Jacob  Ludlow,  Surgeon. 

June  14 — David  C.  Robertson  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  1. 
June  \4 — Thomas  Richardson  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  1. 
July  11 — , (Ensign),  Beat  No.  1. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


209 


1819 

Jan.  11 — John  Whitehead  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  2. 

(Lieut.),  Beat  No.  2. 

(Ensign),  Beat  No.  2. 

1818 

July  11 — Terry  McCuskin  (C'apt.),  Beat  No.  3. 

July  11 — Phillip  McC’losky  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  3 
July  11 — , (Ensign),  Beat  No.  3. 

1818 

Dec.  10 — Joshua  Clements  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  4. 

Dec.  10 — Killogg  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  4. 

, Lalle  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  4. 

1816 

Dec.  10— Charles  Hall  (Capt.)  ; Resigned  Mar.  31,  1818,  Beat  No.  5. 
Dec.  10 — Cyrus  Sively  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  5. 

Dec.  10 — Patrick  Byrne  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  5. 

1818 

Apr.  22 — Charles  C.  Foster  (Capt.),  Blakely  Volunteer  Co. 

Apr.  22 — J.  E.  Sheffield  (Lieut.),  Blakely  Volunteer  Co. 

Apr.  22 — J.  W.  Pettus  (Ensign),  Blakely  Volunteer  Co. 

Monroe  County 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Offices,  When  Resigned  or  Removed) 

1818 

Mar.  16 — Reuben  Hill,  Chief  Justice. 

Feb.  27 — James  Dillett,  J.  Q. 

Feb.  27 — Wingate,  J.  Q. 


210 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Feb.  27 — -Elijah  Lunsden,  J.  0. 

1819 

Mar.  20 — James  Perkins,  J.  Q. 

Feb.  28 — Richard  Danzy,  J.  P. 

Feb.  23 — James  Binson,  J.  P. 

1818 

Nov.  24 — Dread  Dawson,  J.  P. 

Feb.  27 — Mason  A.  Rivers,  J.  P. 

Feb.  27— John  Bell,  J.  P. 

Apr.  22 — John  Ratcliffe,  J.  P. 

1819 

Feb.  23— Jesse  Mabry,  J.  P. 

Feb.  23 — James  Binson,  Surgeon. 

Feb.  23 — Leevin  Rogers,  Constable. 

1818 

Nov.  24 — Jesse  Rice,  Constable. 

1819 

Feb.  23 — Abijah  Ward,  Ranger. 

Feb.  23 — John  Hare  Senr.,  Constable. 
Feb.  23 — John  H.  Graham,  Constable. 

1818 

Mar.  27 — Hugh  Wooland,  Constable. 
Apr.  28 — Nathan  Coker,  Constable. 

1819 

Feb.  23 — John  B.  Crump,  Constable. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


211 


1818 

Jan.  11 — Austin  Windham,  J.  P. 

July  7 — John  Gilmour,  J.  P. 

July  20— Willm.  Me  Curdy,  J.  P. 

1819 

Jan.  8 — Thomas  G.  Dixon,  J.  P. 

Jan.  8 — Henry  Taylor,  J.  P. 

Jan.  8 — Henry  G.  Williams,  J.  P. 

1811 

Aug.  4 — James  Sifnpson,  Treasurer. 

Joel  T.  Rions,  Constable. 

1818 

Aug.  12 — John  Gilmour,  Jr.,  Constable. 
1816 

Aug.  13 — Alex  Henderson,  J.  P. 

1818 

Aug.  4 — Nicholas  T.  Horton,  Coroner. 
1819 

Jan.  28 — Norborne  Chandler,  Auctioneer. 
1818 

Nov.  13— Abijah  Ward,  J.  P. 

Dec.  2 — William  McConico,  J.  Q. 

Dec.  2— Gilbert  Russell,  J.  P. 

Dec.  3 — Matthew  Wood,  J.  P. 

Dec.  3 — James  K.  Benson,  J.  P. 

Dec.  3 — Wm.  Walker,  J.  P. 


212 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Dec.  3 — Allan  Jones,  Constable. 

Dee.  3 — John  Murphy,  Constable. 

1819 

May  24 — William  Judge,  Constable. 

Oct.  28 — Abel  Farrar,  Clk.  Cir.  Ct. 

Oct.  28 — Harrison  Young,  Clk.  Cty.  Ct. 

Oct.  28 — Yancy,  Sheriff. 

Mar.  30 — Charles  Crawford,  Assessor. 

Mar.  30 — Jesse  Mayberry,  Collector. 

Mar.  30 — Abel  Farrar. 

Mar.  30 — Samuel  L.  Dewolf,  Notary  Public. 

Mar.  30 — Norman  E.  Chandler,  Auctioneer. 

Mar.  30 — Gordon  Robertson,  Auctioneer. 

Apr.  23 — Cyprian  Webster,  Auctioneer. 

Apr.  26 — William  W.  Walker,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  26 — Nathan  Coker,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 

Apr.  26 — Hugh  Finch,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  26 — Richard  Demsey,  Justice  Peace. 

May  6 — John  Carr,  Justice  Peace. 

May  6 — Dempsey  Wilburn,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 
May  6 — James  H.  Dreighton,  Justice  Peace. 

May  6 — Garland  Robertson,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 
Aug.  8 — Miles  Lewis,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  8 — Alexander  Terry,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  8 — Alexander  Henderson,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  8 — David  English,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  8 — William  R.  Hamilton,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  8 — Samuel  Black,  Justice  Peace. 


. SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


213 


Aug.  16 — John  Welch,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  16 — John  Briggs,  Justice  Peace;  Removed. 

1820 

June  6 — Benjamin  Foster,  Justice  Peace. 

June  6 — Thomas  Nicholson,  Justice  Peace. 

Sept.  22 — Miles  Lewis,  Justice  Peace. 

Sept.  22 — A.  Terry,  Justice  Peace. 

Nov.  9 — Ziba  Harden,  Justice  Peace. 

Nov.  9 — Matthew  Averett,  Justice  Peace. 

Dec.  22 — Thomas  Stokes,  Justice  Peace. 

July  10 — James  Flemming,  Justice  Peace. 

1821 

Jany.  20 — James  Moore,  Justice  Peace. 

Jany.  20 — John  Gully,  Justice  Peace. 

1820 

Apr.  26 — William  Sheppard,  Constable. 

Apr.  26 — William  F.  Eazell,  Constable. 

Apr.  26 — Dabney  Palmer,  Constable. 

Apr.  26 — Samuel  Landy,  Constable. 

Aug.  8 — George  W.  Wilson,  Constable. 

Aug.  8 — John  Francis,  Constable. 

Aug.  8 — Page  R.  Windham,  Constable. 

Aug.  8 — S.  M.  Rogers,  Constable. 

Sept.  16 — John  A.  White,  Constable. 

Sept.  16 — Charles  Wheeler,  Constable. 

Sept.  22 — George  W.  Wilson,  Constable. 

Nov.  9 — Richard  Waggister,  Constable. 


214 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


1821 

Jan.  20 — Samuel  Gulley,  Justice  Peace. 

Jan.  29 — John  Welch,  Justice  Peace. 

Jan.  29 — John  Briggs,  Justice  Peace;  30  Nov.  Resigned. 
Nov.  26 — Charles  O.  Foster,  Justice  Peace. 

Nov.  26 — Levin  Gayle,  Justice  Peace. 

Nov.  30 — Wiliam  Robert,  Justice  Peace  ; Vice,  Jno.  Briggs. 
1822 

Jan.  15 — Jesse  C.  Farren,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  G.  Robinson. 
May  4 — Wimbunk  Boney,  Justice  Peace. 

May  4 — Neill  Maclain,  Justice  Peace. 


Montgomery  County 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Offices,  When  Resigned  or  Removed) 
App.  by  Gov.  Holmes 

H.  D.  Stone,  Chief  Justice;  Oct.  2,  1819. 

1818 

Feb.  13— John  D.  Bibb,  J.  Q. 

Oct.  15 — Hudson  Powell,  J.  Q. 

1819 

Jan.  18 — Larkin  Cleveland,  J.  Q. 

1818 

Dec.  15— Walter  Ross,  Clk.  Sup.  & Co.  Co. 

Dec.  15 — John  Mintur,  Sheriff. 

Mar.  31 — Walter  R.  Ross,  Treasurer. 

Aug.  6 — ... , Coroner. 


Aug.  6 — Geo.  W.  Thompson,  Surveyor. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


Sept.  30 — John  Gaines,  Ranger. 

1818 

Feb.  13 — Jeremiah  Loftin,  J.  P. 

Feb.  13— Hudson  Powell,  J.  P. 

Mar.  30 — James  Jackson,  J.  P. 

Mar.  30 — Reuben  Jourdan,  J.  P. 

Mar.  30 — James  M.  Morison,  Constable. 

Feb.  13 — John  D.  Wyatt,  Constable. 

May  15 — Elias  Spenser,  J.  P. 

May  15 — Edmund  Gilchrist,  Constable. 

Aug.  6 — William  Barnett.  J.  P. 

Sept.  1 — John  P.  Hoggans,  J.  P. 

Sept.  1 — John  T.  Steward,  Constable. 

Sept.  1 — „ , Constable. 

Oct.  20 — Wiliam  Ashley,  J.  P. 

1819 

Jan.  5 — Lemuel  Trannum,  Constable. 

Jan.  18 — , Constable. 

Mar.  12 — Reuben  Jourdan,  Ass.  & Coll,  for  1819. 

Apr.  15 — John  C.  Adamson,  Constable. 

Sept.  — John  Goldthwaite,  Auctioneer;  Oct.  2,  1819. 

Oct.  28 — Sterling  E.  Harrison,  Clk.  Cty.  Ct. 

Oct.  28— Jesse  Evans,  Clk.  Ct.  Ct. 

Oct.  28 — John  Martin,  Sheriff. 

Mar.  17 — Andrew  Leprade,  Assessor. 

Mar.  17 — David  Graves,  Collector. 

Mar.  17 — Joseph  Swan,  Coroner. 


210 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Mar.  17 — Walter  AY.  Ross,  Auctioneer. 

Alar.  17 — L.  N.  Stone,  Auctioneer. 

Alar.  17 — Charles  Shaw,  Auctioneer. 

Apr.  25 — Benjamin  D.  Hassell,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  25 — Jeremiah  Loftin,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  25 — -William  Hansford,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 

Apr.  25 — David  Repeta,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  25 — William  Barnett,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  25 — Robert  Mitchell,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  25 — Willis  Atkins,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  25 — Samuel  Townsend,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  25 — John  G.  Ashley,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  25 — Isaac  Lunsdale,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned  7 July.  1820. 
May  3 — William  Baldwin,  Justice  Peace. 

May  3 — Wiliam  McLemore,  Justice  Peace. 

May  3 — William  H.  Waller,  Justice  Peace. 

May  3 — Samuel  Qualls,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned  7 July,  1821. 
May  3 — -George  Dabney,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 

May  3 — Wiliam  Sanson,  Justice  Peace. 

June  5 — William  Hudson,  Justice  Peace. 

June  5 — William  Grieves,  Justice  Peace. 

1819 

June  13 — George  Powell,  Justice  Peace. 

June  13 — Robert  Moseley,  Justice  Peace. 

1821 

Apr.  12 — Charles  McDade,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  12 — Thomas  M.  Barnett,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned  14  Mar 
1822. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


217 


July  5 — Daniel  Urquhart,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  G.  Dabney. 

1822 

July  5 — William  Masden,  Justice  Peace:  Vice,  J.  Lansdale. 

{an.  15 — Albert  M.  Borde,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  Hansford. 

1820 

Apr.  25 — John  Wood,  Constable. 

Apr.  25 — John  F.  Steward,  Constable. 

Apr.  25 — David  Evans,  Constable. 

Apr.  25 — Hezekiah  Harston,  Constable. 

May  3 — William  Flinn,  Constable. 

May  3 — Naaman  Shropshire,  Constable. 

May  3 — John  Huggins,  Constable. 

May  3 — John  Hand,  Constable. 

June  5 — William  Moon,  Constable. 

June  5 — Willey  Thompson.  Constable. 

1822 

Mar.  14 — Levi  D.  Eiland,  Justice  Peace. 

Mar.  14 — Alexander  McDade,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  Tho.  M.  Bar- 
nett. 

- June  21 — Fleming. 

Organization  of  the  Fourth  Regiment — Montgomery  County 

Militia 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Offices,  When  Resigned  or  Removed) 
1819 

Apr.  27 — William  Laprade,  Colonel. 

Apr.  27 — John  Gans,  Lieut.  Colonel. 

May  11 — Robert  Mitchel,  Major. 


218 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Apr.  27 — Sami  W.  Way  (Capt.),  Beat  Xo.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Apr.  27 — Elisha  Stinson  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Apr.  27 — Mordecai  Harrison  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 
Apr.  24 — John  Martin  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 

(Lieut.),  Beat  ATo.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 

(Ensign),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Apr.  27 — Hudson  Powell  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Apr.  27 — A.  Ferguson  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Apr.  27 — Isaac  Edwards  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  1. 
Apr.  27 — John  Huggins  (Capt),  Beat  No.  4,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Apr.  27 — Elisha  Mosby  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  4,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Apr.  27 — Elisha  Lully  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  4,  Batt.  No.  1. 

- (Capt.).  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 

(Lieut.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 

(Ensign),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Apr.  24 — George  Thomson  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  2. 
Apr.  26 — Peter  Pruit  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Apr.  26 — Sami  Welsh  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Apr.  27 — Reuben  Jourdan  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Apr.  26 — James  Jackson  (LieuL),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Aug.  31 — James  Griffin  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Aug.  27 — -Benj.  Young  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  4,  Batt.  No.  2. 

(Lieut.),  Beat  No.  4,  Batt.  No.  2. 

(Ensign). 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


219 


Perry  County 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

1820 

Mar.  —Thomas  Means,  Clk.  Cir.  Ct. 

Mar.  — William  Chesney,  Clk.  Cty.  Ct. 

Mar.  — Anderson  West,  Sheriff. 

Apr.  26 — Edward  McGraw,  Asssesor. 

Apr.  26 — Hiram  Robertson,  Collector. 

Apr.  26 — George  B.  McLusky,  Coroner. 

Apr.  17 — Armstead  Norman,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  17 — John  Wyatt,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned  1st  Aug. 
Apr.  26 — Thomas  Lowe,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  26 — Jesse  Crawford,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 

Apr.  29 — Thomas  A.  Morris,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 

Apr.  29 — Caleb  Russell,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  17 — William  Moose,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 

Apr.  29 — Wiliam  Read,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  29 — George  Y.  Farrar,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 

Apr.  29 — William  C.  H.  Finley,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 
May  13 — John  Nave,  Justice  Peace. 

May  13 — David  Cole,  Justice  Peace;  Removed. 

1821 

Jany.  31 — Andrew  Walker,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  J.  Wyatt. 
'Apr.  7 — Abraham  Madden,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  W.  Moose. 
Apr.  7 — A.  G.  Jackson,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  J.  Crawford. 
July  5 — Robert  Martin,  Justice  Peace. 

Oct.  18 — Robert  Sturdivant,  Justice  Peace. 


220 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Oct.  29 — M.  Bladson,  Justice  Peace. 

Xov.  21 — James  B.  Wright,  Justice  Peace  ; Resigned  ; Vice,  G.  Y. 
Farrar. 

Xov.  21 — Reuben  J.  Rogers,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  \Y.  C.  H.  Finlay. 
1822 

Jan.  25 — -John  McLaughlin,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  D.  Cole,  Re- 
moved. 

‘Mar.  Id — George  C.  King,  Justice  Peace. 

June  30 — Benjamin  Barton,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  26 — Dempsey  Jourdan,  Constable. 

Apr.  26 — William  Warren,  Constable. 

Apr.  29 — Alexander  Moore,  Constable. 

Apr.  29 — Richard  Tubbs,  Constable. 

Apr.  29 — William  Harwell,  Constable. 

May  13 — Jesse  Nave. 

Pickens  County 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

1821 

Mar.  20 — Adino  Griffin,  Sheriff. 

Mar.  20 — Peter  Kilpatrick,  Clk.  Cir.  Ct. 

Levi  Parker,  Clk.  Cty.  Ct 
Sept.  11— Underhill  Ellis,  Justice  Peace. 

Thomas  Shannon,  justice  Peace. 

Nov.  21 — Joseph  Parker,  Justice  Peace. 

Nov.  21 — Hezekiah  Williams,  Justice  Peace. 

Nov.  21 — Samuel  Carmile,  Justice  Peace. 

Nov.  21 — William  Johnson,  Justice  Peace. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


221 


Nov.  21 — Thomas  Gore,  Justice  Peace. 

Nov.  21 — Benjamin  Pollard,  Justice  Peace. 

1821 

Sept.  11 — Herbert  Bickham,  Constable. 

St.  Clair  County 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Offices,  When  Resigned  or  Removed) 
1818 

Nov.  20 — James  Thomson,  Chief  Justice. 

Nov.  20 — James  Hindwick,  J.  O. 

Nov.  20— John  Ash,  J.  Q. 

Nov.  20 — Phillip  Coleman,  J.  Q. 

Nov.  20 — Martin  Kidd,  J.  Q. 

1819 

July  8 — Matthew  D.  Tomison,  J.  Q. 

1818 

Nov.  20 — David  Connors,  Sheriff. 

Nov.  20— J.  C.  Roberts,  Clk.  Sup.  & Co.  Co. 

Nov.  21 — Jesse  Crawford,  Ass.  & Coll,  for  1819. 

Nov.  21 — Obadiah  Roberts,  Ranger. 

Nov.  21 — M.  D.  Tomison,  Treasurer. 

Nov.  20 — James  Cunningham,  J.  P. 

Nov.  20 — Peter  Ragsdale,  J.  P. 

Nov.  20 — John  McCollam,  J.  P. 

Nov.  20 — Abraham  Horton,  J.  P. 

1819 


July  8 — John  Massey,  J.  P. 


222  ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 

July  1-1 — Morris  Chenault,  J.  P. 

July  27— John  Dill,  J.  P. 

July  27 — William  McCaig,  Constable. 

July  27 — John  Hood,  Constable. 

July  27 — John  Blackstock,  Constable. 

1818 

Nov.  20 — Henry  Robertson,  Constable. 

1819 

July  8 — Obadiah  Roberts,  Constable. 

Oct.  28 — Jesse  C.  Roberts,  Clk.  Cir.  Court. 

Oct.  28 — Morris  Chenault,  Clk.  Cty.  Court. 

Oct.  28 — John  Bush,  Sheriff. 

Oct.  28 — John  Massey,  Assessor. 

1820 

Apr.  13 — Norris  Hendon,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  13 — Samuel  Mays,  Justice  Peace. 

June  20 — William  Ward,  Justice  Peace. 

June  20 — John  F.  Dill,  Justice  Peace. 

June  20 — Peter  Ragsdale,  Justice  Peace;  Deceased. 
June  20 — James  Cunningham,  Justice  Peace. 

June  20 — Moses  Lester,  Justice  Peace  . 

June  20 — Isaac  Love,  Justice  Peace;  Removed. 

June  20 — Samuel  Massey,  Justice  Peace. 

June  20 — Charles  C.  Clayton,  Justice  Peace. 

July  20 — John  L.  Bickerstaff,  Justice  Peace. 

July  20 — Hugh  Lollar,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 
Aug.  19 — Henry  Box,  Justice  Peace. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


223 


Aug.  19 — Thomas  Sloan,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  19 — Jacob  Walker,  Justice  Peace. 

Aug.  19 — Samuel  Boyce,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned  20  Oct.,  1821. 
1821 

Jan.  13 — Obidiah  Roberts,  Justice  Peace  ; Resigned. 

Feb.  25 — Austin  Wood,  Justice  Peace. 

July  14 — John  Moody,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  E.  Roberts. 

Sept.  11— Hugh  Callahan,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  Isaac  Love. 

Nov.  24 — Jesse  Fondran,  Justice  Peace. 

Nov.  24 — Samuel  Walker,  Justice  Peace. 

1822 

Jan.  29 — Wm.  V.  Johnston,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  P.  Ragsdale. 
Mar.  26 — Aba  Roberts,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  Lollar. 


1820 

Apr.  13 — John  Patrick,  Constable. 

Apr.  13 — John  Nicholson,  Constable. 

Apr.  13 — Guin  L.  Brown,  Constable. 

Apr.  13 — John  Littlefield,  Constable. 

Apr.  13 — W illiam  Hobbs,  Constable. 

July  24 — William  Sides,  Constable. 

Aug.  19 — Elijah  Bell,  Constable. 

Aug.  19 — Golden  Fields,  Constable. 

Aug.  19 — John  McHugh,  Constable. 

1822 

Apr.  20 — Obadiah  Mize,  Justice  Peace. 
Apr.  20 — Stephen  Chenault,  Justice  Peace. 


224 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Nineteenth  Regiment,  First  Battalion — St.  Clair  County  Militia 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Offices,  When  Resigned  or  Removed) 
1818 

Nov.  20 — David  Conner,  Major  Comm. 

Nov.  20 — Willm.  M.  Morrow,  Adjutant. 

Nov.  20 — Furlton  Hall  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  1. 

(Lieut.),  Beat  No.  1. 

Nov.  20 — Willm.  Harper  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  1. 

1819 

July  27 — John  Bush  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  2. 

July  27 — Jeremiah  Bason  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  2. 

July  27 — Taylor  Kelly  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  2. 

David  Silas  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  3. 

-(Lieut.),  Beat  No.  3. 

(Ensign),  Beat  No.  3. 

Hugh  Lallahan  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  4. 

(Lieut. ) , Beat  No.  4. 

William  Crump  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  4. 

1819 

July  27 — Baker  Delany  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  5. 

July  27 — Chas.  Dobbs  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  5. 

July  27 — William  Lang  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  5. 

July  27 — Jesse  Ragsdale  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  6. 

(Lieut.),  Beat  No.  6. 

—.(Ensign),  Beat  No.  6. 

-(Capt.),  Beat  No.  7. 

(Lieut.),  Beat  No.  7. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


225 


(Ensign),  Beat  No.  7. 

Shelby  County 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Offices,  When  Resigned  or  Removed) 

1818 

Feb.  14 — George  Phillips,  Chief  Justice. 

Feb.  14 — Bennet  Ware,  J.  Q. 

Feb.  14 — Patrick  Hays,  J.  Q. 

Nov.  20 — Needham  Lee,  J.  Q. 

James  Walker,  J.  Q. 

Feb.  14 — William  L.  Wallace,  Ranger;  Removed. 

Feb.  14 — William  Gilbert,  Treasurer. 

Feb.  14 — Bennett  Ware,  County  Surveyor. 

Feb.  14 — James  Hamilton,  Sheriff. 

1819 

July  30— William  Farell,  Sr.,  J.  P. 

1818 

Feb.  14 — Henry  Avery,  C'lk.  Sup.  & Co.  Co. 

Nov.  20 — Arthur  Taylor,  Ass.  & Tax  Coll,  for  1819 
Feb.  14 — Jonathan  Musick,  J.  P. 

Feb.  14 — David  Morida,  J.  P. 

Feb.  14 — Peter  Ragsdale,  J.  P. 

Feb.  14 — James  Martin,  J.  P. 

Feb.  14 — Abraham  Horton,  J.  P. 

Nov.  20 — James  Tubb,  Constable. 

Nov.  20 — James  Bailey,  Constable. 

Nov.  20 — Richard  Crowson,  J.  P. 

Nov.  20 — William  Johnson,  J.  P. 


226 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Nov.  20 — Benj.  Davis,  J.  P. 

Nov.  20 — William  Lee,  J.  P. 

Nov.  20 — Isaac  McQuire,  J.  P. 

Nov.  20 — Herckial  Bayles,  J.  P. 

1819 

J uly  23 — Harry  Avery,  Ranger. 

June  1— Benj.  Frost,  Constable. 

Oct.  28 — Henry  Avery,  Clk.  Cir.  Court ; Resigned. 

Oct.  28 — James  Walker,  Clk.  Cty.  Court. 

Oct.  28 — William  B.  Arnold,  Sheriff. 

Apr.  1 — Garland  Oldham,  Assessor. 

Apr.  1 — William  Arnold,  Auctioneer. 

Apr.  1 — Minor  W.  Havis,  Coroner. 

Apr.  1 — William  Cameran,  Collector. 

Apr.  1 — Jack  Shackleford,  Notary  Public. 

1821 

Aug.  31—' Thomas  W.  Smith,  Clk.  Co.  Ct. ; Vice,  H.  Avery. 

1820 

Apr.  13 — Jesse  Evans,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 

Apr.  13 — Thomas  E.  Bailey,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 

Apr.  13 — William  Cameron,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  13 — Job  Mason,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  13 — Thomas  Payne,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  13 — Moses  Walters,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  13 — Thomas  Stone,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 

Apr.  13 — William  West,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 

Apr.  13 — James  Walker,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


227 


Apr.  13 — Edward  W.  Powell,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned  9 Dec.  1820. 
Dec.  9 — Martin  McLeroy,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  E.  W.  Powell. 

1821 

Jan.  13 — Benjamin  C.  Hazlet,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  Thomas  Stone. 

Jan.  13 — Cornelius  Elliotte,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned;  Vice,  Jesse 
Evans. 

Apr.  15 — Jack  Shackleford,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  T.  L.  Bailey. 

Apr.  15 — James  Pierce,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  C.  Elliotte. 

Mar.  17 — Charles  Mundine,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  J.  Walker. 

Oct.  18 — James  W.  Burk,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  Wm.  West,  Re- 
signed. 

Nov.  9 — John  Marony,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 

Nov.  9 — Joab  Lawler,  Justice  Peace. 

1822 

Mar.  14 — Abraham  Smith,  Justice  Peace. 

Mar.  14 — Martin  Jennings,  Justice  Peace. 

Mar.  18 — David  Fletcher,  Justice  Peace. 

1820 

Apr.  13 — Uriah  Jourdan,  Constable. 

Apr.  13 — Janies  McLaughlin,  Constable. 

Apr.  13 — Blassengame  Neighbors,  Constable. 

Apr.  13 — Moses  Johnston,  Constable. 

Apr.  13 — John  Parsons,  Constable. 

Dec.  9 — John  Marony,  Constable. 

1821 


Oct.  29 — Charles  Elliot,  Constable. 


228 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Eighteenth  Regiment,  First  Battalion — Shelby  County  Militia 

(When  Appointed,  Name,  Offices,  When  Resigned  or  Removed) 
1818 

Nov.  19 — James  Hamilton.  Major  Comm.  1st  Batt. 

Nov.  19 — Adjutant,  1st  Batt. 

— (Capt.),  Beat  No.  1. 

(Lieut.),  Beat  No.  1. 

(Ensign),  Beat  No.  1. 

1819 

Jan.  1 — Isaac  Sollet  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  2. 

Jan.  1 — Amos  Elliot  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  2. 

1818 

Nov.  19 — Stewart,  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  2. 

Nov  19 — Isaac  McGuin  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  3. 

Nov.  19 — Sami  Howard  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  3. 

Nov.  19 — James  Wilson  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  3. 

1819 

June  1 — John  Bickerstaff  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  4. 

1818 

Nov.  19 — James  McCane  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  4. 

1819 

June  1 — James  McLaughlin  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  4. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


229 


Tuscaloosa  County 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Offices,  When  Resigned  or 
1818 

Feb.  20 — James  O.  Crump,  Chief  Justice. 

July  23 — Patrick,  J.  O. 

Aug.  20 — William  Purvis,  J.  Q. 

Nov.  14 — William  Rupee,  J.  Q. 

Aug.  20 — James  Drinnon,  J.  P. 

Aug.  20 — George  Roberts,  J.  P. 

Aug.  20 — Mark  Haiden,  Coroner. 

Aug.  20 — Aaron  Lankusta  , Constable. 

Aug.  20 — Absalom  Dinson,  Constable. 

Aug.  20 — Samuel  Rhodes,  Constable. 

William  D.  Terrill,  Clk.  Sup.  Co. 

Thomas  Lovell,  County  Treasurer. 

Richard  Harrison,  County  Surveyor. 

Matthew  B.  Click,  Clk.  Co.  Co. 

John  Smith,  Sheriff. 


1819 

Mar.  22— James  Hill,  J.  P. 

John  Campbell,  J.  P. 

Thomas  Whitson,  J.  P. 

Abner  Nash,  J.  P. 

Boley  Connor,  J.  P. 

James  Hardine,  Constable. 
Robert  M.  Elvany,  Constable. 


Removed) 


230 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


1818 

Nov.  14 — John  Pennington,  J.  P. 

Nov.  1-1 — Thomas  Lovel,  J.  P. 

Nov.  14 — William  Bunyan,  Jr.,  J.  P. 

Nov.  14 — Sampson  M.  Cowan,  J.  P. 

1818 

Nov.  14 — Joseph  Eddis,  J.  P. 

Nov.  16 — Johnson  Bickerstaff,  Constable. 

William  White,  Constable. 

Nov.  16 — Levin  Powel,  Coll.  & Ass.  for  1819. 

1819 

Mar.  25 — Joseph  D.  Harrison,  J.  P. 

Mar.  25 — John  Bailey,  Constable. 

Oct.  25— John  Hodge,  Sheriff. 

Oct.  25 — George  W.  Churchill,  Constable. 
Oct.  28 — Matthias  B.  Click,  Clerk  Cir.  Ct. 
Oct.  28 — Henry  T.  Anthony,  Clerk  Cty.  Ct. 
Oct.  John  Hodge,  Sheriff. 

1820 

Mar.  30 — Joseph  D.  Harrison,  Assessor. 

Mar.  30 — Peter  A.  Remson,  Collector. 

Mar.  30 — James  Rather,  Coroner. 

Mar.  30 — Hopson  Owen,  Notary  Public. 

Mar.  30 — Janies  Pitcher,  Auctioneer. 

1822 

Mar.  18 — James  B.  Childress,  Surveyor. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


231 


1820 

Aur.  18 — Samuel  Rhodes,  Constable. 
Apr.  18 — John  Hill,  Constable. 

Apr.  18 — James  Baker,  Constable. 

Apr.  18 — James  Wright,  Constable. 
Apr.  18 — James  Mitchell,  Constable. 
Apr.  18 — Edmond  T.  Bacon,  Constable. 
Apr.  18 — Thomas  I.  Wash,  Constable. 


May 

5— 

-William  Seal,  Constable. 

May 

5— 

-James  Shaw,  Constable. 

May 

5— 

-West  George,  Constable. 

May 

5— 

-Bright  McLendon,  Constable. 

May 

5— 

-John  Little,  Constable. 

June  28 — Thomas  Poe,  Constable. 

July  8 — William  Cannon,  Constable. 

Sept.  9 — Matthew  Lunkford,  Constable. 

1821 

Feby.  21 — Alexander  Faith,  Constable. 

1820 

Apr.  18 — Moses  Collins,  Justice  Peace. 

Aquila  McElroy,  Justice  Peace. 

Charles  Levin,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 
Levin  Powell,  Justice  Peace. 

James  Drennan,  Justice  Peace. 

David  Buck,  Justice  Peace. 

James  Hill,  Justice  Peace. 

Michael  Moore,  Justice  Peace. 


232 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


John  Wilson,  Justice  Peace. 

James  Hudson,  Justice  Peace. 

John  Campbell,  Justice  Peace;  Removed. 

John  Crenshaw,  Justice  Peace. 

Robert  C.  Fraywick,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 
Joseph  D.  Harrison,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 

June  5 — James  Knox,  Justice  Peace. 

William  F.  Lucky,  Justice  Peace. 

John  Thomas,  Justice  Peace. 

John  Moore,  Justice  Peace. 

William  Griffith,  Justice  Peace. 

Martin  Adams,  Justice  Peace. 

Robert  McRight,  Justice  Peace. 

John  Saunders,  Justice  Peace. 

Joseph  Barnet,  Justice  Peace. 

Aaron  Shannon,  Justice  Peace. 

28 — Robert  Walker,  Justice  Peace. 

John  Baillie,  Justice  Peace;  Refused  to  Qualify. 
July  8 — Thomas  Shannon,  Justice  Peace. 

James  Heflin,  Justice  Peace. 

Oct.  14 — John  Helms,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 

1821 

Mar.  5 — Zachery  Middleton,  Justice  Peace;  Removed. 

Mar.  5 — James  Richards,  Justice  Peace;  Removed. 

26 — Richard  Jones,  Justice  Peace;  Removed. 

Nov.  21 — -Jonathan  Bird,  justice  Peace;  Vice,  R.  Jones. 

Nov.  26 — Isaac  Patrick,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  Jno.  Moon. 

Dec.  17  -John  M.  Jenkins,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  Chs.  Lenon. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


233 


1822 

Mar.  15 — Thomas  Lindsey,  Justice  Peace. 
Mar.  15 — Jolly  Jones,  Justice  Peace. 

Mar.  15 — James  Jenkins,  Justice  Peace. 
Apr.  13 — George  Gates,  Justice  Peace. 
Apr.  13 — James  Foster,  Justice  Peace. 


5th  Regiment — Tuskaloosa  County  Militia 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Offices,  When  Resigned  or  RemovedJ 
1818 

May  14 — Thomas  C.  Hunter,  Colonel. 

May  14 — , Adjutant. 

May  14 — Matt  Ware  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 

May  14 — Willm  Young  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 

May  14 — Daniel  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 

George  Read  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 

James  Ashmore  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 
William  Phillips  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 
George  Hill  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Jesse  Hiflin  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  1 . 
William  Young  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Sam  C.  Edmonson  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  4,  Batt.  No.  1. 

John  Brownlee  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  4,  Batt.  No.  1. 
William  Follis  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  4,  Batt.  No.  1. 

(Capt.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  2. 

(Lieut.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  2. 

— ' (Ensign),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  2. 

William  Scales  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  2. 


234 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Thos.  Blassingame  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  2. 
Edmond  Lyon  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Henry  Bird  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Wm.  McOuire  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Hugh  McCory  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  2. 
Abraham  Hargiss  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  4,  Batt.  No.  2. 
Burwell  Traweek  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  4,  Batt.  No.  2. 
James  Westmoreland  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  4,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Washington  County 

(When  Appointed,  Name,  Office,  When  Resigned  or  Removed) 
1818 

Feb.  20 — George  Buchanan,  Chief  Justice. 

Feb.  21 — William  Godfrey,  J.  Q. 

Feb.  21 — James  Thomson,  J.  Q. 

Feb.  21 — William  Trotter,  J.  Q. 

1819 

Mar.  20 — William  Grayson,  J.  P. 

1818 

Feb.  3— James  Mills,  J.  P. 

Feb.  3 — Grey  Sims,  J.  P. 

Feb.  3 — Walter  Woodyard,  J.  P. 

Feb.  3 — Daniel  Smith,  J.  P. 

Feb.  3 — James  Thomson,  J.  P. 

Feb  3 — James  Tiggart,  J.  P. 

Mar.  7 — Pleasant  May,  J.  P.  for  S.  Stephens. 

Mar.  10 — Thomas  Eastin,  J.  P. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


235 


1819 

Mar.  29 — Emmitt  E.  Sexton,  Constable  for  St.  Stephens. 
1818 

Mar.  12 — John  V.  Welsh,  Constable  for  Rodney. 

May  5 — William  Bowling-,  J.  P. 

Mar.  9 — David  Fore,  Constable. 

June  11 — James  C.  Brown,  J.  P. 

1819 

Feb.  1 — Jesse  Grimes,  J.  P. 

1818 

Nov.  13 — George  Welsh,  Constable. 

Nov.  17 — Harrison  Cooper,  Constable. 

Dec.  30 — -Josiah  D.  Lister,  Ass.  & Coll,  for  1819. 

1819 

Jan.  28 — Silas  Dunsmore,  J.  P. 

Jan.  28 — Silas  Dunsmore,  Auctioneer. 

Jan.  23 — Alexander  Faith,  Constable. 

1818 

Mar.  9 — James  G.  Lyon,  Notary  Public. 

1819 

Oct.  27 — Josiah  D.  Lister,  Sheriff. 

Oct.  27 — James  G.  Lyon,  Clk.  Cir.  Court. 

Oct.  27 — Jesse  Grimes,  Clk.  Inf.  Co. 

Oct.  27 — Thos.  M.  McKory,  Constable  (given). 

Oct.  27 — , Constable. 


23o 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Oct.  28 — Janies  G.  Lyon,  Clk.  Cir.  Ct. 

Oct.  28 — Jesse  C.  Grimes,  Clk.  C’ty.  Ct. 

Oct.  28 — Josiah  D.  Lester,  Sheriff. 

Apr.  17 — William  Grimes,  Assessor. 

Apr.  17 — Josiah  D.  Lester,  Collector. 

Apr.  17 — James  G.  Lyon,  Notary  Public. 

Apr.  17 — -Charles  L.  S.  Jones,  Notary  Public. 

Apr.  17 — Dennison  Darling,  Auctioneer. 

Apr.  17 — Thomas  H.  Herndon,  Auctioneer. 

Apr.  17 — -John  F.  Everett,  Auctioneer. 

Apr.  17 — James  C.  Brown,  Coroner. 

1821 

( )ct.  30 — Nathan  Whiting,  Notary  Public. 

1820 

Apr.  18 — Abraham  Philips,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  18 — James  Moore,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  18 — Robert  Carson,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  18 — Gabriel  Allen,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  18 — Daniel  Coleman,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  18 — Shadrack  J.  Price,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  18 — Joseph  M.  Flant,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  18 — William  Henry,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  18 — William  Grayson,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  18 — Daniel  Smith,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  18 — Jesse  Grimes,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  18 — James  C.  Brown,  Justice  Peace. 

Apr.  18 — James  H.  Dearing,  Justice  Peace.  President  of  St.  Ste- 
phens Commission  expired. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


237 


1821 

Feb.  12 — -Reuben  Chamberlain,  Justice. 

1822 

Jan.  15 — Michael  Taylor,  Pres.  St.  Stephens. 

1820 

Apr.  18 — John  McLean,  Constable. 

Apr.  18 — Frances  Harvey,  Constable. 

Apr.  18 — Joseph  Carson,  Constable. 

Apr.  18 — Silas  Carrington,  Constable. 

Apr.  18 — James  Bevel,  Constable. 

Apr.  18 — William  Fennin,  Constable. 

Third  Regiment,  Second  Battalion — Washington  County  Militia 

(When  Appointed,  Names,  Offices,  When  Resigned  or  Removed) 
1818 

May  12 — James  Thomson,  Colonel. 

1819 

Aug.  7 — Robert  Caller,  Jr.,  Lieut.  Colonel. 

Aug.  7 — Joseph  Thompson,  Major. 

1818 

June  15 — Alex  B.  Smoot,  Adjutant. 

Nov.  27 — Thomas  Eastin,  Quartermaster. 

(Capt.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Nov.  27 — Richard  Bowsworth  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 
Nov.  27 — Edward  Herndon  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  1. 
Nov.  28 — S.  J.  Price  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Nov.  27 — Daniel  Coleman  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 


238 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Xov.  27 — Jesse  Cobb  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  1. 


(Capt.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Nov.  28 — , (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Nov.  28 — William  Gough,  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  1. 

Nov.  28 — (Capt.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Nov.  28 — (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  2. 


Nov.  26 — John  Vanice  (Ensign),  Beat  No.  1,  Batt.  No.  2. 
Nov.  26 — John  McRory  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  2. 
Nov.  28 — John  Griffin  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Nov.  28 — (Ensign),  Beat  No.  2,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Nov.  27 — Peter  Cartwright  (Capt.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  2. 
Nov.  27— Gabriel  Allen  (Lieut.),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  2. 
Nov.  28 — (Ensign),  Beat  No.  3,  Batt.  No.  2. 

Wilcox  County 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

1820 

Mar.  2 — Duncan  C.  Smith,  Clk.  C’ir.  Ct. 

Mar.  2 — Duncan  C.  Smith,  Clk.  Cty.  Ct. 

Mar.  2 — Archibald  K.  Smith,  Sheriff;  Failed  to  give  bond. 
May  13 — Archibald  K.  Smith,  Sheriff;  Pro.  Tern. 

May  13 — Ephraim  Pharr,  Assessor. 

May  13 — Robert  H.  Gregg,  Collector. 

May  13 — Samuel  Dickson,  Coroner. 

May  13 — Benjamin  Williamson,  Notary  Public. 

May  13 — Robert  J.  W.  Reel,  Auctioneer. 

Aug.  17— Archibald  K.  Smith,  Sheriff. 

Sept.  20 — John  C.  Gamble,  Justice  Peace. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


239 


Sept.  20 — William  Matthews,  Justice  Peace. 

Sept.  20 — Benjamin  Hoff,  Justice  Peace. 

Sept.  20 — B.  Hickenbottom,  Justice  Peace. 

Sept.  20 — John  Gullet,  Justice  Peace ; Resigned. 

Sept.  20 — Matthew  Wood,  Justice  Peace;  Resigned. 

Sept.  20 — Simon  Donald,  Justice  Peace. 

Sept.  20 — William  Hays,  Justice  Peace. 

1821 

Jany.  19- — John  Jenkins,  Justice  Peace. 

Jany.  19 — Jeremiah  Tharp,  Justice  Peace. 

Oct.  29 — Ephraim  Pharr,  Justice  Peace;  Vice,  M.  Wood. 

Oct.  29 — William  Mason,  Sr.,  Justice  Peace  ; Vice,  John  Gullet. 

1819 

Sept.  20 — James  C.  Drew,  Constable. 

Sept.  20 — William  Hinson,  Constable. 

Sept.  20 — Weightman  Gullet,  Constable. 

Sept.  20 — John  Smith,  Constable. 

STATE  MILITIA 

Number  of  Regiments  and  in  what  counties 
From  Register  of  Appointments  of  the  Civil  and  Military — 1818 

(Regiments,  Counties,  Battalions) 

First  Regiment,  Clarke  County  2 

Second  Regiment,  Monroe  County  __ 2 

Third  Regiment,  Washington  County  2 

Fourth  Regiment,  Montgomery  County  2 

Fifth  Regiment,  Tuskaloosa  County  2 


240 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Sixth  Regiment,  Blount  County  2 

Seventh  Regiment.  Autauga  County  2 

Eighth  Regiment,  Lawrence  County  2 

Ninth  Regiment,  Marengo  County  2 

Tenth  Regiment,  Franklin  County  2 

Eleventh  Regiment,  Conecuh  County  1 

Twelfth  Regiment,  Cahawba  County  1 

Thirteenth  Regiment,  Dallas  County  _____  1 

Fourteenth  Regiment,  Madison  County  4 


Fifteenth  Regiment,  Madison  County  — 
Sixteenth  Regiment,  Lauderdale  County 


Seventeenth  Regiment,  Mobile  County  1 

Eighteenth  Regiment,  Shelby  Count}'  1 

Nineteenth  Regiment,  St.  Clair  County  1 

Twentieth  Regiment,  Limestone  County  4 

Twenty  First  Regiment,  Limestone  County  

Twenty  Second  Regiment,  Marion  County  1 

Twenty  Third  Regiment,  Baldwin  County  1 

Twenty  Fourth  Regiment,  Cotaco  County  


(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

1821 

Nov  — Israel  Pickens,  Governor  and  Commander  in  Chief. 
Dec.  10 — John  M.  Taylor,  Aid-de  Camp. 

14 — John  Gayle,  Jr.,  Aid-de-Camp. 

1822 

Jan.  15 — -Edmund  Lane,  Aid-de-Camp. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


241 


First  Division,  First  Brigade,  First  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

John  Brahan,  Major  General. 

William  J.  Adair,  Brigadier  General. 

1820 

Mar.  28 — Lewis  Kirby,  Colonel ; Resigned. 

1821 

Oct.  29 — Richard  B.  Clayton,  Colonel;  Vice,  L.  Kirby. 

James  Smith,  Lieut.  Colonel;  Thrown  into  35  Regt. 

1822 

Apr.  20 — W.  Evan  Bolton,  Lieut.  Colonel. 

William  Thornton,  Major;  Resigned. 

1822 

July  30 — Joshua  Browning,  Major;  Vice,  Wm.  Thornton. 

July  8 — Nathaniel  Hillion,  Captain. 

July  8 — Euin  Houston,  Captain. 

July  8 — Austin  Kendrick,  Captain. 

July  8 — John  Beason,  Captain. 

July  8 — Giles  McNalty,  Captain;  Resigned. 

July  8 — John  Brewer,  Captain. 

July  8 — Isaac  Clark,  Captain. 

July  8 — James  Rutherford,  Captain. 

July  8 — Charles  Edwards,  Captain. 

July  8 — Robert  Morris,  Captain. 

1821 

May  29 — John  Lusk,  Captain;  Vice,  G.  McNulty. 


242 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


1822 

Aug.  24 — Jno.  K.  Tate,  Captain. 

Juh  8 — John  Smith,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

July  8 — Hiram  Walker,  Lieutenant. 

July  8 — Hzekiah  Pickens,  Lieutenant. 

July  8 — William  Prewit,  Lieuenant. 

July  8 — John  Ho  wart,  Lieuenant. 

July  8 — Samuel  McGehee,  Lieutenant. 

July  8 — Wiliam  King,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

1820 

July  8 — William  Clark,  Lieutenant. 

July  8 — Isam  Gideon,  Lieutenant. 

July  8 — Mark  Holder,  Lieutenant. 

1821 

Mar.  5 — Jabez  Pickens,  Lieutenant,  Vice,  John  Smith. 
May  29 — Archibald  Dickson,  Lieutenant ; Vice,  W.  King. 

1822 

June  1 — Adam  Self,  Lieutenant. 

1820 

July  8 — James  Brown,  Ensign. 

July  8 — Wiliam  Snare,  Ensign. 

July  8 — Elias  Nelson,  Ensign. 

July  8 — John  Rachel,  Ensign. 

July  8 — Wiliam  Baker,  Ensign. 

July  8 — John  Clay,  Ensign;  Removed. 

July  8 — James  Weaver,  Ensign. 

July  8 — William  Scott,  Ensign. 


. SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


243 


July  8 — John  Sexon,  Ensign. 

July  8 — Jeremiah  Matthews,  Ensign. 

1821 

May  29 — Shipman  Reed,  Ensign;  Vice,  John  Clay. 

(Volunteers) 

1820 

July  24 — Isam  Pendigrass,  Capt.,  Riflemen. 

July  24 — Absolom  Hellion,  Lieut.,  Riflemen. 

July  24 — Nathaniel  Hickman,  Ensign,  Riflemen. 

July  24 — John  Hampton,  Capt.  Cavalry. 

July  24 — George  Griffith,  Lieutenant. 

July  24 — John  Bryant,  Cornet. 

First  Division,  First  Brigade,  Second  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 


1820 

Mar.  28 — Nathl.  Smith,  Colonel. 

Mar.  28 — Henry  King,  Lieut.  Colonel. 

Mar.  28 — John  Cook,  Major. 

May  22 — Lewis  Saunderson,  Captain. 

May  22 — Lewis  Estis,  Captain ; Removed. 

May  22 — Edward  Dupree,  Captain ; Removed. 

May  22 — William  Kirkland,  Captain;  See  Volunteers. 
May  22 — David  Conley,  Captain. 

May  22 — Giles  McElroy,  Captain. 

May  22 — -Nathaniel  Terry,  Captain. 

May  22 — Miles  H.  Power,  Captain;  Removed. 


244 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


May  22 — Eli  Petty,  Captain. 

May  22 — John  Milham,  Captain, 

1821 

May  6 — Josiah  Raney,  Captain;  Died. 

July  12 — -Samuel  Lewis,  Captain;  Vice,  E.  Dupree. 

1822 

May  25 — Thompson  Harris,  Captain ; Vice,  Estes. 

Jul}-  31 — -Morgan  Smith,  Captain;  Vice,  Miles  H.  Power. 

May  22 — George  Robert,  Lieutenant;  Not  Accepting. 

May  22 — David  Braton,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Samuel  Lewis.  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Benjamin  F.  Clark,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Timothy  Barnet,.  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Stephen  King,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — William  Wadkins,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Moses  Fowler,  Lieutenant ; Resigned,  April  1822. 

May  22 — Thomas  Johnston,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — William  F.  Scott,  Lieutenant. 

Sept.  8 — Traylors  Barnes,  Lieutenant. 

Dec.  13 — Edward  Keeton,  Lieutenant;  G.  Robert,  not  accepted. 
1822 

July  31 — John  W.  Sneed,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  M.  Fowler. 

1820 

May  22 — Abrarri  Kendrick,  Ensign;  Not  Accepting. 

May  22 — Robert  Boyd,  Ensign;  Not  Accepting. 

May  22 — Charles  M.  Conley,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Samuel  D.  Clark,  Ensign. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


245 


May  22 — George  Blackburn,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Thomas  Elkins,  Ensign ; Resigned. 

May  22 — Alexander  Cavot,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Simeon  Fowler,  Ensign;  Removed. 

May  22 — James  Teague,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Owen  Griffith,  Ensign. 

1821 

May  29 — Joseph  Moore,  Ensign;  Vice,  L.  Elkins. 

Sept.  8 — Parker  Philips,  Ensign. 

Sept.  8 — John  T.  Bains,  Ensign. 

Dec.  13 — John  Gallick.  Ensign;  Vice,  A.  Kendrick  not  acepting. 
Dec.  12 — Clayton  Harris,  Ensign ; Vice  R.  Boyd,  not  accepting. 
Dec.  13— Joseph  Moore,  Ensign;  Vice,  T.  Elkins. 

1822 

July  31 — Moses  Ledbetter,  Ensign;  Vice,  Simeon  Fowler. 

(Volunteers) 

1820  — Chas.  Welburn,  Capt.  Cavalry. 

John  A.  Allen,  Lieut.  Cavalry;  Resigned. 

Francis  W.  Flanagan,  Cornet  Cavalry;  Resigned. 

Sutton  F.  Allen,  Lieut.  Cavalry;  Vice,  J.  A.  Allen. 
Sutton  F.  Allen  Resigned  17  Aug.  1822. 

1822 

Apr.  15 — Thomas  Slaughter,  Cornet;  Vice,  F.  W.  Flanagan. 

Henry  Winfry,  Capt.  Artillery ; Resigned  18  May,  1822. 

John  Cotrell,  Lieut.  Artillery;  Resigned  18  May,  1822. 

Burwell  Andrews,  Ensign,  Artillery;  Resigned  18  May. 
1822. 


246 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


1822 

July  31 — Wiliam  Kirkland,  Capt.  Artillery. 

July  31 — Stephen  Terry,  Lieut.  Artillery. 

July  13 — William  Gibson,  Ensign. 

1821 

May  29 — Clayton  C.  Harris,  Cornet ; Thomas  Slaughter. 

1822 

Oct.  5 — John  W.  Webster,  Lieut.  Cavalry;  Vice,  Sutton  F.  Allen. 

(Staff  Officers) 


1822 

July  31 — John  Angel,  Adjutant. 

July  31 — John  Moseley,  Paymaster. 

July  31 — Thomas  Wilson,  Quarter  master. 

First  Division,  First  Brigade,  Third  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices^  Remarks) 

1820 

Mar.  28 — Griffin  Lampkin,  Colonel ; Resigned. 

Sept.  29 — Danl.  M.  Bradford,  Vice;  G.  Lampkin. 

Mar.  28 — Daniel  M.  Bradford,  Lieut.  Colonel;  Resigned. 

Sept.  29 — Calvin  C.  Morgan,  Lieut.  Colonel  ; D.  M.  Bradford,  Pro- 
moted. 

Mar.  28 — William  A.  Rogers,  Major;  Elected  Colonel  33rd. 

1821 

May  6 — William  Saunders,  Major;  Vice,  W.  A.  Rogers. 

May  22 — Richard  McNulty,  Captain;  Resigned. 

May  22 — James  B.  Roper,  Captain. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


247 


May  22 — John  Biddle,  Captain;  Resigned. 

May  22 — John  F.  Newman,  Captain. 

May  22 — William  Farris,  Captain. 

May  22 — John  Hill,  Captain. 

May  22 — John  Montgomery,  Captain. 

May  22 — John  Sively,  Captain. 

May  22 — Samuel  Baskerval,  Captain. 

May  22 — George  McWhorter,  Captain. 

1821 

Mar.  5 — William  Eaton,  Captain;  Vice,  B.  McNulty. 

Sept.  29 — Daniel  M.  Bradford,  Colonel;  Vice,  G.  Lampkin. 

Sept.  29 — Calvin  C.  Morgan,  Lieut.  Colonel;  Vice,  D.  M.  Bradford, 
Promoted. 

Oct.  9 — William  McC^usland,  Capt. ; Vice,  Jno.  Biddle. 

1822 

Apr.  1— William  M.  Wofford,  Capt. 

1821 

Apr.  21 — Ebenezer  Byram,  Capt. 

Adams  Lanier,  Ensign. 

James  Walker,  Ensign. 

May  22— William  Eaton,  Lieutenant;  Promoted. 

May  22 — William  P.  Wofford,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — William  G.  Seay,  Lieutenant. 

1821 

May  22 — John  Philips,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — James  Gallaway,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Silas  Brazleton,  Lieutenant. 


248 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Mav  22 — James  B.  Watteson,  Lieutenant. 

Mav  22 — George  Russell,  Lieutenant. 

Mav  22 — -William  McMahan,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  23 — Charles  H.  Byrne,  Lieutenant. 

1821 

Jany.  29 — Francis  T.  Mastin,  Paymaster. 

Jany.  29 — Bartley  McLeod,  Quarter  Master. 

Jany.  29 — Thomas  Simmons,  Adjt. ; Resigned. 

Mar.  5 — William  A.  Scott,  Vice  W.  Eaton. 

1822 

Apr.  2 — Ebenezer  Titus,  Adjutant. 

May  22 — Thomas  Bullion,  Ensign ; Resigned. 

May  22 — Thomas  E.  Thompson,  Ensign. 

May  22 — George  Lynes,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Richard  S.  Coffee,  Ensign  ; Resigned. 

May  22— John  M.  Potts,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Simon  McClendon,  Ensign. 

May  22 — John  Fitz,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Thomas  Trotman,  Ensign. 

Alay  22 — John  Finley,  Ensign. 

Aug.  23 — Samuel  D.  Sherrill,  Ensign. 

1821 

Mar.  5 — John  Smith,  Ensign;  Vice,  T.  Bullion. 

July  14 — William  M.  Hayden,  Ensign;  Vice,  R.  S.  Coffee. 
1822 

Apr.  1 — John  R.  Wood,  Ensign. 

Apr.  1 — -John  B.  McClendon,  Ensign. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


249 


1822 

Apr.  1 — Timothy  Musheren,  Lieutenant. 

Apr.  1 — Richard  B.  Purdom,  Lieutenant. 

Apr.  1 — Jonathan  Collier,  Lieutenant. 

June  1— Joseph  Boyce,  Lieutenant. 

June  1 — Neely,  Lieutenant. 

June  1 — Reuben  Bundrann,  Lieutenant. 

(Volunteers) 

Aug.  26 — William  A.  Aikens,  Captain  Lt.  Infantry. 

Aug.  26 — R.  L.  Watson,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  26 — Athelstan  A.  W.  Andrews,  Ensign,  Lt.  Infantry. 
Aug.  26 — Nathan  Baker,  Capt.  Cavalry. 

Aug.  26 — Thomas  W.  Littlepage,  Lieut.  Cavalry. 

Aug.  26 — Joel  T.  Sturman,  Cornet  Cavalry. 

Aug.  26 — James  G.  Carriel,  Capt.  Artillery. 

Aug.  26 — Jarard  J.  Sample,  Lieut.  Artillery. 

Aug.  26 — Beverly  Stubberfield,  Ensign  Artillery  ; Removed. 

1821 

Mar.  5 — Luke  Howard,  Ensign;  Vice,  B.  Stubberfield. 

June  16 — John  K.  Dunn,  Cap.  I.  Bat.  of  Huntsville. 

June  16— James  Gaston,  Lieut.  Bat.  of  Huntsville. 

June  16 — Robt.  Stephens,  Ens.  Bat.  of  Huntsville. 

First  Division,  First  Brigade,  Thirty  Third  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

1821 

Apr.  7 — William  A.  Rogers,  Colonel;  Resigned. 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


250 


1822 

Mar.  20 — Wiliam  A.  Aiken,  Lieut.  Colonel. 

Mar.  20 — Wm.  Gray,  Major. 

1822 

fitly  8 — Wm.  A.  Aiken,  Colonel;  Vice,  Rogers. 

1822 

July  30 — Edward  W.  Parker,  Lieut.  Colonel;  Vice.  Aiken. 
1821 

Nov.  3 — George  G.  Petty,  Captain. 

Nov.  3 — John  Priest,  Captain. 

Nov.  3 — Joseph  L.  Jacobs,  Captain;  Resigned  3 Oct. 

1822 

July  30 — Tandy  W.  Lewis,  Captain  Cavalry. 


1823 

Oct.  3 — John  Turner,  Captain. 

Oct.  3 — William  B.  Johnson,  Captain;  Light  Infantry. 

Oct.  3 — James  Harrell,  Lieutenant;  Light  Infantry. 

Oct.  3 — Thomas  Bell,  Lieutenant;  Light  Infantry. 

1821 

Nov.  3 — Samuel  Looney,  Lieutenant. 

Nov.  3 — William  L.  Brown,  Lieutenant;  Resigned,  3 Oct. 
Nov.  3 — Edmond  Elliott,  Lieutenant. 

Nov.  3 — Joseph  McClung,  Lieutenant;  Resigned  3 Oct. 

1822 

July  30 — John  Hudson,  Lieutenant  Cavalry. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


251 


1823 

Oct.  3 — William  McMahan,  Lieutenant. 

Oct.  3 — Benj.  W.  Clarke,  Jas.  Gilfoy,  Lieutenant. 

1821 

Nov.  3 — George  J.  Johnson,  Ensign. 

Nov.  3 — Caleb  Lewis,  Ensign. 

Nov.  3 — Elbert  T.  Reynolds,  Ensign. 

Nov.  3 — Philomon  Petty,  Ensign. 

1822 

July  30 — Reuben  L.  Watkins,  Cornet  Cavalry:  Resigned,  3.  Oct. 
1823 

Oct.  3 — James  G.  Arnett,  Cornet  Cavalry. 

1821 

Sept.  11 — Thomas  Carroll,  Adjutant. 

Robert  Manning,  Qr.  Master. 

Henry  Jordon,  Paymaster. 

1st  Division,  35th  Regiment,  1st  Brigade 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

1821 

Nov.  21 — James  Smith,  Colonel. 

Dec.  10 — James  Daniel,  Lieut.  Col. 

Dec.  10 — William  W.  Pruitt,  Major. 

1822 

Mar.  16 — Edmond  Bridges,  Captain;  Removed  Dec.  26. 

Mar.  16 — Archibald  Barclay,  Captain. 

Mar.  16 — David  Rickets,  Captain. 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


252 


Alar.  16 — Ephraim  Ledbetter,  Captain. 

Alar.  16 — Isham  Wright,  Captain. 

Alar.  16 — Elias  Welborn,  Captain;  Resigned  11  March,  1823. 

Alar.  16 — Campbell  R.  Eaton,  Captain;  Resigned. 

Alar.  16 — Adam  Campbell,  Captain ; Resigned. 

Alar.  19 — Thomas  Gasaway,  Captain  Riflemen. 

Sept.  9 — Lovell  Coffman,  Captain;  Vice,  Adam  Campbell. 

Dec.  27 — Robert  Craig,  Captain. 

1823 

Alar.  7 — Richard  McAnulty,  Captain. 

1822 

Alar.  16 — Caswell  Byba,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

Alar.  16 — Irwin  Bohannon,  Lieutenant;  Resigned,  30  Nov. 

Alar.  16 — Thomas  Manning,  Lieutenant. 

Alar.  16 — John  Baker,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

Alar.  16 — Lemla  Woodall,  Lieutenant;  Removed. 

Alar.  16 — Joseph  Hall,  Lieutenant;  Resigned,  11  Apr.  1823. 

Alar.  16 — George  Sparks,  Lieutenant. 

Alar.  16 — Henry  Baker,  Lieutenant. 

Alar.  19 — Isham  Clay,  Lieutenant  Riflemen;  Removed. 

July  30 — Jabez  Perkins,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  Lemla  Woodall. 

Sept.  9 — Benjamin  Bullard,  Lieutenant  Riflemen;  Vice,  Isham 
Clay. 

NTov.  30 — James  Orr,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  Bohannon. 

Dec.  27 — James  Newberry,  Lieutenant. 

Dec.  27 — Jason  Cloud,  Lieutenant. 

1822 

Mar.  16 — Dodson  Nevels,  Ensign;  Resigned. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


253 


Mar.  16 — William  Tidwell,  Ensign;  Resigned. 

Mar.  16 — Robert  Anderson,  Ensign  ; Resigned. 

Mar.  16 — John  Styers,  Ensign;  Resigned. 

Mar.  16— Samuel  Hoke,  Ensign. 

Mar.  16 — George  Gilliand,  Ensign;  Resigned,  11  Apr.  1823. 

Mar.  16 — Winnight  Vickney,  Ensign. 

Mar.  16 — Joseph  Bragg,  Ensign ; Resigned. 

Mar.  19 — William  Gasaway,  Ensign  Riflemen. 

Sept.  9 — William  Jones,  Ensign  ; Vice,  Joseph  Bragg. 

Dec.  22 — Joel  B.  Cook,  Ensign. 

Dec.  22 — Thomas  Woolsy,  Ensign. 

Dec.  22 — Wm.  Benson,  Ensign. 

1822 

June  14 — William  B.  Jones,  Adjutant. 

June  14 — James  Hodges,  PayMaster ; Resigned.  May  16,  1822. 
June  14 — Alex.  W.  Dulany,  Or.  Master. 

First  Division,  Second  Brigade.  Fourth  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

Hardy  Robinson,  Brig.  Genl. 

1820 

Mar.  28 — Washington  Keays,  Colonel. 

Hardy  Robinson,  Lieut.  Colonel. 

Dec.  9 — Archibald  McRoberts,  Lt.  Colonel ; Vice,  Hardy  Robin- 
son. 

James  Allison,  Major. 

Aug.  8 — James  H.  Walker,  Captain. 


254 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Aug.  8 — Charles  Sewell,  Captain. 

Aug.  8 — Robert  Brown,  Captain;  Resigned. 

Aug.  8 — John  Mallone,  Captain. 

Aug.  8 — Joseph  N.  Massie,  Captain. 

Aug.  8 — Alexander  Ward,  Captain. 

Aug.  8 — Joseph  S.  Carrell,  Captain;  Removed. 

Aug.  8 — Richard  C.  Bird,  Captain. 

Aug.  8 — Richard  Saunders,  Captain. 

1822 

May  2-1 — Matthew  H.  Roberts,  Captain. 

May  24 — Daniel  R.  Sumner,  Captain. 

May  24 — John  H.  Johnston,  Captain. 

Aug.  8 — George  W.  Fisher,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  8 — Archibald  McRoberts,  Lieutenant;  Promoted. 
Aug.  8 — John  Massie,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  8 — Josiah  Elliot,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  8 — Johnston  Richardson,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  8 — Abner  Haney,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  8 — Thomas  Taylor,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  8 — Sydney  Posey,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  8 — William  Sims,  Lieutenant. 

1822 

May  24 — Paul  Mitchell,  Lieutenant. 

June  21 — John  O.  Neal,  Lieutenant. 

1820 

Aug.  8 — David  R.  Fisher,  Ensign. 

Aug.  8 — Jesse  Roundtree,  Ensign. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


255 


Aug.  8 — Joseph  R.  Eason,  Ensign. 

Aug.  8 — Edward  Malone,  Ensign. 

Aug.  8 — Jared  Dutton,  Ensign. 

Aug.  8 — Bernard  Pratt,  Ensign. 

Aug.  8 — William  Thomas,  Ensign;  Removed. 
Aug.  8 — James  Posey,  Ensign. 

Aug.  8 — Traverse  Pilant,  Ensign. 

1822 

May  24 — Levi  I.  Johnston,  Ensign. 

May  24 — Charles  Tucker,  Ensign. 

Jan.  21 — Philip  Long,  Ensign. 

(Volunteers) 

1821 

Jan.  21 — Starke  Washington,  C'apt.  Cavalry. 
Jan.  21 — Washington  Lewis,  Lieut.  Cavalry. 
Jan.  21 — William  Winston,  Cornet  Cavalry. 

(Staff) 

1822 

May  25 — George  Keyes,  Adjutant. 

May  25 — Beverly  Hughes,  Pay-Master. 

May  25 — Woodson  C.  Montgomery,  Qt.  Master. 

1822 

July  30 — Mooresville  Blues,  Volunteers. 

July  30 — George  S.  Miller,  Captain. 

July  30 — Ebenezer  Darby,  Lieutenant. 

July  30 — Scott  Bayne,  Ensign. 


256 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


First  Division,  Second  Brigade,  Fifth  Regiment 

1820 

Mar.  28 — John  S.  Doxey,  Colonel. 

Mar.  28 — Ebenezer  Frazier,  Lt.  Colonel. 

Mar.  28 — John  Abel,  Major. 

Aug.  8 — Charles  Booth,  Captain. 

Aug.  8 — Archibald  Warner,  Captain. 

Aug.  8 — Lewis  B.  Black,  Captain. 

Aug.  8 — William  Levask,  Captain. 

Aug.  8 — Samuel  Leutz,  Captain. 

Aug.  8 — John  Wofford,  Captain. 

Aug.  8 — James  Miller,  Captain. 

Aug.  8 — Jesse  W.  Cork,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  8 — William  Pounder,  Lieutenant 
Aug.  8 — Abram  Moss,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  8 — -Charles  Alford,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  8 — Samuel  Slaughter,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  8 — Jesse  Craft,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  8 — Samuel  H.  Hughes,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  8 — David  Pugh,  Ensign. 

Aug.  8 — Benjamin  Dennis,  Ensign. 

Aug.  8 — David  Smith,  Ensign. 

Aug.  8 — John  F.  Abernathy,  Ensign. 

Aug.  8 — Johnston  Coobin,  Ensign. 

Aug.  8 — Branch  Copeland,  Ensign. 

Aug.  8 — Ambrose  James,  Ensign. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


257 


Volunteers  (Cavalry) 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

1822 

Mar.  16 — James  Slaughter,  Capt.  Cavalry,  Volunteers. 

Mar.  16 — Charles  Hodges,  1st  Lieut., . Volunteers. 

Mar.  16 — William  English,  2nd  Lieut..  Volunteers. 

Mar.  16 — Jesse  H.  Holoway,  Cornet,  Cavalry,  Volunteers. 

First  Division,  Second  Brigade,  Tenth  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

Mar.  28 — Samuel  D.  McMahan,  Colonel. 

Mar.  28 — Gutridge  Mastison,  Lt.  Colonel. 

Mar.  28 — Matthias  Richardson,  Major. 

May  22 — Robert  Shelton,  Captain. 

May  22 — Elisha  Milton,  Captain ; Refused  to  Accept. 

May  22 — John  Welch,  Captain. 

May  22 — William  Snoddy,  Captain. 

May  22 — Zachariah  Rose,  Captain. 

May  22 — Samuel  Croft,  Captain. 

Sept.  1 — John  S.  Campbell,  Captain;  Vice,  E.  Milton,  Resigned. 
1821 

Mar.  31 — Asa  Harrell,  Captain;  Vice,  J.  S.  Campbell. 

Oct.  25 — James  Gordon,  Captain. 

1821 

May  22 — James  W.  Shadwick,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Aseal  Acres,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — John  Edwards,  Lieutenant. 


258 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


May  22 — James  Thomason,  Lieutenant. 
May  22 — James  Jackson,  Lieutenant. 

1821 

Mar.  31 — Jesse  Milton,  Lieutenant. 

Oct.  25 — Andrew  Reed,  Lieutenant. 

Oct.  25 — Henry  Richardson,  Lieutenant. 
Oct.  25 — Benjamin  Cross,  Lieutenant. 

1821 

May  22 — John  Brown,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Allan  Kirk,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Benjamin  Adair,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Wiley  Jones,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Bennall  Baggett,  Ensign. 

1821 

Feb.  22 — Edward  Cane,  Ensign. 

Oct.  25 — Lemuel  Rodgers,  Ensign. 

Oct.  25 — John  Wiley,  Ensign. 

Nov.  21 — -William  Kennerman,  Ensign. 

1821 

May  29 — Jesse  O.  Tate,  Adjutant. 

May  29 — William  McMahan,  Qr.  Master. 
May  29 — Eph.  Sheffield,  Pay  Master. 

1822 

July  17 — Sami.  W.  Echols,  Captain. 

July  17 — Wm.  Morrow,  Lieutenant. 

July  17— John  McQueen,  Ensign. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


259 


First  Division,  Second  Brigade,  Eleventh,  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

Mar.  28 — James  Benham,  Colonel. 

Mar.  28 — Andrew  Calahan,  Lt.  Colonel. 

Mar.  28 — William  Berry,  Major;  Removed. 

Mar.  28 — Thomas  Harraldson,  Major;  Vice,  Wm.  Berry. 

July  21 — Allan  H.  Johnston,  Captain;  Removed. 

July  21 — John  Morgan,  Captain;  Resigned. 

July  21 — Thomas  Farmer,  Captain. 

July  21 — John  Valhoose,  Captain;  Resigned. 

July  21 — James  Young,  Captain. 

July  21 — Francis  Willet,  Captain. 

1821 

May  29 — Wm.  Wright,  Captain,  Removed;  Vice,  A.  H.  Johnston. 
Oct.  25 — Daniel  Judd,  Captain;  Vice,  John  VanHoose. 

1822 

May  25 — William  Garrette,  Captain ; Vice,  Morgan. 

July  30 — Caleb  S.  Manley,  Captain;  Vice,  Wm.  Wright. 

July  21 — Thomas  Lackey,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

July  21 — Thomas  McBride,  Lieutenant. 

July  21 — Alfred  Norman,  Lieutenant. 

July  21 — Henry  A.  Wamble,  Lieutenant. 

July  21 — Joseph  Smart,  Lieutenant. 

July  21 — Samuel  Craig,  Lieutenant. 

1821 

May  29 — William  Wood,  Lieutenant;  Removed;  Vice,  T.  Lackey. 


260 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


1822 

July  30 — John  Campbell,  Lieutenant  ; Vice,  William  Wood. 

July  21 — Tilman  Bowman,  Ensign;  Dec’d. 

July  21 — Samuel  Littlejohn,  Ensign. 

Adam  Wommack,  Ensign;  Resigned. 

July  21 — Runsey  Ballew,  Ensign. 

1821 

May  29 — A.  H.  Davis,  Ensign. 

June  7 — Samuel  Wilkes,  Ensign;  Vice,  A.  Womack. 

1821 

May  29 — Jesse  O.  Tate,  Adjutant;  Error. 

May  29 — Wm.  McMahan,  Qt.  Master;  Error. 

May  29 — Ephraim  Sheffield,  Pay  Master ; Error. 

May  29 — W.  H.  Gardner,  Adgt. ; Removed. 

May  29 — Edmund  Harrison,  Qr.  Master. 

May  29 — William  McDonald,  Pay  Master;  Promoted. 

1822 

July  30 — William  McDonald,  Adjutant;  Vice,  W.  H.  Gardner. 
July  30 — William  Middleton,  Paymaster;  Vice,  Wm.  McDonald. 

(Volunteers) 

Thomas  Hevalston,  Capt.  Riflemen. 

John  C.  Bailey,  Lieutenant  Riflemen. 

William  Cooper,  Lieutenant  Riflemen. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


261 


Second  Division,  Third  Brigade,  Sixth  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

1821 

Feb.  10 — Thomas  W.  Farrar,  Maj.  Genl. 

Feb.  10 — Gabriel  Hanby,  Bri.  Genl. 

6th  Regiment 

1820 

Mar.  28 — Hezekiah  Johnston,  Colonel;  Removed. 

1822 

Jan.  29 — Jonathan  F.  Owens,  Colonel ; Vice,  H.  Johnston;  Re- 
moved. 

Jan.  29 — McKinney  S.  Childress,  Ft.  Colonel. 

1821 

Nov.  21 — Thomas  D.  Crabb,  Ft.  Colonel ; Vice. 

Nov.  21 — David  Bellew,  Major. 

May  22 — Thomas  Hubbard,  Captain;  Resigned. 

May  22 — John  Kims,  Captain;  Resigned. 

May  22 — Samuel  Davis,  Captain. 

May  22 — Isam  Medford,  Captain. 

May  22 — Matthews  Harbison,  Captain ; Resigned. 

May  22 — Jonathan  F.  Owens,  Captain;  Promoted. 

May  22 — Isaac  Geary,  Captain. 

Aug.  25 — Moses  H.  Fyon,  Captain ; Resigned. 

Aug.  25 — Isaac  Williams,  Captain;  Removed. 

Aug.  25 — Elijah  Moore,  Captain. 

Aug.  25 — James  Cist,  Captain;  Vice,  John  Kims. 

Aug.  25 — William  Skidmore,  Captain  Riflemen. 

Sept.  1 — Jonathan  Bulison,  Captain  Cavalry. 

Sept.  1 — Alfred  Danday,  Captain  Artillery. 


262 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


May  22 — Jacob  Jones,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

May  22 — Samuel  H.  Davis,  Lieutenant  ; Resigned. 

John  Dunkins,  Lieutenant. 

William  Parker,  Lieutenant. 

John  Arbough,  Lieutenant. 

Charles  McClelland,  Lieutenant ; Resigned,  24  Au 

1821 

Thomas  James,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

Robert  Morrow,  Lieutenant ; Resigned. 

James  Petty,  Lieutenant. 

Adam  Elrod,  Lieutenant;  Removed. 

Sept.  1 — Mittleton,  Ford,  Lieutenant ; Vice,  C.  McClelland 
John  A.  Gray,  Lieutenant. 

Sept.  1 — Thomas  Ecford,  Lieutenant  Cavalry. 

Geo.  W.  Crabb,  Lieutenant  Artillery. 

May  22 — Isaac  Miller,  Ensign;  Resigned. 

May  22 — Thomas  Edy,  Ensign. 

May  22 — John  Menasco,  Ensign. 

May  22 — John  S.  Moore,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Allen  Davidson,  Ensign. 

May  22 — John  Turley,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Josiah  Evans,  Ensign;  Resigned. 

Aug.  25 — William  Lyme,  Ensign;  Resigned. 

Aug.  25 — William  Sommers,  Ensign;  Removed. 

Aug.  25 — Henry  Donahoe,  Ensign. 

John  Gago,  Ensign  Riflemen. 

Sept.  1 — Gideon  Terry,  Ensign  Cavalry. 

Marvin  Kyle,  Ensign  Artillery. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


263 


1821 

Oct.  24 — W.  Graves  Bouldin,  Captain;  Vice,  Thomas  Hubbard. 
Oct.  24 — Robert  D.  Moore,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  Jacob  Jones. 

Oct.  24 — Thomas  L.  Dupree,  Ensign;  Vice,  Isaac  Miller. 

Oct.  24 — Drewry  Stovall,  Captain ; Vice. 

Oct.  24 — Samuel  Livingston,  Lieutenant. 

Oct.  24 — John  Smith,  Ensign. 

Nov.  29 — Lewis  Reno,  Lieutenant. 

1821 

Jany.  29 — Jabez  G.  Callaway,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  Sami.  H.  Davis. 
Feb.  26 — James  Clark,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  A.  Elrod. 

Nov.  21 — Wilson  Oaks,  Ensign. 

Nov.  21 — James  Nelson,  Lieutenant. 

Nov.  21 — John  T.  Rather,  Captain. 

Nov.  21 — Wesley  Harvey,  Ensign. 

1821 

Feb.  26 — Benjamin  Holly,  Capt. ; Vice,  J.  Williams. 

Nov.  21 — Benjamin  Jones,  Capt. 

1822 

Jan.  25 — James  Thomason,  Capt. 

Jan.  25 — Hiram  Wright,  Lieut. 

Jan.  7 — Jacob  Arbough,  Captain;  Vice,  M.  Harbison. 

Nov.  21 — Horatio  Philpot,  Adjutant. 

Nov.  21 — Joseph  Sykes,  Qr.  Master. 

Nov.  21 — John  McK.  A.  Wallace,  Pay  Master. 

1822 

Jan.  25 — Thomas  L.  Dupree,  Lieutenant. 


264 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 

Jan.  25 — George  W.  Locke,  Ensign. 

Jan.  1 — George  Ellison,  Lieutenant. 

Jan.  1 — -Green  B.  Birmingham,  Ensign. 

Jan.  1 — Jno.  Barneard,  Ensign. 

Second  Division,  Third  Brigade,  Twelfth  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 


1820 

Mar.  28 — John  Massey,  Colonel;  Resigned. 

Solomon  Nichols,  Colonel;  Vice,  J.  Massey. 

Mar.  28 — Tarlton  B.  Hall,  Lt.  Colonel. 

Mar.  28 — Solomon  Nichols,  Major. 

Aug.  25 — Henry  Bickerstaff,  Captain  ; Resigned. 

Aug.  25 — Thomas  Hall,  Captain. 

Aug.  25 — Henry  Carter,  Captain  ; Resigned. 

Aug.  25 — William  K.  Greenwood,  Captain;  Resigned. 

Aug.  25 — William  Hobbs,  Captain. 

Aug.  25 — Samuel  Means,  Captain ; Resigned. 

Aug.  25 — Wm.  H.  Barkhill,  Captain. 

Aug.  25 — Hugh  Callahan,  Captain. 

1821 

Mar.  17 — John  Washington,  Captain;  Resigned;  Vice,  S.  Means. 
July  12 — James  Johnston,  Captain;  Vice,  H.  Carter. 

Oct.  24 — Archibald  H.  Nult,  Captain. 

Nov.  29 — Sami.  F.  McGaha,  Captain. 

1822 


Mar.  16 — John  Moody,  Captain. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


265 


Aug.  15 — William  Stovall,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  15 — Enoch  Benson,  Lieutenant. 

Augf.  15 — Hez.  Love,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  15 — John  Martin,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

Aug.  15 — John  Truss,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  15 — Isaiah  Handcock,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

Aug.  15 — William  Hall,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  15 — William  Brown,  Lieutenant. 

1821 

May  17 — Robert  McMims,  Lieutenant;  Resigned;  Vice,  J.  Hand 
cock. 

June  7 — James  Ward,  Lieutenant;  Died. 

Jan.  12 — Edward  Royster,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  J.  Martin. 

Oct.  24 — -William  H.  M.  Newton,  Lieutenant. 

Nov.  24 — Henry  Box,  Lieutenant. 

Nov.  29 — William  Hicks,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  25 — Levi  Side,  Ensign. 

Aug.  25 — William  Watson,  Ensign. 

Aug.  25 — Thomas  Adams,  Ensign. 

Aug.  25 — Samuel  McGahee,  Ensign ; Resigned. 

Aug.  25 — Silas  Dobbs,  Ensign. 

Aug.  25 — Grey  Barbe,  Ensign  ; Resigned. 

Aug.  25 — Moses  Vinyard,  Ensign. 

Aug.  25 — Owen  Williams,  Ensign. 

1821 

May  17 — John  McDaniel,  Ensign;  Resigned;  Vice,  G.  Barbe. 

June  7 — George  Walker,  Ensign;  Vice,.  S.  McGahee. 

July  12 — James  Lewis,  Ensign;  Vice. 


266 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Oct.  2 4 — William  P.  Stovall,  Ensign. 

Nov.  24 — Nathan  Matthews,  Ensign. 

Nov.  29 — Willis  Staton,  Ensign. 

1822 

Mar.  16 — Thomas  Sorell,  Ensign. 

June  8 — Richard  Nally,  Ensign. 

1821 

Sept.  11 — Jeremiah  Gibson,  Captain,  Rifle  Company. 

Dempsey  Forman,  Lieutenant,  Rifle  Company. 
Thomas  Lovorn,  Ensign,  Rifle  Company. 

Nov.  24 — John  Bush,  Adjutant. 

Nov.  24 — Anderson  Reeves,  Paymaster. 

1822 

May  24 — Charles  Royster,  Captain. 

May  24 — Jesse  Humphreys,  Ensign. 

Jan.  8 — Jesse  C.  Hooper,  Capt. 

Jan.  8 — Jesse  Fuller,  Lieutenant. 

Second  Division,  Third  Brigade,  Fourteenth  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 


1820 

Mar.  28 — John  Galbraith,  Colonel. 

Mar.  28 — Joseph  Rutherford,  Lt.  Colonel. 

Mar.  28 — William  Hayse,  Major. 

Ala)-  27 — Thomas  Nations,  Captain  ; Resigned. 

Alay  27 — James  Windsor,  Captain;  Resigned. 

Alav  27 — Alanly  Tiles,  Captain;  Resigned,  28  July,  1822. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


267 


May  27 — James  Blackburn,  Captain  ; Resigned. 

May  27 — Jesse  Harbin,  Captain. 

May  27 — Asa  R.  Brindley,  Captain ; Removed  4 May,  1822. 

1821 

Jan.  29 — John  Nash,  Captain;  Vice,  J.  Blackburn. 

Jan.  29 — Jesse  Ellis,  Captain,  Riflemen. 

Nov.  29 — William  Vaughan,  Captain;  Vice,  J.  Windsor. 

Nov.  29 — Benjamin  Hines,  Captain. 

1822 

Apr.  6 — Wm.  H.  Musgrove,  Captain. 

Apr.  6 — Thomas  Yates,  Captain. 

May  22 — Christopher  Jones,  Lieutenant;  Removed. 

May  22 — William  Long,  Lieutenant;  Removed. 

May  22 — Matthias  Turner,  Lieutenant;  Removed. 

May  22 — Michael  Burleson,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Joseph  Henderson,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Daniel  Stephens,  Lieutenant. 

1821 

Jan.  29 — Thomas  Jones,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  M.  Turner;  Thomas 
Jones  resigned  28  July  1822. 

Tan.  29 — Henry  Gotcher,  Lieutenant,  Riflemen. 

May  29 — Matthias  Turner,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  W.  Long;  Matthias 
Turner  resigned  28  June  1822. 

May  29 — Hezekiah  Elliott,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  C.  Jones. 

May  29 — Robert  Causby,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — James  Anderton,  Ensign. 

1821 

May  22 — William  Davidson,  Ensign;  Resigned. 


268 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


May  22 — W illiam  Fulton,  Ensign  ; Resigned. 

May  22 — Lewis  Fretwell,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Elbert  Jones,  Ensign. 

May  22 — M.  Brindley,  Ensign. 

Nov.  18 — Thomas  Jones,  Ensigm  ; Vice,  \Y.  Fulton,  Resigned. 
1821 

Jany.  29 — Simon  Murphy,  Ensign;  Vice,  T.  Jones;  S.  Murphy  re- 
signed 28  July  1822. 

Jany.  29 — Isaac  Morris,  Ensign,  Riflemen. 

1820 

May  29 — John  Sims,  Ensign. 

May  29 — Hezekiah  Elliott,  Ensign. 

Nov.  29 — Humphrey  Smott,  Ensign. 

Nov.  29 — John  Morris,  Ensign. 

1822 

Apr.  6 — Bartlett  McAnally,  Ensign. 

Aug.  7 — Parmenus  Williams,  Ensign;  Vice,  S.  Murphy. 

Nov.  29 — Hezekiah  H.  Elliott,  Lieutenant. 

1822 

Aug.  7 — Lunsford  Kinsey,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  T.  Jones. 

Aug.  7 — George  Berry,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  Matthias  Turner. 

1822 

Jan.  29 — William  Cornelius,  Qr.  Master. 

Jan.  29 — Littleberry  Vaughn,  Adjutant. 

Jan.  29 — Joseph  H.  Mead,  Paymaster. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


269 


1822 

May  4 — Caleb  Murphree,  Captain ; Vice,  Brindley. 

Aug.  7 — Moses  Justice,  Captain;  Vice,  Manly  Files. 

Second  Division,  Fourth  Brigade,  Seventh  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 
James  Davis,  Brigadier  General. 

1820 

Mar.  28 — Samuel  Mitchell,  Colonel. 

Mar.  28 — Bartlett  Coxe,  Lieut.  Colonel. 

Mar.  28 — Daniel  Wade,  Major. 

May  22 — Charles  W.  Williams,  Captain. 

May  22 — Thomas  Ashford,  Captain. 

May  22 — Jacob  W.  Blagg,  Captain. 

May  22 — George  Woodlieff,  Captain;  Resigned. 

May  22 — William  Weatherford,  Captain;  Resigned. 

May  22 — William  Hughes,  Captain,  Riflemen. 

May  22 — George  L.  Rosseau,  Captain,  Cavalry. 

1821 

June  7 — Charles  Anderson,  Captain. 

June  7 — John  P.  Broadman. 

May  22 — John  R.  Frost,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — John  Browning,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — William  Elam,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Samuel  Vaughn,  Lieutenant,  Riflemen;  Resigned. 
May  22 — Robert  Dixon,  Lieutenant,  Cavalry. 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


1821 

| une  7— John  Alford,  Lieutenant.  Riflemen;  Vice,  S.  Vaughan. 
May  22 — James  St.  Clair,  Ensign. 

May  22 — -Wiliam  Peters,  Ensign. 

May  22 — William  Box,  Ensign. 

Ma\  22— John  P.  Johnston,  Ensign,  Riflemen;  Resigned. 

May  22 — Francis  Michaux,  Ensign,  Cavalry. 

1821 

June  7 — -James  Asky,  Ensign. 

June  7 — Thomas  McGregor,  Ensign;  Vice,  J.  P.  Johnston. 

Second  Division,  Fourth  Brigade,  Eighth  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

Mar.  28 — George  Washington  McGaughy,  Colonel. 

Mar.  28 — Milton  McClenihan,  Lt.  Colonel. 

Mar.  28 — Willis  Bryan,  Major;  Removed. 

Mar.  28 — Samuel  Henderson,  Major. 

May  22 — Jabez  Isbell,  Captain;  Resigned. 

May  22 — Nicholas  Ally,  Captain  ; Removed. 

May  22 — Moses  Eldrig,  Captain. 

May  22 — Thomas  Coopwood,  Captain. 

May  22 — John  Stewart,  Captain;  Removed. 

May  22—  -Isaac  R.  Moore,  Captain. 

May  22 — John  W.  Blackwell,  Captain. 

Nov.  9 — Daniel  Burford,  Captain. 

Nov.  9 — Henry  Gragg,  Captain,  Cavalry. 

Nov.  9 — George  M.  Mahan,  Captain;  Vice,  John  Stewart. 

Nov.  9 — Russell  Scroggins,  Captain  ; Vice,  N.  Ally. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


271 


1821 

Jany.  30 — Wm.  Y.  Higgins,  Captain;  Vice,  Jabez  Isbell. 
May  22 — David  McAllister,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — William  McRitchey,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Aaron  Allen,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Woodson  F.  Coopwood,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — James  Kitchen,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Wyley  W.  McDaniel,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — James  H.  McGaughy,  Lieutenant. 

Nov.  9 — Hardy  Hampton,  Lieutenant ; Removed. 

Nov.  9 — John  Isbell,  Lieutenant  Cavalry. 

Nov.  9 — Wilson  Parish,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  H.  Hampton. 
May  22 — Joseph  Stone,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Benjamin  Foster,  Ensign. 

May  22- — Silas  Stockton,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Wyley  Patrick,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Alexander  S.  McDaniel,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Hardy  Thompson,  Ensign. 

May  22 — John  Kirkpatrick,  Ensign. 

Nov.  9 — Thomas  Phelps,  Cornet  Cavalry. 

Nov.  9 — Hance  Hamilton,  Ensign  Cavalry;  Resigned. 


1821 

Mar.  26 — Daniel  Benstall,  Ensign  Cavalry;  Vice,  H.  Hamilton. 
1821 

Nov.  5 — Hiriam  Tharp,  Captain;  Vol.  Riflemen. 

Nov.  5 — John  Herrell,  Lieutenant;  Vol.  Riflemen. 

Nov.  5 — Stephen  Bennett,  Ensign;  Vol.  Riflemen. 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


272 

Xov.  5 — Wiliam  Jones,  Adjutant. 

Nov.  5 — -John  Henderson,  Or.  Master. 

Nov.  21 — Charles  Pearson,  Pay  Master. 

Second  Division,  Fourth  Brigade,  Ninth  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

1820 

Mar.  28 — John  Duke,  Colonel;  Regiment  Divided. 

1822 

Apr.  13 — James  Frazier,  Colonel. 

Apr.  13 — James  Frazier,  Lt.  Colonel;  Regt.  Divided. 

Apr.  13 — Joseph  Wofford,  Lt.  Colonel. 

Apr.  13 — Robert  Dickson,  Major;  Resigned. 

1821 

June  14 — John  P.  Brown,  Major;  Vice,  R.  Dickson. 

Aug.  25 — Joseph  Wofford,  Captain;  Promoted. 

Aug.  25 — John  A.  Rotan,  Captain. 

Aug.  25 — George  Hooker,  Captain. 

Aug.  25 — Andrew  G.  Guest,  Captain. 

Aug.  25 — Ira  Olive,  Captain. 

Aug.  25 — Ezl.  Bates,  Captain. 

Aug.  25 — John  Roger,  Captain. 

Aug.  25 — James  Long,  Captain. 

Aug.  25 — Daniel  McKinley,  Captain. 

Aug.  25 — George  Martin,  Captain. 

1821 

June  14 — Mai  McCollom,  Captain;  Vice. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


273 


June  14 — John  N.  Evans,  Captain;  Vice. 

Dec.  8 — Major  A.  Temple,  Captain;  Vice,  Jos.  Wofford,  Pro- 
moted. 

Aug.  25 — William  Gates,  Lieutenant ; Removed. 

Aug.  25 — Samuel  Skinner,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  25 — William  Nuner,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  25 — Alexander  Carter,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  25 — James  Gates,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  25 — David  W.  Wade,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  25 — Abraham  Simmons,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  25 — Leml.  Koonce,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  25 — Pleasant  Bowling,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  25 — Benjamin  Price,  Lieutenant. 

1821 

Dec.  20 — John  V.  Brown,  Adjutant. 

Christopher  Tompkins,  Q.  M. 

James  Cook,  P.  M. 

June  14 — A.  Thompson,  Vice,  P.  M. ; Vice. 

Aug.  25 — Mark  Doss,  Ensign ; Removed. 

Aug.  25 — George  E.  Davis,  Ensign. 

Aug.  25 — Jesse  H.  Ward,  Ensign. 

Aug.  25 — James  Jackson,  Ensign. 

Aug.  25 — Parsons  Brinton,  Ensign. 

Aug.  25 — Francis  Parsons,  Ensign. 

Aug.  25 — James  Dubose,  Ensign. 

Aug.  25 — Solomon  Belcher,  Ensign. 

Aug.  25 — John  Arnold,  Ensign. 

Aug.  25 — John  Benson,  Ensign. 


274 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


1821 

June  1-1 — Daniel  Hunt,  Ensign;  Vice. 

June  1-1 — Allen  Bigham,  Ensign;  Vice. 

Dec.  8 — John  Young,  Ensigai ; Vice,  M.  Doss. 

1822 

Aug.  7 — William  Selfe,  Cornet  Cavalry. 

1821 

Dec.  8 — Edward  Pate,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  Wm.  Gate. 

1822 

Aug.  7 — Robert  Thompson,  Captain  Cavalry. 

Second  Division,  Fourth  Brigade,  Sixteenth  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 


1820 

Mar.  28 — Samuel  McGowan,  Colonel. 

1822 

Mar.  16 — Solomon  Stewart,  Colonel;  Vice,  S.  McGowan. 
Mar.  16 — Alexander  Kilpatrick,  Lt.  Colonel. 

Mar.  16 — Jesse  Parchman,  Major. 

Aug.  25 — Micajah  Cox,  Captain. 

Aug.  25  -Thomas  Mullins,  Captain. 

Aug.  25 — Philip  Hodges,  Captain. 

Aug.  25- — Bartlett  Sims,  Captain. 

Aug.  25 — Robert  Montgomery,  Captain. 

Aug.  25 — Edward  Maxey,  Captain. 

Aug.  25 — John  McGee,  Captain. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


275 


1821 

June  7 — John  Woods,  Captain. 

Aug-.  25 — Samuel  Barremore,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  25 — William  Parker,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  25 — Samuel  Dowell,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  25 — John  Haynes,  Lieutenant. 

Aug-.  25 — Pleasant  Crenshaw,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  25 — William  Pierce,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  25 — John  Ellis,  Ensign. 

Aug.  25 — William  Laurence,  Ensign. 

Aug.  25 — Moses  Shoatt,  Ensign. 

Aug.  25 — John  Smithson,  Ensign. 

Aug.  25 — Isaac  Casey,  Ensign. 

Aug.  25 — John  Ritter,  Ensign. 

Aug.  25 — Willie  Hutchins,  Ensign. 

1821 

June  7 — Daniel  Holloday,  Ensign. 

Dec.  10 — Peter  Weeks,  Ensign. 

Second  Division,  Fourth  Brigade,  Thrity  Seventh  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 


• 1821 

Dec.  8 — William  W.  Parham,  Colonel. 

Dec.  8 — Tidance  Lane,  Lieut.  Colonel. 

1821 

Dec.  8 — David  Wade,  Captain. 

Dec.  8 — Alexander  W.  Bell,  Captain;  Transcribed. 


276 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Dec.  8 — John  Mitchell,  Captain. 

1821 

Dec.  8 — Caleb  Hewett,  Lieutenant. 

Dec.  8 — Angus  McMillan,  Lieutenant. 

Dec.  8 — John  T.  Abernathy,  Ensign. 

1821 

Dec.  8 — Adam  L.  Stewart,  Adjutant. 

Argyle  Taylor,  Or.  Master. 

Pulaski  Dudley,  Pay  Master. 

1822 

Second  Division,  Fifth  Brigade,  Thirteenth  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

1820 

Mar.  28 — James  Hamilton,  Colonel  ; Resigned. 

1822 

Juh’  1 — Jack  Shackleford,  Colonel ; Vice,  Hamilton. 

July  1 — Isaac  Johnston,  Lt.  Colonel. 

July  1 — Jack  Shackleford,  Major;  Promoted. 

1820 

May  22 — Robert  Womack,  Captain  ; Resigned. 

May  22 — James  Humphill,  Captain  ; Resigned. 

May  22 — William  Elliotte,  Captain. 

May  22 — Samuel  Heton,  Captain. 

May  22 — Daniel  McLaughlin,  Captain. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


277 


1821 

May  17 — William  Davis,  Captain;  Vice  Humphill.  Removed. 
May  17 — Robert  McHenry,  Captain;  Vice,  R.  Womack. 

1822 

Mar.  16 — Elias  Petner,  Captain;  Vice,  Wm.  Davis. 

Mar.  16 — Martin  Andrews,  Captain;  Vice,  R.  Womack. 

May  22 — William  Copeland,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Robert  McHenry,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

May  22 — James  Shaw,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — John  Acton,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

May  22 — John  Heard,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

1821 

May  7 — William  Mardis,  Lieutenant ; Resigned ; Vice,  R.  Mc- 
Henry. 

Benj.  Blassingame,  Lieutenant;  Resigned;  Vice,  R.  Mc- 
Henry. 

Oct.  24 — James  Murphy,  Lieutenant;  Resigned;  Vice,  W.  Mardis. 
May  22 — William  King,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Jacob  Miles,  Ensign;  Resigned. 

May  22 — Wyly  Shaw,  Ensign. 

May  22 — James  Acton,  Ensign;  Resigned. 

May  22 — Mitchell  Pool,  Ensign;  Promoted. 

May  7 — Wm.  Hewlett,  Ensign;  Vr*ce. 

May  7 — -Wm.  Robertson,  Ensign. 

1821 

Oct.  25 — Mervin  W.  Havis,  Pay  Master. 

Oct.  25 — John  Copeland,  Qr.  Master. 

Oct.  Jonathan,  McDavid,  Adjutant. 


278 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


1822 

June  21 — Janies  A.  Prewett,  Captain. 

Aug.  26 — J.  J.  Mann,  Captain. 

June  21 — Mitchell  Pool,  Lieutenant. 

June  21 — Thompson  Corbin,  Lieutenant. 

June  21 — -Abner  Lawler,  Lieutenant. 

June  21 — Charles  Dodds,  Ensign. 

June  21 — Greenberry  Seale,  Ensign. 

Aug.  26 — Wm.  S.  Morgan,  Ensign. 

Aug.  26 — Thomas  Harvey,  Ensign. 

1822 

Aug.  26 — Calvert  Davis,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  26 — Elisha  Smith,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  Murphy. 

Second  Division,  Fifth  Brigade,  Fifteenth  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

1820 

Mar.  28 — John  Martin,  Colonel ; Resigned  16  May  1822. 
1822 

May  16 — Absalom  Russell,  Colonel. 

May  16 — John  Brown,  Lt.  Colonel. 

May  16 — John  W.  Wilson,  Major;  Resigned. 

June  21—  Lemuel  G.  McMillan,  Major. 

1820 

May  22 — Abraham  Duff,  Captain ; Resigned. 

May  22 — -Daniel  G.  McMillan,  Captain;  Resigned. 

May  22 — James  Lindsay,  Captain.. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


279 


May  22 — John  Smith,  Captain. 

May  22 — Robert  D.  Middleton,  Captain;  Resigned. 

May  22 — John  M.  Duprey,  Captain. 

May  22— Thomas  Hutchison,  Captain ; Resigned. 

May  22 — Robert  Montgomery,  Captain. 

May  22 — Daniel  Ayres,  Captain. 

May  22 — George  Powell,  Captain. 

1821 

Feb.  1 — George  T'arrant,  Captain,  Cavalry. 

Mar.  19 — John  Hall,  Captain,  Cavalry;  Vice.  Resigned. 

Apr.  20 — Briant  Guin,  Captain,  Cavalry;  Vice,  T.  Hutchison. 

1822 

Mar.  16 — John  W.  Wilkinson,  Captain. 

May  22 — Edward  Croft,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — John  McWhorter,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

May  22 — Bryant  Guin,  Lieutenant;  Elected  Captain. 

May  22 — Henry  Click,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — George  Ellison,  Lieutenant ; Resigned. 

May  22 — John  Vansant,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

May  22 — David  Franklin,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Charles  Rogan,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Joseph  Nations,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Robert  Hopkins,  Lieutenant ; Removed. 

Aug.  28 — William  L.  Brown,  Ensign;  Vice,  G.  Ellison. 

Aug.  28 — Robert  Harrison,  Ensign;  Vice,  J.  McWhorter. 

1821 


Feb.  1 — Harper  Camp,  Ensign. 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


280 

Feb.  1 — Thomas  Gumming,  Ensign,  Cavalry  ; Resigned. 

1821 

Mar.  19 — Tarlton  Cuming,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  Resigned. 

.Apr.  20 — Richard  Drake,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  B.  Guin. 

July  5 — John  R.  Matthews,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  J.  Vanzant. 

July  14 — John  Vinzant,  Lieutenant;  Resigned;  Vice,  T.  Cuming. 

1822 

Alar.  22 — Jesse  Horn,  Lieutenant. 

1820 

May  22 — -Lewis  Turner,  Ensign;  Resigned. 

May  22 — Price  Johnston,  Ensign. 

Ala}-  22 — John  Riley,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Watson  McWilliams,  Ensign. 

Ala}-  22 — Dudley  Grace,  Ensign  ; Resigned. 

May  22 — William  Bishop,  Ensign. 

Alay  22 — -James  McAdory,  Ensign ; Removed. 

May  22 — -Nathan  Barton,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Joseph  Tepton,  Ensign;  Resigned. 

Aug.  28 — Eli  Thompson,  Ensign;  Resigned;  Vice,  J.  T'epton. 
Aug.  28 — Neil  McCorkel,  Ensign;  Resigned. 

1821 

Feb.  1 — John  B.  Tarrant,  Cornet;  Resigned. 

Mar.  19 — Enoch  Wood,  Ensign;  Vice;  Resigned. 

Apr.  20 — -Demsey  H.  Hicks,  Ensign;  A7ice,  L.  Turner. 

July  5 — William  Goode,  Ensign;  Resigned;  Vice,  D.  Grace. 

July  14 — Thomas  Little,  Ensign;  Resigned;  Vice,  E.  Wood. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


281 


1822 

Mar.  16 — Benjamin  Lacester ; Ensign;  Resigned. 

May  24 — Charles  Rogan,  Lieut.  Cavalry;  Vice,  Tho.  Camming. 
May  24 — Frederick  Walker,  Cornet  Cavalry;  Vice,  J.  B.  Tarrant. 
June  21 — Thomas  W.  Peydon,  Ensign. 

June  21 — -James  Truss,  Ensign. 

June  21 — Jennings  Seay,  Ensign. 

June  21 — Demsey  H.  Hix,  Ensign. 

June  21 — William  Wilson,  Ensign. 

June  21 — James  McAdory,  Captain. 

June  21 — James  H.  Wood,  Captain. 

June  21 — Sherwood  H.  Ginn,  Captain. 

June  21 — James  McWilliams,  Captain. 

June  21 — William  Bell,  Captain. 

June  21 — Joseph  Dickerson,  Captain. 

1822 

June  21 — Baker  Dulany,  Captain. 

June  21 — Ephraim  Thompson,  Captain. 

June  21 — Henry  Gordon,  Lieutenant. 

June  21 — John  H.  Barton,  Lieutenant. 

June  21 — Robert  Daniel,  Lieutenant. 

June  21 — Lewis  Hobbs,  Lieutenant. 

June  21 — Benjamin  Barrow,  Lieutenant. 

Second  Division,  Fifth  Brigade,  Seventeenth  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

John  Wood,  Brigadier  General,  Rank  9th  in  Com. 


282 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


1820 

Mar.  28 — George  Reid,  Colonel. 

Mar.  28 — Jeptha  V.  Isbell,  Lt.  Colonel. 

Mar.  28 — John  Hodge,  Major. 

1820 

May  22 — Matheny  McMath,  Captain. 

May  22 — Zachariah  Warren,  Captain. 

'Slay  22 — Charles  G.  Coons,  Captain. 

Slay  22 — -John  Hudson,  Captain. 

May  22 — Abel  Pennington,  Captain. 

May  22 — -Alfred  McKinney,  Captain ; Resigned. 

May  22 — Burrel  Tray  wick,  Captain. 

May  22 — Henry  Pickard,  Captain. 

1822 

June  28 — Ira  Griffin,  Captain. 

May  22 — Solomon  Bennet,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

May  22 — -William  Wilson,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

May  22 — -William  Crider,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Augustus  Pless,  Lieutenant ; Resigned. 

May  22 — Shadrach  Moffet,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — James  Pitch,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

May  22 — William  Pickard,  Lieutenant;  Removed. 

May  22 — James  Rice,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Matthew  Langston,  Lieutenant. 

1821 

June  9 — George  Gillepsie,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  S.  Bennet. 
June  9 — Bomkley  Brannon,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  M.  Wilson. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


283 


June  9 — Jones  Eades,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  A.  Pless. 

1822 

June  28 — James  R.  Hill,  Lieutenant. 

June  28 — James  Fears,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — James  Pearson,  Ensign. 

May  22 — John  James,  Ensign;  Resigned. 

May  22 — Allen  Nevels,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Benjamin  Richardson,  Ensign;  Resigned. 

May  22 — Daniel  Tearson,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Ira  Griffin,  Ensign ; Promoted. 

May  22 — Edward  Houst,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Wyley  Brewett,  Ensign  ; Resigned. 

1821 

June  9 — William  Coffee,  Ensign;  Vice,  J.  James. 

June  9 — William  Blacker,  Ensign;  Vice,  B.  Richardson. 

1822 

Mar.  16 — Jonathan  Bird,  Adjutant. 

Mar.  16 — David  Johnston,  PayMaster. 

Mar.  16 — Alexander  Wommack,  Qr.  Master. 

June  28 — Peter  Delany,  Ensign. 

1822 

Mar.  16 — John  H.  Campbell,  C’apt.  Cavalry. 

Mar.  16 — Drake  F.  Randolph,  1st  Lieut.  Cavalry. 

Mar.  16 — Samuel  Rhodes,  2nd  Lieut.  Cavalry. 

Mar.  16 — William  Nichols,  Cornet  Cavalry. 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


284 
1822 

June  28 — Thomas  Alexander,  Ensign. 

Second  Division,  Fifth  Brigade,  Eighteenth  Regiment 

1820 

Mar.  28 — Dennis  Dent  , Colonel  ; Resigned. 

1821 

June  1 4 — Hugh  Harrison,  Colonel;  Removed;  Vice  D.  Dent. 
June  14 — Wiliam  Lyon,  Lt.  Colonel;  Resigned. 

Wiliam  F.  Malone,  Major;  Resigned. 

1822 

May  22 — Joseph  Cleveland,  Colo.;  Vice,  Harrison. 

July  30 — Wiliam  G.  Carridign,  Lt.  Colonel;  Vice,  Lyon. 

1822 

June  28 — David  Farr,  Major;  Vice,  Malone. 

July  30 — Bright  M.  Lendon.  Adjutant. 

May  22 — William  Corodine,  Captain. 

May  22 — Benjamin  Williams,  Captain  ; Resigned. 

May  22 — Edward  B.  Flliotte,  Captain. 

July  22 — Abraham  Hargus,  Captain. 

Aug.  4 — John  H.  Scott,  Captain. 

( )ct.  24 — LeGrand  Jennings,  Captain. 

( )ct.  24 — Edward  L.  Fryerson,  Captain  ; Removed. 

( )ct.  24 — Lewis  Arthur,  Captain. 

Oct.  24 — Joseph  Cleveland,  Captain ; Promoted. 

( )ct.  24 — Samuel  Darden,  Captain. 

May  22 — Alexander  Young,  Lieutenant. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


May  22 — Hiram  Ross,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Andrew  Scott,  Lieutenant. 

July  22 — George  Portman,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  4— Isam  Dansby,  Lieutenant. 

Oct.  24 — James  T.  Mayhew,  Lieutenant. 

Oct.  24 — James  Cannon,  Lieutenant. 

Oct.  24 — William  Wheat,  Lieutenant  . 

Oct.  24 — Humphrey  B.  Rodgers,  Lieutenant. 
May  22 — Obadiah  Wright,  Ensign. 

May  22 — William  Jones,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Robert  Poe,  Ensign. 

1822 

July  22 — T'ilden  Musgroves,  Ensign. 

Aug.  4 — Samuel  Cannon,  Ensign. 

Oct.  24 — Archibald  Morrison,  Ensign. 

Oct.  24 — Alanson  Hamner,  Ensign. 

Oct.  24 — Spencer  Trawick,  Ensign;  Promoted. 
Oct.  24 — Lewis  Appling,  Ensign. 

Mar.  16 — William  Downs,  Captain. 

June  28 — Nathan  Gill,  Captain. 

July  8r. — Spencer  Trawick,  Captain. 

Aug.  26 — Samuel  Taylor,  Captain. 

1822 

'Mar.  26 — William  Peyton,  Lieut. 

Mar.  16 — Thomas  Johnson,  Ensign. 


286 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Second  Division,  Fifth  Brigade,  Thirty  Fourth  Regiment 

(When  Comm..  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

1821 

June  6 — Samuel  Carwiled,  Colonel. 

1822 

June  1 — James  Heflin,  Colonel. 

1821 

Oct.  18 — Jonathan  Ellison,  Captain. 

Oct.  18 — Wiliam  Moorehead,  Captain. 

Oct.  24 — John  McKinley,  Captain. 

1821 

Oct.  18 — Fielding  Oakley,  Lieutenant. 

Oct.  18 — James  Varner,  Lieutenant. 

Oct.  24 — William  McCombs,  Lieutenant. 

1821 

Oct.  18 — Elisha  Morris,  Ensign. 

Oct.  18 — Farley  Brookshire,  Ensign. 

Oct.  24 — James  Falliston,  Ensign. 

Third  Division,  Sixth  Brigade,  Nineteenth  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 
William  Taylor,  Maj.  General. 

Patrick  May,  Brig.  General. 

1820 


Mar.  28 — James  C.  Noel,  Colonel. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


287 


Mar.  28 — Robert  H.  Warren,  Lt.  Colonel. 

Mar.  28 — William  Chiles,  Major. 

1820 

July  21 — John  Long,  Captain. 

July  21 — James  Whitson,  Captain. 

July  21 — James  Yates,  Captain. 

July  21 — William  McDore,  Captain. 

July  21 — Isham  Pace,  Captain. 

July  21 — Berril  Halbrooks,  Captain. 

July  21 — Jaret  McConico,  Captain. 

July  21 — Malekiah  Gold,  Captain. 

July  21 — William  N.  Morrow,  Captain. 

Tuly  21 — John  May,  Captain. 

1821 

Jan.  11 — Edward  Herndon,  Captain,  Riflemen. 
Dec.  19 — Needham  Watkins,  Captain. 

Dec.  19 — Abraham  Livingston,  Riflemen. 

Dec.  19 — Francis  Parkham,  Captain. 

July  21 — John  W.  Fleming,  Lieutenant. 

July  21 — John  Whitsell,  Lieutenant. 

July  21 — John  Woodall,  Lieutenant. 

July  21 — Robert  Archibald,  Lieutenant. 

July  21 — Lewis  Blackman,  Lieutenant. 

July  21 — James  Collins,  Lieutenant. 

1820 

July  21 — Eli  Needham,  Lieutenant. 

July  21 — P.  Cainay,  Lieutenant. 


288 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


[uly  21 — Jesse  Hawkins,  Lieutenant. 

July  21 — -John  Leisseur,  Lieutenant. 

1821 

Jan.  11 — Hiraim  Shortridge,  Lieutenant,  Riflemen. 
Dec.  19 — Blanton  McAlpin,  Lieutenant. 

Dec.  19 — William  W.  Story,  Lieutenant. 

Dec.  19 — -Abraham  C.  Harden,  Lieutenant. 

Dec.  19 — Denney  Hopkins,  Lieutenant. 

July  21 — Riley  Kimber,  Ensign;  Resigned. 

July  21 — John  Bell,  Ensign. 

July  21 — James  Hall,  Ensign. 

July  21 — Andrew  Ramsay,  Ensign. 

July  21— -David  Boobouth,  Ensign. 

July  21 — Richard  Turner,  Ensign. 

July  21 — Samuel  Freeman,  Ensign. 

July  21 — John  Mays,  Ensign. 

July  21 — Jesse  Hawkins,  Ensign. 

July  21 — William  Stephens,  Ensign. 

1821 

Jany.  11 — Oliver  Buckman,  Ensign,  Riflemen. 

July  12 — James  Pellegrew,  Ensign 
Dec.  19 — William  Anderson,  Ensign. 

Dec.  19 — A.  Lefoy,  Ensign. 

Dec.  19 — George  H.  Singleton,  Ensign. 

Dec.  19 — Horatio  Miller,  Ensign. 

Dec.  19 — Kenard  Bennett,  Ensign. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


289 


1821 

Dec.  19 — John  C.  Whitsell,  Capt. 

Dec.  19 — R.  G.  Stana,  Capt. 

Dec.  19 — Pleasant  Daniel,  Capt. 

Dec.  19 — John  Trapell,  Capt. 

Third  Division,  Sixth  Brigade,  Twentieth  Regiment 

(When  C’omm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

Mar.  28 — James  Caller,  Colonel;  Removed. 

1821 

Nov.  5 — John  E.  Anderson,  Colonel;  Elected:  Contested  and 
made  vice  May  16,  1822. 

Nov.  5 — Laurence  Brasure,  Lieut.  Colonel ; Resigned  24  July  1822. 
1822 

May  16 — Leonard  Pearson,  Colonel  Com. 

May  16 — Leonard  Pearson,  Major;  Promoted. 

Aug.  7 — Samuel  H.  N.  Dickson,  Lieut.  Colonel  ; Vice,  Laurence 
Bradsure. 


1820 

May  22 — Fleming  Thompson,  Captain;  Resigned,  6 Apr.  1822. 

May  22— Frances  Kendall,  Captain;  Refused  to  Accept. 

May  22 — Richard  Russell,  Captain. 

May  22 — James  P.  Hainsworth,  Captain. 

May  22 — Frances  Daughty,  Captain. 

May  22 — James  Irwins,  Captain;  Resigned,  5 Oct.  1822. 

Sept.  19 — Samuel  H.  N.  Dickson,  Captain;  Promoted;  Vice,  F. 
Kendall. 

Oct.  28 — Thomas  C.  Shields,  Captain,  Lt.  Infy. ; Resigned. 


290 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


1822 

Jan.  16 — Edward  Chaudron,  Captain,  Et.  Infy. ; Vice,  Tho.  C. 
Shields. 

Oct.  19 — John  Cade,  Captain;  Vice,  James  H.  Ivans. 

Oct.  19 — Arch  McNeil,  Captain,  New  Co. 

May  22 — Vincent  Anderson,  Lieutenant;  Resigned 
May  22 — John  Hurtwall,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

May  22 — John  Perrett,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

May  22 — George  W.  Eacle,  Lieutenant ; Resigned  6 April,  1822. 
May  22 — -William  Stinson,  Lieutenant;  Resigned  1st  Oct.  1820. 
May  22 — Matthew  Parham,  Lieutenant. 

Oct.  28 — Edward  Chaudron,  Lieutenant,  Lt.  Infant. 

1821 

Feb.  16 — Joseph  Allen,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  Vincent  Anderson. 
Mar.  20 — George  N.  Stewart,  Adjutant. 

Jan.  1 — John  Mayhew,  Lieut.;  Vice,  W.  Stinson. 

May  29 — Canaan  Pistole,  Lieut.;  Vice,  John  Perrett. 

1822 

Jan.  16 — Achilles  George,  Lieut.;  Vice,  J.  Hurtwall. 

Apr.  6 — Elisha  Toles,  Lieut. 

Oct.  19 — William  Woodward,  Lieut.,  New  Co. 

1820 

May  22 — John  Landrum,  Ensign;  Resigned. 

May  22 — Ashieba  George,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Carman  Pistole,  Ensign ; Promoted. 

May  22 — George  Cunningham,  Ensign ; Appointments  in  staff, 
Dec.  20,  1822. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


291 


May  22 — Joseph  Cates,  Ensign;  Resigned. 

May  22 — Moses  Roberts,  Ensign. 

Oct.  28 — Thomas  Raser,  Ensign. 

Dec.  A — George  N.  Stewart,  Ensign. 

1821 

Feby.  16 — Jeremiah  Washum,  Ensign;  Vice,  John  Landrum. 
June  7 — Elias  Pledger,  Ensign;  Died. 

1822 

Jan.  25 — William  White,  Ensign;  Vice,  C.  Pistole,  Promo. 
Jan.  25 — James  Holt,  Ensign;  Vice,  Jos.  Cates. 

Apr.  6 — Elias  Morgan,  Ensign. 

Oct.  19 — Raford  O’Neal,  Ensign,  New  Co. 

1821 

Dec.  20 — George  Cunningham,  PayMaster. 

Third  Division,  Sixth  Brigade,  Twenty  First  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 


1820 

Mar.  28 — Jacob  Mayberry,  Colonel. 

1821 

Dec.  1 — Duncan  Dew,  Lt.  Colonel. 

Dec.  1 — Ebenezer  Leath,  Lt.  Colonel. 

Dec.  1 — Ebenezer  Leath,  Major,  Promoted. 

1822 


June  8 — William  Vardiman,  Major;  Vice  Leith,  Promoted. 


292 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


1820 

May  22 — Josiah  K.  Leath,  Captain;  Removed. 

May  22 — Hezekiah  Pollard,  Captain;  Resigned. 

May  22 — James  Mahan,  Captain. 

May  22 — John  D.  Jones,  Captain. 

May  22 — Burton  Rucker,  Captain ; Resigned. 

May  22 — Jones  Williams,  Captain  ; Resigned. 

Oct.  13— Bartlet  Oden,  Captain. 

Oct.  13 — Grief  Johnston,  Captain  Artillery. 

Oct.  13 — Thompson  Coker.  Captain,  Riflemen. 

1821 

Apr.  15 — AVilliam  Frost,  Captain;  Vice,  H.  Pollard. 
July  11 — Samuel  Carter,  Captain;  Vice,  J.  K.  Leath. 
Oct.  24 — David  Moore,  Captain. 

1822 

July  8 — Alexander  Spears,  Captain. 

July  8 — Drury  Dunn,  Captain. 

May  22 — Alexander  Hargiss,  Lieutenant  ; Resigned. 
May  22 — -Samuel  Standley,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 
Ma_v  22 — Thomas  Rowland,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 
May  22 — Aaron  Searcy,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Zeno  Philips,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — William  Smith,  Lieutenant. 

Oct.  13 — Benjamin  Shaddock,  Lieutenant. 

Oct.  13 — Hopkins  Pratt,  Lieutenant,  Artillery. 

Reuben  S.  Cargill,  Lieutenant,  Riflemen. 

24 — Robert  Fleming,  Lieutenant ; Vice,  A.  Harg 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


293 


24 — Thomas  Childress,  Lieutenant ; Vice,  T.  Rowland. 
24- — -Seaborn  Hightower,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  C.  Stanly. 

1822 

July  8 — Daniel  Henison,  Lieutenant. 

1820 

May  22 — Ichabod  Henderson,  Ensign. 

May  22 — John  Blake,  (Bluke),  Ensign;  Resigned. 

May  22 — John  R.  Cotton,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Laurence  Latham,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Tsaac  N.  Eakin,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Henry  H.  Henley,  Ensign. 

Oct.  13 — John  Philips,  Ensign. 

Oct.  13 — William  Harman,  Ensign,  Artillery. 

Henry  Blankinship,  Ensign,  Riflemem 


1821 

Apr.  15 — Zachariah  Harman,  Ensign;  Vice,  John  Blake. 
Oct.  24 — Francis  Carson,  Ensign. 

(Staff  Officers) 

1821 

May  10 — James  Neighbors,  Adjutant;  Removed. 

May  10 — Ezra  M.  Tate,  Qr.  Master;  Removed. 

May  10 — John  Henry,  Pay  Master. 

1822 

May  24 — Robert  Carleton,  Adjutant;  Vice,  Neighbors. 
May  24 — Ansel  Sawyers,  Qr.  Master. 


294 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Third  Division,  Sixth  Brigade,  Thirty  Second  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

1820 

Mar.  28 — Leonard  Hooks,  Colonel ; Removed. 

1822 

Jan.  25 — David  Cole,  Colonel;  Vice,  L.  Hooks;  Removed. 

Mar.  28 — Burwel  Taylor,  Lt.  Colonel;  Lt.  Colonel,  Resigned,  Oct. 
7,  1822. 

Oct.  15 — Robert  Baird,  Lt.  Colonel;  Vice,  Burwel  Taylor. 

Oct.  15 — William  R.  Williams,  Major;  Removed. 

Sept.  27 — Abner  G.  McGraw,  Major;  Vice,  William  R.  Williams. 

1820 

May  22 — Jolly  Atkins,  Captain;  Removed. 

May  22 — Elijah  Williams,  Captain. 

May  22 — Jesse  Boylston,  Captain;  Resigned  19  Oct.  1822. 

May  22 — Albert  Jernigan,  Captain;  Removed. 

May  22 — -Robertus  Royston,  Captain. 

May  22 — John  Haynes,  Captain;  Resigned. 

Aug.  1 — Joseph  Brittain,  Captain,  Cavalry;  Resigned. 

1821 

Mar.  13 — George  B.  McClusky,  Captain,  Resigned;  Vice,  A.  Jer- 
nigan. 

May  30 — Sami.  W.  Wallace,  Captain;  Vice,  J.  Haynes,  Resigned. 
July  5 — John  D.  Duke,  Captain. 

May  22 — William  Franks,  Lieutenant;  Removed. 

May  22 — Jehu  Nave,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Micajah  McLeroy,  Lieutenant;  Resigned  Oct.  19,  1822. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


295 


May  22 — Thomas  Wallace,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

May  22 — Obid  E.  Eilands,  Lieutenant;  Resigned  7 Oct.  1822. 

May  22 — Joab  Beasan,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

Aug.  1 — George  W.  Harvey,  Lieutenant,  Cavalry. 

1821 

Feb.  22 — Thomas  Robinson,  Lieutenant;  Removed;  Vice,  W. 
Franks. 

July  5 — Thomas  Walker,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — William  Lee,  Ensign ; Removed. 

May  22 — Jacob  Adam,  Ensign. 

May  22 — John  Morgan,  Ensign;  Removed. 

May  22 — George  W.  Tubbs,  Ensign;  Removed. 

May  22 — James  Skinner,  Ensign;  Resigned  7 Oct.  1822. 

May  22 — Jackson  Patrick,  Ensign. 

1820 

Feb.  22 — Wilie  Howell,  Ensign  ; Vice,  W.  Lee. 

Mar.  13 — Thomas  Winn,  Ensign;  Vice,  G.  Tubbs. 

Mar.  13 — Stephen  Pollard,  Ensign;  Vice,  J.  Morgan,  Stephen  Pol- 
lard, Resigned,  19  Oct.,  1822. 

May  30 — Ab.  G.  McGraw,  Ensign ; Promoted  ; Vice. 

1821 

July  5 — Hugh  Kennedy,  Captain. 

Nov.  29 — William  Harville,  Captain. 

1822 

Mar.  16 — Lee  George,  Captain;  Vice,  Jolly  Atkins,  L.  George,  Re- 
signed. 


296 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


1822 

Jan.  12 — Thomas  Walker,  Captain. 

Jan.  12 — Abner  G.  McGraw,  Captain;  Promoted. 

Julv  30 — John  Thomas,  Captain;  Vice,  George  B.  McClusky. 
Oct.  15 — Wiley  Howell,  Captain;  Vice,  Lee  George. 

Nov.  29 — William  Woodly,  Lieut. 

1822 

Mar.  16 — Willie  Howell,  Lieut.;  Tho.  Robinson,  Removed. 

June  12 — Noah  Langley,  Lieut. 

July  30 — William  Chatham,  Lieut. ; Vice.  Thomas  Wallace. 

1822 

Aug.  7 — Isaac  Russell,  Lieut.,  New  Co. 

Oct.  15 — Sampson  B.  Thomas,  Lieut.;  Vice,  Obed  E.  Eiland. 
Oct.  22 — William  Collins,  Lieut. ; Vice,  Micajah  McLeroy. 

1821 

July  5 — Martin  Johnston,  Ensign;  Removed. 

July  5 — David  Bell,  Ensign. 

Nov.  21 — William  Smith,  Ensign. 

1822 

June  12 — John  Martin,  Ensign. 

July  30 — William  Sanders,  Jr.,  Ensign;  Vice,  Martin  Johnston. 
Aug.  7 — Elijah  Russell,  Ensign;  New  Co. 

Oct.  15 — Thomas  Oaks,  Ensign;  Vice,  James  Skinner. 

Oct.  22 — James  Spragins,  Ensign;  Vice,  Stephen  Pollard. 

1821 

Nov.  21 — Thomas  A.  Perry,  Adjutant. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


297 


Nov.  21 — Samuel  W.  Wallace,  Paymaster. 

1822 

Aug.  7 — Daniel  Norwood,  Qr.  Master. 

Aug.  7 — Richard  D.  Shackleford,  Captain  ; New  Co. 

Oct.  15 — Terry  Dalton,  Captain;  Vice,  Abner  G.  McCraw. 

Oct.  22 — Warner  Young,  Captain;  Vice,  Jesse  Boydston. 

3rd.  Division,  6th  Brigade,  38th  Regiment 

1822 

June  15th — Alex  McAlpin,  Colonel  Comm. 

Third  Division,  Seventh  Brigade,  Twenty  Second  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

Thomas  Woodard,  Brigadier  General. 

1820 

Mar.  28 — Matthew  W.  McClelland,  Colonel. 

Mar.  28 — Theop.  Williams,  Lt.  Colonel;  Resigned. 

July  15 — Edward  Conaway,  Lt.  Col. 

July  15 — Allen  Atkins,  Major. 

1820 

May  22 — James  W.  Earnest,  Captain;  Removed. 

May  22 — Benedict  Vanpredilles,  Captain;  Removed. 

May  22 — William  Boswell,  Captain;  Resigned  11  July. 

May  22 — John  McKinsey,  Captain. 

May  22 — Andrew  Youst,  Captain. 

May  22 — Greene  McElroy,  Captain ; Resigned. 

May  22 — Ebenezer  Miles,  Captain;  Resigned. 

May  22 — James  Hebrald,  Captain. 

July  24 — Daniel  M.  Riggs,  Captain;  Resigned;  Vice,  W.  BoswelL 
Aug.  4 — James  Jackson,  Captain. 

Sept.  22 — Frances  Ford,  Captain  ; Vice,  G.  McElroy. 


298 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Oct.  28 — Benjamin  Grumbles,  Captain;  Vice,  E.  Miles. 

1821 

[any.  27 — Israel  O.  Crocheron,  Captain;  Vice,  B.  VanPredellis. 
[any.  29 — Bernard  Johnston,  Captain;  Vice,  Smith. 

Alar.  1 — Philip  Page,  Captain. 

Mar.  5 — John  W.  Williamson,  Captain;  Removed;  Vice,  J.  W. 
Earnest. 

Nov.  21 — Jacob  D.  Shelley,  Captain. 

1822 

Apr.  1 — Wm.  W.  Gary,  Captain. 

May  22 — Robert  C.  Carr,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

May  22 — Daniel  M.  Riggs,  Lieutenant ; Elected  Captain. 

May  22 — Moses  Overton,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — James  M.  Fike,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Abner  Stone,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — James  Butler,  Lieutenant;  Resigned 
May  22 — Andrew  George,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — William  A.  Jones,  Lieutenant;  Removed. 

Aug.  4 — David  H.  Freeman,  Lieutenant. 

Sept.  2 — William  Bragg,  Lieutenant. 

( )ct.  28 — Caderburry,  Lieutenant. 

1821 

Jan.  27 — Giles  K.  Jackson,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  R.  Carrs,  Resigned. 
Feb.  27 — Edward  Wood,  Lieutenant ; Removed. 

Feb.  27 — - John  Lasiter,  Lieutenant;  Resigned  6 April,  1822. 

Mar.  5 — William  Bolton,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  W.  A.  Jones. 

May  7 — Jas.  D,  Murrel,  Lieutenant  ; Vice,  G.  B.  Jackson. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


299 


1822 

Mar.  27 — Joseph  Wood,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Thomas  White,  Ensign;  Elect.  Capt.  Vol. 

May  22 — E.  R.  Byrd,  Ensign  ; Resigned  13  July. 

May  22 — George  W.  Parsons,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Jourdan  Baker,  Ensign. 

May  22 — John  King,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Henry  B.  McDaniel,  Ensign. 

May  22 — James  McDonald,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Cornelius  Burk,  Ensign;  Removed. 

July  24 — George  G.  Brooks,  Ensign;  Vice,  E.  R.  Byrd,  Resigned. 
July  — George  Mason,  Ensign;  Vice,  Thos.  White,  Resigned. 
Aug.  4 — William  C.  Lee,  Ensign ; Vice,  G.  Mason. 

1821 

Jan.  27 — John  R.  Tobin,  Ensign;  Vice,  G.  Mason. 

Feb.  26 — Robert  B.  Watson,  Ensign;  Promoted,  Vice,  G.  G. 
Brooks. 

Feb.  2 7 — Ira  McAdair,  Ensign. 

Mar.  1 — Henry  W.  Sturdivant,  Ensign. 

Mar.  5 — Samuel  Sauls,  Ensign;  Vice,  C.  Buck. 

Nov.  21 — John  Works,  Captain;  Vol.  Rifle  Co. 

Nov.  21 — William  Harrell,  Lieutenant;  Vol.  Rifle  Co. 

Nov.  21 — Sterling  Moss,  Ensign;  Vol.  Rifle  Co. 

1822 

Oct.  7 — William  Sanders,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  John  Lasiter. 

Mar.  20 — William  Foster,  PayMaster;  Vice,  G.  M.  Rives. 

Mar.  30 — Robert  B.  Watson,  Captain;  Vice,  D.  M.  Riggs. 

Mar.  30 — William  B.  Allen,  Lieutenant. 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


300 

Apr.  1 — Jackson  Stokes,  Lieutenant. 

Apr.  1 — -Jonathan  Shelly,  Ensign. 

Oct.  7 — Willis  Nunley,  Captain;  Vice,  John  W.  Williamson. 

Third  Division,  Seventh  Brigade,  Twenty  Third  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

1820 

Mar.  28 — Jourdan  Abbot,  Colonel. 

Mar.  28 — Organ  Tatum,  Lt.  Colonel. 

Mar.  28 — Bird  Fitzpatrick,  Major. 

May  22 — John  Lewis,  Captain;  Resigned. 

May  22 — -Zachariah  Powell,  Captain ; Resigned. 

May  22 — Henley  Brown,  Captain. 

May  22 — James  G.  Johnston,  Captain. 

May  22 — Lewis  Tyres,  Captain;  Resigned. 

May  22 — James  Aldridge,  Captain;  Resigned. 

Aug.  1 — Alex.  R.  Hutchison,  Captain,  Cavalry  ; Supposes  to  have 
resigned,  see  T.  S.  Rodgers. 

Nov.  8 — David  Epperson,  Captain;  Vice,  Lewis  Tyres. 

1821 

June  7 — Fielding  Sharp,  Captain;  Vice,  Wm.  S.  Traninum. 

Dec.  8 — Thomas  Durden,  Captain ; Promoted. 

1822 

Mar.  16 — Thomas  Hogg,  Captain;  Vice,  J.  Aldridge. 

May  22 — Solomon  Robbins,  Captain  ; Lieutenant. 

May  22 — J.  Hickman,  Captain;  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Daniel  Sneed,  Captain ; Resigned. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


301 


May  22 — John  Pearce,  Captain. 

May  22 — Loyd  Riddle,  Captain ; Resigned. 

May  22 — Alven  Davis,  Captain ; Resigned. 

Nov.  25 — Nimrod  W.  Long,  Captain. 

Aug.  1 — James  D.  Goss,  Captain,  Cavalry. 

Sept.  13 — Stephen  Shelton,  Captain;  Vice,  Loyd  Riddle. 

1822 

July  30 — William  Hagler,  Captain;  Vice,  Daniel  Sneed. 

July  30 — Samuel  Fleming,  Captain;  Vice,  Thos.  Durdon. 

May  22 — James  Letcher,  Ensign. 

May  22 — William  McMillan,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Thomas  Smith,  Ensign ; Resigned. 

May  22 — George  Ritter,  Ensign ; Resigned. 

May  22 — Patterson  Pate,  Ensign ; Resigned. 

May  22 — -William  Hicks,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Thomas  Chambless,  Ensign. 

Aug.  1 — Gray  E.  Hill,  Ensign,  Cavalry. 

1821 

Mar.  2 — -Stephen  White,  Ensign  ; Resigned. 

Sept.  5 — Thomas  Clark,  Lieutenant ; Vice  Alven  Davis,  Resigned. 

Sept.  5 — Absolom  B.  Hewes,  Ensign;  Vice  Stephen  White,  Re- 
signed. 

Sept.  13 — James  N.  Merrick,  Ensign ; Vice,  Patterson  Pate,  Re- 
signed. 

1822 

July  30 — George  Morgan,  Ensign;  Vice,  Thomas  Smith. 

July  30 — Robert  Stewart,  Ensign;  (Com.  July  30,  1822);  Vice 
George  Ritter. 


302 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Sept.  5 — William  Davis,  Capt.,  Riflemen. 

Sept.  5 — John  Tyus,  Lt.,  Riflemen. 

Sept.  5 — John  Davis,  Ensign,  Riflemen. 

Dec.  20 — Timothy  L.  Rodgers,  C’apt.,  Cavalry. 

Dec.  20 — John  Tuber,  Cornet. 

(Staff) 

1821 

June  14 — Phil.  C.  Tooly,  PayMaster,  24th  Regiment. 

June  14 — Henry  Goldthwaite,  Adjutant,  24th  Regiment. 

3822 

Juh'  30 — William  McMillan,  Captain;  Vice,  John  Lewis. 

July  30 — Samuel  Butler,  Captain;  Vice,  Z.  Powell. 

Third  Division,  Seventh  Brigade,  Twenty  Fourth  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

1820 

Mar.  28 — Henry  D.  Stone,  Colonel. 

Mar.  28 — Andrew  Laprade,  Lt.  Colonel;  Resigned. 

1821 

Feb.  17 — James  Humphries,  Lt.  Colonel;  Vice,  A.  Laprade,  Re- 
signed. 

Feb.  17 — Benjamin  Young,  Major. 

1822 

June  21 — -Nicholas  Blackwell,  Lt.  Colonel. 

May  16 — Eli  Shaver,  Captain. 

May  22 — Rode  L.  Smith,  Captain. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


303 


May  22 — William  A.  Campbell,  Captain;  Promoted  to  Adjt.  of 
40th  Regiment. 

May  22 — Nathaniel  S.  Waller,  Captain. 

May  22 — William  H.  Wade,  Captain;  Resigned,  26  Sept.  1822. 
May  22 — Benj.  Mock,  Captain. 

May  22 — Joseph  H.  Meigs,  Captain. 

May  22 — James  Hays,  Captain. 

May  22 — Benjamin  Davis,  Captain. 

May  22 — William  Westmoreland,  Captain. 

May  22 — William  Bennett,  Captain. 

Sept.  1 — James  Thompson,  Lt.  Infant. 

Aug.  1 — Thomas  Graham,  Captain,  Cavalry. 

1821 

Feb.  17 — John  Hollingshead,  Captain;  Vice. 

July.  5 — Bird  H.  Young,  Captain;  Vice. 

May  22 — Joseph  Bennet,  Eieutenant ; Resigned. 

May  22 — Hiram  H.  C’ockran,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Joseph  Underwood,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — A.B.S.D.  Wilson,  Lieutenant;  Elect.  Captain  Vol.  R. 
Comp. 

May  22 — William  Hutson,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Solomon  Thompson,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — William  Twilly,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — John  Hollingshead,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Hez.  Harston,  Lieutenant. 

May  22— Eli  Johnston,  Lieutenant. 

Sept.  1 — Thomas  Hannan,  Lieutenant,  Lt.  Infant. 

Aug.  1 — John  H.  Stone,  Lieutenant,  Cavalry. 


304 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


1821 

Feb.  17 — Albert  Berde,  Lieutenant;  Vice. 

Feb.  17 — -John  Drummond,  Lieutenant;  Vice. 

1822 

May  16 — John  Thornton,  Lieut. 

June  14 — John  H.  Traywick,  Lieut. 

May  22 — Elsanah  Cavandoe,  Ensign. 

May  22 — John  Riley,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Thomas  Gardner,  Ensign. 

May  22 — -Caleb  Piles,  Ensign;  Resigned. 

May  22 — George  Pelot,  Ensign. 

May  22 — -Joshua  Gourd,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Alvose  Daniel,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Samuel  Griffin,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Andrew  Burns,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Peter  Bagget,  Ensign. 

Sept.  1 — J.  \Y.  Patterson,  Ensign,  Lt.  Infant.;  Resigned. 

Aug.  1 — Thomas  Brock,  Cornet;  Resigned. 

1820 

Dec.  1 — Peter  Bell,  Cornet  Ens. ; Cabile  Piles. 

1821 

Feby.  17 — Moses  Thompson,  Ensign;  Vice,  Resigned  12  Aug.  1822. 
July  5- — -Samuel  B.  Lyons,  Ensign;  Vice. 

1822 

May  11 — Edward  Harris,  Ensign. 

May  11 — David  Craig,  Ensign. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


305 


1821 

July  20 — Robert  R.  Rives,  Lieut.,  Riflemen. 

July  20 — A.B.S.D.  Wilson,  Capt.,  Riflemen. 

July  20 — Robert  R.  Rives,  Lieut.,  Riflemen. 

July  20 — Thomas  C.  Hogan,  Ensign. 

1822 

Mar.  16 — William  Laprade,  Paymaster;  Resigned  19  Sept.  1822. 
Mar.  16 — Wm.  W.  Hewit,  Adjutant;  (Removed  and  Resigned, 
Sept.  19,  1822. 

June  14 — Peter  J.  Murrell,  Ensign. 

1822 

Aug.  17 — Archibald  Roy,  Ensign;  Vice,  Moses  Thompson. 

1821 

June  7 — B.  W.  Bell,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  J.  Bennet. 

1822 

May  16 — Chelsey  Johnston,  Qr.  Master. 

June  14 — Thomas  Johnson,  Captain. 

June  14 — John  Blackwell,  Captain. 

June  22 — Jesse  Hand,  Lieut. 

June  7 — Minor  Pinkston,  Cornet;  Vice  T.  F.  Brook. 

1822 

Nov.  8 — Thomas  Davis,  Lieut.;  Vice,  Nath.  Hickman. 

June  7 — George  Whitman,  En.  Lt.  Inf.;  Vice,  J.  W.  Patterson. 

1822 

Oct.  4 — Aminadab  Marlow,  Adjutant ; Vice,  Hewitt. 

Oct.  4 — John  A.  Fraser,  Paymaster;  Vice,  LaPrade. 


306 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Nov.  8 — James  Abercrombie,  Capt.,  Cavalry, 

Nov.  8 — Walter  R.  Ross,  Lieutenant,  Cavalry. 

Nov.  8 — Thornton  Taliaferro,  Cornet,  Cavalry. 

Third  Division,  Seventh  Brigade,  Thirty  Sixth  Regiment 
Wilcox  Battalion,  By  Act  of  Dec.  6th,  1821 

(When  Appointed,  Name,  Office,  When  Resigned  or  Removed) 
1822 

Aug.  16 — William  H.  Pledger,  Col.  Comd. 

Apr.  26 — John  Speight,  Major;  Resigned  23  Oct.  1822. 

Oct.  24 — Archibald  K.  Smith,  Lieut.  Col. 

Oct.  24 — Alexander  Johnson,  Major;  Vice,  John  Speight. 

July  22 — Ezekial  Gilbert,  Captain. 

July  22 — William  P.  Fisher,  Captain. 

July  22 — William  Owens,  Captain. 

July  22 — A.  C.  Horn,  Captain. 

July  22 — William  Hayes,  Captain 

1822 

Oct.  24 — Alman  James,  Captain;  New  Co. 

Oct.  24 — Barrel  B.  Bennet,  Captain. 

July  22 — Mark  Morgan,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

July  22 — David  White,  Lieutenant. 

July  22 — John  Wilson,  Lieutenant. 

July  22 — -Samuel  Matthews,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

July  22 — John  Kelly,  Lieutenant;  Removed. 

Sept.  25 — R.  J.  W.  Reel,  Lieutenant;  Vice  Mark  Morgan. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


307 


1821 

Sept.  13 — Manassa  Philing,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  J.  Kelly. 

Oct.  24 — Benjamin  Williamson,  Lieutenant ; Vice,  S.  Matthews. 

1822 

Oct.  24 — Everet  Sheffield,  Lieutenant;  New  Co. 

Oct.  24 — William  L.  Rotten,  Lieutenant ; New  Co. 

July  22 — James  Morgan,  Ensign. 

July  22 — John  Hoff,  Ensign;  Removed. 

July  22 — John  Owen,  Ensign. 

July  22 — John  McCarter,  Ensign. 

July  22 — -Enoch  Kelly,  Ensign. 

1821 

Oct.  29 — James  Holley,  Ensign ; Vice,  J.  Hoff. 

1822 

Oct.  24 — Jesse  Williams,  Ensign;  New  Co. 

Oct.  24 — William  S.  Aikens,  Ensign;  New  Co. 

1822 

Oct.  24 — Chas.  F.  Stewart,  Adjutant. 

Oct.  24 — Abel  E.  Evans,  Qr.  Master. 

Oct.  24 — Thomas  Evans,  PayMaster. 

Fourth  Division,  Eighth  Brigade,  Twenty  Fifth  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

Eldridge  L.  Greening,  Brigadier  General. 

Robert  Erwin,  Colonel. 

William  C.  Watson,  Lt.  Colonel. 

William  Erwin,  Major. 


308 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Sumpter  Land,  Captain. 

J.  T.  McClendon,  Captain. 

James  Rogers,  Captain. 

Smith,  Captain. 

Jesse  Handley,  Lieutenant. 

Philip  Bordon.  Lieutenant. 

William  Loyd,  Lieutenant. 

George  Shetto,  Lieutenant. 

Benjamin  Jacobs,  Ensign. 

John  Walding,  Ensign. 

Fourth  Division,  Eighth  Brigade,  Twenty  Sixth  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

Mar.  28 — John  M.  Flinn,  Colonel. 

Mar.  28 — Stephen  C.  Richardson,  Lt.  Colonel;  Resigned. 

1821 

Apr.  28 — Robert  Draughan,  Lt.  Colonel ; Vice,  S.  Richardson. 
Apr.  28 — Henry  G.  Williams,  Major. 

Nov.  30 — Henry  C.  Carter,  Major  ; Vice,  H.  G.  Williams. 

July  18 — Thomas  Redden,  Captain. 

July  18 — John  Snell,  Captain. 

July  18 — Henry  Wait,  Captain. 

July  18 — Solomon  M.  Rogers,  Captain;  Removed  4 May,  1822. 
July  18 — Fielding  Bradford,  Captain. 

July  18 — Thomas  C.  Lovet,  Captain. 

July  18 — Thomas  Shelton,  Captain;  Resigned  30  Mar.,  1822. 

July  18 — Joel  Boyles,  Captain;  Removed. 

Sept.  2 — John  Hambrick,  Captain;  Resigned. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


309 


Sept.  2 — Jethro  Hardy,  Captain;  Removed. 

Nov.  30 — John  C.  Pickens,  Captain;  Resigned. 

1822 

May  4 — Albert  G.  Woodson,  Captain. 

May  4 — Wiley  C’ato,  Captain. 

June  21 — John  C.  Pickens,  Captain;  Vol.  Artillery. 

July  4 — Sawyer  Brooks,  Captain. 

July  30 — Jonathan  Hardie,  Captain;  Vice,  Thos.  Shelton. 

July  18 — Richardson  M.  O’Neal,  Lieutenant. 

July  18 — Daniel  D.  Shoemate,  Lieutenant. 

July  18 — William  Stubblefield,  Lieutenant. 

July  18 — George  Knapps,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

July  18 — E.  B.  Wood,  Lieutenant. 

July  18 — Ogden  Newman,  Lieutenant. 

July  18 — Charles  Jourdan,  Lieutenant;  Resigned  30  March,  1822. 
July  18 — Joseph  Boyles,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

Sept.  2 — Jacob  Eldridge,  Lieutenant;  Removed. 

Sept.  2 — Gipsum  Hardy,  Lieutenant. 

Sept.  11 — Wiley  Cato,  Lieuteant ; Promoted,  Vice,  George  Kraffts, 
Promoted. 

Nov.  30 — Daniel  McCollum,  Lieutenant. 

1822 

May  4 — Thomas  Flinn,  Lieutenant;  Vol.  Artillery. 

June  21 — Edward  Duning,  Lieutenant. 

July  18 — Alexander  Terry,  Ensign  ; Resigned. 

July  18 — John  McCloud,  Ensign. 

July  18 — Elias  Wilson,  Ensign. 

July  18 — John  Shoultz,  Ensign;  Resigned. 


310 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


July  18 — William  Jamison,  Ensign. 

July  18 — Lewis  Slaughter,  Ensign. 

July  18 — Kendrick  Hardy,  Ensign;  Resigned,  30  March  1822. 

July  18 — Reuben  Adcock,  Ensign;  Reuben  Adcock,  Resigned. 
Sept.  2 — William  Kennedy,  Ensign;  Resigned,  29  Aug. 

Sept.  2 — Martin  B.  East,  Ensign. 

Sept.  2 — William  B.  Bonds,  Ensign;  Vice,  John  Shutts. 

1822 

May  4 — William  Gill,  Ensign. 

May  4 — Henry  Young,  Ensign. 

June  21 — Joseph  Guavend,  Ensign;  Vol.  Artillery. 

July  30 — William  B.  King,  Ensign;  Vice,  Alex.  Terry. 

July  30 — C.  Dunnam,  Ensign;  Vice,  Kendred  Hardy. 

July  30 — William  Milton,  Ensign;  Vice,  Reuben  Adcock. 

July  30 — Atherton  T.  Penniman,  Ensign;  Vice,  Edward  L.  Smith, 
who  resigned. 

Aug.  29 — James  E.  Black,  Ensign;  Vice,  Kennedy. 

1822 

July4 — Hiram  Miller,  Lieutenant. 

July  30 — James  Christon,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  Chas.  Jordan. 

July  30 — Robert  W.  Browning,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  Joseph  Boyle. 
Aug.  30 — Robert  T.  Black,  Lieutenant ; Vice,  Eldridge. 

Oct.  17 — Edwin  Cato,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  Cato. 

1822 

July  30 — Charles  Whitehead,  Captain;  Vice,  Joel  Boyles. 

July  30 — Ezra  Hill,  Captain;  Vice,  John  C.  Pickens. 

Aug.  29 — Obadiah  Barnes,  Captain,  Vice,  Hambrick. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


311 


Fourth,  Division,  Eighth  Brigade,  Twenty  Seventh  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

1820 

Mar.  28 — Henry  L.  Riviere,  Colonel;  Resigned,  6 Aug.  1822. 

1822 

Aug.  7 — Mozea  Rousseau,  Colonel ; Vice,  Rivere. 

Aug*.  7 — Thomas  M.  Brumley,  Lt.  Colonel. 

Aug.  7 — Alexander  S.  Lyle,  Major. 

July  18 — John  Denn,  Captain. 

July  18 — Zachriah  Tenley,  Captain;  Resigned. 

July  18 — Bird  M.  Simpson,  Captain;  Removed. 

July  18 — John  Ballenger,  Captain. 

1822 

Mar.  16 — Westwood  Armstead,  Captain;  Vice,  Simpson. 

June  30 — Thomas  McConnell,  Captain. 

June  30 — Benjamin  C.  Foster,  Captain. 

July  18 — Levin  Gayle,  Lieutenant. 

July  18 — Willis  Reynolds,  Lieutenant;  Resigned,  9th  Nov.  1822. 
July  18 — Thomas  Martin,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

July  18 — Joshua  Minton,  Lieutenant. 

1821 

May  19 — Josiah  Hays,  Lieutenant. 

May  19 — Noah  Dodridge,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  T.  Mastin. 

1822 

Mar.  16 — Duncan  Harvey,  Lieutenant. 

July  18 — Daniel  Harrison,  Ensign. 


312 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Jul}-  18 — Silas  Moore,  Ensign. 

July  18 — Randle  Harris,  Ensign  ; Resigned. 

July  18 — William  Hayse,  Ensign. 

Sept.  2 — Huston  Windham,  Ensign. 

1822 

Mar.  16 — Meret  Potter,  Ensign. 

Fourth  Division,  Eighth  Brigade,  Twenty  Eighth  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

Mar.  28 — Robert  Smilie,  Colonel ; Resigned. 

1821 

May  29 — Charles  Hunter,  Colonel ; Vice,  R.  Smilie. 

May  29 — Jabez  N.  Brown,  Lt.  Colonel ; Resigned,  5 July  1822. 

1822 

Aug.  7 — Goodman  Bethea,  Lt. ; Vice,  Jabez  N.  Brown. 

Aug.  7 — Seaborn  Whatley,  Major. 

May  22 — James  Jones,  Captain;  Resigned. 

May  22 — Solomon  Sitler,  Captain. 

May  22 — William  Carter,  Captain. 

May  22 — Elias  P.  Muse,  Captain. 

May  22 — William  Bagby,  Captain. 

May  22 — Samuel  J.  Isaacks,  Captain;  Resigned. 

May  22 — Joshua  Zeiber,  Captain. 

May  22 — James  W.  Mann,  Captain  ; Resigned. 

May  22 — James  Howard,  Captain. 

1821 

Apr.  28 — Rediwick  B.  Branton,  Captain;  Vice,  J.  Jones. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


313 


Apr.  28 — James  R.  Riley,  Captain;  Vice,  (Riley  Removed). 

Apr.  28 — James  May,  Captain;  Vice. 

May  11 — Neal  Ferguson,  Captain;  Vice,  S.  J.  Isaacks. 

July  1 — James  Holmes,  Captain;  Vice,  16  May,  1822. 

May  22 — Hamilton  Cook,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Robert  Browning,  Leiutenant. 

May  22 — James  May,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Larry  Wilson,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Hyram  Speirs,  Lieutenant ; Resigned. 

May  22 — Neil  Ferguson,  Lieutenant;  Promoted. 

May  22 — William  B.  Main,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — John  Hendrick,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — John  Kelly.  Lieutenant;  Transferred. 

1821 

Jany.  11 — Largin  Linsey,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  Resigned  16  May,  1822. 
Apr.  28 — Cornelius  Craker,  Vice  Lieutenant ; Vice. 

Apr.  28 — Thomas  J.  Snowdin,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  Promoted. 

Apr.  28 — Jeremiah  Matthews,  Lieutenant;  Vice. 

May  10 — Tho.  Smith,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  Neil  Ferguson. 

Sept.  1 — George  A.  Snowdin,  Lieutenant. 

1822 

Oct.  19 — Dugald  Anderson,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  Richd.  Brazil. 

May  22 — Hosea  Halley,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Abijah  Clark,  Ensign  ; Resigned. 

May  22 — Enoch  Beeson.  Ensign. 

May  22 — George  H.  Caldwell,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Jones  Weatherford,  Ensign. 


314 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


May  22 — John  Scroggins,  Ensign;  Resigned. 

May  22 — Abner  D.  Griffith,  Ensign. 

May  22 — David  Reese,  Ensign;  Resigned. 

May  22 — Seaburn  Kelly,  Ensign;  Resigned. 

1821 

May  10 — Granby  Bagget,  Ensign ; J.  Scoggins. 

July  1 — Elijah  Beesley,  Ensign;  Vice,  L.  Kelly. 

July  1 — Joseph  Campbell,  Ensign;  Vice,  D.  Reese. 

Sept.  1 — Dempsey  Harrell,  Lieutenant ; Vice,  Abijah  Clark. 
Sept.  1 — Richard  Brazill,  Lieutenant;  Removed. 

1821 

Apr.  7 — Alexander  Watson,  Adjutant;  Superseded. 

Apr.  7 — Martin  H.  Fenlow,  Quarter  Master. 

Apr.  7 — Radford  S.  Cotton,  Pay  Master. 

1822 

Aug.  7 — Reuben  S.  Dean,  Adjutant;  Vice,  Alexander  Watson. 
Sept.  1 — -Joseph  C.  Downie,  Captain;  Resigned  21  Sept. 

Oct.  19 — John  Priddy,  Captain;  Vice,  Downie. 

Oct.  19 — Thomas  J.  Snowden,  Captain. 

Dec.  17 — Charles  W.  Gerald,  Lieut. ; Vice,  H.  Spear. 

1822 

Aug.  29 — Nathaniel  Hawthorn,  Lieut.,  Riflemen. 

July  1 — Sterling  B.  K-emp,  Capt.,  Cavalry;  Volunteer. 

July  1 — Reuben  Deen,  Lieut.,  Cavalry. 

July  1 — Vincheon  Ellis,  Ensign. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


315 


1821 

July  1 — Allen  Rowe,  Lieut. 

1822 

May  16 — Stephen  Andrews,  Capt. ; Vice,  Holmes,  Resg. 

May  16 — John  Deekle,  Lieut.,  Vice,  Linsey. 

May  26 — Owen  Lee,  Ensign. 

Fourth  Division,  Eighth  Brigade,  Twenty  Ninth  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 


1820 

Mar.  28 — William  Lee,  Colonel. 

Mar.  28 — Andrew  T.  Perry,  Lt.  Colonel. 

Mar.  28 — Ward  Taylor,  Major. 

May  22 — John  H.  Watts,  Captain. 

May  22 — Ennis  McDaniel,  Captain;  Resigned. 
May  22 — Frederick  Jolly,  Captain. 

May  22 — William  Graydon,  Captain;  Resigned. 


1821 

Apr.  12 — -Samuel  Paynes,  Captain  ; Vice,  W.  Graydon. 
Apr.  25 — J.  W.  Ernest,  Captain;  Vice,  Ennis  McDaniel. 

1822 

May  24 — William  McCurry,  Captain ; Vice,  Graydon. 
May  22 — William  Ellett,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Nathan  Cook,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Thomas  Herbert,  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Daniel  Payne,  Lieutenant ; Resigned. 


316 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


1821 

Mar.  15 — Jesse  Womack,  Adjutant. 

Mar.  15 — Absolam  Gary,  Qr.  Master. 

Mar.  15 — Micajah  Wade,  PayMaster. 

1822 

May  24 — Etheldred  Bozeman,  Lieut. 

July  8 — James  W.  Wade,  Lieut. 

May  22 — John  H.  Lucky,  Ensign. 

May  22 — Kencheon  Womack,  Ensign ; Resigned. 

May  22 — John  Henton,  Ensign;  Resigned. 

May  22 — Thomas  Faily,  Ensign. 

1821 

Apr.  25 — Thomas  Griffith,  Ensign;  Vice,  K.  Womack. 

1822 

Jan.  15 — William  McCurry,  Ensign. 

June  8 — James  Jones,  Ensign. 

Butler \ Volunteer  Rifle  Company 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

1822 

Oct.  5 — Frederick  Jolly,  Captain. 

Oct.  5 — -William  McDaniel,  Lieutenant. 

Oct.  5 — Michael  Peevy,  Ensign. 

Fourth  Division,  Ninth  Brigade,  Thirtieth  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

John  F.  Everitt,  Brigadier . General. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


317 


1820 

Mar.  28 — George  Steed,  Colonel. 

Mar.  28 — Jonah  W.  Creagh,  Lieut.  Colonel. 

July  16 — John  D.  Curtis,  Major. 

July  19 — Sidney  M.  Good,  Captain;  Resigned. 

July  19 — Blassenger  Johnston,  Captain;  Removed. 

July  19 — Wyley  White,  Captain;  Resigned. 

July  19 — James  C.  Adams,  Captain. 

July  19 — Daniel  Baugh,  Captain. 

July  19 — Daniel  Gilbert,  Captain. 

July  19 — Jesse  B.  Landrum,  Captain. 

July  19 — Roland  J.  Raines,  Captain. 

July  19 — Ambrose  Charleton,  Captain. 

July  19 — John  C.  Hill,  Captain,  Riflemen. 

1821 

Dec.  1 — William  B.  Wiley,  Captain,  Cavalry;  Resigned,  23  Sept. 
1822. 

June  6 — John  Files,  Captain;  Vice,  B.  Johnston. 

June  6 — Willis  Bridges,  Captain;  Vice,  W.  White. 

July  19 — Benjamin  Forscue,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

1820 

Dec.  1 — Wiliam  B.  Wiley,  (Above),  Lieut.,  Cavalry;  Resigned, 
23  Sept.  1822. 

July  19 — Job  Johnston,  Lieutenant  ; Dead. 

July  19 — William  Wiggins,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

July  19 — Windsor  Spinks,  Lieutenant. 

July  19 — Peter  Marsh,  Lieutenant. 

July  19 — Benjamin  F.  Alston,  Lieutenant. 


318 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


filly  19 — Thomas  Black,  Lieutenant;  Removed. 

July  19 — John  B.  Roundtree,  Lieutenant. 

July  19 — Abner  L.  Slack.  Lieutenant. 

July  19 — James  C.  Williams,  Lieutenant,  Riflemen;  Resigned. 
Dec.  1 — William  Chapman,  Lieutenant,  Cavalry. 


1821 

Feb.  22 — Andrew  Cockran,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  T.  Black. 

June  6 — Nathaniel  Jackson,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  Job  Johnston. 
June  6 — Richard  Dick,  Lieutenant;  Vice,  W.  Wiggins. 

July  12 — O.  B.  Havis,  Lieutenant,  Riflemen;  J.  C.  William. 
July  19 — Pendleton  T.  Bidell,  Ensign;  Resigned. 

July  19 — Calven  Jones,  Ensign;  Refused  to  accept. 

July  19 — Thomas  Porter,  Ensign;  Resigned. 

July  19 — Huff  Thomas,  Ensign. 

July  19 — Isaiah  Hayes,  Ensign  ; Removed. 

July  19 — -William  Gilbert,  Ensign  ; Resigned. 

July  19 — David  Childress,  Ensign;  Removed. 

July  19 — -Windsor  Hickman,  Ensign. 

July  19— John  Knight,  Ensign. 

July  19 — C.  W.  Hvsle,  Ensign,  Riflemen ; Removed. 

1821 

Jan.  11 — Edward  Oliver,  Ensign,  Riflemen;  Vice,  C .W.  Hvsle. 
Dec.  — Henry  Ray,  Ensign;  Resigned  ; Vice,  W.  Gilbert. 

Jan.  11 — Benjamin  H.  Loftis,  Ensign,  Cavalry. 

Feb.  22— Nicholas  Lewis,  Ensign;  Resigned;  Vice,  D.  Childress. 
June  6 — Daniel  Watson,  Ensign;  Vice,  C.  Jones. 

Sept.  10 — Peter  King,  Ensign  ; Vice,  Thos.  Porter. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


319 

Sept.  10 — Henry  Preswall,  Ensign;  Vice,  Jonah  Hayes. 

Sept.  10 — James  Dewitt,  Jr.,  Ensign. 

Nov.  29— Walter  Bell,  Captain;  Vice,  S.  M.  Good. 

Nov.  29 — Jacob  Kersinger,  Lieut.;  Vice,  F.  Forscue. 

Nov.  29 — James  S.  Bidgood,  Ensign;  P.  T.  Biddle. 

Dec.  20 — Jacob  L.  Stack,  Capt. 

1822 

May  24 — Jesse  Pugh,  Ensign;  Vice,  Lewis. 

Fourth  Division,  Ninth  Brigade.  Thirty  First  Regiment 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 


1820 

Mar.  28 — James  Thomson,  Colonel. 

Mar.  28 — John  McCrory,  Lt.  Colonel. 

Mar.  28 — William  Johnston,  Major;  Resigned. 

1821 

Dec.  15 — John  Moore,  Major;  Vice,  W.  Johnston. 

July  16 — James  Moore,  Captain;  Resigned,  6 Apr.  1822. 
July  16 — Gabriel  Allen,  Captain;  Removed,  6 Apr.  1822. 
July  16 — Wiliam  Furmin,  Captain. 

July  16 — Edward  Herndon,  Captain. 

July  16 — Daniel  Coleman,  Captain. 

July  16 — John  Moore,  Captain;  Promoted. 

1821 

Jan.  21 — John  McLaughlin,  Captain. 

June  7 — Lawrence  Tinnin,  Captain;  Vice,  W.  Furmen. 


320 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Dec.  1-1 — William  Worsham,  Captain;  Vice,  John  Moore;  Pro- 
moted. 


1822 

Apr.  1 — Micajah  McGee,  Captain. 

Apr.  1 — B.  P.  Whitlow,  Captain. 

July  16 — Nelson  Fortune,  Lieutenant;  Resigned,  6 Apr.  1822. 
July  16 — William  Armstrong,  Lieutenant. 

July  16 — Lawrence  T'innin,  Lieutenant. 

July  16 — John  McLaughlin,  Lieutenant;  Elected  Captain. 

July  16 — Isaac  Baker,  Lieutenant;  Resigned. 

July  16 — Lindsay  McCarey,  Lieutenant. 


1821 

Jany.  20 — Isaac  Fisk,  Lieutenant;  Resigned;  Vice,  J.  McLaughlin. 


1822 

Mar.  27 — John  Archer,  Lieutenant. 

Apr.  6 — James  Agee,  Lieutenant. 

July  16 — Iredell  Kittrell,  Ensign;  Resigned  6 Apr.  1822. 
July  16 — Albert  Emery,  Ensign. 

July  16— Thomas  Underwood,  Ensign. 

July  16 — J.  M.  Baxter,  Ensign. 

July  16 — John  Repshine,  Ensign. 

July  16 — Charles  Simpson,  Ensign. 

1821 

Jany.  20 — John  D.  Bennett,  Ensign;  Vice,  J.  M.  Baxter. 
1822 

Apr.  6 — Hiram  Harris,  Ensign. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


4th  Division,!  31st  Regiment,  9th  Brigade 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

1821 

May  29 — Morison  Harriot,  Adjutant. 

May  29 — Enoch  Everett,  Qr.  Master. 

May  29 — Thomas  Eastin,  PayMaster. 

(Volunteers) 

1821 

Jany.  20 — Alexander  B.  Smoot,  Capt.,  Et.  Inf. 

Jany.  20 — Joseph  M.  Flant,  Lt.,  Inf. 

Jany.  20 — Henry  Sossaman,  Ens.,  Inf. 

Fourth  Division,  Ninth  Brigade,  Baldwin  Battalion 

(When  Comm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

1820 

Mar.  28 — Cornelius  Rain,  Major;  Resigned,  5 Nov.  1821. 
1821 

May  17 — Bryant  B.  Randall,  Major. 

June  18 — William  Tutle,  Captain. 

June  18 — W.  B.  Stone,  Captain. 

Sept.  22 — John  W.  Carney,  Captain. 

Sept.  22 — William  R.  Stone,  Captain. 

1822 

Mar.  15 — Frederick  W.  Miller,  Captain. 

Mar.  15 — Charles  Conway,  Captain. 

Mar.  15 — Gerald  Byrne,  Captain. 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


322 

June  18 — Edward  Chesney,  Lieutenant. 

June  18 — William  Briant,  Lieutenant. 

Sept.  22 — Mark  Sullivan,  Lieutenant. 

Sept.  22 — William  P.  Bryant,  Lieutenant. 

1822 

Mar.  15 — Oren  Peabody,  Lieutenant. 

Mar.  15 — John  Overton,  Lieutenant. 

Mar.  15 — William  Hall,  Lieutenant. 

June  18 — John  Johnston,  Ensign. 

June  18 — Edmund  Wiggins,  Ensign. 

Sept.  22 — William  Walker,  Ensign. 

Sept.  22 — Edmond  Wiggins,  Ensign. 

1822 

Mar.  15 — Noah  B.  Buell,  Ensign. 

Mar.  15 — John  Greenwood,  Ensign. 

Nov.  8 — Joseph  Hall,  Ensign. 

Fourth  Division,  Ninth  Brigade,  Mobile  Battalion 

(When  C’omm.,  Names,  Offices,  Remarks) 

1820 

Mar.  28— John  H.  Malory,  Major;  Resigned,  Nov.  21,  1820. 
1821 

Mar.  16 — Joseph  Scott,  Major;  Vice,  J.  H.  Mallory. 

1820 

May  22 — Thomas  Richardson,  Captain. 

May  22 — Jonathan  Woodward,  Captain. 

May  22 — Joseph  Swet,  Captain. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


323 


May  22 — Joseph  McCandless,  Captain;  Resigned. 

May  22 — B.  J.  Randal,  Captain. 

Nov.  30 — Cyrus  Beardsley,  Captain. 

Nov.  30 — Rufus  Foster,  Captain. 

1822 

Mar.  19 — Thos.  G.  Newbold,  Captain. 

June  30 — Calderwood  Mason,  Captain. 

1822 

Oct.  3 — Edward  Chastang,  Captain. 

1820 

May  22 — Thomas  G.  Newbold,  Lieutenant;  Promoted. 
May  22 — Thomas  Blake,  Leiutenant. 

May  22 — Walter  George  Lieutenant. 

May  22 — Peter  Mickle,  Lieutenant ; Resigned. 

May  22 — Henry  Bailey,  Lieutenant. 

1822 

Mar.  19 — William  Pollard,  Lieutenant. 

Mar.  19 — James  Purse,  Lieutenant. 

June  30 — Jesse  Kirkland,  Lieutenant. 

1822 

Oct.  5 — Diego  Alvarez,  Lieutenant. 

1820 

May  22 — John  M.  Edney,  Ensign;  Resigned. 

May  22 — Andrew  Bullion,  Ensign ; Refused  to  accept. 
May  22 — George  B.  Steer,  Ensign;  Deceased. 

May  22 — William  Pollard,  Ensign;  Promoted. 


324 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


May  22 — Patrick  Byrne,  Ensign. 

1822 

Mar.  19 — Thomas  A.  Weathers,  Ensign. 

Mar.  19 — Richard  G.  Rider,  Ensign. 

Mar.  19 — Wm.  R.  Hallett,  Ensign. 

June  30 — Alexander  Miller,  Ensign. 

June  30 — Sami.  Branon,  Ensign. 

1822 

Oct.  5 — Gasseng  Bericu,  Ensign. 

1821 

Dec.  1 — B.  B.  Breedon,  Adjutant. 

Dec.  1 — John  Williams,  Qr.  Master. 

Dec.  1 — Joshua  Armstrong,  PayMaster. 

Volunteers  (Mobile  Ind.  Blues) 

1822 

Aug.  24 — Wm.  D.  Stone,  Captain. 

Aug.  24 — L.  G.  Swift,  Lieutenant. 

Aug.  24 — B.  B.  Breedin,  Ensign. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


325 


ATTORNIES  AND  COUNSELLORS  AT  LAW 
Register  of  Appointments  of  the  Civil  and  Military — 1818 
Territory  of  Alabama 

(When  licensed,  Names) 

1818 

Jan.  27 — John  Gayle,  Jr. 

Jan.  27 — Constantine  Perkins. 

Feb.  7- — Lunsford  W.  Bramlett. 

Feb.  7 — Alfred  M.  Harris. 

Feb.  7 — Argylle  Campbell  . 

Feb.  7 — William  E.  Kennedy. 

Feb.  7 — John  Edmonson.^/ 

Feb.  7 — Dunklin  Sullivan. 

Feb.  10 — John  Boardman, 

Feb.  23 — Israel  Pickens. 

Feb.  23 — George  W.  Owens. 

Feb.  23 — James  White  Perkins. 

Apr.  19 — Absalom  Carter. 

May  11 — Jesse  Beene. 

Apr.  23 — Peter  Martin. 

Apr.  23 — Samuel  Chapman. 

Apr.  23 — James  McCampbell. 

Apr.  23 — Alexander  E.  Spottswood. 

May  13 — Isaac  Thomas. 

May  13 — John  Catron. 

May  13 — Julius  M.  Robertson. 

June  11 — James  D.  Colt. 


326 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


June  11 — James  Pinn. 

June  11 — Lemuel  Ing-alls. 

June  11 — Daniel  N.  Maury. 

June  12 — -Archd.  T.  Dick. 

June  12 — Thomas  A.  Rogers. 
June  22 — Joseph  Young,  Jr. 

July  6 — Augustus  Burton. 

Aug.  19 — Thomas  L.  Lloyd. 

Oct.  19— Jesse  W.  Garth. 

Sept.  2 — Ebzr.  M.  Bolles. 

Nov.  5 — Thomas  A.  Rogers. 
Nov.  7 — Walter  Crenshaw. 

Nov.  9 — William  L.  Adams. 
Nov.  9 — Stephen  Strong. 

Nov.  9 — Chas.  De.  Brosse. 

Nov.  13 — Wm.  W.  Martin. 

Nov.  13 — -Thomas  Owen. 

Nov.  16 — Marston  Mead. 

Nov.  19 — Benjamin  B.  Jones. 
Nov.  19 — Joseph  Eastland. 

Nov.  19 — James  Dellet. 

Nov.  21 — Charles  M.  Cuningham. 
Nov.  21 — John  F.  Mosely. 

Nov.  23— Bay  B.  Jones. 

Nov.  24 — William  Stoddert. 

Nov.  27 — Benjamin  B.  Wilson. 
Nov.  27— Samuel  Moore. 

Dec.  10— William  IT.  Field. 


SUMMER  ISSUE,  1944 


327 


1819 

Feb.  24— John  Campbell,  J*\ 

Mar.  22 — John  Hunter. 

Apr.  3 — Sidun  M.  Goode, 

1819 

Apr.  3 — Richard  P.  Creagh. 
Apr.  12 — Benjamin  J.  Randal. 
May  10— Willis  B.  Lowe. 

May  10 — Andrew  G.  Mays. 

July  5 — Ebenezer  Titus. 

July  5 — James  White  McClung. 

1818 

Dec.  19 — John  Taylor. 

Dec.  19 — Thomas  White. 

Dec.  23 — Ezra  Tate. 

1819 

Jan.  15 — Andrew  Dexter. 

Feb.  2 — Nathan  Sargentt. 

Mar.  3— Benson. 

Mar.  10 — Alexander  Copeland. 
Apr.  10 — Alexander  Rumbert. 
May  15 — Willoughby  Barton. 

May  28 — Samuel  . 

June  3 — Dreadzill  Pace. 

June  11 — George  Matthews. 

July  8 — John  McKinley. 

July  8 — Hopson  Owen. 


328 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


July  8 — Hardin  Perkins. 

July  8 — John  N.  S.  Jones. 

July  8 — Arthur  M.  Henderson. 
July  7 — Hezekiah  Flag. 

July  30 — Bennett  H.  Henderson. 
July  23 — Stephen  Tugg. 

July  23 — James  Campbell. 

July  23 — Hudson  Lewis. 

1819 

July  31 — Joshua  L.  Martin. 

July  30 — Nelson  Robinson. 

Oct.  8 — Henderson  Lewis. 

Oct.  12 — Charles  L.  S.  Jones. 
Oct.  12 — George  P.  Peters. 

Oct.  12 — Samuel  DeWolf. 

Oct.  16 — Aaron  V.  Brown. 

Oct.  23 — Stephen  Heard. 

Nov.  11 — Alex.  D.  Frazer. 

22 — Charles  Shaw. 

27 — -John  Ferguson. 

Dec.  8 — John  Leigh  Towns. 

1 — John  Willson. 

15- — -Samuel  Davis. 

Aug.  14 — A.  McWherter. 

Oct.  5 — John  Fv.  Graham. 

Oct.  5 — Robert  G.  Gordon, 


THE 

ALABAMA  HISTORICAL 
QUARTERLY 

MARIE  BANKHEAD  OWEN,  Editor 
EMMETT  KILPATRICK,  Co-Editor 


Published  by  the 
STATE  DEPARTMENT 
OF 

ARCHIVES  AND  HISTORY 

Price  $2.00  annually ; single  copies,  50c 


Vol.  6 No.  3 


FALL  ISSUE 
1944 


WETUMPKA  PRINTING  CO. 
Printers  and  Publishers 
Wetumpka,  Ala. 

1945 


ALABAMA 


CENSUS  RETURNS 
1820 
and 

An  Abstract  of  Federal  Census  of  Alabama  1830 

ALABAMA  STATE  DEPARTMENT 


OF 

ARCHIVES  AND  HISTORY 


Montgomery,  Alabama 


CONTENTS 


1.  Editorial p.  333' 

2.  An  Act  authorizing-  the  taking  of  the  Census  of  the 
Alabama  Territory,  passed  by  Legislative  Council, 

Feb.  9th,  1818 p.  334-336 

3.  An  Abstract  of  the  Census  of  the  State  of  Alabama, 
together  with  the  Assessments  in  each  County  for 

year  1820  p.  337-338 

4.  An  Abstract  of  the  Federal  Census  of  Alabama  for 

the  year  1832  p.  339-340 

5.  Baldwin  County  Census  Returns  for  1820 p.  341-345 

6.  Conecuh  County  Census  Returns  for  1820 p.  346-368 

7.  Dallas  County  Census  Returns  for  1820  ..... p.  369-395 

8.  Franklin  County  Census  Returns  for  1820  p.  396-415 

9.  Limestone  County  Census  Returns  for  1820  p.  416-474 

10.  St.  Clair  County  Census  Returns  for  1820  p.  475-493 

11.  Shelby  County  Census  Returns  for  1820  p.  494-506 

12.  Wilcox  County  Census  Returns  for  1820  p.  507-515 

13.  Map  of  Alabama,  1820  ... p.  333  A 

14.  Map  of  Alabama,  1830  p.  338  A 

15.  Map  of  Alabama,  1840  p.  395  A 

16.  Map  of  Alabama,  1850  & 1860  ___ p.  474  A 

17.  Map  of  Alabama,  1870  p.  506  A 


EDITORIAL 


This  issue  of  the  Alabama  Historical  Quarterly,  No.  3,  of  Vol. 
6,  is  devoted  to  the  publication  of  the  first  Census  records  of  Ala- 
bama for  eight  counties  for  the  year  1820  and  an  abstract  of 
the  Federal  Census  of  Alabama  for  the  year  1830.  The  Depart- 
ment of  Archives  and  History  has  tried  for  years  to  locate  the 
Census  returns  for  other  Counties  covering  the  period  but  has  so 
far  failed.  Not  even  the  Census  Bureau  at  Washington,  D.  C., 
has  these  early  returns. 

Mrs.  Gertrude  Worthington  Jeffries,  of  Birmingham  and  Boli- 
gee,  Alabama,  has  given  money  to  the  Department  as  a memorial 
to  her  late  husband,  Frank  M.  Jeffries,  to  be  expended  for  such 
other  Census  returns  as  may  be  found  for  1830,  1840,  1850,  1860 
and  1870.  Copies  of  some  Alabama  County  Census  returns  were 
located  in  Washington,  D.  C.,  at  the  Census  Bureau  by  Dr.  Clanton 
Williams,  Professor  of  History  at  the  University  of  Alabama.  He 
had  microfilm  copies  made  from  these  originals  which  are  in  the 
Amelia  Gayle  Gorgas  Library  at  the  University,  and  are  being 
copied  and  indexed  by  Mrs.  Pauline  Jones  Gandrud,  of  Tusca- 
loosa, for  the  Department. 

The  Census  returns  for  the  eight  Alabama  Counties  herewith 
presented  were  prepared  under  the  direction  of  Miss  Frances  M. 
Hails,  State  Archivist,  with  the  aid  of  Mrs.  Mary  Livingston  Akin, 
her  assistant  in  the  archival  division  of  the  Department.  Mrs.  Akin 
is  painstaking  and  accurate  in  her  work  and  in  addition  to  copying 
old  historical  records  she  also  has  charge  of  the  portograph  ma- 
chine for  reproducing  original  records.  These  records  from  our 
archival  material  are  frequently  called  for  by  students  and  business 
organizations,  and  prove  of  great  help  to  both. 

MARIE  BANKHEAD  OWEN, 


Editor 


ALABAMA  IN  1820 


The  Formative  Period  in  Alabama  1815-1828,  by  Abernathy,  p. 


AN  ACT 


Authorizing  the  taking  the  Census  of  the  Alabama  Territory 

Section  1.  Be  it  enacted,  by  the  Legislative  Council  and  House 
of  Representatives  of  the  Alabama  Territory,  in  General  Assembly 
convened,  That  it  shall  be  the  duty  of  all  the  inhabitants  of  this 
territory,  being  heads  of  families,  and  persons  not  belonging  to 
any  particular  family,  to  render  a true  and  faithful  estimate  to  the 
Assessors  of  taxes  in  their  respective  counties ; such  estimates  from 
heads  of  white  families  to  be  on  oath,,  and  contain  an  enumeration 
of  the  whole  number  of  inhabitants  belonging  to  his  or  her  family. 
Making  a correct  distinction  between  the  number  of  white  males 
over  twenty-one  years  of  age ; white  males  under  twenty-one  years 
of  age ; white  females  over  twenty-one  years,  white  females  under 
twenty-one  years,  the  total  of  free  people  of  color,  Indians  not 
taxed  excepted ; and  the  total  of  slaves. 

Section  2.  And  be  it  further  enacted,  that  it  shall  be  the  duty 
of  the  Assessor  of  taxes  in  each  and  every  county  within  this  Ter- 
ritory, to  claim  and  receive  of  all  heads  of  families,  and  other  per- 
sons as  described  in  the  preceding  section,  the  estimate  which  they 
are  therein  required  to  furnish.  The  oath  required  of  the  heads 
of  families  as  aforesaid  shall  be  administered  by  the  said  Assessors 
in  each  respective  County  and  form  as  follows,  to  wit : 

“You  do  solemnly  swear  (or  affirm,  as  the  case  may  be)  that 
the  estimate  which  you  now  render,  contains  a true  and  faithful 
enumeration  of  the  number  of  inhabitants  of  which  your  family 
consists,  with  the  proper  distinction  of  sexes,  age,  and  color,  So 
help  you  God.” 

Section  3.  And  be  it  further  enacted,  that  if  any  person  shall 
fail  to  make  a return  of  him  or  herself  and  family,  or  any  part 
thereof,  being  thereunto  requested  by  the  said  Assessors,  or  shall 
knowingly,  make  a false  or  improper  return,  he  or  she  shall  be 
fined  in  the  sum  of  Fifty  Dollars,  to  be  recovered  before  any  Jus- 
tice of  the  Peace  or  of  the  Quoram  of  the  County,  one  half  thereof 
to  the  use  of  the  informer  and  the  other  half  to  be  paid  into  the 
County  Treasury. 

Section  4.  And  be  it  further  enacted,  that  in  addition  to  the 
penalty  prescribed  in  the  preceding  section,  if  any  person  shall, 
knowingly,  make  a false  or  incorrect  return  of  his  or  her  family, 
as  directed  by  this  Act,  he  or  she  shall  be  liable  to  all  the  pains  and 
penalties  provided  by  law  against  perjury. 

Section  5.  And  be  it  further  enacted,  that  the  following  form 
shall  be  adopted  and  used  by  each  and  every  Assessor  in  the  Terri- 
tory, for  the  classification  of  the  inhabitants  thereof: 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


335 


FORM  TO  BE  USED 


Names  of  the  heads  of  families 

White  males  over  twenty  one  years 

White  males  under  twenty  one  years  - 

1 

White  females  over  twenty  one  years 

White  females  under  twenty  one  years 

Total  of  white  inhabitants 

I 

Total  of  free  people  of  color 

Total  of  slaves 

| 

Total  of  Inhabitants 

Section  6.  And  be  it  further  enacted,  that  each  and  every  as- 
sessor in  this  Territory,  shall,  before  he  enters  on  the  duties  of  his 
office,  in  addition  to  the  oath  required  of  him  by  law,  as  assessor, 
take  and  submit  before  some  person  authorized  to  administer  the 
same,  an  oath  in  the  following  form,  towit : I A.  B.  do  solemnly 
swear  (or  affirm,  as  the  case  may  be)  that  I will  take  the  Census  of 
the  County  of , according  to  the  true  intent  and  mean- 

ing- of  this  act,  to  the  best  of  my  knowledge,  So  help  me  God  ; which 
said  oath,  sworn  and  subscribed  to,  shall  be  transmitted,  together 
with  a copy  of  said  enumeration,  agreeably  to  the  foregoing  form  to 
the  Executive  of  this  Territory  and  also  another  copy  of  the  enum- 
eration, in  form  as  aforesaid,  to  the  Speaker  of  the  House  of  Repre- 
sentatives of  the  Territory  on  or  before  the  first  day  of  the  next 
session  of  the  General  Assembly,  and  each  and  every  assessor 
failing  to  comply  with  the  requisitions  of  this  Act  shall  be  fined 
in  the  sum  of  Seven  Hundred  and  Fifty  dollars,  recoverable  before 
any  Court  of  competent  jurisdiction,  one  half  thereof,  to  the  use 
of  the  informer  and  the  other  half  to  be  paid  into  the  Territorial 
Treasury. 


336 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Section  7.  And  be  it  further  enacted,  that  each  and  every  As- 
sessor in  this  Territory  shall  be  allowed  as  a compensation  for 
taking  the  census  in  his  county,  One  dollar  and  twenty-five  cents 
for  every  hundred  inhabitants  and  the  Auditor  is  hereby  required 
to  issue  his  warrant  on  the  Territorial  Treasurer  in  favor  of  such 
assessor  for  the  same  upon  the  certificate  of  the  Governor  that  a 
copy  of  such  census  is  delivered  to  him,  in  which  certificate  the 
total  of  inhabitants  in  each  county  shall  be  specified. 

GABRIEL  MOORE,  Speaker  of 
the  House  of  Representatives 
JAMES  TITUS,  President  of  the 
Legislative  Council 
Approved  9th  February  1818 
Wm.  W.  BIBB 

Governor  of  the  Alabama 
Territory 


DANL.  COLEMAN,  Clk 
February  7th  1818. 


(From  the  original  Manuscript  Act  as  passed  by  the  Legislative  Council 
of  the  Territory  of  Alabama.) 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


337 


CAHABA. 

The  following  abstract  exhibits  the  strength  of  the  different 
counties,  and  the  assessments  of  each ; by  which  it  will  appear  that 
the  northern  part  of  the  State  is  much  more  populous  and  also 
pays  more  to  the  support  of  government,  than  the  southern. 


ABSTRACT  of  the  Census  of  the  State  of  Alabama,  together 
with  the  Assessments  in  each  County,  for  the  year  1820. 


Counties 

Slaves 

Ag’gate 
including 
Whites  free  blacks 

Amount  of 
Assessment 
$ Cents 

Autauga  

1,665 

2,096 

3,763 

$ 1,167.61 

Butler  

531 

763 

1,294 

434.24 

Blount  

247.75 

Clarke  

217 

3,715 

5,905 

2,647.64 

Conecuh  

1,919 

3,613 

5,549 

1,225.08 

Cotaco  

822 

4,087 

4,919 

856.66 

Cahawba  

727 

2,547 

3,278 

602.92 

Dallas  

2,520 

3,121 

5,646 

3,207.53 

Franklin  

1,436 

2,817 

4,258 

1,194.04 

Greene  

1,580 

2,878 

4,468 

933.75 

Jackson  

357 

5,246 

5,603 

461.34 

Jefferson  

707 

3,345 

4,114 

965.93 

Lauderdale  

1,013 

3,338 

4,365 

1,335.05 

Lawrence  

2,423 

4,782 

7,223 

2,165.65 

Limestone  

2,586 

5,727 

8,313 

2,282.58 

Madison  

9,323 

10,242 

19,619 

9,254.95 

Marengo  

845 

1,891 

2,752 

662.97 

Monroe  

3,695 

4,511 

8,206 

2,995.92 

Montgomery  

2,602 

3,827 

6,443 

2,180.07 

Perry  

830 

2,512 

3,344 

564.10 

St.  Clair  

531 

3,188 

3,733 

462.17 

338 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Ag’gate  Amount  of 
including  Assessment 

Counties  Slaves  Whites  free  blacks  $ Cents 


Shelby  448  2,044  2,492  407.62 

Tuscaloosa  2,253  5,069  7,329  1,757.09 

Washington  1,645  2,616  4,281  2,257.76 

Wilcox  1,005  1,420  2,428  917.41 

Total  43,714  83,286  129,227  $ 41,187.89 


From  the  Counties  of  Blount,  Baldwin,  Henry,  Marion  and 
Mobile,  no  returns  have  been  made.  Of  the  above  assessment, 
only  $18,677.29  have  been  received  into  the  Treasury.  The  bal- 
ance of  more  than  $22,000.00  is  still  due  the  State,  a considerable 
portion  of  which  it  is  supposed  will  never  be  collected.  We  un- 
derstand the  County  Court  neglected  to  take  from  him  the  requi- 
site security ; of  course  the  taxes  from  that  County  will  be  a dead 
loss  to  the  State. 

(The  Alabama  Republican 

Published  by  John  Boordman,  Printer  of  the  Laws  of  the  Union 


Huntsville,  Alabama 
Friday  Dec.  1,  1820 
Page  2,  Col.  5) 


338A 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


ALABAMA  IN  1830 


The  Formative  Period  in  Alabama  1815-1828,  by  Abernathy,  page  177. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


339 


Secretary  of  State’s  Office, 
Tuscaloosa,  Nov.  13,  1832. 

Hon.  Sami.  W.  Oliver,  Speaker  House  of  Rep. 

Sir — In  compliance  with  a resolution  of  the  House  of  Repre- 
sentatives of  the  9th  inst.  “That  the  Secretary  of  State  furnish  the 
House  with  a statement  shewing-  the  number  of  white  population 
and  the  slaves  in  each  county  in  this  state,  which  was  taken  under 
the  late  Act  of  Congress  of  the  United  States,”  I have  the  honor 
respectfully  to  transmit  herewith  a report  which  furnishes  the  in- 
formation required,  together  with  the  number  of  free  persons  of 
color,  which  was  not  called  for  by  the  resolution,  but  which  may 
not  be  deemed  irrelevant  to  the  object  of  the  call. 

4 

I have  the  honor  to  be,  with  great  respect, 

Your  obedient  servant, 

JAMES  I.  THORNTON. 

AGGREGATE  AMOUNT  OF  EACH  DESCRIPTION  OF  PERSONS 
WITHIN  THE  STATE  OF  ALABAMA 


Counties 

Whites 

Slaves 

Free  Col’d 

Total 

Madison  

13,855 

13,977 

158 

27,990 

Limestone  

8,077 

6,689 

41 

14,807 

Jefferson  

5,121 

1,715 

19 

6,855 

Walker  

2,033 

168 

0 

2,201 

Marion  

3,452 

600 

6 

4,058 

Morgan  

6,126 

2,894 

42 

’ 9,062 

Lawrence  

8,361 

6,556 

67 

14,984 

St.  Clair  

4,818 

1,154 

3 

5,975 

Franklin  

6,069 

4,988 

21 

11,078 

Lauderdale  

7,960 

3,795 

26 

11,781 

Blount  

3,882 

330 

21 

4,233 

Jackson  

11,418 

1,264 

18 

12,700 

Mobile  (including  city)  - 

3,440 

2,281 

546 

6,267 

Baldwin  

965 

1,263 

96 

2,324 

Monroe  

5,165 

3,541 

76 

8,782 

o40 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


AGGREGATE  AMOUNT  OF  EACH  DESCRIPTION  OF  PERSONS 


WITHIN  THE  STATE 

OF  ALABAMA 

Counties 

Whites 

Slaves 

Free  Col’d 

Total 

Dallas  

6,794 

7,160 

63 

14,017 

Pickens  

4,974 

1,631 

17 

6,622 

Bibb  

5,113 

1,192 

1 

6,306 

Montgomerv 

6,180 

6,450 

65 

12,695 

Clarke  

3,894 

3,672 

29 

7,595 

Shelby  

4,549 

1,139 

16 

5,704 

Butler  

3,904 

1,739 

7 

5,650 

Henry  

3,005 

1,009 

6 

4,020 

Marengo  

4,549 

3,138 

13 

7,700 

Greene  

7,585 

7,420 

21 

15,026 

Pike  

5,204 

1,878 

26 

7,108 

Perry  

7,149 

4,318 

23 

11,490 

Conecuh  

3,812 

3,618 

14 

7,444 

Autauga  

5,867 

5,990 

17 

11,874 

Wilcox  

5,442 

4,090 

16 

9,543 

Fayette  

3,035 

512 

0 

3,547 

Dale  

1,757 

269 

5 

2,031 

Covington  

1,118 

396 

8 

1,522 

Washington  

1,924 

1,532 

18 

3,474 

Lowndes  

5,001 

4,388 

21 

9,410 

Tuscaloosa  

8,807 

4,783 

46 

13,646 

190,405 

117,549 

1,572 

309,526 

(The  Southern  Advocate 
Huntsville,  Alabama 
Nov.  24,  1832 
Pag$  3,  Col.  2.) 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


341 


BALDWIN  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820* 


Names  of  the  heads  of  families. 

(1)  — White  males  over  twenty  one  years. 

(2)  — White  males  under  twenty  one  years. 

(3)  — White  females  over  twenty  one  years. 

(4)  — White  females  under  twenty  one  years. 

(5)  — Total  white  population. 

(6)  — Total  of  free  people  of  colour. 

(7)  — Total  of  slaves. 

(8)  — Total  of  inhabitants. 


(1) 

(2) 

(3) 

(4) 

(5) 

(6) 

(7) 

(8) 

Chastang,  Louisa  

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

29 

13 

42 

Andra,  John  

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

14 

15 

29 

Dubrocar,  Mea  

3 

0 

0 

0 

3 

10 

12 

25 

Durette,  Namereth  

1 

0 

1 

0 

2 

6 

13 

21 

Pope,  N.  

2 

1 

0 

0 

3 

0 

4 

7 

Faggard,  Daniel  

1 

3 

1 

1 

6 

0 

0 

6 

Roberson,  D.  

1 

1 

1 

2 

5 

0 

2 

7 

Bates,  J.  P.  

2 

1 

0 

0 

3 

1 

1 

5 

Faggard,  Henry  

1 

1 

1 

0 

3 

0 

0 

3 

Cotten,  Daniel  

1 

2 

1 

1 

5 

0 

0 

5 

Toulmin,  H.  

4 

1 

1 

3 

9 

0 

23 

32 

Thomas,  W.  

1 

2 

1 

0 

4 

0 

2 

6 

Crabtree,  L.  

2 

2 

1 

1 

6 

0 

0 

6 

Dupree,  H.  

1 

2 

1 

1 

5 

0 

9‘ 

14 

Bates,  Joseph  

2 

2 

1 

1 

6 

0 

9 

15 

Briant  J 

1 

2 

1 

1 

5 

0 

5 

10 

Hollinger,  Alex  

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

0 

24 

28 

* This  and  all  following  Census  data  are  from  Alabama  Official  Archives. 
Family  names  are  spelled  as  recorded  and  original  forms  followed  as  near 
as  possible.  The  official  Census  returns  for  the  other  Counties  for  1820  have 
not  been  located. 


342 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


BALDWIN  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 


Hollinger,  Mary 1 

Tuttle,  W.  1 

Crawford,  Mason  1 

Heartly,  D.  1 

Wilkinson,  J.  1 

Tyrus,  J.  1 

Johnson,  Isaac  1 

Johnson,  Joseph  3 

Johnson,  Jr.  John  1 

Johnson,  James  3 

Reaves,  R.  1 

Rain,  C.  2 

Lewis,  R.  1 

Anderson,  T.  1 

Graves,  Phillip  3 

Slade,  H.  2 

Munger,  H.  5 

Strong,  T.  I.  3 

Kenedy,  J.  1 

Roberson,  J.  1 

Sulevent,  Owen  1 

Sulevent,  Plem  1 

Wheat,  J.  2 

Wheat,  S.  1 

Sulevent,  T.  2 

Bates,  Martha  2 

Mims,  J.  2 

Mims,  H.  2 

Dunn,  Sarah  1 


1 

1 

1 

4 

3 

47 

54 

0 

1 

0 

2 

0 

1 

3 

3 

1 

4 

9 

0 

0 

9 

2 

1 

0 

4 

0 

0 

4 

1 

1 

1 

4 

0 

0 

4 

2 

1 

1 

5 

0 

0 

5 

1 

1 

1 

4 

2 

8 

14 

0 

1 

1 

5 

0 

14 

19 

1 

1 

0 

3 

0 

20 

23 

3 

1 

2 

9 

0 

22 

31 

0 

0 

0 

1 

0 

5 

6 

3 

1 

3 

9 

1 

9 

19 

2 

0 

0 

3 

0 

14 

17 

4 

1 

4 

10 

0 

1 

11 

5 

2 

4 

14 

0 

0 

14 

4 

1 

3 

10 

0 

35 

45 

3 

1 

2 

11 

0 

9 

20 

1 

2 

1 

7 

0 

44 

51 

1 

1 

2 

5 

1 

7 

13 

1 

1 

2 

5 

0 

0 

5 

6 

1 

2 

10 

0 

2 

12 

1 

1 

2 

5 

0 

0 

5 

3 

1 

0 

6 

0 

3 

9 

1 

1 

3 

6 

0 

10 

16 

5 

2 

3 

12 

0 

0 

12 

4 

1 

5 

12 

0 

18 

31 

1 

1 

0 

4 

1 

22 

27 

1 

1 

0 

4 

1 

22 

27 

0 

1 

0 

2 

0 

9 

11 

FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


343 


BALDWIN  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6) 


Hinson,  John  1—  1 

Montgomery,  E.  2 

Hogan,  J.  B.  2> 

Steadham,  B.  3 

Beard,  H.  4 

Pierce,  W.  A.  J.  3 

Wooten,  Wm.  3 

Maning,  J.  — — 2 

McPonald,  J.  1 

McDonald,  W.  2 

McDonald,  Ruben  1 

Briars,  L.  J.  1 

Melton,  A.  2 

Davis,  T.  1 

Wheler,  W.  1 1 

Rials,  A.  2 

Moye,  J.  2 

Pybern,  J.  1 

Blue,  M.  1 

Mitchell,  W.  1 

Fletcher,  J.  2 

Coady,  H.  1 

Jones,  E.  2 

Buford,  W.  1 

Lankester,  E.  1 

Gray,  T.  F.  1 

Stepleton,  J.  2 

Bridges,  F.  1 

Stepleton,  S.  1 


2 115  0 
112  6 0 
0 12  5 0 
1116  0 
112  8 0 
0 0 0 3 0 

3 2 3 11  0 
3 117  0 

2 14  8 0 
114  8 0 
0 10  2 0 
6 119  0 
0 15  8 0 
5 118  0 
0 12  4 0 
114  8 0 
0 12  5 0 
110  3 0 

3 1 2 7 0 
0 0 0 1 1 
1115  0 

1114  0 
0 0 2 4 0 
10  13  0 
12  15  0 
5 2 19  0 

1115  0 
110  3 0 
2 2 2 7 0 


(7) 

29 

17 

8 

9 
2 

15 
2 
0 
8 
0 
2 
1 

16 
2 
0 
0 
7 
0 

10 
13 
12 

0 

10 

0 

0 

0 

1 

9 

1 


(8) 

34 

23 
13 

15 
10 
18 

13 

7 

16 

8 
4 

10 

24 
10 

4 

8 

12 

3 

17 

15 

17 

4 

14 
3 

5 
9 

6 
12 

8 


344 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


BALDWIN  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1) 

(2) 

(3) 

(4) 

(5) 

(6) 

(7) 

(8) 

Crawford,  Stepn  

1 

2 

1 

0 

4 

0 

5 

9 

Walker,  J.  

1 

3 

1 

3 

8 

0 

0 

8 

Earls,  J.  

2 

4 

1 

1 

8 

1 

21 

30 

Miles,  J.  

1 

2 

0 

2 

5 

0 

2 

7 

Holmes,  T.  G.  

3 

0 

0 

1 

4 

0 

4 

8 

Stepleton,  W.  

2 

7 

1 

1 

11 

0 

2 

13 

Harris,  L.  

2 

4 

1 

4 

11 

0 

30 

41 

Weatherford,  W.  

1 

4 

1 

0 

6 

0 

20 

26 

Huse,  J.  

1 

1 

1 

0 

3 

0 

0 

3 

Johnson,  H.  

1 

4 

1 

5 

11 

0 

0 

11 

Holder,  J.  

2 

4 

1 

4 

11 

0 

0 

11 

Jinkins,  J.  

1 

2 

1 

0 

4 

0 

8 

12 

McClain,  Jos.  

1 

2 

1 

3 

7 

0 

1 

8 

Laval,  L.  

1 

2 

1 

1 

5 

1 

11 

17 

Carter,  H.  .... 

1 

3 

1 

3 

8 

0 

0 

8 

Harrel,  R.  

2 

2 

1 

4 

9 

0 

23 

32 

Cob,  Jo.  

.: 1 

2 

1 

4 

8 

0 

0 

8 

Mann,  John  

2 

2 

1 

0 

5 

0 

20 

25 

Carney,  T.  B.  

' 2 

0 

0 

0 

2 

0 

23 

25 

Cooldrige,  N.  

1 

3 

1 

1 

6 

0 

0 

6 

King,  W.  

2 

1 

1 

2 

6 

0 

21 

27 

Freman,  E.  

2 

0 

2 

1 

5 

0 

0 

5 

Lott,  Jesse  

1 

5 

1 

6 

13 

0 

0 

13 

Newton,  I.  

1 

2 

1 

2 

6 

0 

0 

6 

Ercoit,  J.  

1 

1 

1 

2 

5 

0 

0 

5 

Langford,  E 

1 

3 

1 

2 

7 

0 

3 

10 

Jentry,  David  

2 

1 

1 

1 

5 

0 

0 

5 

Rany,  H.  

1 

1 

1 

2 

5 

0 

1 

6 

Ervin,  S.  

2 

0 

1 

1 

4 

0 

48 

52 

FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


345 


BALDWIN  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Murphy,  M.  1 1 1 0 3 0 0 3 

McGill,  H.  1 1 0 1 3 0 0 3 

Ellis,  W 1 2 1 5 9 0 0 9 

Gruning,  W.  H.  1 2 0 0 3 0 46  49 

Toulmin,  T.  L.  4202806  14 

Tate,  David  2 3 1 4 10  0 80  90 

167  178  100  167  612  72  905  1,589 

Total  of  inhabitants  fifteen  hundred  & eighty  nine  Nov.  6,  1820 

Theopolilus  L.  Toulmin, 

Assessor  for  Baldwin  County. 


The  Alabama  State  Dr. 
to 

T.  L.  Toulmin, 
for  taken  the  census  of 
Baldwin  County  for  the 
year  1820  @ $1.75  per  100 

Persons $26.25. 

B.  Bsccepted 
November  6th,  1820. 

T.  L.  Toulmin. 


346 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


CONECUH  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


Names  of  the  heads  of  families. 

(1)  — White  males  over  twenty  one  years. 

(2)  — White  males  under  twenty  one  years. 

(3)  — White  females  over  twenty  one  years, 

(4)  — White  females  under  twenty  one  years. 

(5)  — Total  white  population. 

(6)  — Total  of  free  people  of  colour. 

(7)  — Total  of  slaves. 

(8)  — Total  of  inhabitants. 


James  Grace  

Abram  Baggett  

Nathan  Jenkins  

Stephen  Pipkin  

John  Dowdell  

Henry  Williams  

Thomas  Jackson  

R.  L.  Deens  

John  Scogin  

Joel  Baggett  

Willy  Williams  

Alexander  Sanders 

Martin  Pipkin  

Clarke  Carter  

Isaac  Carter  .. 
Thomas  Armstrong 

Wylly  Rogers  

John  H.  Pickard  

Robert  Mosley  

David  Hendrick  

Thompson  Hemphill 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 


1 1 

2 2 

1 0 

2 0 

1 2 

1 1 

1 2 

1 0 

1 4 

1 1 

1 1 

1 3 

1 2 

1 0 

1 4 

1 5 

1 4 

1 1 

2 5 

1 3 

1 3 


1 3 

2 2 

0 2 

2 0 

1 4 

1 2 

1 2 

0 1 

1 4 

1 1 

1 1 

1 3 

0 1 

0 2 

1 2 

1 4 

1 2 

1 0 

1 2 

1 3 

1 1 


11  0 

8 0 

3 0 

4 0 

8 0 

5 0 

6 0 

2 0 

10  0 

4 0 

4 0 

8 0 

4 0 

3 0 

8 0 

11  0 

8 0 

3 0 

10  0 

8 0 

6 0 


0 11 

0 8 

6 9 

0 4 

0 8 

2 7 

0 6 

1 3 

2 12 

0 4 

5 9 

4 12 

0 4 

2 5 

7 15 

9 20 

6 14 

7 10 

1 11 

12  20 

2 


8 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


347 


CONECUH  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

William  Fooshee  1 1 103003 

Joshua  Peavy  11158008 

Edmund  Dean  ► 1 6 1 2 10  0 1 11 

Cunningham  Sharp  11114004 

Louis  May  1 2 1 1 5 0 16  21 

Fulden  Straughn  1 4 1 2802  10 

Joseph  Runnels  1 3 1 0 5 0 0 ~ 5 

John  Burt  1 3 1 4 9 0 0 9 

Hiram  Bruster  1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 

Daniel  Gillespie  1 2 1 4 8 0 0 8 

James  W.  Mann  10001034 

Sherod  Liles  1 2 1 4 8 0 0 8 

Shadrick  Walston  1 2 1 3 7 0 0 7 

David  Ketchium  1 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 

Malcom  McLeod  1 0 0 4 5 0 0 5 

James  Holmes  1 1 1 4 7 0 2 9 

Aaron  Lee  2 5 1 2 10  0 8 18 

Lovard  Ingram  1 102402  6 

Thomas  Hawkins  10113014 

Stephen  Hawkins  13116006 

John  Hawkins  1 1 0 1 3 0 0 3 

Samuel  Collins  - 1314  9 009 

Joel  Duke  — 221  16006 

Joshua  Calloway  1 1 1 4 7 0 0 

Georg  G.  A.  Gage  1 1 1 2 5 0 0 5 

Daniel  Brown  131490  0 9 

Samuel  Salter  1 6 1 4 12  0 0 22 

Thomas  Massey  1 0 1 1 3 010  13 

James  Tomlinson  1 3 1 1 6 0 18  24 


348 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


CONECUH  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 


William  Bond  

James  Salter  .. 

Joel  Lee 
Samuel  Yates  __ 

Isaac  Betts  

Thomas  Jones  

Jermiah  Dean 

Robert  Kindrick  

John  Ethridge  

Alex  McDougald  

William  H.  Shelton 
Wm.  Fuller  __ 

George  W.  Comens? 
Daniel  Simpson 

Henry  Hawsey  

Charles  Deakle  

Jesse  Luker 
Meshack  Shambrick 
Louis  Pugh  - 

Micajah  Stinson  

John  M.  Pugh 
Mathew  Rea 
George  Jackson  __ 
Anthony  Preslar  Sr. 
Anthony  Preslar  Jr. 
David  Stoll 
Garland  Burt 
Lou’s  Joiner 
Eli  Stricklin 


15  13 

17  12 

16  12 

1113 
12  11 

10  10 

14  2 1 

13  13 

12  10 

10  0 0 

2 2 13 

2 2 11 

2 0 10 

1110 
13  12 

1 3 1 4 

12  12 

1113 
13  11 

16  10 

12  10 

12  12 

3 5 1 3 

2 111 

110  2 

12  10 

12  12 

12  11 

1 1 11 


10  0 4 14 

11  0 8 19 

10  0 4 14 

6 0 0 6 

5 0 0 5 

2 0 4 6 

8 0 0 8 

8 0 0 8 

4 0 0 4 

10  0 1 
8 0 0 8 

6 0 0 6 

3 0 3 6 

3 0 0 3 

7 0 0 7 

9 0 2 11 

6 0 0 6 

6 0 0 6 

6 0 3 9 

8 0 6 14 

4 0 0 4 

6 0 3 9 

12  0 14  26 

5 0 3 8 

4 0 0 4 

4 0 0 4 

6 0 6 12 

6 0 0 5 

4 0 0 4 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


349 


CONECUH  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6) 


Joel  Brown  3 5 1 1 10  0 

Hiram  Kelley  10  0 12  0 

Jesse  Rustin  1 0 0 2 3 0 

Elias  Preslar  1 1 0 2 4 0 

John  Rustin  1 2 2 3 8 0 

James  Philips  10  1 13  0 

John  Reed  10  14  6 0 

Wm.  Kelley  13  12  7 0 

Jacob  Pitman  1113  6 0 

King  W.  Howard  1 0 0 3 4 0 

Wm.  L.  Campbele  1 112  5 0 

John  Fields  11114  0 

Hugh  Cravy  1 4 1 4 10  0 

John  Peard  11114  0 

Tyre  Kelley  1 4 1 4 10  0 

James  Howard  12  12  6 0 

Harris  Campbele  1 0 0 0 1 0 

John  Welch  1 1 0 2 4 0 

Ephraim  Brown  12  12  6 0 

Wm.  Spurlin  10  15  7 0 

Wm.  Rabon  11114  0 

Aaron  Fagan  2 1 12  6 0 

John  Brantley  1 4 1 1 7 0 

John  Priddy  10  10  2 0 

John  Daniley  2 2 1 16  0 

Wm.  Lee  12  12  6 0 

Henry  Allen  1 1 0 2 4 0 

Wert.  Allen  1 1 1 ,2  5 0 

James  Thompson  13  116  0 


(7)  (8) 

1 11 

0 2 

0 3 

1 5 

0 8 

0 3 

2 ‘ 8 

0 7 

0 6 

0 4 

0 5 

2 6 

0 10 

0 4 

1 11 

0 6 

0 1 

0 4 

0 6 

6 13 

1 5 

29  35 

10  17 

0 2 

10  16 

6 12 

2 6 

5 10 

0 6 


350 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


CONECUH  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 


Richard  Curry  

Addison  Scarbouglv .. 

David  Wood. 

Wm.  Horton  ' ... 
George  W.  Wilsonh. 

Labon  Turk  1 

John  Mason  • 

Terril  Higden  

Abram  Jones ; 

Mark  Manning  

Stephens  Maiming 

Baldy  Kenedy  

Andrew  Tarvor  .... 
Nicholas  Baggett 
David  Jones  - 

William  Ruffin  

Wm.  Wilson 

Allen  H.  Curry  

Jas.  A.  Curry  

John  Farnel  . 

James  Parks  .. 

Wm.  Autery 
Jas.  W.  Wilson  .. 
John  Me  Intire 
Levi  Mobly 
Mitchell  Burford 
Henry  Chapman 
Daniel  D.  Mobley 
Abram  Blackshaw 


2  0 10 

1 4 12 

12  11 
13  14 

110  1 
12  11 

2 10  2 

15  12 

2 10  1 
12  11 
12  10 
12  10 

2 2 14 

13  11 

13  10 
12  11 

14  14 

1112 
12  10 
14  13 

10  11 
2 111 
2 12  1 

12  11 
2 2 2 0 
1114 

3 5 14 

1111 
12  12 


3 0 8 11 

8 0 0 8 

5 0 5 10 

9 0 1 1 20 

3 0 2 5 

5 0 15  20 

5 0 0 5 

9 0 7 16 

4 0 0 4 

5 0 4 9 

4 0 0 < 

4 0 0 4 

9 0 13  22 

6 0 0 6 

5 0 16 

5 0 0 5 

10  0 0 10 

5 0 0 5 

4 0 0 4 

9 0 0 9 

3 0 2 5 

5 0 0 5 

6 0 1 / 

5 0 16 

6 0 6 12 

7 0 13  20 

13  0 2 15 

4 0 5 9 

6 0 3 9 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


351 


CONECUH  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 


John  B.  Porden  L 1 0 1 2 4 0 4 8 

James  H.  Porden  11114  0 1 

John  Porden  3 12  0 6 0 7 13 

George  Andrews  2 4 1 1 8 0 513 

William  Richards  1 1 125038 

Alexander  Riddick  1 2 1 6 10  0 5 15 

Richard  Warren  2 0 1 3 6 0 18  * 24 

James  Chandler  12014004 

Benjamin  Hart  3 1 1 5 10  0 22  32 

Nathan  Littlefield  : 1 1 0 1 3 0 0 3 

Benjamin  Hynes  101  1300  3 

Henry  Hillard  ___  3 1 2 2 8 0 1 9 

Alexander  Travis  1 4 1 1 7 0 61 3 

Hailey  Tisdale  2 1 1 3 7 0 7 14 

Asa  Wright  1 1 0 2 4 0 1 5 

Ebenezia  Ellis  2322904  13 

George  McSpier  20013003 

Wm.  Bagby  1 0 1 1 3 0 8 11 

Josiah  Martin  12126017 

Marshall  Smith  1 2 1 3 7 0 2 9 

Major  Weatheford  12  115  0 16 

Thomas  Sharpless  11114004 

Job  Castleberry  1 3 1 3807  15 

Cary  Curry  1 3 1 1 6 0 0 6 

Lernerd  Brown  13138008 

Nicholas  Stallworth  1 6 1 4 12  0 17  29 

Sterling  Kemp  11114048 

Radford  Jordan  1 4 1 4 10  0 3 13 

Thomas  Grubbs  12227018 


352 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


CONECUH  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 


Jno.  E.  Graham  

Jesse  Maye  

Gin  Taylor  

Tempe  Straughn  

Abraham  A.  Clarke  

Rebecca  Crawford  .. 

Charles  Hinson  

Thomas  Hooks  

Sarah  Patrick 
Jacob  McClenden  ........ 

Isaiah  Parker  

Wm.  Taylor  

Jordan  Taylor  ._ 

Joseph  Campbell  

Watts  Mann  

Nathan  Serman  

Mark  McClamma  

James  Chitty  

Kittrel  Warren  

John  Adams  .. 

John  Greene  .. 

John  M.  Duke  - 
James  W.  Josey  ... 
James  R.  Mobley 
Joseph  P.  Clough 
William  Toney  .. 

Henry  Heron  

Redman  Hutchens  

James  Brewer  ... 


10  0 0 

1111 
15  12 

0 0 13 

1111 
0 5 10 

2 0 2 0 

15  17 

0 3 14 

1110 
10  0 0 

110  3 

12  12 

14  10 

13  2 5 

14  12 

1111 
10  0 0 

13  11 

12  15 

110  2 
10  0 1 

1 10  2 

10  0 1 

2 2 2 1 

10  17 

13  15 

12  15 

110  1 


10  0 1 

4 0 0*4 

9 0 9 18 

4 0 0 4 

4 0 5 9 

6 0 0 6 

4 0 18  22 

14  0 8 22 

8 0 0 8 

3 0 0 3 

10  0 1 

5 0 10  15 

6 0 11  17 

6 0 17 

11  0 0 11 

8 0 0 8 

4 0 0 4 

10  0 1 

6 0 3 9 

9 0 7 16 

4 0 4 8 

2 0 0 2 

4 0 0 4 

2 0 3 5 

7 0 16  23 

9 0 13  22 

10  0 5 15 

9 0 0 9 

3 0 0 3 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


353 


CONECUH  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6) 


Edward  Brooks  1 

William  Johnson  1 

John  Stringer  1 

John  Salter  2 

George  W.  Nolan  1 

John  J.  Kelley  1 

Calvin  Downey  1 

Samuel  Downey  3 

Jacob  Clower  1 

Wm.  Wood  1 

Isaac  Cain  1 

Charles  Paul  1 

George  L.  Lampkin  2 

Samuel  L.  Lampkin  1 

John  Salter  Sr.  2 

James  Dewberry  1 

Harrison  Harris  1 

Sterling  Brown  1 

John  Brown  1 

Presley  Brown  1 

Wylley  Sawyer  .... 1 

Edmond  Lindsey  1 

Lamach  Hudson  1 

James  Hays  1 

Mullikin  Norid,  Jr.  1 

Mullikin  Norid,  Sr.  1 

Abner  D.  Griffith  1 

Joshua  Betts  1 

Stephen  Jones  1 


0 12  4 0 

0 113  0 

3 1 4 9 0 

0 0 13  0 

2 115  0 

0 10  2 0 

5 12  9 0 

113  8 0 

2 14  8 0 

4 1 4 10  0 

3 2 0 6 0 

0 0 2 3 0 

3 0 4 9 0 

113  6 0 

3 3 5 13  0 

3 1 2 7 0 

2 115  0 

0 10  2 0 

3 116  0 

110  3 0 

10  13  0 

2 10  4 0 

0 10  2 0 

1114  0 

2 2 3 8 0 

0 2 0 3 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

5 1 3 10  0 

5 118  0 


(7) 

8 

0 

2 

0 

9 

9 

0 

0 

3 
2 

4 
2 
7 
1 
0 

4 
0 
1 
7 
1 
1 
0 

13 

37 

5 
2 
0 
0 
0 


(8) 

12 

3 

11 

3 

14 
11 

9 
8 

11 

12 

10 

5 

16 

7 

13 

11 

5 

3 

13 

4 

4 

15 
41 
13 

5 
1 

10 


8 


354 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


CONECUH  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 


William  Johnson  1 1 1 2 5 0 0 

Pleasant  Bowden  1 3 1 2 7 0 8 

George  Brewer  11114  0 0 

Eddy  Crowell  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 

James  McFarlans  1 0 1 6 8 0 2 

George  Lewis  1 1 1 1 4 Oil 

William  Brewer  2 5 1 311  0 0 

Wm.  McPherson  2 5 2 211  0 0 

John  Flowers  2 5 1 2 10  0 0 

Thomas  Howard  ...... 1 1 1 0 3 0 3 

James  Johnson  2 3 2 3 10  0 0 

Mark  Travis  2 4 1 4 11  0 3 

Robert  Warren  1 1 1 3 6 0 8 

Caleb  Johnson  1 0 1 3 5 0 6 

Asa  Johnson  1 0 0 1 2 0 4 

Elisha  Edwards  2 2 1 0 5 0 0 

Peter  H.  Steele  .’. 12  115  0 4 

Josiah  Curry  1 0 1 3 5 0 0 

Isaac  Curry  1 1 0 2 4 0 0 

Stephen  Anderson  12  115  0 0 

William  Wood,  Jr.  11114  0 0 

Jacob  Carter  1 2 1 0 4 0 0 

James  Daniley  1 0 0 1 2 0 4 

George  Zinnamon  10  1 13  0 2 

Lewis  Tippit  - 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 

George  Fagan  1511803 

Phileman  Hodges  — 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 

Richard  Brazile  1 0 1 2 4 0 2 

Absolum  Reed  1 10  13  0 1 


5 

15 

4 

1 

10 

15 


10 

6 

10 

14 

14 

11 

6 

5 

9 

5 

4 

5 
4 

4 

6 

5 
2 

11 

1 

6 
4 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


355 


CONECUH  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

George  Roye  1 3 1 1 6 0 612 

Josiah  McClendon  141  17018 

Guin  Neal  1 4 3 1 9 0 3 12 

Joseph  Burson  4 4 1 211  0 Oil 

Samuel  Grau  10023014 

Reuben  Slaughter  110  13  0 4 

Daniel  Slaughter  1 2 1 1 5 0 7.  12 

James  May  — 1 3 1 0 5 0 2 

Joel  Howerton  23106017 

Ralph  Sawyer  1 3 1 2 7 0 1 

John  Parker  1 3 1 3 8 0 2 10 

Jacob  Futch  201  14004 

Jacob  Weldin  13217007 

Malichi  Ethridge  1 2 1 2609  15 

James  Jones  11103003 

James  Staples  12025005 

Wm  Robuck  .101  13025 

Benjamin  Price  12126006 

Stephen  Floyd  10124015 

Charles  Floyd  1 1002013 

Thomas  Loyd  1 0 0 0 1 0 25  26 

James  Carter  3 4 2 5 14  0 014 

Jesse  Ward  13138008 

Hiram  Carter  1 1 1 1 4 0 3 7 

Elcanah  Sawyer  1 1 1 0 3 0 3 

Elijah  Plummer  10001001 

John  Crumbley  10001001 

Moses  Carter  10135005 

Wm  Bates  2 5 1 311  0 3 14 


356 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


CONECUH  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6) 


Johnson  Wright  1 

William  Carter,  Sr.  2 

Andrew  Colvin  1 

Isaiah  Smith  2 

Francis  Gray  1 

James  Tippit  1 

Jesse  Carter  1 

Jacob  Welden,  Jr.  0 

Jordan  Floyd  2 

Isaac  Keils  1 

Wylly  Meeks  1 

Thomas  Floyd  1 

Robert  Barron  1 

Amos  Harris  1 

Sami  Parker  1 

Merret  Meeks,  Sr.  1 

John  Parker,  Jr.  1 

Merret  Meeks, Jr.  1 

Isaac  Welden  1 

James  Fooshee  1 

John  Maxcey  1 

Wm.  Session  1 

George  Stomun  2 

Hugh  Cameron  3 

George  G.  Blackwell  . 1 

Geo.  Snowdes  1 

Wm.  Carter  1 

Richard  Smith  2 

Samuel  Buchanan  1 


2 2 0 5 0 

4 3 1 10  0 

2 1 3 7 0 

5 1 5 13  0 

5 118  0 

113  6 0 

2 12  6 0 

110  2 0 

3 117  0 

1114  0 

1114  0 

3 1 2 7 0 

3 0 0 4 0 

1 1 3.6  0 

4 13  9 0 

0 113  0 

1114  0 

0 0 12  0 

112  5 0 

0 10  2 0 

3 13  8 0 

2 2 1 6 0 

0 0 0 2 0 

3 1 3 10  0 

0 10  2 0 

0 0 12  0 

1 2 0 4 0 

2 116  0 

112  5 0 


(7)  (8) 

5 10 

4 14 

0 7 

0 13 

1 9 

3 9 

0 6 

0 2 

4 11 

0 4 

0 4 

0 7 

0 4 

3 9 

1 10 

0 3 

0 4 

0 2 

0 5 

0 2 

0 8 

15  21 

9 11 

3 13 

0 2 

0 2 

0 4 

0 6 

1 6 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


357 


CONECUH  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

People  C.  Jordan  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Gidon  Mayo  2 5 1 311  0 2 13 

Joseph  Mayo  14117007 

Reuben  Rowland  1 1215005 

Robert  Huggins  21  115005 

H & C.  E.  Beard 50005005 

Absolum  Wall  1 12  0 4015 

Wright  Wall  1 0 1 1 3 0 0 3 

Thomas  Wall  1 0 1 1 3 0 0 3 

John  Nelson,  Sr.  1 0 1 1 3 0 0 3 

John  Nelson,  Jr.  1 1 103003 

David  Ard  12115005 

Absolum  Barrow  1 3 0 2’6  0 3 9 

George  Ard  12014004 

William  Ellis  1 2 1 2 6 0 0 6 

John  Barrow  1 7 2 6 16  0 30  46 

Radford  L.  Cotton  11125016 

Reuben  Hart  1 9 1 1 12  0 6 18 

Martholomew  Cauley  1 1 1 3 6 010  16 

Solomon  Siler  2 0 1 0 3 0 16  19 

Andrew  Siler  1 1 0 0 2 0 17  19 

John  Weaver  21115005 

Allen  Murphy  23106  0 06 

John  Jemison  3 4 1 3 11  0 1 12 

Windall  Taylor  1 3 1 5 10  0 1 11 

Allen  Jones  1 2 1 0 4 0 0 4 

Elias  Brown  *121  1 5005 

Avington  Phelps  12126006 

Andrew  Jones  . r 1 6 1 1 9 0 35  44 


358 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


CONECUH  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 


Zachariah  Riley  4 4 2 1 11  0 0 11 

John  W.  Mayo  1 1 1 0 3 0 1 4 

Morris  Boney  1101  3 003 

Wm.  Gainer  221  16006 

William  Taylor  1 3 1 1 6 0 1 7 

Dennis  Adams  ... .. 1 21  37  07  14 

Isham  Adams  11103003 

Robert  Parrot  21  148008 

Daniel  McLean  14106006 

Alley  Williams  0 3 1 0 4 0 1 5 

Hugh  Taylor  3 0 2 5 10  0 3 13 

Duncan  McQuaig  ... 1221600  6 

Malcolm  McSwain  12126006 

Elias  Massey  ... 1 3 1 2 7 0 0 7 

Samuel  Cook  32117018 

Joseph  Bruton  1 3 1 4 9 0 211 

John  Martin  13127007 

Benjamin  Bruton  20  1 0309  12 

Needham  Parker  1 3 1 3 8 0 0 8 

Peter  McCaskle  30115027 

Alex  McDaniel  21216006 

Howell  Sasser  3222904  13 

John  Travis  1 0 0 4 5 0 0 5 

Bartley  Brown  11114015 

Ephraim  Jones  3 0 0 3 6 0 814 

Robert  Smilie  1 3 1 0505  10 

Amos  Adams  1 5 1 3 10  0 0 10 

Hinche  Warren  ...... 1 1 1 2 5 0 20  25 

Henry  Hunter  1 1 1 1 4 0 86  90 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


359 


CONECUH  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Absolum  Littlefield  10102002 

Thomas  Watts  2 2 1 0 5 0 12  17 

Isaac  Stephens  1 6 1 2 10  0 0 10 

John  Spier  2 3 2 3 10  0 5 15 

William  Ellis  1 1 0 0 2 0 0 2 

Dushee  Shaw  21014004 

Jesse  Pearin  1 0 0 0 1 0 0-1 

Mabry  Thomas  — - 2 1 1 1 5 015  20 

Alex  Autery  2 5 1 311  0 8 19 

Phillip  Noland  .... 2 4 1 3 10  0 3 13 

Carlton  Thompson  2 3 1 1 7 0 714 

Jonathan  Stuckey  1 6 1 311  0 011 

Nathan  Stuckey  2 3 2 3 10  0 0 10 

James  Noles  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Charley  Crosby  1 1 1 1 4 0 13  17 

Elizabeth  Gholson  0 2 1.3  6 0 5 11 

Benedict  Jotton  2 2 1 611  0 011 

Silas  Johnson  10001001 

Walker  D.  Langham  1 21  2607  13 

' S.  J.  Whatley  1 0 0 2 3 0 3 6 

M.  McPherson  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Benjamin  Blow  1 1 125005 

Darby  Henly  2 2 1 3 8 0 0 8 

Thomas  Lord  12126006 

Robert  Savage  1 0 1 0 2 0 5 7 

Andrew  Rea,  Sr.  1 1 1 2 5 0 1 6 

Robert  Brazin  13149009 

Wm.  Pugh,  Sr 1 1 1 3 6 0 0 6 

Bartlett  Walker  2 2 1 5 10  0 4 14 


360 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


CONECUH  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6) 


E.  S.  Gruning  — 2 

Malichi  Warren  1 

James  B.  Culp  1 

Joseph  Harvill  1 

Claiborn  Curry  1 

Randolph  Hester  1 

Josiah  Wright  1 

Kendar  Hawthorn  1 

James  Oliver  1 

Joseph  Oliver  ... 1 

Joel  Duke  1 

Jesse  Carter  - 1 

Joshua  Zuber  1 

Jordan  Smith  2 

Francis  McLendon  1 

Malory  Stroud  1 

Ethen  Stroud  2 

Wm.  D.  Stone  1 

Wm.  Brown  — 1 

John  Cunningham  1 

Alex  Watson  .... 1 

Drury  Deas  2 

Sherward  Lewis  1 

Jacob  Warbington  1 

Isaac  Collins  1 

Warren  Hart  1 

Drury  Dean  1 

Levin  Watson  1 

Thomas  Lewis  2 


10  14  0 

0 0 0 1 0 

2 115  0 

2 13  7 0 

10  13  0 

2 115  0 

2 12  6 0 

7 1 4 13  0 

0 10  2 0 

0 0 12  0 

1114  0 

3 10  5 0 

1 0 0 2 0 

0 12  5 0 

110  3 0 

1 1 0.  3 0 

4 2 18  1 

10  13  0 

0 0 0 1 0 

0 12  4 0 

1 0 2 4 0 

2 116  0 

115  8 0 

4 1 511  0 

2 1 2 6.0 

1 1 0 3 0 

3 2 4 10  0 

2 13  7 0 

2 116  0 


(7)  (8) 

15  19 

0 1 

1 6 

0 7 

2 5 

1 6 

0 6 

0 13 

12  14 

0 2 

1 5 

12  17 

0 2 

0 5 

1 4 

9 12 

17  26 

14  17 

0 1 

0 4 

1 5 

5 11 

7 15 

0 11 

0 6 

0 3 

0 10 

0 7 

0 6 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


361 


CONECUH  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

John  Liles  - 2 2 1 0 5 0 0 5 

Thomas  Powell  3 1 10505  10 

John  Powell  0 2 0 1 3 0 0 3 

Louis  Pipkin  - 1 4 1 4 10  0 0 10 

David  Pipkin  1 1 125005 

William  Boykin  11103003 

Joel  Ellis  - 1 3 1 2 7 0 0-7 

William  Callihan  1 2 1 0 4 0 0 4 

Hodges  McWilliams  2 5 2 4 13  0 0 13 

James  Howard,  Sr.  13116017 

John  Perry  .... 10001034 

Robert  Welden  1 0 1 3 5 0 0 5 

Isaac  Hussey  21  126006 

Lord  Ware  1 2 1 2 6 0 1 

John  Gibbons  2 0 1 0 3 0 0 3 

Henry  Folk  1 3 1 2 7 0 2 9 

Martha  Posey  01113014 

Elizabeth  Williams  00101001 

Silas  Baggett  10001001 

John  Barge  10001001 

Joseph  Waits  14005005 

Littlebury  Hutchens  11114004 

Floyd  Preslar  ? 020  2 4004 

Abraham  Deson  10146  0 06 

Samuel  Waits  1 1 1 2 5 O'  0 5 

James  Waites  10102002 

Joshua  Horn  10012002 

Fredirick  Mathis  100120,02 

Benjamin  Mitchell  2 6 1 1 10  0 0 10 


362 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


CONECUH  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1) 

(2) 

(3) 

(4) 

(5) 

(6) 

(7) 

(8) 

Alex  Graham  

1 

0 

0 

2 

3 

0 

0 

3 

Wm.  DeBose  

2 

0 

0 

1 

3 

1 

9 

13 

W,  M.  B.  Scrimshon  

1 

3 

1 

4 

9 

0 

0 

9 

Lord  B.  Fleming  

1 

0 

1 

3 

5 

0 

7 

12 

Abner  Jackson  

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

0 

0 

4 

Mathews  Davis  

1 

2 

1 

2 

6 

0 

0 

6 

David  Simmons  

2 

3 

1 

2 

8 

0 

0 

8 

Michael  Peavy  .•1. 

1 

2 

1 

4 

8 

0 

8 

16 

Jacob  Hammons  

1 

0 

0 

2 

3 

0 

0 

3 

James  Simmons  

2 

1 

1 

6 

10 

0 

0 

10 

Richard  Seamon  

1 

1 

1 

0 

3 

0 

1 

4 

James  Caldwell  

1 

4 

1 

2 

8 

0 

3 

11 

Andrew  Muldro  

1 

1 

1 

2 

5 

0 

9 

14 

Charles  Howard  

1 

0 

0 

0 

1 

0 

0 

1 

Micajah  Mathis  

1 

2 

1 

2 

6 

0 

13 

19 

Daniel  McFarland  

1 

1 

1 

2 

5 

0 

1 

6 

McConnele  & McMillian  __ 

2 

0 

0 

0 

2 

0 

6 

8 

David  May  

1 

0 

1 

4 

6 

0 

2 

8 

Henry  Clemmons  

2 

1 

0 

1 

4 

0 

0 

4 

Wm.  Blackshere  

3 

0 

1 

3 

7 

0 

4 

11 

Margaret  Anderson  

0 

0 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

4 

Robert  Browning  ... 

1 

0 

0 

0 

1 

0 

0 

1 

Drury  White 

1 

4 

1 

3 

9 

0 

0 

9 

Isaac  Hawkins  

1 

0 

1 

1 

3 

0 

0 

3 

James  Harell  

2 

1 

3 

2 

8 

0 

0 

8 

Josiah  Runnels  ... 

1 

5 

1 

2 

9 

0 

0 

9 

Elisha  Herale  

1 

0 

1 

1 

3 

0 

0 

3 

Charles  Mayo  .. 

2 

1 

1 

4 

8 

0 

0 

8 

Luke  Townley  

1 

1 

2 

6 

10 

0 

2 

12 

FALL  ISSUE,  1944  463 


CONECUH  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 


Charles  Roberts  1 3 1 0 5 0 1 6 

Aaron  Snowden  1 4 1 2 8 0 0 

Jonathan  Heraldson  12  1 15005 

William  Mancill  2 2 3 3 10  0 0 10 

Levi  Peavy  1 0 0 2 3 0 0 3 

Ephraim  Gordon  2 4 1 2 9 011  20 

Jabez  N.  Brown  1 0 1 2 4 0 3*7 

James  Hubburt  101  13  0 03 

Roley  Robuck  1 2 1 2 6 0 0 6 

Aaron  Burlison  3 3 1 0 7 0 0 7 

Dempsia  Jones  1 5 1 3 10  0 15  25 

Penelopi  Deas  0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 

Lofton  Cotton  2 3 3 2 10  *0  0 10 

David  Purser  1 4 1 4 10  0 0 10 

John  Jones  1 4 1 2 8 0 0 8 

Josiah  Jones  12216107 

John  Dickson  1 5 1 3 10  0 4 14 

Benjamin  Johnakin  1 5 1 2 9 0 413 

Samuel  Williams  10124  0 04 

Josiah  Folks  2 0 3 1 6*0  0 6 

James  Hale  1 1 0 1 3 0 0 3 

Robert  McKinnon  22105016 

Wylly  Williams  1 4 1 0 6 0 1 7 

Peter  Campbele  2 1 2 3 8 0 0 8 

Josiah  Jones,  Sr.  33129009 

Janies  King  1 1 2 6 10  0 0 10 

Daniel  McKnolly  13228008 

Elijah  Hobbs  1 3 1 5 10  0 0 10 

William  Goddin  1 5 1 3 10  0 0 10 


364 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


CONECUH  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1) 

(2) 

(3) 

(4) 

(5) 

(6) 

(7) 

(8) 

Levi  Jackson  

1 

3 

1 

1 

6 

0 

0 

6 

Wm.  Whitmire  

1 

1 

0 

1 

3 

0 

0 

3 

Abijah  Clark  

* 1 

0 

1 

0 

2 

0 

0 

2 

Thomas  Beelar  

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

1 

1 

6 

Dugald  McBride  

2 

2 

1 

1 

6 

0 

2 

8 

Giles  Trickev  

1 

0 

0 

1 

2 

0 

0 

2 

Neal  McGilvary  

1 

1 

1 

2 

5 

0 

0 

5 

Neal  Pursell  

4 

3 

4 

2 

13 

0 

0 

13 

Henry  Potts  

1 

1 

1 

0 

3 

0 

6 

9 

Benjamin  Bruton  

1 

2 

2 

2 

7 

0 

7 

14 

Thomas  Henly  

1 

0 

0 

2 

3 

0 

0 

3 

Owen  Alford  

2 

5 

1 

1 

9 

0 

0 

9 

Wm.  Oglesby  

1 

0 

1 

3 

5 

0 

0 

5 

John  Morrison  

3 

1 

3 

1 

8 

0 

0 

8 

Colson  Adams  

1 

1 

1 

3 

6 

0 

2 

8 

Louis  Johnakin  

2 

3 

1 

0 

6 

0 

0 

6 

Jacob  White  

1 

4 

1 

3 

9 

0 

0 

9 

Thomas  B.  Green  ..... 

1 

2 

1 

2 

6 

0 

3 

9 

Duncan  Mclntire  

1 

2 

1 

3 

7 

0 

4 

11 

Emry  Stringer  .... 

1 

2 

0 

2 

5 

0 

0 

5 

Andrew  Rea,  Jr.  

2 

1 

1 

1 

5 

0 

2 

7 

Wm  Pugh,  Jr.  

1 

2 

1 

1 

5 

0 

3 

8 

Joshua  Hawthorn  ... . 

2 

6 

1 

3 

12 

0 

13 

25 

James  Coursin  

1 

6 

1 

2 

10 

0 

7 

17 

John  Chandler  

1 

1 

2 

3 

7 

0 

0 

7 

Elias  Hodges  

2 

2 

1 

1 

6 

0 

15 

21 

Hinche  Warren  

2 

1 

1 

2 

6 

0 

5 

11 

Starke  Hunter  

1 

0 

0 

0 

1 

1 

130 

132 

Thomas  Boykin  

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

17 

17 

FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


365 


CONECUH  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Elias  P.  Muse,  (Min)  0 0 0 0 0 0 23  23 

Micajah  Herrington  141  17029 

David  Powell  121  37  06  13 

Wm.  Fort  1 3 1 3 8 0 0 8 

Harvy  Herrington  1 3 1 5 10  0 9 19 

Samuel  T.  Jones  3 2 1 2 8 0 0 8 

John  Nelson  2 1 1 5 9 0 0*9 

Bartholomino  Bryant  11002013 

Janies  Bright  1 5 1 5 12  0 15  27 

James  Taylor  1 4 1 4 10  0 0 10 

Allen  Preslar  2 3 2 1 8 0 0 8 

Daniel  Cole  2 2 1 1 6 0 6 12 

Isaac  H.  Horne  10  113  0 14 

Noah  Cole  1 0 1 1 3 0 2 5 

Edward  Mancile  1 1 1 4 7 0 0 7 

George  Clarke  , 10124004 

Needham  Perry  1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 

Abner  Stanley  10001001 

Jacob  Smith  1 6 1 3 11  0 0 11 

Thomas  Mindenhall  1 1013003 

Jordan  Morris  10023003 

Starke  Baker  ____ 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 

Stephens  Phillips  1 1002002 

Samuel  Gainer  2 3 2 5 12  0 1 13 

David  Roe  1 0 1 1 3 0 0 3 

Wm.  Hurley  1 0 1 0 2 0 0 2 

Hector  McNeil  1 2 1 3 7 0 2 9 

James  Kenedy  21  104026 

Joseph  Alford  10146006 


366 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


CONECUH  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 


Wm.  Holley  1 7 

Isaac  Kraker  2 1 

Asa  Moody  1 3 

Daniel  Honeford  0 0 

Richard  Miller  — 1 0 

George  Williams  1 4 

James  Jones  1 0 

Samuel  Jones  1 0 

James  Thompson  1 2 

Thomas  Hinson  1 6 

Garrett  Long.nin  2 4 

Joseph  East  2 0 

Wm.  Brackin  2 1 

Wylly  Lampkin  . 1 0 

Sheredon  Davis  1 1 

Eli  Stroud  1 0 

Orion  Stroud  1 1 

N!  W.  Nicholls  1 0 

Ruben  Pearce  1 0 

Kedar  Hawthorn  1 4 

■Wm.  Curry  1 3 

Samuel  Burnett  1 1 

Moses  Franklin  1 0 

William  Rabb  2 2 

Edward  Weatherford  - 1 0 

Houghton  & Robinson  3 0 

Washington  Johnson  1 2 

Wirtley  Young  ...  1 2 

William  Johnson  1 1 


1 2 11 

1 2 6 

2 1 7 

0 0 0 

0 1 2 

2 2 9 

0 0 1 

1 0 2 

1 0 4 

1 4 12 

1 3 10 

1 0 3 

2 1 6 

0 2 3 

0 1 3 

0 1 2 

0 1 3 

0 0 1 

0 1 2 

1 1 7 

1 5 10 

1 2 5 

0 0 1 

1 4 9 

1 0 2 

0 0 3 

1 3 7 

1 2 6 

1 0 3 


0.0  11 
0 0 6 

0 0 7 

10  0 10 

0 0 2 

0 4 13 

0 0 1 

0 0 2 

0 0 4 

0 0 12 

0 18  28 

0 0 3 

0 0 6 

0 0 3 

0 0 3 

0 4 6 

0 4 7 

0 1 2 

0 0 2 

0 0 7 

0 0 10 

0 11  16 

0 0 1 

0 9 18 

0 0 2 

0 6 9 

0 1 8 

0 0 6 

0 1 4 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


367 


CONECUH  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

James  Russell  1 4 3 2 10  0 0 10 

Abraham  Russell  10023003 

James  Mallett  1 2 0 0 3 0 6 9 

Gilbert  Finley  12014004 

Powell  Smith  131  16006 

T.  W.  Devereux  1 2 0 0 3 0 14  17 

Simpson  Sawyer  ____ 1 1 1 4 7 0 0- 

Edinborough  Collier  1 1 158008 

Thomas  Shaw  1 4 3 1 9 0 0 

Archer  Powell  1 2 1 2 6 0 0 

Asa  Pipkin  101  13003 

Mark  Deas  1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 

David  Jay  — 1 1 1 2 5 0 1 

Guin  Gillis  1 0 1 2 4 0 0 4 

David  Shipp  2 3 1 4 10  0 0 10 

William  Lindsey  11114004 

John  S.  Irvine  12216006 

John  Fergerson  3 0 2 3 8 0 311 

Neal  Ferguson  2 2 1 2 7 0 0 

Jesse  Baggett  1 2 1 1 5 0 0 5 

Boden  Stroud  00000044 

Amos  Pipkin  1 0 1 1 3 0 0 3 

John  Shaw  10001001 

Thomas  Willis  12227007 

David  Turner  .... 10001001 

John  Runnells  21  1 15005 

John  G.  Wingate  1 1 0 1 3 0 0 3 

George  W.  Odum  101  13003 

Charlis  B.  Oliver  .... 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 


368 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


i 

CONECUH 

COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1) 

(2) 

(3) 

(4) 

(5) 

(6) 

(7) 

(8) 

Hazail  Littlef eild  

1 

0 

1 

1 

3 . 

0 

0 

3 

John  Stokes  

1 

0 

0 

0 

1 

0 

0 

1 

Nancy  Taylor  

0 

0 

1 

0 

1 

0 

0 

1 

Wm.  B.  Stover  

1 

0 

1 

3 

5 

0 

13 

18 

Wm.  Gaines  

1 

2 

1 

1 

5 

0 

0 

5 

Rolley  Ellis  

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

0 

0 

4 

John  Williams  

1 

1 

1 

2 

5 

0 

1 

6 

John  Harley  

1 

0 

0 

0 

1 

0 

0 

1 

John  Brown  

1 

1 

1 

2 

5 

0 

0 

5 

David  Jones,  Senr.  

1 

1 

1 

0 

3 

0 

0 

3 

John  Bell  

1 

4 

1 

2 

8 

0 

43 

51 

J.  F.  Furguson  

1 

0 

0 

0 

1 

0 

0 

r 

Total  Amount  

788 

1,151 

583 

1,093 

3,615 

15 

1,919 

5,549 

E.E. 


I,  James  Ferguson  Assessor  for  Conecuh  County,  do 
hereby  certify  that  the  within,  is  a correct  statement 
of  the  number  of  inhabitants,  of  which  Conecuh  Coun- 
ty consists,  with  a proper  distinction  of  sexes,  age  and 
color,  agreeable  to  the  form  laid  down  for  that  pur- 
pose, this  30th.,  day  Oct.  A.  D.  1820. 

J.  F.  Ferguson. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


369 


DALLAS  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 
Census 

The  enumeration  of  Dallas  County,  State  of  Alabama,  for  the 
year  1820,  taken  in  pursuance  of  an  act  of  the  General  Assembly, 
Entitled,  An  Act,  authorizing  the  taking  the  Census  of  the  Alabama 
Territory,  Passed  the  9th  of  February  1818. 

Oath  of  Office. 

State  of  Alabama  ) I Saul  Davis  do  solemnly  swear  that  I 

Dallas  County  ) will  take  the  Census  of  the  County  of 

Dallas,  according  to  the  true  intent  and 
meaning  of  this  Act,  to  the  best  of  my 
knowledge. 

Signed  Saul  Davis. 

Sworn  to  before  me  this  19th  day  of  April,  1820. 


Signed  Jonas  Brown,  J.  C.  C. 


370 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


DALLAS  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

Names  of  the  heads  of  families. 

"(1) — White  males  over  twenty  one  years. 

(2)  — White  males  under  twenty  one  years. 

(3)  — White  females  over  twenty  one  years. 

(4)  — -White  females  under  twenty  one  years. 

(5)  — Total  of  white  inhabitants. 

(6)  — Total  of  free  people  of  colour. 

(7)  — Total  of  slaves. 

(8)  — Total  of  inhabitants. 


Arnette,  John  

Armstrong,  James  H.  

Anders,  Robert  

Averette,  Henry  

Averette,  Jonathan  

Adams,  Erwin  

Adkins,  Allen  

Allen,  Will. am  B.  

Allen,  Horatio  G.  - 

Adams,  Benjamin  

Aylette,  William  

Adams,  Henry  „ 

Barnette,  David  

Barron,  James  .. 

Butler,  James  .. 

Bolton,  Benjamin  

Buck,  Cornelius  ~ 

Bentley,  Jeremiah  

Bolton,  William  .. 

Bolton,  William  

Blalach,  Wade  .. 

Blalac,  Richard  „ 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5) 


1 0 0 0 1 

11114 
11114 
13  116 

10  113 

10  113 

12  10  4 

1 4 2 3 10 

1 0 0 0 1 


1 0 0 0 1 

1 3 1 7 12 

12  14  8 

1 0 2 0 3 

10  12  4 

1 0 0 0 1 


1 5 3 1 10 

1 0 0 0 1 


1 0 0 0 1 

10  0 12 
1 0 0 0 1 

2 5 1 4 12 

1 0 0 0 1 


(6) 


0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

1 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 


(7)  (8) 

0 1 

0 4 

0 4 

5 11 

1 4 

0 3 

4 8 

1 11 

0 1 

0 1 

26  38 

2 10 

18  22 

0 4 

0 1 

0 10 

0 1 

0 1 

4 6 

0 1 

3 15 

0 1 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


371 


DALLAS  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

ft 

Brantley,  John  1 0 0 0 1 0 2 3 

Boze,  Zedekiah  131  16006 

Baker,  Joseph  12  1 15  0 2 

Burlingame,  Charles  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Brantley,  Harris  1 1 1 3 6 0 15  21 

Barnes,  Jeremiah  1 7 1 1 10  0 8 18 

Blakey,  Joseph  A.  2 0 1 3 6 0 4 - 10 

Boyle,  Samuel  1 1 1 2 5 0 2 

Blevins,  William  1 1 1 2 3 0 16  19 

Butler,  Henry  1 2 1 2 6 0 0 6 

Burgess,  William  M.  101  13003 

Beeson,  Jonathan  1 6 1 3 11  0 2 13 

Baker,  Jordan  10001001 

Butcher,  Thomas  12126028 

Bigham,  John  M.  12104004 

Bradham,  Reuben  12148008 

Ball,  Hiram  11114004 

Bloodworth,  Hardy  11147007 

Barren,  Thomas  C.  1 1 2 0 4 0 0 4 

Blann,  Silas  11114004 

Blann,  Stephen  1 3 1 2 7 0 0 7 

Browning,  William  1 4 1 3 9 0 29  38 

Barnett,  Thomas  1 1125005 

Burney,  Thomas  J.  10001001 

Bell,  James  1 3 1 3 8 0 2 10 

Barksdale,  William  10  110  0 4 

Battle,  James  10001001 

Bragg,  William  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Bozeman,  Harmon  W.  ....  1 2 1 2 6 0 1 


372 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


DALLAS  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6) 


Bass,  Thomas  1 

Berryhill,  John  1 

Boswell,  William  1 

Bird,  E.  E.  1 

Blake,  Luther  1 

Blanks,  George  W.  1 

Brown,  James  1 

Blanks,  James  1 

Burton,  Charles  W.  1 

Baird,  John  1 

Beebe,  Roswell  1 

Burke,  David  H.  1 

Bogle,  Joseph  L.  1 

Bowles,  E.  M.  1 

Beckley,  Walter  O.  1 

Boyd,  John  1 

Brown,  Thomas  1 

Bell,  James  2 

Boice,  John  1 

Brooks,  Oliver  C.  - 0 

Brooks,  Parsons  & Co.  — 3 

Besha,  John  1 

Boyls,  Patric  1 

Bass,  Jesse  0 

Brown,  Jonas  0 

Benton,  Mires 

(Colored  man)  0 

Bean,  Jesse  1 

Booker,  William  1 


2 12  6 0 

5 118  0 

0 0 0 1 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

2 115  0 

0 0 0 1 0 

1114  0 

0 0 0 1 0 

0 113  0 

0 10  2 0 

1114  0 

112  5 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

2 12  7 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

2 3 0 5 0 

0 0 0 3 0 

1 0 0 2 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

112  4 0 

10  0 10 

0 0 0 0 1 

0 0 0 1 0 

0 0 0 1 0 


(7) 

0 

0 

0 

0 

1 

1 

0 

0 

0 

1 

0 

3 

0 

17 

9 

0 

0 

6 

0 

15 

0 

0 

0 

3 

0 

0 

0 

0 


(8) 

6 

8 

1 

1 

2 

2 

1 

5 

1 

5 
1 

6 
2 

21 

14 

1 

1 

13 

1 

20 

3 

2 

1 

7 

i 

1 

1 

1 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


373 


DALLAS  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Bender,  Griffin  - i-  10113069 

Bayne,  John  R.  — 10001001 

Berry,  John  W.  1 11  3 6 0 3 9 

Box,  Edward  13015005 

Bloodworth,  Timothy  1 4 1 2804  12 

C 

Coleman,  Charles  1 0 0 0 1 0 01 

Cox,  John  21  137  0 29 

Carson,  John  2 3 1 1 7 0 6 13 

Carter,  Meshech  11103014 

Cook,  Pleasant  10001001 

Curry,  Cadar  12137018 

Covington,  Leroy  11024015 

Cundiff,  John  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Cranford,  Leonard  1 2 1 3 7 0 0 

Cowan,  Robert  13127007 

Campbell,  James  122  380  0 8 

Clarke,  Jabes  10012024 

Cowan,  James  1 3 1 4901  10 

Campbell,  James  13116006 

Christopher,  George  10001001 

Carr,  Josiah  2 0 0 1 3 0 0 3 

Callan,  James  20237  08  15 

Calicotes,  George  14139009 

Cowan,  David  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Craig,  John  1 21  4803  11 

Carmichael,  Hannah  041  3802  10 

Carmichael,  John  10001001 

Childers,  George  - 2 1 1 2 6 0 13  19 


374 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


DALLAS  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6) 


Campbell,  John  1 

Campbell,  William  1 

Crawford,  John  1 

Craig,  Robert  0 

Cumbast,  John  1 

Craig,  Thomas  1 

Creig,  Robert  1 

Carrall,  Charles  Junr.  1 

Cartha,  Alexander  1 

Clower,  George  1 

Carson,  Thomas  H.  V.  1 

Carrall,  Charles  1 

Coleman,  Josiah  1 

Crowell,  John  1 

Carson,  John  B.  1 

Chandler,  John  1 

Chandler,  Asa  1 

Cowan,  John  1 

Carson,  David  1 

Cooper,  John  1 

Chauncey,  James  1 

Cleveland,  Carter  H.  1 

Carr,  Robert  W.  1 

Curtis,  William  1 

Carnes,  Robert  .... 1 

Crawford,  James  1 

Clapp,  Elisha  Junr.  1 

Cannon,  William  1 

Cravey,  Benjamin  1 


114  7 0 
114  7 0 
0 12  5 0 
10  0 10 
1114  0 

3 13  8 0 
112  5 0 
0 0 12  0 
2 1 7 11  0 
0 0 0 1 0 
0 0 12  0 

4 1 4 10  0 
2 14  8 0 
0 0 0 1 0 
0 0 0 1 0 
0 10  2 0 
1114  0 
6 1 4 12  0 
2 115  0 

112  5 0 

2 115  0 
12  15  0 
0 0 0 1 0 

3 2 17  0 
0 0 0 1 0 
0 0 0 1 0 
0 0 0 1 0 

113  6 0 
3 12  7 0 


(7)  (8) 

0 7 

0 7 

6 11 

2 3 

7 11 

6 14 

1 6 

5 7 

1 12' 

0 1 

2 4 

5 15 

0 8 

7 8 

0 1 

9 11 

0 4 

0 12 

20  25 

0 5 

0 5 

26  31 

0 1 

5 15 

0 1 

0 1 

0 1 

0 6 

0 7 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


375 


DALLAS  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


Casey,  Thomas  .... 

Carter,  Joseph  

Crenshaw,  Anderson  

Crocheron,  J & J 

Cotton,  John  A.  

Campbell,  Elizabeth  

Cunningham,  Samuel  

Curtis,  John  

Camp,  Joseph  

Coleman,  Johnson  P.  

Crocheron,  D & N.  

Crenshaw,  Walter  __ 

Coleman,  Stephen  

Coles,  William  M.  

Crawford,  James  

Christie,  Hugh  

Cawthorn,  Larkin  

Campbell,  Isaac  N.  

Collins,  — 

Cullins,  Amos  

Chapen,  Nathan  

Carroll,  Asa  

Colvill,  Davidson  

Day,  Frederick  

Davis,  John  

Devaughan,  Samuel  

Davis,  James  R.  

Dennis,  William  

Davidson,  Joseph  Junr. 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5) 

1 1 2 3 7 

1 0 0 0 1 

12  115 

2 0 0 0 2 

1110  3 

0 13  4 8 

1 0 0 0 1 

1 0 0 0 1 

1 0 0 0 1 

1 0 0 0 1 

2 0 0 0 2 

1 0 0 0 1 

4 2 0 0 6 

10  10  2 

1 0 0 0 1 

1110  3 

11114 
1 0 0 0 1 

12  104 

13  10  5 

10  10  2 

1 0 0 0 1 

10  113 

2 3 1 4 10 

13  12  7 

1 0 0 0 1 

11114 
110  13 

1 0 0 0 1 


(6) 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 


(7) 

25 

0 

10 

0 

0 

8 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

70 

0 

0 

0 

0 

9 
7 
0 
4 
0 
2 

10 
0 
1 
0 
0 


(8) 

32 

1 

15 
2 
3 

16 
‘ 1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

6 

72 

1 

3 

4 
1 


13 


12 

2 

5 

3 


12 


17 

1 

5 

3 

1 


376 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


DALLAS  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 


Davidson,  Joseph  Senr. 

Dubose,  Peter  

Dubose,  Isaac  „ 

Drewry,  Humphrey  

Dubose,  Samuel  

Davis,  Frederick  

Davis,  John  

Dunn,  James  

Davis,  Saul  

Dunn,  Alexander  

Dear,  Bradley  

Duckworth,  Randal  

Driver,  John  C.  

Dickerson,  Griffin  

Davis,  Samuel  

Davis,  Person  

Davis,  William,  Sen.  

Dallon,  David  

Dick,  William  

Davis,  Ransom  

Davis,  William  Junr.  

Dunaway,  John  

Dexter,  & Mason.  

Day,  Nathaniel  

Douglas,  Robert  

Dick,  Samuel  

Dewry,  Joseph  

Davis,  James  W.  

Davis,  Polly  


1 1 

1 3 

1 3 

1 0 

1 0 

1 4 

1 2 

1 0 

1 0 

1 1 

1 4 

1 4 

1 1 

2 0 

1 0 

1 3 

1 0 

1 '0 

1 0 

1 3 

1 0 

1 0 

2 0 

1 4 

1 0 

1 1 

1 0 

1 0 

0 3 


1 1 

1 1 

1 1 

0 0 

0 0 

0 4 

2 6 

0 0 

0 0 

1 2 

1 1 

1 4 

1 2 

1 0 

0 0 

1 6 

1 0 

0 0 

0 0 

1 4 

0 2 

0 0 

0 0 

1 1 

0 0 

1 0 

0 0 

0 0 

1 4 


4 0 

6 0 

6 0 

1 0 

1 0 

9 0 

11  0 

1 0 

1 0 

5 0 

7 0 

10  0 

5 0 

3 0 

1 0 

11  0 

2 0 

1 0 

1 0 

9 0 

3 0 

1 0 

2 0 

7 0 

1 0 

3 0 

1 0 

1 0 

8 0 


0 4 

7 13 

18  24 

0 1 

0 1 

6 IS 

5 16 

0 1 

6 7 

0 5 

10  17 

12  22 

0 5 

4 7 

0 1 

6 17 

16  18 

0 1 

0 1 

5 14 

0 3 

0 1 

2 

1 8 

0 1 

10  13 

4 5 

0 1 

13 


21 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


377 


DALLAS  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Dark,  Thomas  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Durham,  Isaac  14128019 

E 

Earnest,  James  W.  1 0001001 

Elliott,  Arthur  K.  1000  1001 

Estes,  Shepton  .1. 10102002 

Ellis,  Benjamin  1 5 2 4 12  0 3 '15 

Ewing,  Thomas  1 3 1 6 11  0 1122 

Elder,  Samuel  13105005 

Erwin,  Andrew  10001001 

Erwin,  John  1 2 1 4 8 0 311 

F 

Ford,  Frances  1 10113369 

Frederick,  Stephen  1 4 1 4 10  10  3 13 

Fletcher,  William  10001001 

Franklin,  Abner  1 1 0 1 3 0 13  16 

Franklin,  Alfred  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

French,  William  14128008 

Francher,  James  12104015 

Ford,  William  B.  1 1103003 

Fincher,  Armel  11114004 

Francier,  Zecheriah  100010  01 

Flenikin,  David  1 7 2 2 12  0 8 20 

Flenikin,  V.  D.  C.  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Foster,  William  10001001 

Francher,  Henry  11035005 

Frazer,  Elizabeth  0 0 2 1 . 3 0 9 12 

Flenikin,  William  1 1013003 

Flenikin,  Samuel  1 3 1 5 10  0 0 10 


378 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


DALLAS 

COUNTY 

CENSUS 

1820 

(1) 

(2) 

(3) 

(4) 

(5) 

(6) 

(7) 

(8) 

Freeman,  Aaron  

1 

2 

1 

0 

4 

0 

0 

4 

Frith,  Archibald  

1 

0 

0 

0 

1 

0 

0 

1 

Fike,  John  — 

1 

0 

1 

0 

2 

0 

2 

4 

Fike,  James  M.  

p 

1 

0 

0 

1 

0 

0 

1 

Grumbles,  Benjamin  

1 

2 

J 

5 

9 

0 

0 

9 

Grumbles,  John  

1 

3 

2 

3 

9 

0 

0 

9 

Greer,  Robert  Junr.  

1 

2 

1 

5 

9 

0 

10 

19 

Greer,  Robert,  Senr.  

1 

0 

1 

1 

3 

0 

15 

18 

George,  James  

2 

4 

1 

2 

9 

0 

0 

9 

George,  John  

1 

3 

1 

2 

7 

0 

4 

11 

George,  William  P.  

1 

0 

0 

0 

1 

0 

0 

1 

Gilmore,  James  

2 

1 

1 

2 

6 

0 

0 

6 

Grayham,  Joseph  

1 

2 

1 

2 

6 

0 

7 

13 

Guinn,  William  - — 

1 

2 

1 

5 

9 

0 

0 

9 

Guinn,  John  

1 

2 

1 

2 

6 

0 

0 

6 

Graves,  Davenport  

1 

1 

1 

2 

5 

0 

1 

6 

Gayle,  John  .... 

1 

0 

0 

0 

1 

0 

25 

26 

Gilcrease,  Edmund  

1 

3 

1 

1 

6 

0 

8 

14 

Gale,  

1 

0 

a 

1 

2 

0 

0 

2 

Galaspie,  Thomas  

1 

4 

i 

1 

7 

0 

0 

7 

Galaspie,  Samuel  

1 

0 

0 

0 

1 

0 

1 

2 

Gill,  William  P.  

1 

0 

0 

0 

1 

0 

9 

10 

Garey,  William  W.  

1 

2 

l 

2 

6 

0 

6 

12 

Ginnings,  Gillum  G 

1 

0 

0 

0 

1 

0 

0 

1 

Grice,  Barnabas  

1 

3 

1 

5 

10 

0 

2 

12 

Grice,  Carpenter  

1 

0 

0 

0 

1 

0 

0 

1 

Greene,  Lemuel  

1 

0 

1 

2 

4 

0 

0 

4 

Gant,  Robert  

1 

2 

2 

3 

8 

0 

19 

27 

FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


379 


DALLAS 

COUNTY 

CENSUS 

1820 

(1) 

(2) 

(3) 

(4) 

(5) 

(6) 

(7) 

(8) 

Gilliam,  John  

1 

0 

0 

0 

1 

0 

0 

1 

Gardner,  Elizabeth  

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

6 

6 

Gamage,  Thomas  — 

1 

2 

1 

1 

5 

0 

6 

11 

Gardner,  Jason  H.  

1 

1 

1 

4 

7 

0 

56 

63 

Garret,  Jesse  

1 

4 

1 

2 

8 

0 

7 

15 

H 

Hardy,  William  

1 

3 

1 

3 

8 

0 

9 

17 

Hardy,  Jesse  

1 

7 

1 

1 

10 

0 

0 

10 

Hardy,  John  

1 

4 

1 

1 

7 

0 

13 

20 

Holloway,  Thomas  O.  

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

0 

4 

8 

Hanks,  Elijah  

2 

1 

1 

1 

5 

0 

0 

5 

Hardy,  James  

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

0 

1 

5 

Hays,  Patric  

1 

4 

3 

1 

9 

0 

4 

13 

Hays,  James  

1 

3 

1 

2 

7 

0 

0 

7 

Hill,  Hiram  

1 

7 

1 

6 

15 

0 

0 

15 

Hill,  William  

1 

0 

0 

0 

1 

0 

0 

1 

Hayden,  N.  L.  

1 

0 

0 

0 

1 

0 

0 

1 

Hagard,  Joel  

2 

3 

1 

5 

11 

0 

0 

11 

Hall,  Richard  

1 

2 

1 

4 

8 

0 

2 

10 

Hudgens,  Isaac  

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

0 

0 

4 

Honeycutt,  Joel  

2 

3 

1 

5 

11 

0 

0 

11 

Higginbotham,  William 

1 

5 

1 

0 

7 

0 

1 

8 

Hudgins,  Josiah  

1 

2 

1 

0 

4 

0 

0 

4 

Hill,  Major  

1 

4 

1 

3 

9 

0 

0 

9 

Hill,  Benjamin  

1 

1 

1 

0 

3 

d 

1 

4 

Hand,  John  

1 

4 

1 

1 

7 

0 

0 

7 

Hughes,  Joseph  10135016 

Harwell,  Riley  1 0 1 0 2 0 0 2 

Hornbuckle,  Wm.  L 1 0 0 0 1 


0 


0 


1 


380 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


DALLAS  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6) 


Harrald,  James  1 

Howie,  John  1 

Hale,  John  1 

Howie,  Samuel  1 

Hatcher,  James  1 

Hall,  Benjamin  1 

Henderson,  David  1 

Hoot,  George  1 

Hayman,  Johnson  1 

Howell,  John  F.  1 

Hunter,  James  1 

Hunter,  William  1 

Hollingsworth,  Jacob  1 

Holcomb,  John  1 

Hardy,  Daniel  1 

Hardy,  Miles  1 

Hues,  Virgil  H.  1 

Henry,  Augustus  1 

Howard,  John  1 

Hamilton,  Edward  1 

Holley,  James  1 

Henderson,  Robert  1 

Huckeby,  Britain  1 

Holmes,  Clarke  1 

Hughes,  Elizabeth  0 

Howell,  Lewis  1 

Howell,  Bennett  1 

Hart,  Thomas  1 

Hunter,  Alexander  1 


12  15  0 

5 2 2 10  0 

3 12  7 0 

0 10  2 0 

3 14  9 0 

12  4 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

2 115  0 

3 1 6 11  0 

0 0 12  0 

2 2 0 5 0 

2 0 0 3 0 

5 1 5 12  0 

0 0 0 1 0 

2 14  8 0 

2 14  8 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

3 13  8 0 

0 113  0 

0 0 0 1 0 

110  3 0 

0 12  4 0 

10  13  0 

3 115  0 

7 1 1 10  0 

0 0 0 1 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

0 113  0 


(7)  (8) 

0 5 

0 10 

4 13 

1 3 

35  44 

0 4 

0 1 

0 5 

0 11 

0 2 

14  19 

1 4 

0 12 

0 1 

7 15 

5 13 

0 1 

0 1 

5 13 

0 3 

0 1 

0 3 

0 4 

1 4 

0 5 

7 17 

0 1 

0 1 

8 11 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


381 


DALLAS  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Hitt,  Tilman  1 1 1 1 4 0 2 6 

Harrall,  William  1 2 1 1 5 0 0 5 

Hart,  Alexander  1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 

Harrison,  Paschal  0 0 0 0 0 0 10  10 

Harrison,  Carter  B.  1 2 1 0 4 0 15  19 

Huestin,  John  1212600  6 

Holley,  James  1 2 1 0 4 0 4 8 

Holley,  Thomas  L.  1 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 

Harris,  Alexander  12104004 

Humphries,  Carlisle  111  14059 

Haynes,  Henry  1 1 1 1 4 0 13  17 

Harris,  Page  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

J 

Jennings,  Thomas  1 3 1 4908  17 

Jennings,  Jeremiah  10001001 

Jones,  Terrell  01113003 

Jones,  William  A.  1 0 0.0  1 0 0 1 

Jackson,  Lewis  12014004 

James,  Seaborn.  M 10001001 

Johnson,  Jeremiah  1 21  5 9 0 0 9 

Johnson,  William  11013014 

Jones,  Wiley  13  1 1 6 0 2 8 

Johnson,  William  1 4 1 2 8 0 715 

Jordan,  Henry  1 4 1 1 7 0 15  22 

Jones,  Richard  R.  2 4 1 3 10  0 1 11 

Jessup,  Timothy  12126006 

Jessup,  Enoch  10001001 

Jackson,  Jacob  13105005 

Jackson,  Boater  1 3 1 2 7 0 0 


382 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


DALLAS  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6) 


Johnson,  John  1 

Jones,  John  B.  1 

Jones,  James  2 

Jones,  Hastings  1 

Jones,  Russel  — . 1 

Jordan,  L C 1 

Jones,  Matthew  , 1 

Jones,  William  .... 1 

Johnson,  Bernard  1 

Johnson,  Greer  1 

Johnson,  Lewis  1 

Jerigan,  Thomas  1 

Jackson,  William  1 

Jackson,  Thomas  1 

Jones,  Absalom  1 

Jordan,  Levi  1 

K 

Kelly,  Samuel  1 

Keneda,  Jesse  1 

King,  William  R.  1 

King,  Allen  1 

Kendal,  Samuel  1 

Keneda,  John  1 

Keneda,  Alexander  .... 1 

King,  Henry  2 

Killingsworth,  James  .....—  1 

Kanavaugh,  Lee  1 

King,  William  1 

King,  Benajah  1 


3 116  0 
0 1 2 0 
5 1 3 11  0 

4 12  8 0 
110  3 0 
0 0 0 1 0 

5 12  9 0 
7 10  9 0 

2 2 0 5 0 
113  6 0 

3 1 3 8 0 
0 0 0 1 0 
0 0 0 1 0 

4 0 16  0 
112  5 0 
0 0 0 1 0 

4 13  9 0 
0 0 0 1 0 
0 0 0 1 0 
9 1 0 11  0 
115  8 0 
3 116  0 
3 3 0 7 0 
1115  0 
0 0 0 1 0 
0 0 0 1 0 
0 0 0 1 0 
0 0 0 1 0 


(7)  (8) 

0 6 

4 6 

3 14 

0 8 

0 3. 

0 1 

0 9 

0 9 

2 7 

5 11 

2 10 

0 1 

0 1 

7 13 

0 5 

0 1 

0 9 

0 1 

80  81 

0 11 

0 8 

0 6 

0 7 

14  19 

0 1 

0 1 

1 2 

0 1 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


383 


DALLAS  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 


L 

Langford,  Jarvis  

Lee,  William  

Levingston,  Aaron  .. 

Lyle,  Micajah  

Lee  , Miller  

Lee,  William  

Lorring,  Daniel  

Lane,  Edmund  

Lettorette,  W S.  

Leopard,  Charles  ... 
M 

Maull,  James  

Myles,  John  

Myles,  Ebonezer  

Myles,  George  

Mays,  Manoah  

Moseley,  James  

Morgan,  James  A.  . 
Morgan,  Stephen  ... 

Moseley,  John  

Morgan,  John  

Morrison,  William  . 

Mixon,  John  

Morrison,  Robert  ... 
Morrison,  Robert  C. 

Moore,  Isaac  

McGuire,  Isaac  

Morris,  Rachel  


12  14 

1 0 .0  0 

12  0 1 

10  0 0 

15  12 

10  02 

1110 
1113 
10  0 0 

1 3 1 3 

13  12 

2 10 

13  10 

13  12 

10  0 0 

10  0 0 

10  0 0 

19  11 

13  11 

14  2 3 

1111 
12  12 

13  14 

12  13 

1110 
12  10 

0 0 10 


8 0 19 

10  2 3 

4 0 0 4 

10  0 1 

9 0 2 11 

3 0 10-13 

3 0 10  13 

6 0 26  32 

10  0 1 

8 0 0 8 

7 0 42  49 

3 0 3 6 

5 0 0.5 

7 0 0 7 

10  0 1 

10  0 1 

10  0 1 

12  0 4 16 

6 0 0 6 

10  0 7 17 

4 0 4 8 

6 0 10  16 

9 0 5 14 

7 0 7 14 

3 0 19  22 

4 0 5 9 

1 0 6 


7 


384 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


DALLAS  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


McGee,  Richard  - 

McGee,  Benjamin  

Millard,  Samuel  

Moore,  James  

Melton,  Robert  .. 

Miller,  James  

Mitchell,  Aquilla  

Morrow,  John  

Morrow,  David  Senr. 

M orrow,  Adam  

Morrow,  David  Junr.  

Morrow,  Alexander 
Morrow,  Joseph 

Magee,  Joseph  

McGough,  Robert  __ 
Michison,  John 
Marsh,  Robert  __ 

Morrow,  Samuel  .. 

Mills,  William  .. 

Morrison,  William  .. 
Marlin,  Joseph  P.  __ 
Morgan,  Enoch  .. 
Meredith,  David  .. 
Morrison,  James  M.  .. 
Moore,  Thomas  __ 

Moore,  John  ._ 

Moore,  James  ... 

Moseley,  Lewis  ~ 

Molette,  William  P.  __ 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5) 

12  10  4 

12  12  6 
1 0 0 0 1 

110  13 

1 6 1 3 11 

12  12  6 

2 12  16 

1114  7 

112  15 

1 0 0 0 1 

1110  3 

1110  3 

10  10  2 

10  12  4 

11114 
10  15  7 

1 0 0 0 1 

13  116 

112  2 6 

1110  3 

11114 
10  12  4 

14  12  8 

13  12  7 

2 4 118 

14  117 

13  116 

2 2 10  5 

1 0 0 0 1 


(6) 


0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 


0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 


(7)  (8) 

0 4 

0 6 

0 1 

2 5 

2 13 

0 6 

0 6 

1 8 

0 5 

0 1 

0 3 

1 4 

1 3 

0 4 

4 8 

0 7 

0 1 

1 7 

1 7 

0 3 

0 4 

0 4 

2 10 

2 9 

0 8 

0 7 

1 7 

10  15 

34  35 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


DALLAS  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


McGill,  James  

Meadors,  Ira  ... 

Meadors,  John  

McLeroy,  John  

McLeroy,  William  

McLeroy,  James  

M — ord,  David  

Mathews,  Dinah  

Mattison,  James  

Mitchell,  David  

Minter,  Joannah  

McLeroy,  Greene  

McDaniel,  John  

McLeod,  Roderick  

McGuire,  Isaac  

Myles,  John  B.  

McMeans,  Izaac  S.  

Miller,  John  H.  __ 

McAdams,  John  

Moreland,  Elisha  

Mitchell,  Stith  

Mays,  Robert  

Mcjenesey  & Travese  

Morecraft,  William  

Moffett,  Henry  

Mott,  Benjamin  

Mitchell,  U.  G.  ... 

Myers,  William  H.  .. 
Matthews,  Charles  


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5) 

12  13  7 
2 112  6 
1 0 0 0 1 
12  10  4 
10  10  2 
12  12  6 

12  13  7 
2 114 

1 4 1 4 10 
12  12  6 
1 0 2 0 3 
1110  3 

13  10  5 
3 2 3 7 15 
12  10  4 
1110  3 
1 2 1 3 7 
12  115 
1 0 0 0 1 
10  10  2 
1 0 0 0 1 
1116  9 
1 0 0 0 1 
1 0 0 0 1 
1 0 0 0 1 
10  10  2 
1 5 3 3 12 
1 0 0 0 1 
0 0 0 0 0 


(6) 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 


385 


(7)  (8) 

0 7 

0 6 

0 1 

0 4 

0 2 

0 6 

8 -15 

2 6 

1 11 

0 6 

20  23 

1 4 

0 5 

12  27 

5 9 

0 3 

3 10 

10  15 

0 1 

6 8 

0 1 

3 12 

0 1 

0 1 

0 I 

4 6 

62  74 

0 1 

25 


25 


386 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


DALLAS  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5) 


Marshall,  Hugh  „ 

Metcalf,  Nahum  

McArthur,  Duncan  

McDaniel,  James  

McKenzie,  Kematham 

McKenzie,  Samuel  

Miller,  Stephen  .. 
Moss,  Henry  .. 

McLendon,  Lewis  

Miller,  Joseph  

Moses,  Samuel  

Martin,  Shadrach  

Miller,  Elijah  

McCullin,  Council  

McLellen,  M.  W.  .. 

Maxwell,  John  

Moore,  Aaron,  Senr.  . 

Morrow,  William  

McCartha,  Jacob  .. 
Meredith,  Jesse  ~ 
Moore,  Aaron  Junr.  __ 
N 

Nunnelly,  Ousamon  F 
Nunnelly,  Willie  - 
Nunnelly,  Howell 

Norris,  Thomas  

Norris,  William  L.  ~ 
Norwood,  Elias  W.  ... 
Nixon,  William  


1 0 0 0 1 

1 0 0 0 1 

1 0 0 0 1 

10  13  5 

13  10  5 

1 0 0 0 1 

1 0 0 0 1 

14  12  8 

1 2 1 3 7 

1 0 0 0 1 

12  115 

1513  10 

1 0 0 0 1 

12  12  6 
12  115 

10  12  4 

10  10  2 
1 3 1 2 7 

16  12  10 
12  12  6 
12  1 4 

110  13 

12  12  6 
110  13 

14  128 

1116  9 

24  1 3 10 

r o o i 


(6) 


0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 


0 

0 


0 

0 

0 

0 


(7)  (8) 

0 1 

0 1 

0 1 

17  22 

0 5 

0 1 

0 1 

6 14 

0 7 

0 1 

0 5 

0 10 

0 1 

2 8 

2 7 

4 8 

4 6 

0 7 

0 10 

0 6 

1 5 

3 6 

7 13 

2 5 

0 8 

0 9 

0 10 

0 1 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


387 


DALLAS  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Nixon,  John  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

New,  Samuel  13116028 

Nixon,  Edward  10  0 01001 

Nunn,  James  13105038 

Naramore,  Alfred  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Norris,  John  W.  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Newbery,  Jacob  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 -1 

Norris,  Samuel  G.  — 12104015 

Nobles,  Sanders  L.  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Norris,  John  B 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 2 

O 

Olds,  James  12104105 

Osborn,  Christopher  1 3 1 3 8 0 0 8 

Olds,  William  W.  1 5 1 1 8 18  0 26 

Oglesby,  23005005 

Oneal  1 0 0 0 1 3 0 4 

P 

Pierce,  Abraham  10135207 

Pierce,  Levi  ...1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Pierce,  Thomas  12216006 

Pyle,  Thomas  12115005 

Pyle,  Samuel  12126006 

Parnelle,  Elijah  — 11  103003 

Parnelle,  Daniel  1512901  10 

Parnelle,  Jesse  1 5 1 3 10  0 0 11 

Pelhah,  Elisha  l 3 1 1 6 0 2 8 

Pickens,  Joseph  1 0 0 0 1 0 32  33 

Pickens,  Andrew  1 0 0 0 0 0 0 30  30 

Parker,  James  1 2 2 1 6 0 0 6 


388 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


DALLAS  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 


Peters,  William  131  16006 

Page,  William  20204004 

Page,  Philip  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Pepper,  Joseph  12227007 

Porter,  Alexander  11  114037 

Prestige,  Benjamin  10012002 

Prestidge,  Larkin  1 5 1 411  0 Oil 

Pinson,  Joab  1 1 1 1 4 0 17  21 

Perry,  Horatio  G.  10001001 

Persons,  Samuel  1 3 1 3 8 0 311 

Pelham,  William  1 0 2 0 3 0 811 

Prewett,  Lemuel  1314  9 009 

Patric,  John  B.  11125005 

Pye,  William  1 0 0 0 1 0 2 3 

Pharis,  Richard  1000100  1 

Pitts,  George  W.  1 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 

sPope,  Alexander  1 3 1 2 7 0 21  28 

Pelham,  Samuel  10001001 

Posey,  Morgan  10001001 

Peters  & Renaldi  21003003 

— geon,  Henry  10001001 

Perry,  John  C.  10001  0 01 

Peck,  Leonard  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Porter,  James  B.  10001001 

Parsons,  Brooks  H.  30003  0 03 

Pope,  William  C.  11103014 

Pickens,  Samuel  10001001 

Ponsonby,  George  1 3 1 4908  17 

Parris,  William  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


389 


DALLAS  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5) 


Philips,  George  

Payne,  Philip  

Parker,  Elisha  

Parker,  Peter  

R 


10  13  5 
1114  7 
1 0 0 0 1 
14  12  8 


Ramsey,  Isham  

Reives,  Frederick  H. 
Ridgeway,  Thomas 

Robertson,  John  

Roberson,  John 
Robertson,  George 

Roark,  Jesse  

Ross,  Jesse 

Ross,  Benjamin  

Reives,  Jeremiah  

Reives,  David  

Reynolds,  James  

Ross,  James  

Ragsdale,  William  H. 

Ray,  Leonard  P.  

Russel,  James  

Russel,  David  

Russel,  Robert  

Russel,  Robert  E. 
Reeves,  Samuel  H.  ... 

Ross,  William  

Ross,  Hugh  

Rigsby,  Enoch  

Robertson,  Aaron 


1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

0 

2 

2 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

0 

1 


1 

1 

3 11  6 

114  7 

3 1 5 

1 

3 13  8 

4 1 4 10 

10  0 2 

0 0 0 1 

3 10  5 

114  7 

3 0 2 5 

0 114 

110  4 

2 15  9 

4 2 2 10 

2 3 4 10 

0 0 0 1 

110  3 

3 1 5 10 

0 0 0 1 

10  12 
0 0 0 1 


(6) 

0 

0 

0 

0 


0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 


(7)  (8) 

45  50 

0 7 

4 5 

1 9 

1 

. 1 

2 8 

2 9 
5 
1 

2 10 

1 11 

0 2 

0 1 

0 5 

0 7 

0 5 

11  15 

0 4 

3 12 

4 14 

0 10 

0 1 

0 3 

0 10 

0 1 

0 2 

0 


1 


390 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


DALLAS  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6) 


Rutherford,  Thomas  B.  ... . 0 

Rutheford,  William  1 

Rutledge,  John  .... 1 

Rigsby,  Thomas  3 

Richie,  John  1 

Reid,  Josiah  — 1 

Reynolds,  James  1 

Reynolds,  Benjamin  1 

Reid,  John  2 

Radcliffe,  John  1 

Ranson,  Robert  1 

Ray,  John  W.  1 

Reives,  George  M & Co.  ..  1 

Rose,  John  2 

Rose,  Charles  1 

Robertson,  Allen  1 

S 

Scott,  William  1 

Satawhite,  John  1 

Sheffield,  Frederick  ...  1 

Shores,  Jacob  1 

Smith,  Robert  1 

Spratt,  Robert  1 

Swift,  John  1 

Smith,  Baxter  1 

Shearer,  Gilbert  1 

Sanders,  Benjamin  L.  1 

Smith,  Roddy  1 

Scott,  Joseph  1 


0 0 0 0 0 

0 113  0 

0 0 0 1 0 

2 117  0 

0 113  0 

0 0 0 1 0 

4 1 7 13  0 

0 113  0 

114  8 0 

114  7 1 

0 0 0 1 0 

2 10  4 0 

2 0 0 3 0 

0 0 0 2 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

4 13  9 0 

0 10  2 0 

0 12  4 0 

3 14  9 0 

1114  0 

0 0 0 1 0 

2 1 3 7 0 

1 0 0 2 0 

112  5 0 

0 0 3 4 0 

4 117  1 

0 0 0 1 1 


(7)  (8) 


15  15 

9 12 

0 1 
0 7 

0 3 

0 1 

18  31 

0 3 

5 13 

2 10 

0 1 

1 5 

0 3 

0 2 

6 7 

0 1 

0 9 

7 9 

1 5 

0 9 

4 8 

0 1 

27  34 

28  30 

20  25 

13  17 

5 13 

0 1 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


391 


DALLAS  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5) 


Sharp,  William  ...  14  12  8 

Swanson,,  Nathan  1110  3 

Semmes,  Reddick  14  13  9 

Short,  John  2 2 3 4 11 

Sanson,  William  12  12  6 

Short,  Michael  1 0 0 0 1 

Smith,  Andrew  1 6 2 4 13 

Sanson,  Peter  1 0 0 0 1 

Scott,  John  13  13  8 

Shaw,  Alexander  10  13  5 

Sorelle,  John  1 6 2 3 10 

Smith,  John  10  13  7 

Simms,  Littlepage  0 3 0 0 3 

Stone,  Abner  10  12  4 

Stubblefield,  John  1 0 0 0 1 

Summers,  John  1 0 0 0 1 

Stobo,  William  1 0 0 0 1 

Shelton,  Jonathan  1 0 0 0 1 

Sutton,  William  1 0 0 0 1 

Shurley,  George  1 0 0 0 1 

Sargeant,  Nathan  1 0 0 0 1 

Sullivan,  Duncan  1 — 1 0 0 0 1 

Saturwhite,  Charles  1 0 0 0 1 

Saffold,  Rewben  14  12  8 

Smith,  John  B.  10  10  2 

Steinburg,  John  V.  1 0 0 0 1 

Stokes,  Jackson  1 0 0 0 1 

Saffold,  James  1 3 2 3 9 

Sutcliffe,  Silvester  .4. 1 10  2 4 


(6)  (7) 

0 3 

0 2 

0 6 

0 0 

0 0 

0 0 

0 2 

0 0 

0 147 

0 0 

0 12 

0 0 

0 2 

0 0 

0 4 

0 0 

0 0 

0 0 

0 0 

0 4 

0 0 

0 3 

0 12 

0 17 

0 0 

0 0 

0 0 

0 9 

0 3 


(8) 

11 

5 

15 

II 

6 
1 

15 

1 

155 

5 

22 

7 

5 

4 

5 
1 
1 
1 
1 
5 

4 

13 

25 

2 

1 

1 

18 

■-  7 


392 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


DALLAS  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6) 


T — > Josiah  1 

Thomas,  Atha 1 

Todd,  James  1 

Todd,  Richard  1 

Thomas,  John  1 

Tarver,  Benjamin  1 

Traylor,  Betsey  W.  

Taggart,  John  1 

Thrash,  John  1 

Thrash,  George  1 

Thrash,  Joseph  1 

Tatum,  Luke  1 

Thomson,  Alfred  1 

Taylor,  Benjamin  W.  1 

Thomson,  Richard  1 

Tobin,  John  R.  3 

Travers,  Robert  1 

Taylor,  John  Esq.  1 

Turner,  Jesse  1 

Thorington,  John  H.  1 

Tharp,  Hardy  1 

Taylor,  Col.  John  1 

Tool,  David  1 

Tool,  Ely  . 1 

Tippett,  Benjamin  1 

Taylor,  William  1 

Toottle,  Lewis  1 

U 

Underwood,  William  ...  1 


2 14  8 0 

3 116  0 

1 0 0 2 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

114  7 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

4 2 3 9 0 

115  8 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

3 116  0 

0 0 0 1 0 

3 2 5 11  0 

0 13  5 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

0 113  0 

0 0 0 3 0 

1 2 2 6 0 

0 0 12  0 

0 0 0 1 0 

3 13  5 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

0 113  0 

0 10  2 0 

4 12  8 0 

0 10  3 0 

0 113  0 

0 0 10  4 

2 13  7 0 


(7) 

0 

0 

0 

0 

3 

21 

6 

2 

0 

5 

5 
0 
0 
1 
0 
0 

4 
0 
0 
0 
0 

62 

4 

6 
1 
4 
0 

0 


(8) 

8 

6 

2 

1 

10 

22 

15 

10 

1 

14 

1 

11 

5 

2 

3 

3 

10 

2 

i 

5 
1 

65 

6 

14 

4 
7 
1 

7 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


393 


DALLAS  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7) 


Underwood,  Nimrod  1 

V 

Vanderslice,  Benjamin  — — 1 

Vanderslice,  Scott  1 

Vanderslice,  John  1 

Vann,  Joseph  1 

Voltz  & Gray  ... 1 

Vandyke,  Alexander  1 

Vanperdellis,  B.  F.  1 

Walters,  W William  1 

Wood.  Joseph  1 

Wood,  Alfred  1 

Ware,  Samuel  1 

Williams,  Theophilus  1 

Williams,  Henry  1 

Walker,  John  S 1 

Walker,  Joseph  1 

Webster,  Mathew  1 

Washington,  Thomas  1 

Ward,  Joshua  1 

Woods,  Bailey  M.  1 

Wilson,  William  1 

Wilson,  John  M.  K.  1 

Walters,  John  1 

Walters,  Samuel  1 

Walters,  Joseph  1 

Woodley,  Jonathan  1 

Wallace,  Samuel  W.  1 

West,  Simon  H.  1 


0 0 0 1 0 0 

5 1 4 11  0 0 

0 0 0 1 0 0 

0 0 0 1 0 0 

3 1 4 9 0 1 

1 0 0 2 0 0 

0 0 0 1 0 0 

0 0 0 1 0 0 

0 1 2 4 0 0 

3 1 5 10  0 3 

0 0 0 1 0 9 

0 0 0 1 0 0 

0 0 2 3 0 7 

0 0 1 2 0 0 

0 0 0 1 0 0 

3 1 3 8 0 5 

1 1 0 3 0 0 

0 0 0 1 0 0 

0 0 0 1 0 0 

0 0 0 1 0 13 

1114  0 3 

1 1 2 5 0 2 

0 113  0 5 

1 2 2 6 0 0 

1114  0 0 

0 0 0 1 0 0 

0 113  0 2 

0 0 0 1 0 0 


(8) 

1 

11 

1 

1 

10 
- 2 
1 
1 
4 
13 
10 
1 

10 

2 

1 

13 

3 

1 

1 

14 
7 

7 

8 
6 

4 
1 

5 
1 


394 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


DALLAS  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 


Waugh,  Samuel  

Waugh,  William  

Woods,  Thomas 
Woods,  William  B.  ... 

Woods,  Joseph  

Woods,  Cyrus  

Woods,  Edward  — , 

Woods,  Andrew  

Walker,  Joseph  

Walker,  John  G.  .. 

Walker,  John  

Wiliford,  Wiley  .. 
Wilson,  Matthew  .....— 

Wilson,  Fields  

Walker,  Ebenezer  ... _ 
Waldrum,  William  R. 
Walsh,  Thomas  .. 
Wilson,  Russel  __ 

Wilson,  Thomas  

Walker,  Cornelius  

Williams,  George  

Works,  John  

Works,  Oswel 

Waller,  Elizabeth  

Waller,  William  

Waller,  James  

Waller,  Bridget  

Weaver,  Philip  J.  

Wells,  John  H.  


2 0 2 0 

10  0 0 

10  12 

13  12 

13  10 

10  14 

10  0 0 

10  10 

16  13 

1110 
12  12 

1111 
10  0 0 

10  0 0 

10  0 0 

10  0 0 

10  10 

1 0 0 0 

10  0 0 

10  15 

10  0 0 

2 0 0 0 

1115 
0 0 11 

12  12 

10  11 

0 4 12 

10  0 0 

12  14 


4 0 4 8 

10  2 3 

4 0 7 11 

7 0 0 7 

5 0 16 

6 0 0 6 

10  0 1 

2 0 0 2 

11  0 6 17 

3 0 0 3 

6 0 2 8 

4 0 0 4 

10  0 1 

10  12 

10  01 

10  0 1 

2 0 0 2 

10  0 1 

10  0 1 

7 0 0 7 

10  0 1 

2 0 0 2 

8 0 0 8 

2 0 0 2 

6 0 0 6 

3 0 0 3 

7 0 0 7 

10  0 1 

5 0 0 8 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


395 


DALLAS  COUNTY  CENSUS 

1820 

(1) 

(2) 

(3) 

(4) 

(5) 

(6) 

(7) 

(8) 

Williams,  William  

3 

3 

1 

4 

11 

0 

0 

11 

Whatley,  Wilsotji  M. 

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

0 

1 

5 

Whatley,  William  

1 

1 

0 

1 

3 

0 

3 

Williamson,  J.  H.  

1 

2 

1 

1 

5 

0 

20 

25 

Wingate,  Edward  

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

0 

0 

4 

West,  Uriah  

1 

2 

1 

2 

6 

0 

0 

6 

Woodall,  Michael  

1 

3 

1 

0 

5 

0 

4 

‘9 

Works,  Jesse  

1 

3 

0 

0 

1 

0 

0 

1 

Ware,  James  

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

0 

0 

4 

Whitehurst,  Richard  

1 

0 

0 

0 

1 

0 

0 

1 

Wallace,  John  

1 

0 

1 

0 

2 

0 

0 

2 

Williams,  Hannah  

0 

3 

2 

0 

5 

0 

0 

5 

Wardlow,  James  

1 

1 

0 

0 

2 

0 

9 

11 

Wren,  William  

2 

2 

2 

2 

8 

0 

13 

21 

White,  David  

1 

0 

1 

0 

2 

0 

0 

2 

Wiley,  Thomas  M.  

1 

0 

0 

0 

1 

0 

0 

1 

Y 

Yost,  Andrew  

2 

3 

1 

0 

6 

0 

0 

6 

Youngblood,  Jacob  

1 

3 

1 

3 

8 

0 

8 

16 

Youngblood,  William  — 

1 

0 

0 

0 

1 

0 

0 

1 

Youngblood,  Anda  . 

2 

2 

2 

3 

9 

0 

0 

9 

754 

967 

503 

897  3,121 

5 2,520  5,646 

Hence  the  enumeration  of  the  County  of  Dallas  for  the  year 
1820,  gives  a total  of  5646  Souls,  of  whom  2525  are  blacks,  5 of 
whom  are  free.  And  3121  are  whites  of  the  males  of  whom,  754 
are  21,  & 967  are  not,  and  of  the  females  503  are  21  & 897  are  not. 


Saul  Davis  A.  D.  C. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


395  A 


ALABAMA  1840 


Adapted  from  Dorman’s  Party  Politics  in  Alabama  from  1850  Through  1860. 


396 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


FRANKLIN  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

Names  of  the  heads  of  families. 

(1)  — White  males  over  twenty  one  years. 

(2)  — White  males  under  twenty  one  years. 

(3)  — White  females  over  twenty  one  years. 

(4)  — White  females  under  twenty  one  years. 

(5)  — Total  of  white  population. 

(6)  — Total  of  free  people  of  colour. 

(7)  — Total  of  slaves. 

(8)  — Total  of  inhabitants. 


Phillip  C Davis  

Henry  S.  Simington  

Daniel  McKinley  

Anderson  Arnold  - 

Henry  Nowland  

John  Nowlan  

James  Smith  

Jessie  Holland  

James  Corbet  

John  P Brown  

George  Russell  

Wm  Hooker  

Richard  Burgess  

Clemont  Reed  

John  Wilie  ... 

Wm  Russell  

James  McMillen  


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5) 

12  12  6 

2 6 1 1 10 

2 2 10  3 

2 2 13  8 

10  10  2 

15  10  7 

1 2 1 3 7 

1010/2 
1 0 0 0 1 

12  12  6 

1 1 0 0 2 

1 4 2 4 11 

14  117 

1 3 1 2 7 

1113  6 

10  10  2 

15  118 


(6) 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 


(7) 

2 

8 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

3 

4 
0 
1 
0 
1 

17 

0 


(8) 

8 

18 

3 

8 

2 

7 

7 
2 
1 
9 

8 
11 

8 

7 

7 

19 

8 


FALL  ISSUE.  1944 


397 


FRANKLIN  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7) 


Arthur  McWilliams 

Hew  McWillaims  

Noble  S.  Stone  

Abrham  Robertson  

John  Arnold  

Jacob  W.  Brooks  

Samuel  B.  Hooker  

Jesse  Yocom  

Thomas  Mullins  _ 

Wm.  Willie  ... 

William  Little  

Aron  Tucker  

Benjiman  Burgess  

Wm.  Riley 

Janies  Hurlley  - 

Barten  Scrogens  

Hance  McWhorter  

John  Raygor  

Jacob  Humble  

William  F.  Overall  ... 

Thomas  S.  Carson  

Rebaca  Carson  . 

John  Simons  

Abraham  Simons  

Wm.  Corbet  

Daniel  Moses  

Charles  Mattock  

Robert  Kennady  

Joel  Deboy se 


1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

0 

0 

1 

2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
0 
1 
2 
0 
I 
1 
1 
a 


0 o 

1 i 

1 i 

2 1 

1 1 

2 1 

2 1 

2 1 

3 1 

1 0 

3 1 

2 1 

0 1 

6 1 

1 1 

3 1 

3 1 

1 1 

2 1 

2 1 

1 1 

3 1 

4 1 

0 0 

1 1 

3 1 

0 1 

0 0 

1 0 


0 1 

1 4 

2 5 

7 11 

1 4 

4 8 

2 6 

2 6 

0 5 

2 3 

2 6 

2 6 

1 4 

0 8 

1 4 

0 5 

3 8 

2 6 

2 6 

1 5 

0 3 

1 5 

2 8 

2 4 

1 3 

1 6 

3 5 

0 1 

1 2 


0 0 

0 0 

0 0 

0 9 

0 0 

0 0 

0 0 

0 0 

0 0 

0 0 

0 0 

0 0 

0 1 

0 0 

0 0 

0 0 

0 8 

0 1 

0 5 

0 4 

0 0 

0 0 

0 0 

0 0 

0 0 

0 0 

0 0 

0 0 

0 0 


(8) 

1 

4 

5 

20 

4 
8 

6 
6 

5 

3 

6 
6 
5 
8 

4 

5 

16 

7 

11 

9 

3 
5 

8 

4 


6 

5 

1 

2 


398  ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 

FRANKLIN  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Nathan  Lisby  ...  10001001 

Wm.  Akin  0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Harvey  Skinner  13116017 

Samuel  Brooton  11  0 1 3 0 2 5 

Wm,  Mullins  1 2 1 2 6 0 511 

Andrew  Evins  10001001 

Edward  Simpson  0 1 0 0 1 0 0.1 

Hew  McWilliams  1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 

Jesse  Hulsey  21  1 4 8 0 0 8 

James  Clemons  1 1035005 

Wm  Simons  1 2115005 

Jaret  Brannon  14128008 

William  Debuoise  10168008 

Lemuel  Smith  10124004 

James  Smith  1 1 1 4 7 0 0 

Robert  Thompson  10001001 

Samuel  Smith  10001001 

Francis  Buriss  1 2 1 3 7 0 12  19 

Samuel  Gattis  23218019 

John  Mitchel  1 0023003 

James  Carpenter  11125016 

Zekil  Inmon  15118008 

Elizaha  Bates  12216006 

John  May  1 2 1 3 7 0 0 

John  L.  Henderson  12137  0 07 

Mattias  Baust  10001001 

C.  M.  McMillan  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

James  Hickerson  10001001 

Wm.  H.  Duke  1 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


399 


FRANKLIN  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6) 


John  Townson  1 

John  Luke  — 2 

Alex  Orr  4 

Augustine  Thompson  1 

John  Evans  1 

Lewis  Thompson  1 

Luke  Muncey  2 

Wm  Handlin  3 

Jos  Wafford  1 

Valantine  Gates  1 

Richard  Gullet  1 

Sherod  Anderson  1 

Silas  Fuquay  2 

Andrew  Night  1 

Wm  Martin  1 

John  C.  Buriss  .... 3 

Wm,  Self  1 

Stephen.  H.  Doxey  1 

John  Silmon  1 

Niese  Spensor  .... 1 

Adam  Relin  1 

Moses  Cowen  1 

Jno  Armstrong  & Bryan  ..  2 

Joseph  Haslep  1 

T.  L.  Duncan  1 

Wm.  Duncan  .... 1 

Humphery  Thompkin  2 

John  Aitkin  2 

Benjiman  Chapman  1 


0 113  0 

1 0 0 3 0 

0 0 0 4 0 

0 1 1 3 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

0 113  0 

0 0 0 2 0 

1 0 0 4 0 

3.1  3 8 0 

2 1 3 7 0 

0 12  5 0 

2 0 15  0 

12  16  0 

7 0 2 10  0 

2 115  0 

6 4 19  32  0 

0 10  2 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

5 12  9 0 

0 13  5 0 

2 12  6 0 

2 115  0 

0 0 0 2 0 

3 13  8 0 

3 116  0 

110  3 0 

2 13  8 0 

0 10  3 0 

0 13  5 0 


(7)  (8) 

0 3 

0 3 

0 4 

0 3 

0 1 

0 3 

0 2 

0 4 

0 8 

0 7 

0 5 

0 5 

0 7 

1 11 

0 5 

20  52 

1 3 

0 1 

0 9 

0 5 

0 6 

12  17 

10  12 

44  52 

0 6 

0 3 

6 14 

0 3 

0 5 


400 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


FRANKLIN  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6) 


Wilson  McKissic  1 

David  Shanon  3 

John  Williams  1 

Mastin  Graham  1 

James  Frazor  1 

C.  M.  Bradner  1 

M.  A.  Temple  1 

Alex  Morris  1 

Goldman  Kimbro  1 

Marmaduke  Kimbro  1 

Claburn  Williams  1 

John  Morgan  1 

George  Morgan  1 

James  Allen  2 

Linsey  Allen  — 1 

Benjamin  Wallis  1 

Achall  Dancer  : 1 

Peter  Flanigin  1 

Garett  Ford  1 

Wm,  Martin  1 

Elizabeth  Moore  0 

Temple  Sargent  1 

Samuel  Martin  1 

Bennet  A.  Higians  0 

Eli  Silman  ? 1 

Eli  Sugg  1 

Henderson  Bates  1 

Wm.  S.  McCree  1 

Rachel  Legran  0 


0 0 0 1 0 

113  8 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

2 0 0 3 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

10  13  0 

5 12  9 0 

110  3 0 

4 1 2 8 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

0 12  4 0 

3 117  0 

0 0 12  0 

0 0 0 1 0 

0 12  4 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

4 117  0 

10  13  0 

3 1 3 7 0 

3 116  0 

0 13  5 0 

2 0 0 2 0 

0 113  0 

2 10  4 0 

0 113  0 

0 0 0 3 0 

2 13  6 0 


(7) 

0 

0 

0 

7 

0 

0 

0 

2 

0 

0 

4 

0 

2 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

7 

3 

0 

1 

1 

6 

0 

0 

0 


(8) 

1 

8 

1 

10 

1 

1 

• 1 

5 
9 

3 

12 

1 

6 
7 
2 
1 

4 
1 
7 
3 

14 

9 

5 

3 

4 
10 

3 

3 


6 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


401 


FRANKLIN  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Wm.  Grason  . 11002002 

Isoom  Bowman  14  117  0 0 

Wm.  Drake  : 1 1 1 2 5 0 6 11 

Thomas  Benson  10124004 

Earsmas  Tollerson  1 1002002 

Wm.  Townson  ..... 1 1002046 

Jacob  Keykendale  10012013 

Joshua  Brown  14128008 

Josiah  Alexander  11  147007 

Alex  McDonald  1 0 0 2 3 0 1 4 

Robert  McMiken  1 1 1 0 3 0 1 4 

David  McMiken  1 1226006 

Richard  Allen  0 3 1 0 4 0 0 4 

Barnes  Metcalfe  10012024 

Jesse  Grimes  1 4 1 5 11  0 0 11 

Thomas  Hooker  1 5 1 3 10  0 0 10 

Alien  Bullock  1 2 1 0 4 0 0 4 

Samuel  Watts  1 1 1 2 5 0 6 11 

Sam'l  Bell  2 3 1 1 7 0 0 7 

Hutchens  Burten  13116039 

Smith  Hogan  1 0 1 3 5 0 30  35 

David  Enloe  2 4 2 4 12  0 0 12 

Samuel.  B.  Harris  1 5 1 5 12  0 3 15 

Gershon  Farchild  1 1024004 

John  Hogan  1 3 3 0 7 0 3 7 

Pulsky  Dualy  1 0 0 0 1 0 3 4 

Thos.  T.  Friston  1 2 0 1 4 0 14  18 

James  Hagan  1 0 0 0 1 0 14  15 


402 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


FRANKLIN  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6) 


Ephriam  Fuqua  - 1 

Francis  Golston  — 2 

Joseph  Timerson  1 

Marget  Timerson  0 

James  Lawler  1 

John  Lawler  1 

Ann  Dowdle  0 

Thomas  Moose  1 

Benjiman  Hamby  1 

Willie  Skiner  1 

Theophilus  Skinner  1 

Jose  Olive  1 

Peter  Cobbe  1 

Daniel  Malone  1 

Wm.  Stewert  1 

Wm.  Kennady  2 

Wm.  Kennady  Jr.  1 

Davie  Kennady  1 

George  Hooker  1 

Wm.  N.  Parham  1 

Robert  Brunson  1 

Adam.  L.  Stewart  1 

Michal  Dickson  1 

Theop.  A.  W.  Cockburn  1 

M.  D.  Bunch  1 

Walter  Cockburn  1 

David  C.  Rone  1 

John  Davis  1 


2 115  0 

3 117  0 
2 10  4 0 
2 114  0 
10  13  0 

2 115  0 

1 2 0 3 0 

2 1 6 10  0 
0 0 12  0 

3 1 5 10  0 

2 15  9 0 
0 113  0 
113  6 0 
0 0 0 1 0 

3 14  9 0 
3 2 0 7 0 
0 12  4 0 
0 10  2 0 

3 12  7 0 
10  13  0 
2 10  4 0 
0 0 0 1 0 
5 12  9 0 
113  6 0 

4 12  8 0 
0 12  4 0 
0 0 0 1 0 
4 117  0 


(7)  (8) 

1 6 

2 9 

0 4 

•5-  9 

1 4 

0 5 

1 ' 4 

4 14 

0 2 

2 12 

4 13 

2 5 

0 6 

0 1 

0 9 

0 7 

0 4 

0 2 

0 7 

12  15 

45  49 

0 1 

12  21 

16  22 

8 16 

0 4 

0 1 

8 15 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


403 


FRANKLIN  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 


Robert  Dickson  1 0 1 0 2 0 13  15 

Arguil  Taylor  4 2 1 411  0 6 17 

Thoe.  M.  Pope  1 0 1 1 3 0 18  21 

Winslow  Johnson  1 1002013 

Tedence  Lane  2 2 1 2 7 0 10  17 

Micajaha  Taver  10001001 

Goodlow.  W.  Malone  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Abraham.  W.  Bell  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Curtis  Hooks.  1 0 2 1 4 0 15  19 

Michael  Bailey  2 1 1 5 9 0 11  20 

Burne  McKernal  10001078 

Nickalas  Perkins.  3 2 0 0 5 0 12  17 

John  Burrow  10  113  0 14 

Bewben  Nawl  1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 

James  T.  Sanford  3 6 2 0 11  0 10  21 

Brackston  Smith  01001001 

Wm.  O.  Pirkins  1 0 0 0 1 0 19  20 

Miichel  Bird  ... 1400505  10 

Edman  R.  Anderson  10001001 

Jonathan  Wilson  .... 12227007 

Jesse.  H.  Warde  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

John  B.  Nooe.  1 2 1 5 9 0 20  29 

Wm.  Bowman  1 2 1 7 11  0 011 

David  Towen  1 2 1 3 7 0 0 7 

Robert  Bowman  1 3 1 1 6 0 0 6 

Richard  Ellis  1 1 2 1 5 0 23  28 

David  Anderson  12115005 

1 2 2 3 8 0 11 


Wm.  Lucus 


19 


404 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


FRANKLIN  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

David  Cook  1 0 0 1 2 0 7 9 

John.  P.  Masterson  1 3 1 5 10  0 0 10 

Abner  Hill  1 2 1 2 6 0 0 6 

Abraham  Allen  1 0 0 1.2  0 911 

William  Hill  1 3 1 1 6 0 0 6 

Ezekil  Bates  1 3 2 1 7 0 0 

Gillington  Chism  1 3 0 1 5 0 0‘5 

Meriddeth  King  1 1 136006 

William  Wallis  2 3 1 1 7 0 0 

Henry  Scott  13116006 

Amas  Koonce  01012002 

David  Wade  1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 

Abraham  Allen  10012002 

Jame  Culberson  .... 10001001 

John  Davis  1 1 1 0 3 0 35  38 

Daniel  Waller  1 2 1 2 6 0 1 7 

Thomas  Hewett  1 2 1 2604  10 

Andrew  Allen  2 5 1 8 16  0 5 21 

Horatio  Belt  131  16006 

James  Thomas  — 1 4 1 6 12  0 8 20 

LemL  G.  Koonce  10001001 

Palis  Neelly  .... 20215027 

Benjiman  Smith  23117029 

Sam’l  Neelly  .... ... 1 3 0 2 6 0 6 12 

David  Arnet  2412901  10 

Archabale  Daniel  12115005 

James  F.  German  _ 10001001 

John  Bedman  10001001 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


405 


FRANKLIN  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Lemal  Koonce.  1 3 1 6 11  0 0 11 

Edley  Ewing  2 1 0 2 5 0 7 12 

T.  V.  Johnson  . i. ..  1 0 1 0 2 0 3 5 

Henry  Lee  ..... ......... 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 

James  Hardcastle  22149009 

Andrew  Blackwod  1 2137007 

Thomas  Tindle  ..... 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

James  Cook  1 2 1 3 7 0 613 

James  Ford  .; ^ 1 0 0 2 3 0 0 3 

Alpherd  Moore  0 3 1 2 6 0 0 6 

John  Hamilton  32128008 

John  Gillihan  1 3 1 0 5 0 3 8 

Bery  Vinson  1 1 1 0 3 0 0 3 

Wm.  Hamilton  1.4  1 1 7 0 0 7 

John  Rayburn  1 6 1 2 10  0 0 10 

Wm.  H.  Cook  1 5 1 3 10  0 8 18 

John.  H.  Evians  .... 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Thomas  Hamilton  11125005 

John  Brown  1 2 1 3 7 0 0 7 

Besse  Hamilton  01012002 

Wm.  Greene  1 1 2 2 6 0 0-6 

Benjamin  Ford  — 1 4 1 2 8 0 0 8 

Wm.  Burgess  _.  1 1 32709  16 

David  Tallerson  12137007 

John  Moore  1 3 1 2 7 0 0 7 

Solloman  Moody  1 7 1 3 12  0 0 12 

Wm.  Moore  .1 22239009 

David  A.  Mills  1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 


406 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


FRANKLIN  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

William  Mills  1 0 1 1 3 0 4 7 

Gaberl  Bourlan  13105005 

George  Martin  11136  0 06 

Charles  Robertson  13116006 

John  Benson  141  17007 

James  Townson  12137007 

Joseph  Gray  12148008 

Wm.  Gray  11136  0 06 

John  Bell  ...  1 2 1 1 5 0 0 5 

Daniel  Fenerson  12159009 

John  Patrick  13138008 

Wm.  Taylor  1 4 1 3 9 0 2 11 

Vincent  Starrrphill  11125005 

Kinchon  Baldwin  11144004 

John  Gray  1 1 1 2 5 0 0 5 

Briges  Arnel  13138008 

James  Malone  10012002 

Pamphrett  Malone  11013003 

Wm.  Hester  1 4 1 4 10  0 0 10 

Parker  Chandler  11103003 

Wyatt  Freeman  1 41  2807  15 

Jesse  Deese  12238008 

Ira  Olive  22239029 

ELIJAHA  Silivan  1 2 2 2 7 0 0 7 

THOmas  SUgg  2 1 1 1 5 0 10  15 

Elisha  Thomas  2 2 2 2 8 0 3 11 

Thomas  Cook  1 4 1 5 11  0 8 19 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


407 


FRANKLIN  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Wm.  Bingham  1 6 1 4 12  0 1 13 

Levi  Moore  12115005 

Samuel.  B.  White  11013058 

Richard  Wagner  11103025 

Robert  Care  23106006 

Sami  Bell  1 0 1 1 3 0 4 7 

Jamie  McNight  12115005 

John.  C.  Smith  1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 

John.  S.  Paterson  10102013 

W.  T.  Paterson  1 2 1 2 6 0 0 6 

Leml.  S.  Paunders  13105005 

At.  A.  Monroe  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Danl  Lambert  12205005 

James  Newbury  12126006 

Samuel  Martin  10001001 

William  Quilen  22206006 

James  Quilen  10023003 

Thomas  Lane  121  15005 

Zack  Winn  1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 

Alex  W.  Mitchel  1 1 1 5 8 0 51  59 

John  Cook  1 3 1 3 8 0 1 9 

Johnny  Lemay  10001001 

Wm.  Mitchel  1 1 1 1 4 0 8 12 

Francis  Bullock  131  3805  13 

Lenuel  Cook  1 1 1 2 5 0 4 9 

Robert  Mangum  1 1103003 

George  Radford  — 1 1 1 3 6 0 0 6 

Andrew  Fitzpatrick  14128008 


108  ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 

FRANKLIN  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Levi  Moore  20125005 

Marvel  Jones  12014004 

David  Lemay  22138019 

Abner  Vinson  12137007 

James  Anderson  3 2 3 2 10  0 1 11 

Sary  Baker  — 01203003 

Solemon  Smith  10506006 

Elnez  Bourlan  15129  0 09 

Elezebeth  Moore  1 1 1 2 5 0 7 12 

Strange  Coltharp  151  18008 

Neham  Ham  1 0 1 0 2 0 0 2 

James  Long  1 1 0 0 2 0 5 7 

James  McDonald  1 1 1 3 6 0 20  26 

Wm.  A.  Moore  2 1 0 1 4 0 6 10 

Thomas  Lemrick  1 1013036 

Guidian  Mills  1 0 1 0 2 0 0 2 

Isah  Medik  1 3 1 2 7 0 1 8 

James  Inman  10102002 

Elizba  Baker  1 1 1 3 6 0 0 6 

Hew  Finley  ... 1 4 0 5 10  0 0 10 

Charles  Waren  10001001 

Jonathan  Thomas  20103003 

Henry  Davis  1 1169009 

L.  Bery  Ellis  1 1 1 0 3 0 13  18 

Amos  Ellis  1 2 1 1 5 0 0 5 

James.  J.  Mayaers  2 1 2 4 9 0 12  21 

Edward  Persol  1 0 0 1 2 0 13  15 

L & A.  Geist 2000209  11 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


409 


FRANKLIN  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

John  Covy  1 0 1 0 2 0 0 2 

John  McKelvy  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Soloman  D.  Spane  13138008 

John  S.  Beleher  1 0 0 2 3 0 0 3 

Marshall  D.  Spane  1 61  0806  14 

Stephen  Weatherford  1 5 1 3 10  0 0 10 

Archabald  Daniel  121  15005 

Solomon.  C.  Belcher  01012002 

George  Bankhead  1 3 1 4908  17 

Perry  Lansford  1 3 1 2 7 0 0 7 

George  Yong  1 3 1 3 8 0 0 8 

Henry  Dunlap  13127007 

Wm,  Montgomery  13  1 49009 

Joseph  East  1 4 1 7 13  0 0 13 

John  Brown  1 1024004 

Jane  Gray  0213  6 00  6 

Richard  Wagner  11114037 

Elias  James  1 3 1 4 9 0 0 9 

Joseph  Reed  11136006 

William  Williams  1 0 2 2 5 0 0 5 

Edward  Colbert  2 4 1 3 10  0 1 11 

Robert  Parks  ... 1 7 2 2 12  0 0 12 

John  Ford  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Wm.  Brooton  1 0 1 0 2 0 0 2 

Lewis  Bledsoe  1 0 1 3 5 0 0 5 

John  Bankhead  10102079 

George  S.  Beel  .... 1 2 1 1 5 0 9 14 

Henry  Silevant  1224  9 009 


410 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


FRANKLIN  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Nun  Coal  .... 1 5 1 1 8 0 15  23 

Henry  Gotcher  1 1 114004 

Pery  Yong  15129009 

Mary  Yong  0 2 1 2 5 0 0 5 

Tarv  Harvey  1 1 0 1 3 0 0 3 

Thomas  McGaha  101  130  0 3 

Stephen  Ellit  1 1 1 0 3 0 0 3 

Sary  McGaha  ... 01348008 

John  Brown  ... 1 0 1 3 5 0 0 5 

Mary  Patterson  03159009 

Mary  Gotcher  03126006 

Benjiman  Price  1 1013003 

Zeachariah  Davis  10001001 

Peter  Marten  10001012 

John  Dougan  1 1 103003 

John  Drake  10113036 

James  Sales  1 3 1490  1 10 

Alen.  C.  Thompson  1 21  1 507  12 

William  Wilson  33017029 

Charles  Neelly  9 2 1 2 14  0 2 16 

Richard  Brown  14106006 

Elett  Brown  10315  0 05 

William  Jackson  1 10130  0 3 

Thursey  Brotton  0 3 1 4 8 0 0 8 

Hew  McDonald  1 1013003 

Daniel  McDonald  1 2 3 2 8 0 0 8 

James  Allen  12137018 

Peter  Haris  1 1 1 3 6 0 6 12 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


411 


FRANKLIN  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 


Thomas  Hetton  11125005 

John.  C.  Grezzard  12137007 

John  T.  Paterson  1 1 1 0 3 0 1 4 

Joshua  Gotcher  2 2 2 4 10  0 0 10 

Mathew  Woods  231280  0 8 

Eli  Silman  1 113  0 14 

Francis  Buriss  1 2 1 3 7 0 12  19 

John  Mitchel  1 0 0 2 3 0 0 3 

James  Carpenter  1 1 1 2 5 0 1 6 

Ezekil  Inman  1 5 1 1 8 0 0 8 

George  Hickerson  1 1 013036 

Lewis  Allen  23128008 

Lewis  Fetherson  1 1 1 4 7 0 14  21 

Ann.  S.  Levirt  1 1 2 1 5 0 10  15 

Isaac  Anderson  20013036 

James.  M.  Kirk  10001023 

George  Dewoodda  ... . 10001001 

Isaac  Tenstey  1 0 0 0 1 0 01 

Philip  Gates  1 1 1 5 8 0 0 8 

Barth.  Gates  1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 

Wm  Gates  1 0 1 1 3 0 0 3 

Wm.  Trigg  ....  ...  12003058 

James  Drew  — 02020404 

James  Doss  101  13003 

Thomas  Drummon  ___. 10001001 

Elisha  Graddy  10034004 

Charles  Brooks  1 1 1 14004 

2 1 1 5 9 0 0 


James  Linsey 


9 


412 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


FRANKLIN  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6) 


Patin  Cox  3 

Henry  Cox  2 

Edward  Stegar  1 

William  Smith  1 

Sapson  Conell  1 

Philip  Gates  1 

John  Gates  1 

Robert  Bates  1 

Thomas  Greenwood  1 

Wm.  S.  Jones  — 2 

Edmon  Cornilius  2 

Isaac  Butler  1 

David  Allen  1 

Hiriam  Allen  .... 1 

Jonathan  Moore  1 

Sollomon  Milchitt  2 

Alex  Wilke  2 

Nancy  Bean  ... 0 

Isaac  Haris  1 

Mathew  Medium  1 

J.  H.  & R.  D.  Hines.  ‘ 6 

Wm.  S.  Gray  1 

Bengiman.  D.  Murell  1 

John  Philips  1 

Isaac  Crandle  1 

John  Mcclow  .... 1 

Warren  W.  Fortner  1 

James  P .McCollom  1 


3 118  0 

2 12  7 0 

2 12  6 0 

0 0 12  0 

3 116  0 

0 113  0 

2 12  6 0 

4 12  8 0 

3 12  7 4 

0 0 2 4 0 

0 10  3 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

2 10  4 0 

0 0 12  0 

4 117  0 

110  4 0 

110  4 0 

7 1 2 10  0 

0 12  4 0 

113  6 0 

5 2 5 18  0 

2 115  0 

0 0 0 1 0 

1 0 0 2 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

0 0 0 1 0 


(7) 

35 

22 

1 

0 

4 

0 

0 

0 

2 

30 

4 

1 

1 

0 

2 

0 

0 

9 

0 

2 

10 

1 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 


(8) 

43 

29 

7 
2 

10 

3 
6 

8 
13 
34 

7 
2 

5 
2 
9 

4 
4 

19 

4 

8 

28 

6 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


413 


FRANKLIN  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Mary  Pane  01113003 

John  Doss  11103014 

Jared  Hotchkiss  4 3 1 3 11  0 0 11 

James  Yong  1 0 135005 

Thomas  Harris  20136006 

David  Malone  1 4 1 4 10  0 0 10 

Litlebury  Mitlock  121  15005 

John  Tharpe  11103003 

James  Debouys  10124004 

Robert  Tharpe  1 1215005 

Wm.  Wallis  1 1 2 1 5 0 0 5 

Wooddy  Thompson  23229009 

Wm.  Sugg  1 3 1 5 10  0 3 13 

Henry  Herlley  1 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 

Edwin  Farnard  161  1 906  15 

Thomas  Herlly  12126006 

William  Skiner  .... 1 2 1 0 4 0 8 12 

Enoch  McNatt  1 2 1 1 5 0 2 7 

Arthur  Dillingham  151  1803  11 

Thomas.  S.  Pope  11136039 

Joseph  Ray  10124004 

Andrew  B.  Ray  1 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 

Elizha  Lewis  121  15005 

James  Willie  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Wm.  P.  Roden  1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 

Alex  Swafford  1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 

Robert  Sibley  1 1 1 5 8 0 1 9 

Samuel  Wyley  1 2 1 2 6 0 0 6 


414 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


FRANKLIN  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

William  Keykendall  1 1136006 

James.  P.  Newbury  10225005 

John.  H.  Bean  1 7 1 5 14  0 0 14 

Jerimiah  Bobo  12328008 

Alex  Newbury  21014004 

Joseph  Marten  1 0 0 2 3 0 0 3 

James  Duke  1 5 1 2 9 0 110 

James  C.  Blackwell  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Jacob  Autery  1 6 1 2 10  1 0 11 

Albert  Taylor  0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Richard  Marten  161  1901  10 

Joel  Coward  10124004 

James  Hardwick  2 1 1 4 8 0 0 8 

Wm.  Arnold  1 5 1 2 9 0 1 10 

Alex  Gotcher  12126006 

John  Weathers  _1. 10102002 

Wm  Welch  2 2.1  0 5 0 0 5 

Jessee  Wafford  1 510703  10 

William  More  22127007 

William  Pyrian  1 21  3 7 0 0 7 

George  Taylor  122160  0 6 

Jacob  G.  Taylor  1 1 125005 

Hughs  Robertson  131  16  0 06 

Jesee  Ward  1 2238008 

Robert  Box  13138008 

John  Bean  .... 1 2 1 2 6 0 0 6 

James  Davis  20  1 2509  14 

William  Russel  10001001 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


415 


FRANKLIN  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1) 

(2) 

(3) 

(4) 

(5) 

(6) 

(7) 

(8) 

James  Wyly  

1 

4 

1 

4 

10 

0 

3 

13 

Andrew  Ray  .... 

1 

2 

1 

2 

6 

0 

0 

6 

Malcolm  McColum  

1 

3 

1 

1 

6 

0 

0 

6 

John  Ray  

1 

3 

1 

3 

8 

0 

0 

8 

Washington  Brown  

1 

0 

0 

1 

2 

0 

0 

2 

James  Robertson  

1 

4 

1 

1 

7 

0 

1 

8 

Charles  N.  Burgess  

1 

0 

1 

1 

3 

0 

1 

4 

Reuben  E.  Burgess 

1 

0 

1 

1 

3 

0 

2 

5 

Wm.  Duke  

1 

0 

1 

0 

2 

0 

6 

8 

Wm.  H.  Duke  

1 

0 

0 

1 

2 

0 

0 

2 

John  Duke  

1 

1 

1 

3 

6 

0 

1 

7 

Willie  Duke  

1 

1 

0 

1 

3 

0 

0 

3 

Charles  Duke  

1 

2 

1 

2 

6 

0 

2 

8 

William  Wright  

1 

0 

0 

2 

3 

0 

0 

3 

John  Townson  

1 

0 

1 

1 

3 

0 

0 

3 

608  889  453  867  2,718 


5 1,436  4,051 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY,  1819  AND  1820. 


416 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


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orwood,  Joseph 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY,  1819  AND  1820. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


417 


Hardy  Robinson 


Andrew  Foster 


418 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Cullen  Mitchell 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY,  1819  AND  1820. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


419 


Thomas  Green 


Archillis  Moore 


420 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


James  Hollinsworth 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY,  1819  AND  1820. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


421 


Stephen  Stallom 


Thomas  Cummings 


422 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Robert  Beatty 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY,  1819  AND  1820. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


423 


Joseph  Morton 


424 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


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John  Shoemaker 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY,  1819  AND  1820. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


425 


Anderson  Johnson  1 4 1 1 7 26  45  10  15  260 


Hezh.  Childress 


426 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Cread  Taylor 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY,  1819  AND  1820. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


427 


Samuel  Harlan 


Reuben  Tillman 


428 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


William  Simms 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY,  1819  AND  1820. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


429 


Ann  Simmons 


Geraldine  Batts  11136061  2 Yz  300 


430 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Michael  Mahan 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY,  1819  AND  1820. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


431 


Rickets  Copeland 


Jonathan  Blair 


432 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Wm.  Whittaker 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY,  1819  AND  1820. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


433 


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John  R.  Murphy 


434 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


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David 

Clayton  Seal 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY.  1819  AND  1820. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


435 


Arthur  T.  Hopkins 
James  McClung 


Elisha  Lambert 


436 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


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James  B/  Marshall 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY,  1819  AND  1820. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


437 


Thos.  Obanion 


Abner  Roberson 


438 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Millicans,  Heirs 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY,  1819  AND  1820. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


439 


Adam  Ranier 


Samuel  C.  Purnell 


440 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


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George  Able 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY,  1819  AND  1820. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


441 


Ebenezer  Frazier 


Joseph  W.  Ellis 


442 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Issac  McCuen 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY,  1819  AND  1820. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


443 


Henry  Langford 


Shaderick  Sowell 


444 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


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George  Wells 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTV,  1819  AND  1820. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


445 


Joshua  Hancock 


Reddick  Thomas 


446 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


John  Waterson 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY,  1819  AND  1820. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


447 


Hezekeah  Robertson 


Birnard  McDaniel 


448 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


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James  Matthews 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY,  1819  AND  1820. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


449 


Wm.  Martindale 


Brazel  Farrow 


450 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Anderson  Meddows 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY,  1819  AND  1820, 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


451 


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Francis  Nixon 


Thomas  Leonard 


452 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


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Wm.  Stinnett 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY,  1819  AND  1820. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


453 


Wm.  T.  Henderson 


Benjamin  Neighbours 


454 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


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Nathaniel  Norwood 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY,  1819  AND  1820. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


455 


Theophilus  Thomas 


James  Cunningham 


456 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


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Wilson  McKinney  Sr. 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY,  1819  AND  1820. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


457 


Bennett  E .Henderson 


James  McNuse 


458 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


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Moses  Kendall 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY,  1819  AND  1820. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


459 


Zachariah  Jacobs 


Rowland  Gatewood 


460 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


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Hiram  Sanders 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY,  1819  AND  1820. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


461 


Samuel  Garner 


Archibald  Baird 


462 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


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John  Wofford 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY,  1819  AND  1820. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


463 


o o _ o o o 


Jonathan  Greenhorn 


Thos.  Carnahan 


464 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Thomas  Parker 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY,  1819  AND  1820. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


465 


Jacob  Powell 


Samuel  McKinney 


466 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Wm.  B.  Bryant  .. 
Zachariah  Bryant 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY,  1819  AND  1820. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


467 


Daniel  Martindale 


Lovell  Coffman 


468 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Robert  Stinson 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY,  1819  AND  1820. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


469 


James  Weams 


William  Norton 


470 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Thomas  Matthews 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY,  1819  AND  1820 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


471 


Matthew  Gray 


David  Selmon 


472 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


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Peter  Huston 


A LIST  OF  THE  CENSUS  AND  STATISTICS  OF  LIMESTONE  COUNTY,  1819  AND  1820. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


473 


Zachariah  Jacobs  

Archibald  Templeton 


Henry  G.  Fallows 


474 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


474 A 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


ALABAMA  IN  1850  and  1860 


* Benton  County’s  Name  changed  to  Calhoun.  Jan.  29th,  1858. 

* Hancock  County’s  Name  changed  to  Winston,  January  22,  1858. 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


475 


CENSUS  OF  ST.  CLAIR  COUNTY,  1820 

Names  of  the  heads  of  families. 

(1)  — White  males  over  twenty  one  years. 

(2)  — White  males  under  twenty  one  years. 

(3)  — White  females  over  twenty  one  years. 

(4)  — WThite  females  under  twenty  one  years. 

(5)  — Total  of  white  population. 

(6)  — Total  of  free  people  of  colour. 

(7)  — Total  of  slaves. 

(8)  — Total  of  inhabitants. 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6) 


Samuel  Massey  1 

Wm.  Hobbs  1 

C.  C.  Clayton  1 

Warrin  Truss  2 

Margaret  Anderson  1 

John  Edwards  1 

Ruth  Tune  0 

George  Shotwell  1 

Tron  Fuller  1 

Alexander  Beard  1 

J.  Richey  1 

Wm.  Dulaney  1 

D.  Townley  1 

R.  Keyton  1 

John  Dulaney  1 

Jesse  Fuller  1 

Thos.  King  1 

Thos.  King  1 

James  Person  1 

H.  Bradford  2 

J.  Turnlow  2 

A.  McMinn  2 


4 13  9 0 

3 10  5 0 

8 1 1 11  0 

7 1 1 11  0 

2 1 3 7 0 

0 0 2 3 0 

3 2 16  0 

110  3 0 

4 13  9 0 

3 0 4 8 0 

5 1 3 10  0 

6 0 3 10  0 

3 116  0 

112  5 0 

112  5 0 

0 113  0 

2 12  6 0 

0 2 14  0 

0 0 2 3 0 

2 13  8 0 

0 114  0 

6 1 2 11  0 


(7) 

1 

0 

0 

17 

2 

1 

0 

6 

0 

1 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

8 

0 

0 


(?) 

10 

5 

11 

28 

9 

4 

6 
9 
9 
9 

10 

10 

6 

5 

5 

3 

6 

4 

3 

16 

4 
11 


476 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


CENSUS  OF  ST.  CLAIR  COUNTY,  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 


Wm.  Johnson  

Wm.  Hall  

John  Rieles 

G.  Wiginton 

Robert  Jones  

John  Hill  

John  Jones 

Wm.  Barnhill  

Edmon  Lorn  

Wm.  Story  

Richard  Jones  

John  King  

Freeman  Jones  

Wm.  McCage  

B.  Coe 

Norris  Hendon  

David  Conner  

James  Messor  

Robert  Conner  

A.  Brown  

D.  Brown  

John  Bush  

S.  Boid  

P.  Colmon  

T.  Varnon  

J.  W.  Grigry  

G.  L.  Brown  

Z.  Kelley  

Wm.  Vaughan  


13  11 

3 111 

12  2 0 

2 2 2 3 

12  15 

2 0 0 1 

14  2 1 

2 2 14 

12  15 

1111 
12  12 

1110 
12  12 

2 4 13 

2 2 15 

1113 

12  13 

10  10 

13  11 

3 3 13 

12  13 

13  14 

12  12 

12  13 

2 111 
10  11 

2 4 11 

10  0 1 

13  11 


6 0 0 6 

6 0 0 6 

5 0 0 5 

9 0 0 9 

9 0 0 9 

3 8 0 11 

8 0 0 8 

9 0 0 9 

9 0 0 9 

4 0 0 4 

6 0 0 6 

3 0 0 3 

6 0 0 6 

10  0 0 10 

10  0 3 13 

6 0 3 9 

7 0 3 9 

2 0 0 2 

6 0 0 6 

10  0 0 10 

7 10  8 

9 0 2 11 

6 0 3 9 

7 0 14  21 

5 0 0 5 

3 0 7 10 

8 0 0 8 

2 0 0 2 

6 0 0 6 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


477 


CENSUS  OF  ST.  CLAIR  COUNTY,  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 


W.  H.  Greenwood 

R.  Cunningham 

S.  Jorden  

E.  Beason  

J.  Thrasher  

B.  Smith  — - 

J.  Taylor  

J.  Kee  

Joseph  Hester  

John  Dill  

John  Hester  

H.  Box  _ 

R.  Arnold  

J.  Collins  

Wm.  Braden  

J.  W.  Blair  

J.  S.  Box  

T.  R.  Adams  

S.  W.  Wilks  

John  Lowgan  

John  Clanrich  

Wm.  Davis  

Wm.  Johnson  — 

John  McCoy  

W.  W.  Harper  ... 

Thos.  Carter  

John  Colley  

John  Cox  

Jesse  Martin  


12  15 

13  13 

12  13 
1110 

1 3 1 3 

12  10 

10  0 0 

13  14 

12  11 

10  10 

2 6 15 

1110 

3 5 11 

14  11 

14  12 

13  15 

1110 
1 3 1 3 

10  11 

12  13 

4 3 12 

13  11 
1112 

14  12 

10  10 

16  15 

10  0 1 

10  0 1 

15  12 


9 0 2 11 

8 0 3 11 

7 0 0 7 

3 0 14 

8 0 0 8 

4 0 0 4 

3 0 20  23 

9 0 1 10 

5 0 0 5 

2 0 13 

14  0 0 14 

3 0 0 3 

10  0 0 10 

7 0 4 11 

8 0 19 

10  0 0 10 

4 0 0 4 

7 0 0 7 

3 0 0 3 

7 0 0 7 

11  0 0 11 

6 0 0 6 

5 0 0 5 

8 0 0 8 

2 0 2 4 

13  0 0 13 

2 0 0 2 

2 0 0 2 

9 0 3 


12 


478 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


CENSUS  OF  ST.  CLAIR  COUNTY,  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

las.  Cunningham  23117007 

Ruth  McGaha.  .......  1 2 1 4 8 0 0 8 

John  Martin  10012002 

A.  Smith  2 1 1 0 4 0 0 4 

C.  Mertrey  _ 1 1 0 2 4 0 0 4 

John  Nicholson  101  35  0 05 

M.  Strainer  .... 14128008 

Wm.  R/  Greenwood  12116006 

Smith  Alexander  .... 10057007 

J.  Stephens  201030  0 3 

T.  B.  Hall  1 3 1 2 7 0 0 7 

B.  Harper  11158008 

E.  Colley  1 3 1 1 6 0 0 6 

Jesse  Green  10012002 

J.  Byrd  2 0 1 2 5 0 5 10 

Daniel  Farley  1 4 3 3 11  0 Oil 

Mordica  Fuller  2 0 1 1 4 0 0 4 

Janies  Martin,  Esqr.  11136G06 

Wm.  McComb  1 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 

John  Townly  14117007 

Baker  Dulney  3 1 2 4 10  0 1 11 

Edmon  Thompson  11125016 

James  Martin  22149009 

S.  Martin  1 0 0 3 4 0 1 5 

James  Massters  10001001 

Wm.  Stewart  10102013 

Wm.  Presley  1 2 1 3 7 0 0 7 

Silas  Dobbs  1 0 0 1 2 0 1 3 

Wm.  Harrison  1 0 1 0 2 0 4 6 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


479 


CENSUS  OF  ST.  CLAIR  COUNTY,  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6) 


Wm.  Bradford  1 

Thos.  Murphy  2 

Squire  Markum  1 

Dempsey  Formon  1 

Morris  Chenault  1 

Daniel  Barnhill  0 

Wm.  Caddel  1 

Jonah  Rickies  1 

Wm.  Rickies  1 

James  Hodges  1 

B.  Wills  1 

James  Rowlen  1 

C.  Hogan  1 

Cader  Lee  — 1 

Josiah  Hancock  1 

John  Hooper  1 

Thos.  Newton  2 

B.  Green  0 

S.  Steadmon  2 

Wm.  Nance  2 

George  Nance  1 

S.  Formon  0 

Wm.  Scott  1 

John  Conn  1 

Major  Vingard  1 

John  Lawson  1 

John  Allen  1 

John  Howard  1 

Thos.  Thrasher  2 


0 0 0 1 0 

0 14  7 0 

1 15  8 0 
0 0 0 1 0 
114  7 0 

2 0 13  0 
112  5 0 
2 0 14  0 
112  5 0 
0 113  0 
7 1 3 12  0 
0 113  0 
110  3 0 
6 2 4 13  0 
2 13  7 0 
2 7 15  0 
2 12  7 0 
110  2 0 
110  2 0 
5 1 2 10  0 
2 10  4 0 
2 10  3 0 
110  3 0 
1114  0 
0 113  0 
1114  0 
0 17  9 0 
0 14  6 0 
6 1 3 12  0 


(7)  (8) 

3 4 

1 8 

0 8 

1 2 

0 7 

0 3 

0 -5 

0 4 

0 5 

0 3 

3 15 

3 6 

0 3 

6 19 

0 7 

0 5 

0 7 

0 2 

0 3 

0 10 

0 4 

0 3 

0 3 

0 4 

0 3 

0 4 

0 9 

0 6 

0 


12 


480 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


CENSUS  OF  ST.  CLAIR  COUNTY,  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Boise  Getrey  1 1 1 0 3 0 0 3 

Ben  Stovall  231  17007 

Wilson  Hall  1 0 1 1 3 0 0 3 

Wm.  Green  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Wm  Watkins _ 1 1 0 0 2 0 3 5 

Stephen  Harmon  13149009 

John  Lord  12115005 

Alexander  Duvall  12116006 

Thos.  Vaughan  12104059 

Silas  Crump 1 9 2 3 15  0 015 

Sion  Blyth  1 6 1 2 10  0 0 10 

Wm.  Hill  1 3 1 4 9 0 2 11 

James  Seddmon  14117007 

Robert  Watson  13105005 

Edward  Warrington  12115005 

Abner  Crow  3 5 1 2 10  0 0 10 

Ben  Love  13149009 

Davis  Hall  1 0 1 2 4 0 0 4 

Richard  Hall  1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 

John  Michell  1 1 1 4 7 0 2 9 

Eligah  Hall  1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 

Jacob  Walker  1 4 1 1 7 0 0 7 

John  Partlow  13116017 

H.  B.  Moore  1 4 1 1 7 0 0 7 

Thos.  Bradford  221  1 608  14 

Thos.  Stovall  13105005 

John  Montgomery  14128008 

James  Cannaday  11114004 

Wm.  Wiginton  11125005 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


481 


CENSUS  OF  ST.  CLAIR  COUNTY,  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

John  Stovall  12115049 

David  Lord  12148008 

Samuel  Mays  1 2227  07  14 

Robert  Taylor  ... — 1314901  10 

Eldridge  Barker  . — 1 1 1 5 8 0 0 

Richmon  Harmon  0 110  2 0 

Hugh  Loller  1 4 1 2 8 0 0 8 

Daniel  Burnett  2 0 1 0 3 0 0 

H.  Sides  2 3 1 3 9 0 0 

Ben  Sides  1 0 1 4 6 0 0 

Peter  Baker  13  1 16  0 0 

Thos.  Lawrance  13138008 

C.  Sides  1 1 1 3 6 0 0 

Moses  Sides  1 0000001 

John  Mongomery  — 13  116  0 0 

Levi  Sides  - 141  17007 

John  Cuningham  5 2 2 2 11  0 0 11 

Wm.  Stone  - 1 4 1 1 7 0 0 7 

Wm.  Sides  .... 1 2 1 0 4 0 0 4 

Stephen  Vaughan  1 4 1 0 6 0 0 

Lant  Armstrong  10113003 

Drury  Ashcraft  2 3 1 4 10  0 0 10 

James  Vaughan  12104004 

Edmon  Vaughan  1 1024004 

Oba  Roberts  321  1 707  14 

Kinchon  Gamble  > 11013003 

Vanyard  Crawford  — 1 2 1 2 6 0 1 

Wm.  Ward  1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 

Thos.  Potter  1 2 1 2 6 0 0 6 


482 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


CENSUS  OF  ST.  CLAIR  COUNTY,  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 


Peter  Langford  

Wm.  Mackey  

Wm.  Dearmon  

Rowten  Crawford 

John  Shields  

Dancer  Hathcock 

Wm.  King  

Wm.  Carrson  

Auston  Hood  

Richard  Dearmon 
James  Hawkings  ~ 

Nat  Samuel  

James  Hood  

S.  Nicholas  

Golder  Fields  

Wm.  Hood  

Robert  Hood  

Azel  Jones  

John  Hood  - 

Rich  Arnton  

Wm.  Hood  - 

James  Cash  

Wm.  Berryhill  

Wm.  Montgomery 
Richard  Shelton  .. 

Linsey  Milsted  

James  Benson  

Thos.  Hall  .. 
Abraham  Hall  


13  2 3 

2 5 2 6 

13  14 

12  13 

13  12 

12  10 

3 2 10 

1110 
12  10 

12  15 

10  12 

15  12 

13  12 

110  0 

1115 
1111 
1 3 1 0 

13  12 

12  3 2 

1111 
110  1 

14  12 

14  12 

1111 
10  0 2 

14  12 

13  15 

10  10 

12  12 


9 0 0 9 

15  0 0 15 

9 0 0 9 

7 0 0 7 

7 0 3 10 

4 0 0 4 

6 0 2 8 

3 0 0 3 

4 0 0 4 

9 0 1 10 

4 0 0 4 

9 0 0 9 

7 0 0 7 

3 0 0 3 

8 0 0 8 

4 0 0 4 

5 0 0 5 

7 0 0 7 

8 0 0 8 

4 0 0 4 

3 0 0 3 

8 0 0 8 

8 0 0 8 

4 0 0 4 

3 0 0 3 

8 0 0 8 

10  0 9 19 

2 0 2 4 

6 0 0 


6 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


483 


CENSUS  OF  ST.  CLAIR  COUNTY,  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 


Jerrimeah  Beason  .. 

John  Varnom  

Wm.  Conden  

James  Smith  

Solomon  Bregimon 
Robert  Armstrong 

James  Ash  

Wm.  Lenard  

David  Lenard  

Simean  Johnson 

John  Ash  

John  Lewney  

Isaac  Hood  .... 

Hegrum  Dempsey  .. 

John  Lenard  

Steph  Garrison  

Elizabeth  Lawson  . 

Peter  Wagner  

Rober  Ray  

John  Wesson 

John  Crump  

Mark  Phillips  

Calb  Brothars  

Even  Wadkins  

Abraham  Wharton 

Wm.  Whorton  

Robert  Wines  

Salley  Peanix  

William  Walker  ... 


10  11 

17  12 

12  11 

13  13 

110  1 

15  13 

110  1 

12  11 

12  14 

14  14 

10  0 4 

2 7 12 

2 2 14 

12  10 

10  0 1 

12  0 1 

0 5 12 

2 13  7 

10  10 

2 3 10 

3 3 1 1 

10  13 

13  2 0 

16  12 

10  0 2 

1112 
1110 
0 2 13 

12  17 


2 0 0 2 

11  0 0 11 

5 0 4 9 

8 0 0 8 

3 0 3 6 

10  0 0 10 

3 1 2*5 

5 0 0 5 

8 0 0 8 

10  0 0 10 

6 0 7 13 

12  0 12  24 

9 0 0 9 

4 0 0 4 

2 0 0 2 

4 0 0 4 

8 0 0 8 

13  0 2 15 

2 0 2 4 

6 0 0 6 

8 0 0 8 

5 0 0 5 

6 0 0 6 

10  0 0 10 

3 0 4 7 

5 0 6 11 

3 0 14 

6 0 5 11 

11  0 0 11 


484  ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 

CENSUS  OF  ST.  CLAIR  COUNTY,  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Nelson  Battles  1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 

Wm.  Brown  2 3 1 3 9 0 2 11 

John  Littlefield  1 2 1 2 6 0 0 6 

Edmon  Jones  15129009 

John  Thrasher  11136006 

Isaac  Love  2 4 1 310  0 0 10 

ijoeb  Hollensworth  1314  9 009 

Adrew  Caddel  1 3 1 3 8 0 0 8 

Seelvania  Pumphry  .... 10124004 

Wm.  Cane  10124004 

Samuel  McCord  . 1 3 0 1 5 0 0 5 

Jesse  Fonden  1 61  0802  10 

Goode  Green  1 3 1 2 7 0 12  19 

James  Long  12137007 

Hugh  Callaham  1 4 1 3 9 0 0 9 

Josiah  Night  10102  0 02 

Peter  Meril  1 1 1 0 3 0 0 3 

Lewis  Adams  1 1 134027 

Holcomb  McCraney  1 3 1 3 8 0 6 14 

John  Quin  30  1 4803  11 

H.  Sheffield  1 2 1 1 5 0 0 5 

Stephen  Night  1 1204004 

Stephen  Williams  1 41  3 7 0 0 7 

Ezekel  Brothars  12137007 

Robert  Long  2 3 2 411  0 0 11 

Francies  McClung  10102002 

James  McCendon  13015005 

Adam  Sotherland  11103003 

Wm.  Magby  14128008 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


485 


CENSUS  OF  ST,  CLAIR  COUNTY,  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Phillip  Walker  1 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 

Robert  Magby  10034004 

James  Beardin  12159009 

David  Magby  10123003 

Wm  Holloway  23  1 2806  14 

Rewben  McCoy  15107007 

James  Phillips  1 4 1 3*9  0 0 9 

Jesse  Highs  1 1406006 

Phillip  Brothars  1 1 14705  12 

John  Trammell  23117007 

A.  B.  Trammell  1 1103003 

H.  Autrey  1 1 1 3 6 0 0 6 

Adam  Sheffield  1 5 1 2 9 0 0 9 

A.  Autrey  23218008 

Peter  McLehand  13105005 

Barney  Roark  - 131  16006 

Wm.  Gray  13116006 

James  Johnson  10135005 

H.  Carter  1 2 1 0 4 0 4 8 

John  Stone  10102002 

Hesikeah  Love  22116006 

Ansel  Beardon  1 8 1 1 11  0 0 11 

John  Smith  2 6 2 3 13  0 0 13 

Elizabeth  Beardin  — 02114004 

Charrtey  Beardin  00101001 

Wm.  Bell  1 3 2 2 8 0 0 8 

Peter  Ragsdill  131  16028 

A.  Moore  22149009 

Eligh  Bell  1 2 0 3 6 0 0 6 


486 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


CENSUS  OF  ST.  CLAIR  COUNTY,  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Edward  Bell  1 2 1 2 6 0 0 6 

James  Roberson  12137007 

John  Roberson 13127007 

Res.  Skelton 1 2 1 3 7 0 0 7 

A.  Dollar  1 5 1 1 806  14 

Wm.  Rags  12115005 

A.  McNight  1 2 3 5 11  0 0 11 

T.  Stamps  1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 

H.  Strauner 13105005 

A.  Casleburry 1 4 0 3 8 0 18  26 

Levi  Harper 10013003 

David  Casleburry  1 5 1 1 8 0 13  21 

A.  Dollar  _ 1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 

Thos.  Sloan  2 5 1 2 10  0 0 10 

H.  Soomaker  1 2 1 1 5 0 0 5 

Wm.  Kelley  1 0 1 3 5 0 0 5 

James  Ray  10124004 

H.  Shoomaker  2 1 1 0 4 0 0 4 

Wm.  Davidson  111360  0 6 

Jonathan  Elard  101240  0 4 

J.  Ratliff  1 2 2 17  0 0 7 

John  Blakley  1 0 1 0 2 0 0 2 

Wm.  Gremit  _ 2 12  1 6 0 0 6 

Joshua  Ratliff  2 2 2 1 7 0 0 7 

George  Cooper  10113003 

George  Dayley  13206006 

John  Saxon  12115005 

H.  Box  1 2 1 1 5 0 0 5 

James  Blakeley  11  136006 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


487 


CENSUS  OF  ST.  CLAIR  COUNTY,  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Charles  Holt  2 1 2 1 6 0 0 6 

Joshua  Callahan  13116006 

Wm.  Gormon  1 5 0 1 7 0 2 

Jessey  Taylor  11114004 

Vann  Callahan  03126006 

A.  Bradford  — - 12126017 

Elisha  Cockerham  1 2 1 2 6 0 1 

Charles  Dobbs  1 2 1 0 4 0 1 5 

Charles  Peirson  231  17007 

Chas.  Cooke  1 1 1 3 6 0 0 6 

Isaac  Paine  13116  0 06 

M.  Moore  1 2 1 2 6 0 0 6 

H.  Pybus  „ 1 2 0 3 6 0 0 6 

Jesse  Copland  2 3 2 2 9 0 0 

Salley  Blyth  0 1 1 2 4 0 0 4 

James  Blyth  ... 12104004 

Wm.  Mackey  ...  11114004 

James  Hampton  11125005 

A.  Laster  1 3 1 5 10  0 111 

H.  Moore  1 1 1 4 7 0 0 

David  McClain  _ 10102002 

W.  D.  Riggs  3 0 0 1 4 0 0 4 

George  Riggs  - 111470  0 7 

S.  McClendon  13127007 

Joseph  Pike  12137007 

A.  Moore  01012002 

Thos.  Washington  1 4 1 ‘2  8 0 2 10 

John  Washington  10023003 

B.  Langford  23116017 


488 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


CENSUS  OF  ST.  CLAIR  COUNTY,  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Jesse  G.  George 11  0 1 3 0 2 5 

Champ  Langford 10236006 

John  Ramsey  10124048 

Wm.  Gordon  3 4 3 1 11  0 1 12 

G.  L.  Patrick  1 5 1 3 10  0 12  22 

George  Hardwick  1 1125038 

Samuel  Means  1 1 1 0 3 0 0 3 

Stephen  Chaunault  12115005 

A.  Kaddell  1 2 1 3 7 0 5 12 

Elisha  Duvall  1 0 0 2 3 0 0 3 

Thos.  Raynolds  .... 1 3 1 1 6 0 0 6 

G.  Payn  1 3 1 2 7 0 0 7 

Wm.  Faver  1 7 1 3 12  0 2 14 

D.  Greenwood  12014004 

John  Wadkins  1 3 1 2 7 0 0 7 

A.  Hendon  1 2 0 1 4 0 0 4 

John  Chanault  13116006 

J.  Hanock  1 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 

Wm.  McDanil  1 0 1 0 2 0 0 2 

Jerremeah  Gibson  20147007 

Robert  Morris  11158008 

Stephen  Sides  11103003 

David  Sellars  1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 

Samuel  Read  11136006 

Joseph  Hill  1 3 1 2 7 0 0 7 

Elizabeth  Elett  1 2 2 3 8 0 0 8 

Thos.  Conell  J 1 0 1 3 5 0 0 5 

Wm.  Clement  1 6 1 0 8 0 0 8 

George  Hardwick  1 2 1 7 8 0 10  16 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


489 


CENSUS  OF  ST  CLAIR  COUNTY,  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Wm.  McCorkle  1 3 1 1 6 0 2 8 

John  McColum  1 0 2 0 3 0 0 

John  Greenwood  1 3 1 3802  10 

Henry  Hall  1 3 1 4 9 0 0 9 

Wm  Peeples  1 1114004 

Mary  Dearmon  0 2 2 4 8 0 3 11 

James  Malden  10124004 

Burwell  Green  23117007 

Lewis  Watson  1 2 1 3 7 0 0 

D.  Hood  1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 

H.  Malden  ... 1 2 1 0 4 0 0 4 

Margaret  Sellars  0 2 1 2 5 0 0 

James  Ashcraft  13127007 

A.  McLeary  3 12  17  0 0 

Temperance  Coker  13116006 

J.  W.  Carter  1 1 1 3 6 0 0 6 

Jesse  C.  Roberts  10  1 1 3 0 3 

A.  Reaves  11125005 

Wm.  Compton  11103003 

Samuel  Hall  1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 

Merry  Hall  1 0 1 3 5 0 0 

George  Brown  1 1 2 9 13  0 0 13 

Wm.  Watson  1 1 3 1 6 0 0 6 

Wm.  Hodges  12014004 

Martin  Franklin  1 3 1 3 8 0 0 

Samuel  Truss  1 I 1 5802  10 

Thos.  Peeke  .... — - 10113003 

Reuben  Phillips  1 2 1 3 7 0 0 

Daniel  McCoy  1 0 1 4 6 0 0 


490 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


CENSUS  OF  ST.  CLAIR  COUNTY,  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Gray  Barber  021  14004 

Elenor  Fannin  02136006 

Wm.  Almon  11136006 

Bald  Alord  1 5 1 1 8 0 0 8 

James  Truss  10001001 

Elisha  Horton  3 2 2 1 8 0 0 8 

John  McCollin  1 1 1 2 6 0 0 6 

John  Towers  10001001 

James  Parriss  10001001 

Isaac  Read  0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 

S.  Ewson  1 4 1 2 8 0 0 8 

James  Ward  1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 

John  Mitchell  - 1 2 1 2 6 0 1 7 

David  Brown  1 8 1 2 13  0 5 18 

Vinson  Bennett  1 1002002 

Samuel  Battles  1 4 1 3 9 0 0 9 

Lewis  Powell  1 5 1 3 10  0 0 10 

Wm.  Battles  1 0 1 0 2 0 0 2 

Elis  Hill  1 5 1 1 8 0 0 8 

John  Cheate  10113014 

James  Yourk  1 1 1 6 14  0 0 4 

D.  Winchester  1 3 1 6 11  0 0 11 

Wm.  Battles  1 4 1 3 9 0 0 9 

Gordon  Carden  12126006 

Samuel  Walker  2 9 1 0 12  0 2 14 

Eligah  Harrison  12126006 

H.  Williams  1 4 1 2 8 0 0 8 

H.  Sheffield  0 1 0 1 2 0 0 2 

John  Blackstocks  10146006 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


491 


CENSUS  OF  ST.  CLAIR  COUNTY,  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

A.  Sotharland  1 4 2 411  0 Oil 

Wm.  Cumles  1 4 1 4 10  0 0 10 

Joseph  Torris  14128008 

Robert  White  24129009 

Robert  Clark  13116006 

Joel  Chandler  — . 2 3 2 4 10  0 14  24 

Emrey  Laid  1 0 1 2 4 0 1 

Jacob  Burgas  10113003 

James  Williams  2 0 1 3 6 0 0 6 

Jesse  Owens  15118008 

Thos.  Bowlin  01  023003 

J.  Grigrey  1 2 1 0 4 0 0 4 

J.  W.  Grigrey  20002002 

Sion  Bass  12126006 

James  Downing  1 2 0 3 6 0 0 0 

D.  B.  Manley  1 1 1 0 3 0 0 3 

Candler  Aubery  1.  1 1 1*2  4 0 1 

Wm.  Conel  14128008 

Berry  Dodd  14  117  0 0 

D.  Wagnon  1 10  13  0 0 

J.  H.  Smith  1 2 0 2 5 0 0 

John  Doss  1 4 1 4 10  0 0 10 

M.  Lister  1 3 1 4 9 0 5 15 

Levi  Watson  12115005 

Joseph  Garner  13138008 

Joshua  Potts  12115005 

P.  Nailor  ... 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 

John  B.  Larrey  1 1 1 0 3 0 4 

John  Moody  13127007 


492 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


CENSUS  OF  ST.  CLAIR  COUNTY,  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Joseph  Howard 2 0 1 0 3 0 10  13 

Wm.  Mathis  1 3 1 1 6 0 0 6 

Isaac  Casleburry  12126028 

C.  McNight  1 2 1 0 4 0 0 4 

Oba  Hester  1 1 1 2 5 0 0 5 

John  Dun  1 3 1 1 6 0 0 6 

S.  Gorden  2 2 1 3 8 0 0 8 

N.  Myres  1 7 1 2 10  0 4 15 

R.  Skelton  1 0 1 1 3 0 0 3 

Wm.  Akins  1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 

John  Stephens  01002002 

Wm.  Patterson  1 1 1 0 3 0 0 3 

John  J.  Mann  _ 1 2 1 0 4 0 0 4 

J.  Hall  2 1 1 4 8 0 0 8 

Thos.  Hawkins  1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 

S.  McCooke  - 1 3 1 2 7 0 1 8 

Young  Leath  • 10102002 

M.  Kidd  1 4 1 4 10  0 0 10 

Webb  Kidd  1 2 1 1 5 0 4 9 

G.  H.  Thornton  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

J.  W.  Kidd  1 4 1 4 10  0 17  27 

J.  W.  Night  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

D.  Henderson  21  104004 

Randol  Sherrold  1 2 1 3 7 0 5 12 

Isaac  Goolsby  1 2 1 5 9 0 0 9 

Natus  Kirk  1 4 2 1 7 0 4 11 

Wm.  Rowen  1 4 2 0 7 0 6 13 

Thos.  Harris  1 2 2 1 6 0 0 6 

Wm.  Rown  0 1 0 1 2 0 0 2 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


493 


CENSUS  OF  ST.  CLAIR  COUNTY,  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 


A.  Lawlin  

M.  D.  Thomason  

John  Bickerstaff  

J.  Dill  

Thos.  Baley  

Green  Baley  

Richard  Bridges  

John  Massey  

Nichols  Talley  

Terry  Nichols  

James  Hardwick  

James  Thomson  

Eli  Fiot  

Moses  Eleison  

Lee  Taylor  

Susan  Gates  

Elenor  Fannin  

John  Stead  

Jesse  Lovvill  

John  Gaston  

John  Newton  

N.  Wilkerson  

Samuel  Ware  

Aggregate  : 


10  12  4 

1112  5 

1 0 0 2 3 

12  12  6 

11114 
12  10  4 

10  113 

12  115 

1112  5 

2 0 12  5 

1 2 1 3 7 

2 0 1 3 12 

12  12  6 

12  10  4 

12  10  4 

0 12  0 3 

12  115 

1112  5 

12  13  6 

13  14  9 

11114 
1114  7 

1 3 0 3 7 

583  1,062  503  929  3,077 


0 0 4 

0 4 9 

0 1 4 

0 2 8 

0 0 4 

0 0 4 

0 12  T5 

0 2 7 

0 9 14 

0 0 5 

0 2 9 

0 5 17 

0 0 6 

0 0 4 

0 0 4 

0 0 3 

0 0 5 

0 0 5 

0 0 6 

0 0 9 

0 1 5 

0 0 7 

0 0 7 

8 550  3,635 


494 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


SHELBY  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

Names  of  the  heads  of  families. 

(1)  — White  males  over  twenty  one  years. 

(2)  — White  males  under  twenty  one  years. 

(3)  — White  females  over  twenty  one  years. 

(4)  — White  females  under  twenty  one  years. 

(5)  — Total  of  white  population. 

(6)  — Total  of  free  people  of  colour. 

(7)  — Total  of  slaves. 

(8)  — Total  of  inhabitants. 


(1)  (2) 

Bailey,  Thomas  1 3 

Finley,  John  ... 1 2 

Harper,  James  W.  2 0 

Mann,  John  J.  1 2 

Pendergrass,  Spencer  1 2 

Morgan,  Joseph  1 5 

Davis,  John  1 1 

Thorington,  Dozier  1 3 

Robertson,  Henry  Junior  -12 
Robertson,  Henry  Seignier  1 2 

Bradsher,  Thos.  Seignier  ..11 

Hawkins,  Thos.  P.  2 3 

Bradsher,  Henry  1 4 

Nelson,  Elisha  1 0 

Hughs,  William  Seignior  -13 
Hughs,  William  Junior  ....  1 2 

Mcgughey,  Wm.  0 1 

Ray,  William  1 4 

Bradsher,  Thos.  Junior  1 0 

Mabry,  Bartholomew  1 2 

Carden,  Robt.  1 3 

Linsey,  John  1 2 


(3)  (4)  (5) 

1 6 11 

2 3 8 

0 2 4 

1 0 4 

2 3 7 

1 0 7 

1 0 3 

1 2 7 

1 5 9 

1 3 7 

0 1 3 

1 2 8 

1 1 7 

1 2 4 

1 2 7 

0 1 4 

0 2 3 

1 2 8 

0 1 2 

1 1 5 

1 3 8 

0 3 6 


(6)  (7) 

0 7 
0 0 
0 1 
0 0 
0 0 
0 1 
0 0 
0 4 
0 0 
0 0 
0 0 
0 3 
0 0 
0 0 
0 0 
0 0 
0 0 
0 0 
0 0 
0 0 
0 0 
0 0 


(8) 

18 

8 

5 

4 

7 

8 
3 

11 

9 

7 

3 
11 

7 

4 

7 

4 
3 

8 
2 

5 
8 

6 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


495 


SHELBY  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5) 


Linsey,  Joseph  — i — 

Seals,  Herod  1 — 

Dunlap,  James  

Shackelford,  Jack  .1 

Havis,  Minor  W.  1. 

Eliet,  Cornelius  — 

Lee,  Thomas  

Crowson,  Richard  

Fletcher,  David  

Lee,  William  C.  

Jordon,  Uriah  

Hill,  Allen  G.  - 

Mcdanal,  Jeremiah  — 

Mcdanal,  John  

Hazlet,  Benjamin  C.  

Neely,  John  

King,  William  

Miller,  James  B.  

Eliet,  Amos  

Mardis,  Ruben  

Guy,  Joseph  

Owen,  David  

Adams,  Daniel  

Brown,  Charles  

Warnock,  Robert  

West,  Joshua  

Gamble,  James  

West,  William  - — 

Holonback,  Elizabeth  


1112  5 

1113  6 

12  12  6 

13  116 

2 0 0 1 3 

10  113 

1113  6 

1 4 1 6 12 

13  116 

1 2 3 

12  14  8 

1113  6 

12  12  6 

1 3 4 8 

1 5 1 3 10 

13  116 

11  2 4 

1 1 2 
1 5 1 3 10 

14  117 

1 2 2 5 

1 2 1 6 10 

13  14  9 

13  14  9 

11114 

2 4 1 3 10 

1 3 1 2 7 

1 12  4 

5 117 


(6) 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 


(7)  (8) 

0 5 

0 6 

0 6 

21  27 

0 6 

3 6 
. 6 

2 14 

2 8 

1 4 
8 
6 
6 

4 12 
10 

8 14 

4 

2 

2 12 

7 

5 

10 

9 

9 18 

2 6 

10 

7 

1 5 

7 


496 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


SHELBY  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 


Wilson  Jesse  

Coupland,  William 

Printice,  Jno.  

Wear,  Bennet  - 

Martin  Mcleroy.  — . 

Stone,  Thos.  .... 

Burns,  Patrick  

Tubbs,  George  

Rix,  Josiah  

Owens,  James  

Porter,  Alexander  .. 
Powel,  Edward  W. 
Person,  William  ~~ 

More,  John  .... 

Owens,  Thomas  H. 

Carden,  James  

Mitchal,  Nimrod  ... . 

Masingill,  John  

Ferington,  John  

Hinkle,  Henry  

Robertson,  William 

Person,  John  

Henson,  Mathew 
Taylor,  Elizabeth  ~ 

Berry,  James  

Person,  Henry  

Lamb,  James  

Lawler,  Isaac  .... 

Flemin,  William  .... 


3 2 18 

2 2 12 

2 2 12 

1 3 2 7 

1 1 

2 1 1 

12  14 

3 3 12 

1114 
2 111 

13  12 

1 1 3 

12  12 

14  12 

1 1 1 

14  11 

13  11 

12  11 

16  12 

2 2 3 2 

10  14 

10  0 0 

10  11 

0 5 11 

10  0 2 

10  2 0 

10  0 1 

10  11 

10  15 


14  20  34 

7 7 

7 0 0 7 

13  2 15 

2 2 4 

4 0 2 6 

8 0 3 11 

9 0 9 

7 0 5 12 

5 0 10  15 

7 0 0 7 

5 0 14  19 

6 0 0 6 

8 0 0 8 

3 0 3 6 

7 0 0 7 

6 0 0 6 

5 0 16 

10  0 5 15 

9 0 0 9 

6 0 0 6 

10  0 1 

3 0 0 3 

7 0 0 7 

3 0 0 3 

3 0 14 

2 0 4 6 

3 0 0 3 

7 0 9 


16 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


497 


SHELBY  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Linsey,  James  10102002 

Linsey,  Davids  1 01  0208  10 

Gamble,  William  T.  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Miller,  David  10001001 

Johnson,  Isaac  2 5 2 312  0 3 15 

Toomy,  Mary  0 3 1 3 7 0 0 7 

Lawler,  John  11114004 

Merony,  John  10023003 

Wilson,  Benjamin  1 8 1 4 14  0 5 19 

Arnold,  Thomas  H. 10012002 

Jones,  Moses 2 3 1 3 9 0 0 

Gray,  John  1 1 1 4 7 0 0 

McLanahan,  Samuel  13138008 

McDavid,  Jonathan  3000309  12 

Davis,  Benjamin  2 1 1 1 5 0 10  15 

Dodd,  Charles  ... 1 5 1 18  0 0 8 

White,  David  1 0 1 1 3 0 0 3 

Welch,  Thomas  1 0 0 0 1 0 17  18 

Cunningham,  Joseph  10113014 

Merony,  Roady  0 2 1 7 10  0 0 10 

Lawler,  Henry  1 3 1 0 5 0 0 

McHenry,  Thomas  1 9 1 0 11  0 11  22 

Millard,  Nathaniel  1 0 2 3 6 0 0 

Milliard,  William  1 0 1 0 2 0 0 2 

Henry,  Ezekiel  1 4 1 1 7 0 1 8 

Jones,  Jesse  13  116  0 0 

Arnold,  Thomas  2 0 1 1 4 0 10  14 

Parmer,  William  1 4 2 5 12  0 0 12 

Johnson,  Jacob  13105005 


498 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


SHELBY  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 


Mulindore,  William 

Johnson,  Myres  

Runyon,  Wear  

Johnson,  Osnus  

Ross,  Peter  

Johnson,  William  .. 
Mondine,  Charles  - 
McReynolds,  David 

Murphy,  James  

Farler,  Obediah  

Lemly,  Ephraim  

McLeroy,  Andrew 

Lee,  Joseph  D.  

Taylor,  Benjamin  - 

Vardin,  Holoway  

Taylor,  John  F.  

Nelson,  David  

Mink,  Jacob  

Crowson,  Moses  - 

Bynam,  Alden  

Crowson,  William  „ 

Crowson,  David  

Jones,  William  

Rogers,  Isaac  

Gamble,  Robert  

Gamble,  Aron  F.  .... 

Wade,  Ruben  

Crowson,  Aron  

— -,  Samuel  


1113 
1111 
1110 
12  17 

1 3 1 3 

1111 

12  2 3 

2 2 12 

10  2 1 

10  3 0 

1110 
10  14 

13  11 

13  12 

10  10 

0 10  1 

1110 

14  15 

14  13 

14  11 

14  0 1 

1110 
110  1 

12  16 

10  12 

10  0 1 

2 2 12 

10  0 1 

0 2 10 


6 0 0 6 

4 0 0 4 

3 0 0 3 

11  0 0 11 

8 0 19 

4 0 0 4 

8 0 19 

7 0 0 7 

4 0 0 4 

4 0 0 4 

3 0 0 3 

6 0 10  16 

6 0 5 11 

7 0 23  30 

2 0 0 2 

2 0 3 5 

3 0 0 3 

11  0 0 11 

9 0 0 9 

7 0 0 7 

6 0 0 6 

3 0 0 3 

3 0 0 3 

10  0 0 10 

4 015 

2 0 0 2 

7 0 20  27 

2 0 0 2 

3 0 0 


3 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


499 


SHELBY  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Luke,  Joseph  W.  1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 

Lawler,  Christopher  3 0 1 1 5 0 1 6 

Lawler,  John  14128008 

Garner,  Bradly  30104026 

Lawler,  Jesse  10113003 

Lawler,  Elisha  — 10001001 

Wilson,  William  1 2 1 4 8 0 0*8 

Osley,  Willis  — 14128008 

Jones,  Asa  1 5 1 2 9 0 0 

Neighbours,  Blasingame  - 1 3 1 3 8 0 0 8 

Butler,  Zacheriah  13138008 

Hale,  Joseph  1 3 2 2 8 0 0 8 

Lenox,  Richard  12137018 

Payne,  Thomas  201  14026 

Jackson,  Samuel  10124004 

Cowser,  Richard  .... 1 1 16901  10 

Woods,  Oliver  12126006 

Waits,  John  14106006 

Watters,  Tilmon  13  116  0 0 

Watters,  Moses  1 5 2 C 8 0 311 

Neighbours,  Arter  1 3 1 4 9 0 0 

Neighbours,  Abraham  1 4 1 5 11  0 011 

Shaw,  Wiley  1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 

Linsey,  Elijah  1 4 1 0 6 0 0 

Bagwell,  Frederick,  1 0 0 2 3 0 0 3 

Mahan,  John  13127018 

Bullards,  Allen  13127007 

Shaw,  James  - 10023003 

Nixon,  Henry  12205005 


500 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


SHELBY  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Watters,  George  10102002 

Reed,  Charles  1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Naish,  Abraham  11125005 

Acton,  Samuel  10023003 

Acton,  John  1 5 3 3 12  0 0 12 

Lee,  Needham  1 8 1 4 14  0 0 14 

Wilder,  John  1 2 1 5 9 0 0 9 

May,  Benjamin  10157018 

Evans,  Joshua  2 3 1 2 8 0 2 10 

Evans,  Jesse  J.  13149009 

Brown,  John  H.  10001056 

Bailey,  James  1 1103003 

Overton,  David  11125005 

Poe,  Claborn  1 1 1 4 7 0 0 7 

Mason,  Job  1 3 1 3 8 0 10  18 

Hutchens,  David  12115005 

Johnson,  John  100010  01 

Philips,  William  1 5 1 1 8 0 0 8 

Marr,  John  1 0 1 1 3 0 0 3 

Rowan,  William  Sr.  1 4 2 0 7 0 6 13 

Rowen,  William  Jr.  01  102002 

Goldsby,  Isaac  1 3 1 5 10  0 0 10 

Hughs,  George  12137007 

Bobitt,  John  _ ... 2 3 1 4 10  0 0 10 

Neil,  David  1 4 1 3 9 0 6 15 

Smith,  Thomas  12126006 

Vandike,  John  H.  1 2 1 0 4 0 0 4 

Freeze,  Jacob  1 4 2 4 11  0 0 11 

Thomas,  John  12148008 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


501 


SHELBY  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Gaston,  John  13149008 

Thomas,  James  1 1 103003 

Wyatt,  James  16  119  0 0 

McDanal,  Allen  1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 

Halk,  Isaac  1 6 1 2 10  0 0 10 

McDanal,  John  1 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 

Page,  John  1 3 1 3 3 0 0.8 

Pool,  Wm.  13116017 

Hawthorn,  Jas.,  Jr.  1 1 1 7 10  0 4 14 

Wallis,  John  13116017 

Forman,  Isaac  10113003 

McDanal,  Nathan  13127007 

Givens,  James  1 32390  1 10 

Cox,  Henry  11125005 

Thomas,  Andrew  11125038 

Pool,  John  1 3 1 0 5 0 3 8 

Hardin,  Henry  12104048 

Herd,  John  1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 

Nunley,  Moses  2 5 3 6 16  0 5 21 

Hering,  Jas.  14128019 

Johnson,  Elizabeth  00101012 

McLaughlin,  Daniel  SR.  ..1  1013014 

McLaughlin,  Alexander  — 3312901  10 

Gilbert,  Wm.  1 3 1 1 6 0 9 15 

Givans,  Samuel  — 1 2 2 3 8 0 715 

Hariss,  Wm  14128008 

McLaughlin,  O.  Daniel,  Jr.  1 2 1 6 10  0 0 10 

Wallis,  Wm.  1 4 1 3 9 0 0 9 

McCain,  Moses  12104004 


502 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


SHELBY  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Taylor,  Daniel  23139009 

Murphey,  Samuel  13127007 

Hodnet,  Samuel  10001001 

Hodnet,  Thos 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 

Johnson,  Henry  13127007 

Summers,  John  A.  11114004 

Hughs,  Ennes  12104004 

Ray,  Joseph  151  18008 

Neil,  Jas.  H 1 1 1 1 4 0 2 6 

Mcdanal  , Thomas  13149009 

Freeze,  Jacob,  Jr  14139009 

Hamilton,  Jas 1 4 1 4 10  0 0 10 

Malone,  Davis  1 15107018 

Reed,  Geo.  W.  1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 

Thomas,  Jno.  01012002 

Sparks,  Jesse. 14128008 

Sparks,  Isaac  E.  20013014 

McLaughlin,  Jno.  1 3 1 2 7 0 0 7 

Manly,  Jno.  1 1 1 2 5 0 0 5 

Lorance,  Jno.  122270  0 7 

Coupland,  Douglass  21  104004 

Cambell,  Jno.  1 3 2 6 12  0 0 12 

Hughs,  Ralph  E.  1 0 1 2 4 0 0 4 

Cox,  Alexander  13105005 

Coupland,  Samuel  121  15005 

Harvey,  Thos 11125016 

Harrison,  Benj.  100010  0 1 

Hariss,  Thos/.  12126006 

Babb,  Joseph  1 1 2 5 9 0 0 9 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


503 


SHELBY  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Mitchel,  Jno.  2 1 1 1 5 0 0 5 

Ray,  Elizabeth  0 1 1 2 4 0 0 4 

Cameron,  Wm.  2 41  2 9 0 8 17 

Hawthorn,  Jas.  1 0 0 0 1 0 

McGuier,  Timothy,  Sr  1 1114004 

Mcguier,  Marget  0 2 1 3 6 0 0 6 

Mcguier,  Timothy,  Jr.  1 0 0 1 2 0 0-2 

Reed,  Daniel  1 3 1 0 5 0 0 

Lowry,  David  13138008 

Mason,  Jno.  10113014 

Mcguier,  Jno 01012002 

Huttan,  Wm.  0 1 1 5 7 0 0 7 

Donhan,  Jonathan  1 5 1 3 10  0 0 10 

Mason,  Jas.  01001001 

Kelly,  Chas.  1 4 1 5 11  0 0 11 

Howard,  Isaac  1 1 103003 

Howard,  Robert  12104004 

Kelly,  Robert  1 1 2 1 5 0 0 5 

White,  Gabriel  1 21  2 6 0 0 6 

Hariss,  Moses  1 2 1 2 6 0 0 

Howard,  Wm.  1 3 1 0 5 0 0 

Pierce,  Geo.  1 1 103003 

Dikes,  Daniel  2 3 1 2 8 0 0 

Mitchel  Isaac  15118008 

Mitchel,  Wm.  1 2 1 0 4 0 0 4 

Brooks,  Jno.  W.  11103003 

Shepard,  Robert  ± — 1 3 1 1 6 0 0 

Bailey,  Thos.  L.  11114  0 04 

Bailey,  Winey  03238008 


504  ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 

SHELBY  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Forde,  Jency  04138008 

Howard,  Samuel  1 6 1 2 10  0 0 10 

Mann,  Abner  0 3 1 1 5 0 0 5 

Avery,  Henry  20103003 

Ferrell,  Wm.  4 0 2 1 7 0 0 7 

Walker,  James  23229009 

Harrison,  Nathaniel  12115005 

Carrell,  Denis,  1 0 1 0 2 0 0 2 

Langley,  Jno.  16119009 

Shaw,  —ally  ? 1 2 1 2 6 0 0 6 

Crawford,  Christianey  2 0 0 2 0 0 2 

Harrison,  Thos.  1 1 103003 

Nixson,  Wm.  11  136006 

Jones,  Micajer  1 5 1 3 10  0 0 10 

Garner,  Vinson  1 3 1 4 9 0 0 9 

Garner,.  Jas.  11136006 

Garner,  Polly  0 0 1 1 2 0 0 2 

Loocus,  Geo.  14106106 

Loocus,  Solomon  12205005 

Booth,  Adam  1 3 2 3 9 0 0 9 

Mosley,  Jacob  1 1 1 2 5 0 0 5 

Piquot,  Abner  11125005 

Gibson,  Geo.  3 2 1 0 6 0 0 6 

Bowdon,  Samuel  12014037 

Low,  Wm.  B 1 3 1 5 10  0 6 16 

Wilmot,  Walker  20002002 

Tucker,  Wm.  1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 

Towson,  Charles  10001001 

Anders,  Jno.  31105016 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


505 


SHELBY  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 

(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

King,  Edmund  2 1 1 3 7 0 16  23 

Smith,  Thos.  W.  2 7 1 2 12  0 1 13 

Musick,  Jonathan  2 0 2 5 9 0 4 13 

Arnet,  Thomas  1 3 1 2 7 0 0 

Bell,  Jno.  1 3 1 0 5 0 0 5 

Richardson,  Chas.  10236006 

Seals,  Eligah  1 2 1 3 7 0 0 

Seals,  Abraham  10124004 

Seals,  Greenberry  110  13  0 0 

Seals,  Chas.  1 1 1 4 7 0 0 

Seals,  Enoch  11114004 

Hatley,  Robert  — 1 15107018 

Watson,  David  1 0 1 0 2 0 3 

Watson,  Josiah  2 2 1 2 7 0 0 

Guy,  Wm.  1 1013003 

Lovlady,  Jno.  11114004 

Francis,  Jos.  10102002 

Frost,  Hannah  02  1 3607  13 

Frost,  Benj.  01012013 

Eliet,  Amos  11103003 

Eliet,  Wm.  1 2104004 

Butler,  Christopher  (1)3  1 2 7 0 0 

Mcdanal,  Wm.  21  10. 4 004 

Wilder,  Ezekiel  1 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 

Wilder,  Wm.  1 1 0 2 4 0 0 4 

Wilder,  Geo.  10  113  00 

Orr,  Robert  7 — 10102002 

Oldham,  Jno.  3 4 1 0 8 0 0 

Shote,  Sanders  1 1 1 3 6 0 0 


506 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


SHELBY  COUNTY  CENSUS  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Thomas,  Geo.  1 4 1 1 7 0 0 7 

Love,  Samuel  12115005 

Love,  Aaron  10012002 

Eleson,  Jos.  1 3 1 0 5 0 0 5 

Eleson,  Moses  12104004 

Cooper,  Wm.  1 1 14705  12 

Rowan,  James  13105005 

Jonen,  Joseph  13127007 

Wiley,  Jas.  - 1 1 13700  77 

382  690  334  638  2,044  0 448  2,492 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


506A 


ALABAMA  IN  1870 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


507 


CENSUS  OF  WILCOX  COUNTY  1820 

Names  of  the  heads  of  families. 

(1)  — White  males  over  twenty  one  years. 

(2)  — White  males  under  twenty  one  years. 

(3)  — -White  females  over  twenty  one  years. 

(4)  — White  females  under  twenty  one  years. 

(5)  — Total  of  white  population. 

(6)  — Total  of  free  people  of  colour. 

(7)  — Total  of  slaves. 

(8)  — Total  of  inhabitants. 


Robert  H.  Scott  — 

John  A.  Gamble  

Wm.  J.  Gamble  

Young  Johnston 
Elexander  Johnston 

Francis  Powel  

Ashley  Wood  

Robert  Brown  

James  Dale  

John  Speight  

Thornton  Brown 

Wm.  Gaston  

David  Boyd  

Charles  B.  Were  .... 
Samuell  B.  Dickson 
Robert  J.  W.  Bell  ... 

James  C.  Drew  

Elexander  Beverley 

Wm.  Springle  .... 

Joseph  Vaughn  — _■ 

Obadiah  Dumas  

Mary  Ratliff  


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4) 

3 3 1 1 

2 2 10 

10  11 
2 111 
1110 
10  10 
1110 
2 0 10 

2 0 0 0 

4 10  2 

1111 
10  0 0 

2 2 12 

1110 
2 2 14 

2 110 
2 12  2 

2 3 2 2 

1111 
16  13 

10  10 
10  2 0 


(5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

8 0 15  23 

5 0 16 

3 0 14 

5 0 11  16 

3 0 10  13 

2 0 11  13 

3 0 7 10 

3 0 14 

2 0 4 6 

7 0 7 14 

4 0 4 8 

10  5 6 

7 0 4 11 

3 0 14 

9 0 13  22 

4 0 3 7 

7 0 0 7 

9 0 0 9 

4 0 2 6 

11  0 0 11 

2 0 20  22 

3 0 5 


8 


508 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


CENSUS  OF  WILCOX  COUNTY  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 


Wm.  M.  Christian  1110  3 12 

Alexander  Autrey  12104004 

Bailey  Maness.  — 1 3 1 0 5 0 0 

Joseph  Morgan  1 0 0 2 3 0 0 

John  Campbell  1413907  16 

Joshua  Luker  1 2 1 4 8 0 1 

Drury  Childree  — 14128019 

John  N.  Henry  1 3 1 0 5 0 0 

Wm  Mathews  1 0 1 3 5 0 0 

Joseph  Morgan  13149009 

John  C.  Hair  3 2 1 3 9 0 0 9 

James  Morgan  0 2 1 0 3 0 0 

Isam  Shuffeild  1 2 1 3 7 0 0 

Nathan  Shuffeild  01012002 

Wm  Smith  1 0 0 2 3 0 0 

Enoch  Manes  2 0 0 0 2 0 0 

John  Wilkison  1 0 1 3 5 0 0 

Harry  G.  Williams  1 0 0 0 1 0 21 

Meshech  Maness  1 4 2 3 10  0 0 10 

Joshua  Slone  131  1606  12 

George  Morgan  2 6 10  9 0 716 

Shedrich  Maness  10012002 

Elijah  Hattam  2 4 2 0 8 0 0 

Hiram  Bale  11114 

■ Edwin  L.  Harris  1 41  2808  16 

John  Moore  12104004 

Thomas  Long  2 3 1 0 6 0 713 

— man  Jams  2 2 2 1 7 0 0 

Richard  Small  1 1 1 0 3 0 0 


3 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944  .509 


CENSUS  OF  WILCOX  COUNTY  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 


Josiah  Taylor  

Unity  Spiva  

Darling  Seal  

John  Colman  

Joel  Hill  

Charles  Wodard  ... 

John  Wood  

Wm  Wodard  

Benjamin  Turner  . 

James  Jackson  

James  Mitchell  

Caleb  Cox  

John  Landron  

Wm  Traywick  

Nathan  Skinner  

Zedakiah  White  ..... 

Robert  White  

Henry  Hardy  

Isaac  Hayton  

Bud  C.  Mathews  ... 

Henry  Taylor  

John  Ratliff  Jun.  ... 

Francis  Hanson  

Britain  Belke  

David  White  

Isaac  Handley  

William  Fisher  

Samuell  Q.  J.  Bone 
Robert  Williamson 


13  2 0 

12  2 0 

10  0 1 

12  13 
1112 

14  11 
1113 
10  11 
2 112 
112  1 

13  11 

15  10 
1110 
1112 
12  10 

3 7 3 1 

3 12  2 
112  2 

4 3 3 2 

2  110 

• 1 1 0 0 

13  11 

12  0 1 

12  11 
0 3 11 

2 4 2 1 

2 4 10 

2 113 

10  11 


6 0 0 6 

5 0 16 

2 0 0 2 

7 0 0 7 

5 0 0 5 

7 0 0 7 

6 0 0 6 

3 0 0 3 

6 0 0 6 

5 0 0 5 

6 0 0 6 

7 0 0 7 

3 0 0 3 

5 0 0 5 

4 0 0 4 

14  0 0 14 

8 0 3 11 

6 0 0 6 

12  0 0 12 

4 0 12  16 

2 0 16  18 

6 0 13  19 

4 0 4 8 

5 0 16 

5 0 13  18 

7 0 17  26 

7 0 14  21 

7 0 20  27 

3 0 13  16 


510 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


CENSUS  OF  WILCOX  COUNTY  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (8) 

Thomas  Evins  2 0 0 0 2 0 53  55 

Stephen  Day  10113014 

Thomas  Dunn  10012002 

James  McMillian  10102002 

Patrick  Dannely  20103025 

Benjamin  Dunn  15219009 

Hiram  Day  ... — — - 2 2 2 1 7 0 0 7 

Wm  Hobbs  1 4 1 6 12  0 7 19 

Blackley  Higginbotom  — . 11103058 

Thomas  Rhods  21  1 1505  10 

Enoch  Bell  1 2 1 4 8 0 5 13 

John  Huff  2 0 0 0 2 0 15  17 

Jonathan  Bell  1 3 1 4 9 0 4 13 

Ritchard  Eddins  1 3 1 4 9 0 211 

Isrill  Champin  11114004 

Arthur  B.  Watson  1 4 1 4 10  0 6 16 

James  Wilson  - - 2 0 1 0 3 011  14 

Edward  Wingat  11114004 

Wm  B.  Eddins  20002002 

William  Eddins  .. — 13  116  0 3 

Wallace  Noble  1 2 1 0 4 0 0 4 

John  G.  Ramsey  10135005 

Green  English  13206017 

Carmich  Tharp  .... 7 3 2 4 16  0 0 16 

Rubin  Hill  2 5 2 1 10  0 14  24 

Darling  Glover  1 1 2 3 7 0 0 

Thomas  Carter  1 2 1 0 4 0 711 

Abner  Cleaveland  3 1 1 5 10  0 16  26 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


511 


CENSUS  OF  WILCOX  COUNTY  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6) 


Joseph  King  2 

Joseph  Gee  1 

John  H.  McConnal  3 

John  Ratliff,  Sinr  1 

Edmond  Merritt  1 

James  White  3 

Rubin  Satterwhite  1 

Samuell  Luckey  2 

James  Holley  3 

Burrell  Lasiter  1 

Abraham  Wells  2 

James  C.  Irvin  1 

Elexander  Outlaw  3 

John  Gawvoy  1 

George  W.  Odum  1 

D.  Shepherd  .... 1 

Walter  Taylor  2 

John  D.  Chattertin  1 

Charter  L.  Hilman  1 

Wm  Winn  1 

Jonathan  Nubary  1 

John  Jenkins  1 

James  Jenkins  1 

Wm  Hanks  2 

Wm  Owens  2 

Stephen  Miligan  2 

Wm  Smith  2 

Daniell  Green  1 


0 0 0 2 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

110  5 0 

6 119  0 

4 117  0 

5 1 2 11  0 

2 13  7 0 

2 13  8 0 

3 1 6 13  0 

2 115  0 

3 10  6 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

2 117  0 

113  6 0 

10  13  0 

114  7 0 

2 10  5 0 

0 0 0 1 0 

110  3 0 

5 0 0 6 0 

6 1 3 11  0 

3 116  0 

113  6 0 

4 1 4 11  0 

0 114  0 

0 12  5 0 

5 1 2 10  0 

3 1 3 8 0 


(7) 

3 

18 

21 

3 

0 

9 

13 

0 

2 

0 

0 

6 

3 

0 

0 

0 

16 

30 

17 

0 

0 

5 

6 
0 
0 
0 
9 
0 


(8) 

5 

19 

26 

12 

7 

20 
20 

8 
15 

5 

6 
7 

10 

6 

3 

7 

21 

31 

20 

6 

11 

11 

12 

11 

4 

5 

19 

8 


512 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


CENSUS  OF  WILCOX  COUNTY  1820 


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  

Jerimiah  Denis  10124004 

Samuell  Denis  1 0 1 2 4 0 4 

Jerimiah  A.  Tharp  10012057 

James  Hamel  1 4 1 2 8 0 0 

John  G.  Fry  1112  5 0 

Francis  Low  2 1115  0 2 

Seth  Smith  1 3 1 0 5 0 1 6 

Thomas  Bogin  1 3 1 2 7 0 1 

Samuell  Bogin  3 6 2 4 15  0 7 22 

John  McCondicho  3 2 2 1 8 0 14  22 

John  Thigpenn  2 4 1 3 10  0 3 13 

Sampson  Ethredge  14  12  8 0 

John  Lawson  2 6 2 4 14  0 1 15 

Isaac  Shuffeild  1 4 1 2 8 0 0 

Thomas  Thompkin  — ... 10012002 

Peter  Hair  10012002 

Wm  McKerall  3 0 1 0 4 0 27  31 

E.  Pharr  2 0 1 1 4 0 21  25 

John  Gullett  2 0 1 0 3 0 

Waitmon  Gullett  12  115  0 

A.  R.  Smith  2 3 3 2 10  0 7 17 

David  Smith  2 0 10  3 

Joseph  Vaughn  1 5 1 411  0 Oil 

Jonathan  A.  Brantey  12  14  8 

James  Nettles  1 5 1 3 10  0 16  26 

John  McArthur  2 1 0 0 3 0 3 

Thomas  McCants  1 2 1 2 6 011  17 

John  McCants  1 5 1 3 10  0 4 14 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


513 


CENSUS  OF  WILCOX  COUNTY  1820 


(1) 

(2) 

(3) 

(4) 

(5) 

(6) 

(7) 

(8) 

Wm  Black  .. 

6 

4 

3 

3 

16 

0 

6 

22 

Jarrett  Carter  

1 

0 

1 

1 

3 

0 

5 

8 

John  Sims  

4 

3 

2 

4 

13 

0 

0 

13 

Charles  Capell  

3 

2 

1 

0 

6 

0 

30 

36 

John  Devaughn  

4 

0 

0 

0 

4 

0 

0 

4 

Samuell  Lee  

1 

0 

1 

0 

2 

0 

11 

13 

John  Eads  

4 

2 

1 

2 

9 

0 

38 

47 

JoJnn  Wadkins  

1 

0 

0 

2 

3 

0 

3 

6 

Wm  McLendon  ... ... 

1 

4 

1 

3 

9 

0 

7 

16 

James  Ingram  

1 

1 

0 

0 

2 

0 

6 

8 

Andrew  C.  Horne  

2 

0 

0 

0 

2 

0 

20 

22 

Wm  Mason  

2 

2 

2 

0 

6 

0 

17 

23 

John  Beck  

1 

5 

1 

3 

10 

0 

40 

50 

Mathew  Wood  

2 

3 

1 

2 

8 

0 

15 

23 

Samuell  Packer  

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

0 

0 

4 

Noah  Rogers  

1 

0 

1 

0 

2 

0 

2 

4 

Jessee  Bradley  

1 

3 

1 

0 

5 

0 

7 

12 

John  Blackman  

2 

0 

3 

2 

7 

0 

33 

40 

George  Nettles  

1 

0 

0 

1 

2 

0 

3 

5 

James  Rachels  

1 

2 

1 

2 

6 

0 

0 

6 

Rhalf  Gardner  

2 

1 

1 

2 

6 

0 

0 

6 

Hector  McNeil  

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

0 

3 

7 

John  Horne  

1 

1 

1 

3 

6 

0 

2 

8 

James  A.  Tait  

3 

4 

1 

0 

8 

2 

69 

79 

George  Williamson  ..— 

3 

1 

0 

2 

6 

0 

46 

52 

Charles  Thaxton  

2 

1 

0 

0 

3 

0 

26 

29 

Charles  L.  Mathews  — 

2 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

21 

23 

Osbern  Jones  

1 

3 

1 

0 

5 

0 

0 

5 

514 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


CENSUS  OF  WILCOX  COUNTY  1820 


(1) 

(2) 

(3) 

(4) 

(5) 

(6) 

Aaron  Baldwin  

1 

3 

1 

2 

7 

0 

Robert  H.  Gregg  

2 

2 

1 

3 

8 

0 

Lucy  Strother  

0 

0 

2 

1 

3 

0 

Neal  Thomson  

1 

2 

1 

1 

5 

0 

Hardy  Green  

1 

4 

1 

0 

6 

0 

Daniel  Green  

1 

0 

2 

0 

3 

0 

Simon  Donald  

2 

2 

2 

3 

9 

0 

Joseph  Lowery  

2 

1 

1 

0 

4 

0 

Wm  Donald  

1 

4 

2 

1 

8 

0 

Jonathan  L.  Kelly  

1 

1 

1 

2 

5 

0 

Daniel  Walker  

1 

0 

0 

0 

1 

0 

Elijah  Donald  

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

0 

Peter  Filing  

2 

2 

2 

3 

9 

0 

Jonathan  Newman  

1 

2 

0 

2 

5 

0 

Jessee  Kelly  

1 

4 

1 

3 

9 

0 

John  Kelly  

1 

2 

0 

1 

4 

0 

John  Gilmore  

1 

2 

2 

3 

8 

0 

Peter  Filing  Jun.  

1 

0 

0 

1 

2 

0 

John  Smith  

2 

1 

0 

1 

4 

0 

William  Linch  

1 

3 

1 

1 

6 

0 

James  Linch  — 

1 

3 

1 

1 

6 

0 

John  Linch  

1 

3 

1 

1 

6 

0 

Edmond  Wiggins  

1 

1 

1 

2 

5 

0 

Enoch  Kelly  

0 

2 

2 

4 

8 

0 

Joel  Mixon  

2 

1 

1 

3 

7 

0 

Wm  Hays  

1 

1 

1 

3 

6 

0 

Peter  Wetherly  

2 

1 

1 

1 

5 

0 

Joshua  Gates  

1 

0 

2 

0 

3 

0 

(7)  (8) 

15  22 

18  26 

18  21 

1 6 

0 6 

0 ‘3 

13  22 

8 12 

14  22 

0 5 

0 1 

2 6 

3 12 

12  17 

1 10 

0 4 

0 8 

0 2 

1 5 

2 8 

0 6 

1 7 

3 8 

0 8 

0 7 

2 8 

0 5 

0 


3 


FALL  ISSUE,  1944 


515 


CENSUS  OF  WILCOX  COUNTY  1820 


Wm  Smith  

Nathaniel  Walker 

John  Smith  

John  Wray  

James  Thomas  

John  Thomas  

James  Mitchell  Sen  

Daniel  McLane  

Thomas  Philips  

Isaac  Luker  

Wm  Luker  

Isaac  Hay  ton  

Henry  Hardy  — 

Robert  White  

Zedakiah  White  

D.  C.  Smith  

Mathias  Walker  .. 

E.  McCOy  ... 

M.  Williams  

J.  Averitt  

A.  Mullins  


(1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7) 


2 5 
1 1 
2 0 
1 1 
1 1 
1 3 

1 3 

2 0 
1 1 

2 ,3 
1 1 
4 3 
1 1 

3 1 
3 7 
1 1 
1 1 
1 1 
1 2 
2 1 
2 4 


1 3 

1 3 

1 2 

1 2 

2 0 

1 3 

1 1 

1 1 

1 3 

1 3 

1 1 

3 2 

2 2 

2 2 

3 1 

1 1 

1 1 

1 3 

1 3 

1 3 

2 5 


11  0 

6 0 

5 0 

5 0 

4 0 

8 0 

6 0 

4 0 

6 0 

9 0 

4 0 

12  0 

6 0 

8 0 

14  0 

4 0 

4 0 

6 0 

7 0 

7 0 

13  0 


0 

0 

2 

1 

0 

0 

0 

2 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

3 

0 

2 

0 

2 

0 

0 

0 


I do  hereby  Certify  that  the  foregoing  contains  a true 
enumeration  of  the  inhabitants  of  Wilcox  County  in  the 
year  1820  Amounting  to  two  thousand  seven  hundred  and 
fifty  five. 


(8) 

11 

6 

7 
6 
4 

8 
6 
6 
6 
9 
4 

12 

6 

11 

14 

6 

4 

8 

7 

7 

13 


October  4th,  1820. 


Ephriam  Pharr. 


THE 

ALABAMA  HISTORICAL 
QUARTERLY 

MARIE  BANKHEAD  OWEN.  Editor 
EMMETT  KILPATRICK,  Co-Editor 


Published  by  the 
STATE  DEPARTMENT 
OF 

ARCHIVES  AND  HISTORY 

Price  $2.00  annually ; single  copies,  50c 


Vol.  6 No.  4 


WINTER  ISSUE 
1944 


WETUMPKA  PRINTING  CO. 
Printers  and  Publishers 
Wetumpka,  Ala. 

1945 


CONTENTS 


Editorial  520 

Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Alabama  523 


EDITORIAL 


In  view  of  the  fact  that  there  are  thousands  of  Alabamians 
who  are  descended  from  Revolutionary  soldiers,  either  those  buried 
in  this  State  or  in  other  States,  the  Alabama  State  Department 
of  Archives  and  Historv  is  devoting-  the  1944,  Winter  Issue  of  the 
Alabama  Historical  Quarterly  to  that  subject.  In  1911,  Thomas  Mc- 
Adory  Owen,  founder  and  for  twenty  years  Director  of  the  Depart- 
ment, published  as  Bulletin  Xo.  5,  a pamphlet  entitled  “Revolu- 
tionary Soldiers  in  Alabama”.  In  the  Foreword  of  that  bulletin 
Dr.  Owen  made  the  following  statement : 

It  is  believed  that  the  publication  of  this  compilation  will 
be  of  much  practical  service  to  large  numbers  of  people  inter- 
ested in  a study  of  the  personal  records  of  the  Heroes  of  the 
American  Revolution.  And  this  is  true,  although  the  lists  are 
manifestly  incomplete,  and  the  sketches  are  wanting  in  many 
desirable  details. 

The  lists  have  been  made  up  from  altogether  reliable  and 
authentic  sources.  These  consist  of  contemporary  obituaries, 
drawn  from  old  newspaper  files;  the  Revolutionary  Pension  Roll, 
published  by  the  U.  S.  Government  as  Senate  Document  514,  3 
volumes,  23rd  Congress,  1st  Session,  1833-34  ; the  Census  of  Pen- 
sioners, taken  officially  in  1840,  and  pifhlished  by  the  U.  S.  Gov- 
ernment in  1841,  in  one  volume;  inscriptions  from  tombstones; 
well  authenticated  data  taken  from  published  family  histories  ; and 
the  manuscript  Pension  Book,  kept  officially  by  the  State  Branch 
Bank  at  Mobile.  A few  other  sources  have  been  drawn  upon. 
Citation  of  the  authority  or  authorities  has  been  given  in  each 
case. 


In  1904  Mrs.  P.  H.  Mell  published  a paper  containing 
thirty  sketches,  entitled  “Revolutionary  Soldiers  Buried  in 
Alabama.”  It  appears  as  pp.  527-572,  Vol.  iv,  Transactions  of 
the  Alabama  Historical  Society,  1899-1903.  Mrs.  Mell  had 
been  State  Historian  of  the  Alabama  Division  of  the  Daughters 
of  the  American  Revolution.  While  limited  in  numbers,  her 
paper  was  prepared  with  great  care.  The  sketches  appear  in 
their  proper  places  in  the  list  here  presented,  with  due  credit. 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


521 


Although  a few  lists  of  names,  either  by  counties  or  localities, 
had  been  compiled,  no  pretentious  effort,  prior  to  the  work  of 
Mrs,  Mell,  had  been  undertaken. 


Inasmuch  as  this  is  but  a preliminary  effort  looking  to  a 
complete  and  exhaustive  record,  the  attention  of  the  Depart- 
ment should  be  brought  to  any  and  all  errors,  to  dates  and 
places  of  death,  to  places  of  burial,  to  the  names  of  those  who 
removed  from  the  State,  and  to  all  others  whose  names  ought 
to  be  included. 

Montgomery,  Ala.,  Sept.  30,  1010. 

In  the  thirty-four  years  intervening  between  that  publication 
and  the  present  one  additions  have  been  made  to  the  list.  The 
most  active  and  zealous  investigators  of  the  subject  iire  the  Daugh- 
ters of  the  American  Revolution  of  which  Society  there  are  several 
hundred  members  in  the  State,  descendants  of  Revolutionary 
soldiers  of  the  original  thirteen  Colonies.  In  addition  to  the  in- 
formation derived  through  the  D.A.R.,  other  sources  have  con- 
tributed to  the  list  which  sources  have  been  credited  in  connection 
with  each  listing.  In  only  one  case  was  a Negro  found  on  the  list 
Ned  Rice  of  Jackson  County.  There  were,  however,  manv  Negroes 
in  the  Revolutionary  forces. 

The  last  list  published  here,  located  in  Washington  by  Miss 
Maud  McLure  Kelly,  Historical  Materials  Collector  of  the  De- 
partment, is  made  up  of  men  or  their  widows  whose  applications 
to  the  Federal  Government  for  pensions  were  denied.  These  ap- 
plications were  either  rejected  outright  or  were  suspended  pending 
additional  proof  which  was  usually  never  made.  The  most  frequent 
grounds  for  the  rejection  of  the  application  was  that  the  service 
shown  in  the  Continental  Line  had  been  of  less  than  six  months 
duration  or  that  the  service  shown  had  not  been  rendered  in  the 
Continental  Line  but  had  been  in  the  State  Militia  troops,  or  that 
the  service  had  been  non-military,  such  as  wagoner  for  the  troops, 
or  express  riding. 

The  transportation  of  troops  and  other  supplies  was  then  a 
civilian  job,  not  a part  of  military  duties,  and  those  engaged  in  it 
were  civilians  and  not  entitled  to  pensions  under  the  law.  One 
application  was  rejected  because  the  applicant  was  too  young  to 


522 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


qualify  for  a pension  under  the  Act  of  Congress.  Three  were 
rejected  because  the  service  was  rendered  after  the  Revolution 
had  officially  ended  and  three  because  the  applicants  had  deserted. 
The  rejection  of  the  applications  of  the  widows  was  because  they 
had  married  after  the  date  named  in  the  Act  of  Congress.  One 
Act  required  that  the  marriage  must  have  occurred  before  the  close 
of  the  Revolutionary  War,  and  the  other  Act  of  Congress  fixed  the 
date  as  before  January  1,  1794.  With  the  exception  of  the  three 
whose  service  occurred  after  the  close  of  the  War  and  of  the  three 
who  deserted,  all  of  these  men  were  loyal  veterans  of  the  Ameri- 
can Revolution. 

The  Director  of  the  Department  of  Archives  and  History 
wishes  to  express  her  appreciation  of  the  painstaking  work  of 
M iss  Mary  R.  Mullen  in  the  compilation  of  this  Quarterly.  Miss' 
Mullen  has  been  the  Librarian  of  the  Department  for  twenty-seven 
years  having  graduated  in  library  science  in  the  Library  School  of 
Emory  University,  Georgia.  She  has  for  twenty-five  years  been 
the  Secretary  of  the  Alabama  Library  Association  and  is  regarded 
by  the  librarians  of  the  Nation  as  a leader  in  the  library  profession. 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


523 


REVOLUTIONARY  SOLDIERS  IN  ALABAMA 

ABERNATHY,  DAVID — Of  Scotch-Irish  extraction,  an  early 
settler  in  Virginia,  who  served  in  the  Revolutionary  War,  and  who 
was  one  of  the  pioneers  of  Huntsville,  Ala. — Owen,  History  of  Ala- 
bama and  Dictionary  of  Alabama  Biography,  vol.  3,  p.  3. 

ADKINS,  BENJAMIN — Name  appears  on  Huntsville  Monu- 
ment, erected  by  Twickenham  Town  Chapter,  D.A.R. 

AIMES,  COL.  HENRY — Revolutionary  soldier  of  Hanover 
County,  Va.,  was  the  father  of  Samuel  and  Fisher  Aimes,  of 
Sumter  County,  Ala. — Ljungstedt  County  Court  Note  Book,  April 
1927,  p.  17. 

ALEXANDER,  JEREMIAH — Pensioner  of  Morgan  County, 
Ala.,  died  in  Walker  County,  Ala.,  January  26,  1847,  leaving  the 
following  children:  Luticia  Orear ; Esther  Stephenson;  John;  Mar- 
tha Inmon ; and  Abigail  Randolph.  The  arrears  of  his  pension 
were  paid  to  his  son-in-law,  Martin  Orear. — Jones  and  Gandrud, 
Alabama  Records,  vol.  74,  Morgan  County,  p.  62. 

ALEXANDER,  JEREMIAH,  was  residing  in  Washington 
County  Va.,  on  April  1,  1780,  when  he  enlisted  with  the  Virginia 
troops  in  the  Continental  Army,  serving  first  under  Captain  Mont- 
gomery, later  under  Lieutenant  Davidson  and  Captain  Neil,  and 
then  transferred  back  to  Captain  Montgomery’s  company  under 
Colonel  Campbell.  He  was  in  an  engagement  with  British  at 
Whitsitt’s  Mill  on  the  Reedy  Fork  on  the  Haw  River  in  North 
Carolina.  After  the  close  of  the  Revolutionary  War  Jeremiah 
Alexander  moved  from  Washington  County,  Virginia,  to  the  State 
of  Tennessee.  Later  he  moved  to  North  Carolina,  and  1819  he 
came  to  Alabama  and  settled  in  Morgan  County.  He  was  living  in 
Morgan  County,  in  1832,  but  in  1840  he  was  known  to  have  been 
residing  in  Walker  County,  where  he  is  presumed  to  have  died  on 
January  26,  1847. — Dombhart’s  History  of  Walker  County,  Alabama , 
page  120-1.  See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Alabama,  1911,  page  5. 

ALLEN,  ROBERT — Death — Another  Old  Soldier  of  the  Revo- 
lution gone  home.  Died  on  the  29th  ult.  Robert  Allen,  of  this 
county.  They  leave  us  one  by  one — yet  they  live  in  our  memory. — 
The  Democrat,  Huntsville,  Ala.  November  5,  1826. 


524 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


ALLEN,  AN  NANI  AS.  Grave  marked  at  Maxwell,  eight 
miles  from  Stevenson,  Ala.,  October  21,  1934,  by  Tidence  Lane 
Chapter  D.A.R.,  Scottsboro,  Ala.  The  old  house  erected  by 
Annanias  Allen  in  1833  is  still  standing.  He  has  many  descendants 
in  the  county. — Kennamer’s  History  of  Jackson  County,  page  195. 

ALSTON,  LEMUEL  J. — Died  recently  at  his  residence  in 
Clarke  County,  Ala.,  Col.  LEMUEL  J,  ALSTON,  aged  75  years, 
one  of  the  heroes  of  the  Revolution  and  formerly  a member  of 
Congress  from  South  Carolina. — Mobile  Commercial  Register  and 
Patriot,  January  14,  1837. 

AMONETTE,  JOHN  (1756-1833)  applied  for  pension,  1832, 
for  service  as  private  in  Captain  Franklin’s  company,  10th  Virginia 
regiment.  He  was  born  in  Virginia;  died  in  Madison  County,  Ala- 
bama.— D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  Vol.  68,  page  315. 

AMONETTE,  JOHN— Born  1752,  died  March  30,  1833,  buried 
at  Hazel  Green,  Madison  County,  served  in  Captain  Franklin’s 
Company. — General  D.A.R.  Report,  1916. 

ARM  1ST  GAD,  WILLIAM,  (1762-1842),  enlisted  as  a mu- 
sician at  the  age  of  fifteen  ; was  at  Valley  Forge,  Monmouth  and 
the  storming  of  Stony  Point.  His  pension  was  allowed  for  two 
years'  actual  service  as  private,  Virginia  line.  He  was  born  in 
Elizabeth  City,  Va. ; died  in  Clarke  Co.,  Alabama,  and  upon  his 
tombstone  is  inscribed  “A  Virginian.  A soldier  of  the  Revolution.” 
-D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  Vol.  43,  page  144.  See  also  General  D.A.R, 
Report,  1898. 

ARMSTRONG,  JAMES — Shelby  County  Census  of  1830  gives 
his  age  as  between  sixty  and  seventy  and  one  female  between 
sixty  and  seventy.  They  lived  near  Mertsel.  It  is  said  by 
descendants  and  reputed  by  neighbors  that  he  was  a Revolutionary 
soldier  as  he  had  his  musket  and  uniform. — Information  from  Wm. 
F.  Franke,  Birmingham,  Ala. 

ARNOLD,  THOMAS,  (1763-1844)  served  as  private  under 
Captains  John  Ridgeway  and  George  Martin,  Colonels  Sumter  and 
Casey.  He  applied  for  a pension,  1833,  and  his  claim  was  allowed. 
He  was  born  in  Virginia;  died  in  Alabama.— D.A.R.  JJneagc  Book r 
Vol.  123,  page  82. 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


525 


ARNOLD,  THOMAS — His  widow  s application  for  a pension 
states  the  following-:  enlisted  for  eighteen  months,  in  1779;  again 
enlisted  in  March  1783,  for  twelve  months;  served  in  the  battles 
of  Long  Cane,  wounded  at  Hammonds’  Old  Store,  and  was  at 
Cowpens.  He  was  residing  in  Ninety-Six  District,  S.  C.,  when  he 
enlisted.  He  was  residing  in  Autauga  County,  Ala.,  April  16,  1833, 
when  he  applied  for  a pension,  and  was  born  in  Buckingham  County. 
Va.,  October  5,  1766.  His  claim  was  granted.  He  was  married 

October  26,  1786,  to  Mary  , born  May  13.  1766.  He  died 

March  23.  1844.  She  was  allowed  a Revolutionary  pension  on  her 
application  executed  January  18,  1854,  while  a resident  of  Selma, 
Dallas  County.  Children:  Temperance,  born  November  25,  1789, 
married  August  15,  1804,  Peter  Ross;  William  B.,  born  July  4, 
1791;  John,  born  April  4,  1793;  Thomas  H.,  born  March  7,  1797: 
Sally  P.,  born  April  27,  1799;  Ann  H.,  born  June  22,  1802,  married 
Hance  H.  Dunklin. — See  also  Jones  and  Gandrud,  Autauga  County 
Records,  vol.  76,  p.  45. 

AYERS,  SAMUEL — Name  appears  on  Huntsville  Monument, 
erected  by  Twickenham  Town  Chapter,  D.A.R. 

BACON,  RICHARD — Among  the  graves  of  soldiers  of  the 
Revolution  located  that  of  Richard  Bacon,  Captain,  born  1759,  died 
Dec.  5,  1832,  served  in  the  Virginia  Continental  Line.  Buried  on 
the  old  Betts  Place  near  Madison,  in  Madison  County. — General  D.A.R. 
Report,  1908-09. 

BAKER,  SAMUEL,  a resident  of  Caldwell  County,  Kv.  Date 
of  certificate,  February  19,  1825.  Annual  allowance,  $20.00.  Re- 
moved to  Kentucky. — Alabama  Revolutionary  Pensioners.  State  Bank, 
Mobile.  1831-1838,  page  7. 

BARBOUR,  MORDECAI,  (1763-1846),  served  under  Capt. 
John  Stewart  and  Capt.  John  Woodford  and  under  the  command 
of  LaFayette.  He  was  an  officer  in  the  Culpeper  county  militia 
at  the  siege  of  York  and  conveyed  the  prisoners  to  Winchester. 
He  resided  in  Fredericksburg,  Va.,  until  1808,  when  he  removed 
to  Petersburg.  He  died  at  the  home  of  his  daughter  Frances  in 
Alabama. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  Vol.  33,  pages  257-8. 

BARNETT,  NATHANIEL— Born  1727.  died  1820,  buried 
near  Marks  place.  Mount  Meigs  ; captured  by  British  and  held  at 
Augusta.' — General  D.A.R.  Report,  1934. 


526 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


BARNET  or  BARNETT,  THOMAS— Born  May  6,  1764,  place 
not  given  or  parents.  According  to  his  statement  of  September 
6,  1S33,  when  he  applied  for  pension,  he  rendered  the  following 
service  as  Private  in  the  S.  C.  Troops;  from  the  Spring  of  1781, 
4 months  under  Capt.  John  “Goin”  and  Col.  Andrew  Pickens;  in 
the  Fall  of  1781,  2 months  under  Captain  Hampton  and  Col.  John 
Thomas  in  “an  expedition  into  the  Cherokee  Nation.”  Pension 
certificate  was  issued,  No.  22443,  November  4,  1833,  to  Thomas 
Barnet,  rate  $80  per  annum,  act  of  June  7,  1832,  Alabama  Agency. 
At  enlistment  he  resided  in  Spartanburg  District,  S.  C.,  moved 
thence  to  Franklin  County,  Ga.,  moved  from  there  in  1805  “to  the 
Tennessee  River  in  the  State  of  Tennessee”,  returned  to  Franklin 
County,  Ga.,  resided  later  in  Morgan  County,  Georgia,  moved 
thence  to  Montgomery  County,  Ala.,  where  he  resided  until  1820, 
when  he  moved  to  Perry  County,  Ala.,  where  he  resided  when  he 
received  his  pension.  The  records  show  that  certificate  No.  22443, 
was  last  pension  paid  for  the  period  March  4,  1837  to  Sept.  4,  1839, 
pursuant  to  a certificate  issued  by  the  Treasury  Dept.,  Third 
Auditor’s  Office,  on  June  8,  1840.  He  certified  on  March  5,  1840, 
that  he  had  been  living  in  Perry  County,  Ala.,  for  five  years,  and 
that  he  had  previously  lived  in  Morgan  County,  Ga.,  and  in  Spar- 
tanburg District,  S.  C. — Jones  and  Gandrud,  Perry  County,  vol.  73, 
Alabama  Records. 

BARNETT,  WILLIAM  (1761-1834)  served  as  private  in  the 
Virginia  militia  from  Amherst  County  and  was  present  at  the 
surrender  of  Cornwallis.  He  was  born  in  Amherst  County,  Va. ; 
died  in  Montgomery  County,  Ala. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book , Vol.  148, 
p.  154.  Grave  marked  by  Peter  Forney,  Chapter,  D.A.R. , Montgomery, 
June  14,  1933.  See  also  General  D.A.R.  Report,  1934. 

BARRY,  WILLIAM — Died  at  the  residence  of  Salathiel 
Clements,  in  this  County,  on  the  28th  of  June,  1838,  William  Barry, 
aged  about  84  years.  He  was  an  old  Revolutionary  Soldier  & 
Pensioner,  of  the  Virginia  line,  and  served  under  the  personal 
command  of  Washington.  He  was  in  all  the  principal  battles 
fought  to  the  North,  as  Brandywine,  Monmouth,  Germantown, 
Sic.  &c.  He  always  supported  a fair  and  honest  character.  He  is 
the  last  perhaps  of  the  family,  except  one  daughter,  in  whose  arms 
he  died — Jacksonville  Republican , Thursday,  July  12,  1838. 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


527 


BARTON,  JOHN,  was  in  Jefferson  County  in  1822.  He  was 
a Revolutionary  soldier  who  died  in  the  early  1830’s.  I think  his 
service  was  in  South  Carolina. — Information  from  Mrs.  F.  L.  Weil- 
and,  Sr.,  1516  Sweetbrier,  Nashville,  Tenn. 

BARTON,  JOHN — Jefferson  County  Census  of  1830  gives  his 
age  as  between  sixty  and  seventy. 

BASS,  BURWELL — Of  English  descent,  who  served  with  his 
father  in  the  Revolutionary  War,  emigrated  from  North  Carolina 
to  Alabama. — Owen,  History  of  Alabama  and  Dictionary  of  Alabama 
Biography , vol.  3,  p.  110. 

BASS,  BURWELL — Jefferson  County  Census  of  1830  lists 
him  as  having  in  his  household,  including  himself,  a male  and  a 
female  aged  sixty  to  seventy,  female  aged  forty  to  fifty,  a male 
aged  five  to  ten. 

BASS,  BURWELL — Served  in  Militia,  North  Carolina. — 
D.A.R.  Roster  of  North  Carolina  Soldiers  in  Revolution , p.  320. 

BASS,  URIAH — Name  appears  on  Huntsville  Monument, 
erected  by  Twickenham  Town  Chapter,  D.A.R. 

BASS,  URIAH,  private,  Lt.  Col.  Quinn’s  Company,  Col.  John 
Williams  Ninth  Regiment,  enlisted  July  20,  1778  , period  of  service, 
nine  months. — D.A.R.  Roster  of  N.  C.  Soldiers  in  the  American  Revo- 
lution, p.  107. 

BAYLES,  HEZEKIAH — Revolutionary  soldier  from  Virginia, 
who  had  lived  a short  time  in  Madison  County,  was  its  (Decatur 
County)  first  county  judge,  having  been  elected  by  the  legislature. — 
Kennamer,  History  of  Jackson  County , p.  21. 

BAYLES,  HEZEKIAH — State  of  Alabama,  Orphan’s  Court 
of  Madison  County,  November  Term,  1835,  Hezekiah  Bayles,  Jr., 
and  Joseph  Rice,  administrators  of  Hezekiah  Bayles,  Sr.,  de- 
ceased, against  the  heirs  of  Hezekiah  Bayles,  Sr.,  deceased. 

BAYLES,  HEZEKIAH — Came  from  Maryland  to  North 
Carolina,  Tennessee  and  then  in  1806  to  New  Market,  Madison 
County,  Ala.  He  was  a soldier  of  the  Revolution.  He  was  born 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


528 


in  Maryland  in  1756  and  died  in  1835  in  Madison  County.  His 
wife  was  Jane  Evans  who  died  in  1837. — Notes  from  Dr.  Franciso 
Rice,  Library,  Department  of  Archives  a)ut  History.  See  also  Jones' 
Harris  ami  Allied  families,  p.  92. 

BECK.  ANDREW — Born  May  15,  1755,  in  Rowan  County, 
X.  C.  He  alleged  that  he  volunteered  in  March,  1781  ; served  in 
Capt.  Henry  Spears  Company  of  N.  C’.  Troops,  engaged  in  guard- 
ing several  towns  against  the  British  and  the  Tories;  served  as 
private.  His  alleged  service  amounted  to  six  months.  He  was 
pensioned  on  Certificate  No.  22  414  issued  October  29,  1833;  rate 
820  per  annum,  act  of  June  7,  1832,  Alabama  Agency.  It  was  not 
Mated  as  to  whether  or  not  he  was  married  or  as  to  his  parents. 
During  service  he  resided  in  Surry  County,  N.  C.  After  the  War. 
he  resided  in  Chatham  and  Randolph  Counties  in  the  same  states 
then  in  “Chesterfield  District”,  S.  C. ; from  there  he  moved  to 
Henry  County,  Ga.,  and  about  1831  he  moved  to  Peri*}'  County, 
Ala.,  where  he  was  living  in  1833.  The  date  of  his  death  does  not 
appear  in  the  file.  The  last  payment  of  pension.  No.  22414,  cover- 
ing the  period  from  March  4,  1836  to  Sept.  4,  1838,  was  made  to 
him  pursuant  to  a certificate  issued  by  the  Treasury  Dept.,  Third 
Auditor’s  Office,  on  May  25,  1839.  The  pensioner  certified  on 
March  25,  1839,  that  he  had  been  living  in  Perry  County,  Ala.,  for 
seven  years  and  that  he  had  previously  lived  in  Henry  County, 
Georgia. — Jones  and  Gandrud,  Perry  County,  vol.  73,  Alabama  Records. 

BEESON,  CAPT.  ED. — Buried  in  the  little  Bristol’s  Cove, 
Etowah  County,  fifteen  miles  north  west  of  Attalla.  Enrolled  as 
a pensioner.  He  drew  a pension,  1833,  while  living  in  St.  Clair 
County. — Records  from  Alabama  D.A.R. 

BELL,  WILLIAM,  of  Spottsylvania  County,  died  on  the  19th 
of  March,  in  the  94th  year  of  his  age.  He  was  at  Yorktown  when 
Cornwallis  surrendered.  He  had  been  a member  of  the  Baptist 
Church  for  more  than  70  years.  He  was  an  honest  man  and  es- 
teemed by  his  neighbors. — The  Southern  Advocate,  Huntsville,  April 
23d,  1857. 


BENTLEY,  EFFORD,  (1759-1837),  served  as  a minute  man 
<■  nd  gave  three  tours  of  duty,  1777-80.  He  was  sergeant  at  the 
battles  of  Camden  and  Petersburg.  He  was  a pensioner  when  he 
died  in  Madison  County,  Ala. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  Vol.  14,  p.  299. 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


529 


BENTLEY,  EFFORD,  Departed  this  life,  after  a distressing 
illness  of  four  weeks,  on  the  3rd  inst.  at  the  residence  of  his  son, 
John  G.  Bentley,  in  Madison  County,  Ala.,  Col.  Efford  Bentley, 
in  the  78th  year  of  his  age,  formerly  of  Amelia  County,  Virginia. 
In  his  very  boyhood  he  entered  the  military  service  of  his  country, 
during  our  revolutionary  struggle ; on  which  subject  he  dwelt  with 
more  than  ordinary  interest.  The  writer  of  this  was  intimately 
acquainted  with  Col.  Bentley,  and  was  with  him  during  his  last 
illness.  He  Avas  an  affectionate  husband,  a tender  parent,  and 
highly  esteemed  by  his  numerous  acquaintances.  He  bore  his 
afflictions  with  truly  Christian  fortitude  and  patience ; he  was  en- 
gaged in  prayer  for  several  years,  but  it  was  in  his  last  sickness 
that  his  piety  was  most  conspicuous.  But  the  patriot  and  Christian 
is  gone  to  receive  his  reward.  He  has  left  a companion,  eight 
children,  and  a numerous  circle  of  relations  and  friends  to  mourn 
their  loss  ; but  they  weep  not  as  those  who  have  no  hope.  Our 
beloved  and  aged  friend  left  indubitable  evidence  to  his  surround- 
ing attendants,  that  his  peace  was  made  Avith  God.  His  friends 
may  hoav  prepare  to  meet  him  in  hea\ren,  AAdiere  they  may  enjoy 
that  lasting  happiness  of  which  he  so  emphatically  spoke,  Avhere 
friends  will  part  no  more,  but  join  in  the  praise  of  God  forever. 
— The  Editor  of  the  Richmond  Enquirer  and  Whig  will  please  notice 
the  above. — Huntsville  Democrat , July  1 1,  1837.  See  also  Jones’  Harris 
& Allied  Families,  p.  98. 

BERRY,  JAMES  (1750-1836)  enlisted  from  Burks  County, 
Pa.,  1777,  for  the  Avar  and  was  at  BrandyAvine,  Germantown,  Mon- 
mouth, and  Yorktown.  He  applied  for  a pension,  1818,  from 
Russell  County,  Va. ; and  in  1838  from  Montgomery  County,  Va. : 
Avhere  the  widow  received  the  last  payment.  He  Avas  born  in 
Russell  County;  died  in  Florence,  Alabama. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book , 
VoL  69,  page  2. 

BLACK,  JAMES — Born  in  August  or  September,  1754,  in 
Argyle  County,  Scotland  ; emigrated  in  his  twenty-first  year  to  the 
America,  landed  at  Norfolk,  Va. ; settled  on  Cape  Fear  River, 
Cumberland  County,  N.  C. ; later  removing  to  Robeson  County, 
N.C.  While  living  in  the  latter  county,  he  enlisted  in  August, 
1782,  and  served  for  about  six  months  as  a private  in  Capt.  Joshua 
Hadley’s  Company,  Colonel  Lytle’s  North  Carolina  Regiment.  He 
applied  for  a pension  October  26,  1832,  Avhile  living  in  Morgan 
County,  Ala.  At  an  earlier  date,  1828,  he  made  mention  of  two 


530 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


daughters,  names  not  given,  one  married  and  one  unmarried. — 
Jones  and  Gandrud,  Alabama  Records,  vol.  74,  Morgan  County,  pp. 
59-61.  See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Alabama , 1911,  p.  12. 

BLACKBOURN,  CLEMENT— Died  on  Tuesday.  7th  inst., 
about  12  o’clock,  M.,  at  the  residence  of  Mr.  William  Clark,  in 
Limestone,  Air.  Clement  Blackbourn,  in  his  eighty-fifth  year.  Mr. 
B.  was  earh'  in,  and  continued  thro’  the  entire  war  of  the  Revo- 
lution ; his  services  were  rendered  chiefly  in  the  Southern  States. 
He  removed  from  the  County  of  Mecklenburg,  \ a.,  to  Madison, 
Ala.,  in  the  year  1816,  where  he  continued  to  reside,  beloved  and 
respected  by  his  neighbours  and  acquaintances,  until  about  two 
months  ago.  In  June  last,  his  old  and  beloved  wife,  with  whom 
he  had  lived  in  the  happiest  state  of  matrimony  for  upwards  of 
sixty  years,  was  taken  from  him,  by  the  ruthless  hand  of  death  ; 
and  left  him,  as  he  remarked  to  the  writer  of  this  notice,  without 
one  single  motive  or  desire  to  remain  here  ; and  he  only  waited  the 
call  of  his  God,  that  he  might  be  laid-  by  her  side  in  the  orchard 
of  his  son  Franks.  Mr.  Blackbourn  was  a man  of  fine  sense — was 
well  versed  in  history,  ancient  and  modern ; his  kindness  and 
benevolence  knew  no  bounds,  whilst  upon  these  subjects  he  never 
let  his  right  hand  know  what  his  left  hand  did.  Mr.  B.  has  left 
a large  number  of  children,  grandchildren  and  great  grand  children, 
to  mourn  his  loss;  whose  tears  were  freely  shed  and  mingled  with 
those  of  his  old  neighbors — whilst  the  writer  could  but  notice  at 
the  closing  scene  the  deep  distress  and  grief  of  his  slaves,  who 
were  about  him  on  that  trying  occasion.  He  is  gone — he  has  paid 
the  only  debt  lie  owed  upon  this  earth,  and  died,  as  he  lived,  an 
honest  man,  ‘the  noblest  work  of  God.”  T. — Huntsville  Democrat , Feb. 
18,  1843.  See  also  J ones-H arris  & Allied  Families , p.  108. 

BLAIR,  JAMES  (1761-1839)  received  a pension  for  service  as 
private,  orderly  sergeant,  ensign  and  Indian  spy  in  the  North 
Carolina  troops.  He  was  born  in  Augusta  County,  Va. ; died  in 
Pickens  County,  Ala. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  Vol.  155,  p.  74. 

BLANKENSHIP,  REUBEN  N.— Shelby  County  Census  of 
1830,  gives  one  male  aged  ten  to  fifteen,  one  male  and  one  female 
aged  sixty  to  seventy.— See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Alabama, 
1911,  page  12. 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


531 


BLEVINS,  DILLON— Born  in  March  1750,  died  in  April 
1836,  in  Dallas  County,  Ala.,  married  November  12,  1770,  in 
Pittsylvania  County,  Va.,  Ann  Armstrong,  born  May  21,  1750,  died 
October  22,  1844.  He  is  buried  near  Selma,  Dallas  County,  with 
his  wife  beside  him.  It  is  said  that  he  moved  first  into  Rutherford 
County,  Tenn.,  and  then  into  Alabama.  Among  their  children 
were:  Armstead,  born  1775  in  Virginia,  died  in  Tennessee,  married 
Keturak  Carter,  served  in  the  War  of  1812  with  his  son,  Hugh; 
Kittie  married  Mr.  Taylor,  went  to  Georgia  after  1865;  Amarilla, 
married  Mr.  Moore,  of  Moore’s  Bluff;  Nancy  married  William 
Bean;  William,  born  January  16,  1792,  died  in  Dallas  County,  June 
15,  1847,  married  Matilda  Phillips;  John,  born  January  7,  1795, 
married  Margaret  Oldham  Connally,  and  came  to  Alabama. — In- 
formation from  Miss  Laura  Bishop,  Jackson,  Tenn. 

BLEVINS,  DILLON — Madison  County  Census  for  January, 
1809,  gives  two  free  white  males  under  twenty-one,  two  free  white 
males  over  twenty-one,  four  free  white  females  under  twenty-one, 
two  free  white  females  over  twenty-one,  and  ten  slaves. 

BLEVINS,  DILLON — Renounced  allegiance  to  Great  Britain 
and  swore  allegiance  to  Virginia,  October  7,  1777,  Henry  County. — * 
Virginia  Magazine  of  History,  vol.  9,  p.  13. 

BOLTON,  BENJAMIN — Personally  appeared  in  Open  court 
(this  being  Court  of  Record  by  the  laws  of  the  State  of  Alabama, 
by  which  it  has  been  established,  and  further  by  its  proceedings 
being  according  to  the  course  of  common  law  with  a jurisdiction 
included  in  part  of  amount  keeping  a record  of  its  proceedings, 
from  which  a writ  of  error  lies  to  a Superior  tribunal,  for  the 
County  of  Dallas,  in  State  aforesaid),  Benjamin  Bolton  age  57 
years,  who  being  sworn  according  to  law,  doth  this  day,  make  the 
following  declaration,  in  order  to  obtain  the  provisions  by  the  Act 
of  Congress  of  the  18th  of  March  1818  and  the  1st  of  May  1820, 
and  that  he  the  said  Benj.  Bolton  enlisted  for  the  term  of  12  months, 
sometime  during  the  year  1781,  or  1782,  in  the  State  of  N.  C.  in 
the  company  commanded  by  Capt.  Armstrong,  in  the  regiment 
commanded  by  Col.  Little  in  the  line  of  the  State  of  N.  C.  That 
he  continued  the  service  in  the  said  Corps,  the  whole  time  for 
which  he  enlisted.  When  he  was  discharged  from  the  said  service 
at  Ashley  Hill,  in  the  State  of  S.  C.,  and  that  the  certificate  of  the 
said  officer  under  which  he  served,  of  his  honorable  discharge 


532 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


having'  been  accordingly  lost.  He  has  no  other  evidence  now  in  his 
power  of  his  said  service,  than  what  is  herein  prescribed,  and  in 
presence  of  the  Act  of  1st  of  May  1820 — and  that  I have  not  since 
by  gift  or  sale  or  in  any  manner  disposed  of  my  property  or  any 
part  there  of  with  interest  or  there  by  to  diminish  it*  being  myself 
within  the  provision  of  an  act  to  provide  for  the  certain  persons 
engaged  in  the  land  and  Naval  service  of  the  U.  S.  in  the  Revolu- 
tionary M ar.  passed  the  18th  March,  1818.  And  that  I have  not, 
nor  has  an}'  person  in  trust  for  me,  any  property  or  securities, 
contracts  or  debts,  due  to  me,  nor  have  I any  income  other  than 
what  is  contained  in  the  schedule  hereinto  annexed  and  by  me 
subscribed.  Signed. 


Benjamin  (his  X mark)  Bolton 

Schedule — 2 cows  and  calves  worth  $40  dollars,  one  horse  $40 
dollars,  10  head  of  hogs  worth  $20  dollars. 

Signed 

Benjamin  (his  X mark)  Bolton 

My  occupation  is  that  of  a farmer,  which  I am  unable  to  pursue. 
I have  9 children  now  residing  with  me  and  depending  on  me  for 
support.  Rebecca  12  years  old,  Rachel  22,  Sally  18,  Betsy  16,  Ben- 
jamin 14,  James  13,  Edwin  12,  Owen  10  and  Georg'e  9,  who  are 
unable  to  labor  such  as  is  usual  for  persons  of  their  age  and  sex 
to  do.  Signed. 

Benjamin  (his  X mark)  Bolton 

Sworn  in  open  Court,  certified  D .Dalton,  Clerk.  Deed  Book 
A,  Page  344,  Dallas  County,  Ala.  County  Court,  February  Term, 
1821.  17th  day  of  February  1821.  This  instrument  transcribed 
from  old  record  book  A,  page  43,  this  27th  of  September  1828. 

J.  D.  Craig,  Clk. 

BRAGG,  PETER  NEWPORT,  (1763-1841),  served  as  private 
under  General  Greene  at  Guilford  Court  House.  He  was  born  in 
Fauquier  County,  V a. ; died  in  Lowndes  County,  Alabama. — 
D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  Vol.  119,  page  164-5.  See  also  Revolutionary 
Soldiers  in  Alabama,  1911,  p.  13. 

BRANTLEY,  THOMAS  (1754-1822)  received  a land  grant 
in  Washington  County,  Ga.,  for  service  as  a soldier  in  the  Revolu- 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


533 


tionary  War.  He  was  born  in  North  Carolina;  died  in  Dallas 
County,  Ala. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  vol.  48,  p.  223. 

BRANTLEY,  THOMAS.  A Revolutionary  soldied  lived  east 
of  Selma  a short  distance,  near  Burnsville,  and  was  buried  on  the 
bank  of  the  Alabama  river  about  a mile  abo\-e  Selma.  — Informa- 
tion from  Bishop  Robert  K.  Hargrove,  whose  mother  was  a daugh- 
ter of  Thomas  Brantley. — See  McCall,  Roster  of  the  Revolutionary 
Soldiers  of  Georgia. 

BRANDON,  JOSIAH — Departed  this  life,  in  Lincoln  County „ 
Tenn.,  in  the  triumphs  of  Christian  faith,  on  the  5th  inst.,  in  the 
83rd  year  of  his  age,  Rev.  Josiah  Brandon.  Brother  Brandon  had 
been  an  acceptable,  useful,  and  highly  exemplary  member  of  the 
Methodist  E.  Church  for  near  60  years,  and  about  50  years  of  that 
time  a devout,  zealous  and  useful  minister  of  the  gospel  of  Christ, 
beloved  by  all  who  knew  him.  As  a minister  he  was  vigilant  in 
watching  the  interests  of  our  beloved  zion — labored  and  prayed  for 
her  prosperity  and  success,  and  he  was  permitted  by  the  great 
head  of  the  church  to  live  to  see  her  borders  extend  far  and  wide, 
and  see  the  blood  stained  banner  wave  in  majestic  triumph  over 
many  nations.  As  a citizen  in  the  “land  of  the  free  and  the  home 
of  the  brave,'”  he,  after  having  fought  for  the  liberties  of  his  country, 
spent  a long  and  useful  life  in  the  enjoyment  of  that  precious  gift 
of  HeaA^en  to  man,  Liberty.  He  was  ardently  attached  to  the  insti- 
tutions of  his  country-rendering  unto  “Caesar  the  things  that  are 
Caesar’s,  and  to  God  the  things  that  are  God’s.”  His  house  was  a 
home  for  many  years  for  all  the  ministers  of  Christ.  Kind  and 
hospitable  to  friends,  generous  and  liberal  to  the  fatherless  and 
widow,  and  distressed  ; an  indulgent  father,  the  kind  husband,  the 
worthy  citizen,  the  devout  Christian.  He  had  prayed  for  many 
years,  that  when  the  fatal  hour  came  for  his  final  dissolution,  that 
he  might  pass  the  dismal  vale  without  a struggle.  His  prayer  was 
answered.  The  day  on  which  he  died  he  was  happy  all  day,  and 
in  his  usual  health;  at  night  he  fell  asleep  in  the  arms  of  Jesus, 
without  a murmur  or  a sigh  escaping  his  lips.  He  has  left  an  af- 
fectionate companion  and  a large  circle  of  relations  to  mourn  their 
loss.  May  they  follow  the  sainted  patriarch  as  he  followed  Christ. 


534 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


“Another  soul,  dismissed  from  Earth’s  abode, 

Is  borne  triumphant  to  the  throne  of  God — 

Conveyed  by  angels  to  the  realms  above, 

Where  saints  made  perfect  chant  the  song  of  love.” — P.B.R. 
— Huntsville , The  Democrat,  November  14,  1842. 

BREEDLOVE,  JOHN — On  “The  Culpeper  List”  of  men 
called  up  in  Culpeper  County,  Va.,  for  service  in  the  Revolution. 
He  bought  land  in  Montgomery  County,  Ala.,  from  the  United 
States  government.  It  was  across  the  road  from  the  present  Gunter 
Field  and  later  became  the  home  of  William  Lowndes  Yancey.  He 
died  in  the  1830’s  and  is  probably  buried  in  the  family  graveyard 
in  the  yard  of  the  home.  Most  of  the  tombstones  have  disappeared. 
The  flat  tombstone  of  his  son,  Wilkins  Breedlove,  bears  the  fol- 
lowing inscription:  This  monument  was  erected  by  William  B. 

Breedlove  only  son  of  Wilkins  Breedlove.  Deceased  was  born 
the  12th  of  December  1806,  and  departed  this  life  the  10th  of  No- 
vember 1829  aged  22  years,  10  months  and  28  days.  John  Breed- 
love’s will  is  recorded  in  Montgomery  County  Wills,  dated  August 
20,  1833,  and  probated  September  16,  1833.  This  will  mentions 
his  wife,  Nancy  Breedlove,  and  his  daughter,  Mary,  wife  of  James 
Taylor;  son,  Thomas  W. ; grandson,  William,  the  son  of  his  de- 
ceased son  Wilkins;  daughter  Sarah  Bledsoe;  daughter  Frances, 
wife  of  Samuel  J.  Bledsoe;  daughter  Elizabeth,  wife  of  Peachy 
Bledsoe;  Martha  Eubanks,  Lewis  P.  Breedlove,  John  M.  Breedlove 
and  Benjamin  F.  Breedlove,  relationship  unknown;  executors, 
Nancy  Breedlove,  Lewis  P.  Breedlove  and  William  Bledsoe.  The 
following  marriages  are  in  Book  A,  Montgomery  County : Elizabeth 
Breedlove  to  Peachy  Bledsoe,  November  7,  1830;  Frances  Breed- 
love to  Samuel  J.  Bledsoe,  date  not  given;  Martha  Breedlove  to 
Wilson  Eubanks,  January  19,  1832;  Sarah  Breedlove  to  William 
Bledsoe,  date  not  given.  The  estate  was  in  litigation  and  the  case 
is  reported  in  Alabama  Supreme  Court  Reports  37,  Roberts  and 
wife  vs.  Ogburn. 

BREWER,  ISAAC.  Died  at  his  residence  in  Talladega  coun- 
ty, on  the  25th  inst.  Isaac  Brewer,  90  years  old,  who  was  in  the 
war  of  the  revolution  before  he  was  16  years  old,  and  served  from 
the  time  of  Gates  defeat  to  the  end  of  the  war,  peace  to  his  ashes. — ■ 
Jacksonville  Republican,  June  8,  1852. 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


5.55 


BROUGHTON,  MARY,  widow  of  THOMAS  BROUGHTON, 
deceased.  Date  of  certificate,  June  27,  1836. — Alabama  Pensioners , 
State  Bank , Mobile,  1831-1838,  page  7. 

BROUGHTON,  THOMAS  (1760-1835)  enlisted,  1776,  as  a 
private  in  Capt.  Benjamin  Waring’s  company;  promoted  sergeant, 
1780,  and  in  1781  served  as  lieutenant  in  Capt.  Robert  McKelvy’s 
company.  He  was  placed  on  the  pension  roll,  1835,  from  Lawrence 
County,  Ala. ; his  widow  received  a pension  for  his  service.  He  was 
born  in  St.  John  Parish,  S.  C. ; died  in  Lawrence  County,  Alabama. 
— D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  Vol.  53,  page  142. 

BROWN,  DANIEL — Born  in  Virginia  in  1755,  a minister, 
who  served  in  the  Revolutionary  War.  He  lived  in  Jefferson 
County,  Ala.,  for  a short  time  before  going  to  Greene  County 
where  he  died  in  1835. — Information  from  Mrs.  F.  L.  Weiland,  Sr., 
1516  Sweetbrier,  Nashville,  Tenn. 

BROWN,  DANIEL — -'“At  length  they  made  the  attempt,  and 
appointed  their  meeting  on  the  5th  of  September,  1818,  at  the 
house  of  Isaac  Brown,  Esq.,  who,  with  his  wife,  were  Baptists,  and 
who  were  living  about  three  miles  below  where  the  county  town 
(Elyton)  now  stands.  Mr.  Brown  was  the  son  of  the  venerable 
Daniel  Brown,  of  Kentucky,  who  afterwards  emigrated  to  this 
state,  and  died  in  Greene  County  a few  years  since.” — Holcombe, 
History  of  the  Baptists  in  Alabama,  p.  226. 

BROWN,  DAVID — Jefferson  County  Census  of  1830  shows 
him  as  aged  between  sixty  and  seventy,  born  in  1757,  while  his 
wife  was  between  fifty  and  sixty.  His  services  were  in  North 
Carolina.  He  left  Jefferson  County  about  1832,  going  to  Rusk 
County,  Texas,  where  he  died  in  1851  or  1852.  His  children  were 
married  in  Jefferson  County,  Ala. — Mrs.  F.  L.  Weiland,  Sr.,  1516 
Sweetbrier,  Nashville,  Tenn. 

BROWN,  JOHN,  born  in  Spartanburg  county,  South  Caro- 
lina, 1765,  enlisted  under  his  father  Andrew  Brown,  was  at  King’s 
Mountain  under  Colonel  Roebuck,  and  moved  to  Jefferson  County, 
Alabama,  where  his  widow  Jincey  applied  for  pension,  1853,  when 
fifty-eight. — White’s  Kings  Mountain  Men , page  237. 


536 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


BROWN,  COL.  JOHN— Jefferson  County  Census  of  1830, 
aged  sixty  to  seventy. 

BROWN,  JOHN — The  John  Brown  you  have  on  your  list  of 
Revolutionary  soldiers  was  Col.  John  Brown  who  was  prominent 
in  forming  the  early  history  of  the  county  though  not  as  prominent 
as  the  John  Brown  (Red)  who  was  county  judge.  This  Col.  John 
Brown  moved  in  1839  to;  Mississippi  and  died  there  in  1847. — In- 
formation from  Mrs.  F.  L.  Weiland.  Sr.,  1516  Sweetbrier,  Nashville. 
Tenn.  See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Alabama,  1911,  p.  15. 

BROWN,  THOMAS — In  memory  of  Thomas  Brown  who  was 
born  in  Culpepper  County,  Va.,  on  the  22nd  April  A.  D.  1752,  and 
died  in  Montgomery  County,  Alabama  on  the  9th  January  A.  D. 
1827.  In  early  life  he  took  up  arms  in  defense  of  his  country  and 
served  in  the  American  Revolutionary  Struggle,  during  which  he 
was  engaged  at  Guilford,  Kings  Mountain,  and  at  Yorktown.  Pass 
not  rudely  by  his  grave,  but  pause  and  reflect  that  beneath  this 
slab  reposes  the  remains  of  a husband  and  father,  and  one  of  that 
noble  band  of  Heroes  who  by  their  bravery  and  patriotism  achieved 
the  independence  of  this  great  Republic. — Oliver  Cemetery,  Ware’s 
Ferry  Road,  Montgomery  County,  Ala. 

BROWN,  THOMAS— Died  on  the  9th  inst.,  Mr.  Thomas 
Brown,  sen.,  after  a protracted  illness  of  intermittent  fever  for  five 
months,  at  the  residence  of  his  son,  Dr.  Thomas  Brown,  in  this 
county,  aged  74  years  and  9 months.  Mr.  Brown  was  among  those 
whose  Revolutionary  services  demand  the  tribute  of  gratitude  and 
veneration. — Montgomery,  The  Alabama  Journal , January  26,  1827. 

BROWN,  WILLIAM — Pensioner  of  Dallas  County  was  born 
in  1752  in  North  Carolina  and  died  in  Dallas  County  in  1846. — 
From  Mrs.  F.  L.  Weiland,  Sr.,  1516  Sweetbrier,  Nashville,  Tenn. 
See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Alabama,  1911,  p.  15. 

BROWN,  WILLIAM— Pensioner,  born  in  Virginia  in  1760, 
lived  for  a short  time  in  several  Alabama  Counties,  for  three  years 
in  Franklin  County,  removed  to  Monroe  County,  Miss.,  in  the  1840’s 
and  died  there  in  1853. — From  Mrs.  F.  L.  Weiland,  1516  Sweetbrier, 
Nashville,  Tenn. 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


537 


BURGESS,  WILLIAM — Revolutionary  soldier,  born  1743 
Eastern  North’  Carolina,  moved  to  Franklin  County,  Ala.,  following 
the  Revolution. — James — Prominent  People  and  Families  of  Franklin 
County , p.  73. 

BUSSEY,  ZADOC— Recorded  in  Will  Book  2,  of  Montgomery 
County,  Alabama,  page  217,  is  the  will  of  Zadoc  Bussey,  which 
was  dated  January  3,  1822,  and  which  had  been  probated  Nov.  2, 
1825,  in  Edgefield  County,  South  Carolina.  In  it.  he  names  his 
wife  Nancy,  and  his  children  George  Bussey,  John  Bussey,  Emmer- 
son  Bussey,  Elizabeth  Talley,  Sebellah  Boyd  and  Sally  Searles. 
Executors  named  in  the  will  were  wife  Nancy,  son  Emmerson,  and 
nephew  James  L.  Bussey.  Its  execution  was  witnessed  by  A.  Edwards, 
Hezekiah  Lunday  and  Samuel  Edwards,  all  of  Edgefield. 

Records  in  Edgefield  County  Courthouse  show  that  the  son 
John  died  in  1823,  in  Edgefield,  having  married  his  second  cousin, 
Frances  Morgan;  that  Emmerson  married  Sally  Bailey,  that  Eliza- 
beth married  William  Talley,  that  Sebellah  died  before  her  mother 
and  married  John  Boyd,  and  that  Sally  married  Thomas  Searles. 
The  widow  Nancy  died  in  the  “fall”  of  1838. 

Stub  Indents  by  Salley,  U-W  p.  32  lists  Zadoc  Bussey  as  a 
soldier  in  the  Revolution  in  South  Carolina. 

He,  Zadoc  Bussey,  is  mentioned  in  the  will  of  George  Bussey 
(d.  1796)  as  a son,  along  with  Letitia  wife  of  Alexander  Oden, 
who  was  also  a soldier  in  the  Revolution.  The  will  of  George 
Bussey  names  Sebellah  Bussey  as  the  testator’s  wife.  Her  sur- 
name is  not  known,  but  some  of  her  descendants  believe  she  was 
closely  related  to  Zadoc  Magruder,  who  removed  from  Maryland 
with  the  Busseys. 

BUTLER,  EDMUND  or  EDMOND— Served  in  the  Navy 
and  resided  near  Lower  Peachtree,  Ala.,  in  1829.  An  affidavit  is 
shown  from  Douglas  (X)  Pucket,  signed  before  John  Morrissett, 
J.P.,  Monroe  County,  Alabama,  May  19,  1829,  in  which  he  states 
he  had  known  the  applicant  for  pension  for  forty  years.  There  is 
also  filed  a photostat  of  his  discharge,  April  5,  1785,  from  the  State 
Navy  and  signed  by  James  Barrow.  No  State  is  shown. — 
Pension  Files,  National  Archives,  Washington,  D.  C. 


538 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


BUTLER.  JAMES — Resided  in  Elbert  County.  Ga.,  January 
22,  1833.  at  the  time  that  he  applied  for  a pension.  ' He  was  born 
in  Hanover  County,  St.  Paul’s  Parish,  Ya.,  June  5,  1758.  While  a 
resident  of  Alecklinburg  County,  Va.,  he  was  drafted  in  1778  for 
two  months  and.  served  in  the  company  of  C’apt.  James  Anderson, 
Col.  John  Burton’s  Regiment  ; again,  1780,  drafted,  and  served 
eighteen  months  company  of  C’apt.  Richard  Swiflower  or  Swepson, 
Col.  William  Davis’  Regiment ; later  put  in  Captain  Scott’s  Com- 
pany ; and  drafted  for  two  months  in  1781.  He  resided  in  Mecklin- 
burg County,  Va.,  until  a year  or  two  after  the  Revolution,  when 
he  removed  to  Wilkes  County,  Ga.,  now  Elbert  County.  His  refer- 
ences were  signed  by  William  Ward,  Dyonisius  Oliver,  McCarter 
Oliver,  Samuel  Snelling,  Arthur  Jones  and  Samuel  Jones.  .Affida- 
vits were  made  by  William  Ward,  Rev.  James  Davis,  and  Ealum 
Eavens.  He  removed  to  Shelby  County,  Ala.,  in  1837.  The  Shelby 
County  Census  of  1840  gives  one  male  aged  fifteen  to  twenty,  one 
male  eighty  to  ninety;  two  females  twenty  to  thirty,  and  a pen- 
sioner aged  eighty-three. — See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Alabama , 
1911,  p.  15. 

BUTTS,  SETH — Application  executed  ( )ctober  10,  1843,  for 
a pension,  in  Autauga  County  before  the  Circuit  Court  in  Equity. 
He  states  that  he  was  born  in  Norfolk,  Va.,  date  forgotten  but  be- 
lieves that  he  is  ninety-seven  years  old.  At  the  time  that  he  volun- 
teered he  resided  in  Norfolk,  Va.  He  was  a sergeant  for  about  two 
years  of  company  under  Capt.  William  Wilson,  Col.  John  Wilson’s 
Regiment;  was  later  sergeant  of  company  under  Capt.  Josiah 
Butts,  (not  his  father)  between  eighteen  months  and  two  years  ; 
recalls  Maj.  John  Armstrong  and  Capt.  Javin  Miller  of  the  regular 
service;  was  at  the  battle  of  the  Great  Bridge  about  twelve  miles 
from  Norfolk  and  several  skirmishes;  thinks  it  was  the  Fourth 
Regiment ; marched  from  Norfolk  to  Great  Bridge  and  thence  to 
North  West  River  by  Pascotank.  His  father,  Josiah  Butts,  was 
in  the  service  at  the  same  time.  About  twenty  years  after  the 
close  of  the  war,  he  removed  to  North  Carolina,  and  thence  to 
Autauga  County,  Ala.  Affidavits  were  from  Rev.  Robert  B.  James 
and  Crawford  M.  Jackson,  as  to  his  age  and  general  reputation. 
Cc rtificate  by  the  Court  signed  by  W.  K.  Baylor,  Judge,  and  J.  J.  G. 
Johnson,  Clerk.  Affidavits  of  Jesse  Gray  and  John  Gray  were 
signed  before  George  L.  Mason,  J.  P.  Mary  Ann  Butts,  widow  of 
Seth  Butts,  deceased,  he  having  died  in  October,  1846,  filed  an  ap- 
plication but  was  rejected.  He  left  a widow  and  five  living  chil- 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


539 


dren,  by  her:  Josiah,  aged  about  forty-four,  Sarah  aged  thirty- 
eight,  Nancy  Ann,  Parthenia,  and  Joanna,  who  has  since  died,  and 
two  sons  by  a previous  marriage,  James  Butts  and  Wilson  Butts, 
then  living  near  Nashville,  Tenn.  The  power  of  attorney  was 
signed  by  a mark,  June  7,  1852. 

BYRD,  GEORGE,  (1730-1817)  served  as  lieutenant  in  the 
Virginia  troops.  He  was  born  in  Tidewater,  Va. ; died  in  Eufaula, 
Alabama. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book , vol.  121,  page  14. 

CADENHEAD,  JAMES — buried  in  Perote  Cemetery,  Perote, 
Bullock  County,  Ala. — In  Alabama  Military  Archives. 

CAFFEY,  JOHN  (1752-1826)  enlisted  1776,  as  private  in  the 
6th  company,  Maryland  Line.  He  was  born  in  Dorchester  Count}-. 
Maryland;  died  in  Montgomery,  Ala. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  vol.  157, 
p.  17. 

CALHOUN,  JOSEPH.  A good  old  age.  The  Savannah  pa- 
pers publish  a notice  of  the  death  of  a veteran  soldier  of  the  Revolu- 
tion, Mr.  Joseph  Calhoun,  at  the  advanced  age  of  one  hundred 
years  and  ten  months.  He  fought  in  several  of  the  most  important 
battles  of  the  war  of  Independence — at  Camden,  Guilford  Court 
House,  and  Yorktown.  Mr.  Calhoun  died  at  his  residence  in  Dooly 
County,  Georgia.  By  nativity  he  was  a North  Carolinian. — The  Dis- 
patch, Wetumpka,  Dec.  5,  1856. 

CAMPBELL,  GEORGE — Born  October  18,  1759,  in  Orange- 
burgh  District,  S.  C.  He  served  with  the  South  Carolina  Troops 
as  follows:  from  January  1,  1779  until  June  10,  1779,  under  Cap- 
tains Gerson  Kelley  and  John  Oliver,  Lieutenants  Colonels  Mc- 
Intosh and  John  Laurens,  Colonels  Charles  Heatley,  Keating  Sim- 
mons and  Henderson  and  was  in  the  battle  of  Coosawhatchie 
Bridge;  from  April  1,  1780  until  May  15,  1780,  in  Capt.  William 
Reed’s  company;  May  1,  1781  until  December  1,  1781  as  orderly 
sergeant  in  Capt.  William  Reed's  and  Capt.  Isaac  Ross’  companies, 
Col.  Charles  S.  Middleton’s  regiment,  was  at  the  siege  of  Fort 
Motte,  in  the  attack  at  Higgin’s  Church  and  in  the  battle  of  Eutaw 
Springs.  He  served  as  a substitute  for  his  brother,  Benjamin 
Campbell.  He  lived  in  Orangeburgh  District,  S.  C.,  until  1827, 
when  he  removed  to  Autauga  County,  Ala.,  residing  at  Vernon. 
He  died  October  6,  1836.  He  left  no  widow,  but  the  following 


540 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


children:  Elizabeth  Hoffman,  wife  of  Lewis  Hoffman;  Eliza  Hoff- 
man, wife  of  David  Hoffman,  and  George  Campbell. — Jones  and 
Gandrud,  Alabama  Records,  vol.  75,  Autauga  County,  pp.  59-60.  See 
also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Alabama,  1911,  p.  17. 

CAMPBELL.  WILLIAM — Name  appears  on  Huntsville  Mon- 
ument, erected  by  Twickenham  Town  Chapter,  D.A.R. 

CAMFIELD,  CAPT.  AARON — “On  motion  of  Richard  Cam- 
field  of  Shelby  County,  Tenn.,  whose  deposition  taken  before  Judge 
of  the  Court  of  Marion  County,  Alabama,  on  the  3 Feby  1834  is 
produced  in  Court,  ORDERED  : certified  to  the  Register  of  the 
State  Land  Office  in  Virginia  that  the  Court  is  satisfied  that  the 
late  Capt.  Aaron  Camfield,  an  officer  in  the  Continental  Line  of 
Virginia,  shortly  after  the  war  of  the  Revolution,  removed,  from 
Virginia  to  Hancock  County,  Ga.,  and  married,  that  he  died  two 
or  three  years  after  his  marriage,  leaving  a widow  and  only  son ; 
that  his  widow  survived  him  but  a short  time,  and  both  died  inte- 
state and  that  the  aforesaid  Richard  Camfield  is  the  son  and  only 
surviving  heir-at-law  of  said  Capt.  Aaron  Camfield.  Hanover 
County,  Va.,  Order  Book  1831-1835,  p.  158,  Court  28  Nov.  1832.”- — 
Ljungsledt  County  Court  Note  Book,  April,  1927,  p.  15. 

CARD,  HUGH — Randolph  County  Census  of  1850  lists  in  the 
household  of  Joel  T.  Morrison,  Hugh  Cade,  aged  ninety-six,  born 
in  Virginia,  no  occupation. — See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Alaba- 
ma, 1911,  p.  18. 


CARLETON,  JOSEPH— Grave  located:— General  D.A.R.  Re- 
port, 1929. 

CARLETON,  JOSEPH,  born  October  1,  1763,  married  De- 
cember 25,  1787,  Elizabeth  Eddins,  born  November  9,  1771.  He  was 
the  son  of  William  Carleton,  of  Botetourt  County,  Va.  It  is  sup- 
posed that  he  enlisted  at  the  age  of  sixteen.  He  died  in  St.  Clair 
County,  Ala.,  and  is  buried  in  an  old  cemetery,  N.  W.,  Attalla, 
Etowah  County. — Information  from  biographical  files,  Alabama  De- 
partment of  Archives  and  History. 

CARROLL,  DENNIS — Shelby  County  Census  of  1820  gives 
one  male  and  one  female  over  twenty-one.  The  Census  of  1830 
gives  “Daniel”  with  one  male  and  one  female  between  sixty  and 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


541 


seventy.  Denis  Carroll  of  Shelby  County  appears  on  the  list  of 
pensions  rejected. 

CASEY,  WILLIAM — born  in  1759  in  Franklin  County,  N.  C., 
enlisted  1779,  Ninety  Six,  S.  C.  as  private  under  Capt.  Edward 
Hampton,  Col.  Thomas  Branham,  served  in  all  12  months.  Re- 
sided in  Autauga  County,  Ala.,  at  time  of  pension.  J.  R.  W.  32, 
158 — Inv.  Rev.  War.  His  claim  was  allowed. — See  also  Jones  and 
Gandrud — Autauga  County,  Alabama  Records,  v.  76,  p.  47. 

CAVETT,  RICHARD — an  old  and  respectable  citizen  of  this 
county,  died  at  his  residence  on  the  11th  inst.,  aged  80  years  and 
5 months.  His  health  had  been  declining  for  many  years,  and  his 
departure  from  this  world  was  anticipated  by  him  with  resignation 
and  composure.  He  was  a soldier  of  the  Revolution  and  also  of 
the  late  war ; and  had  given  frequent  proofs  of  his  devotion  to 
his  country.  He  was  long  an  acceptable  member  of  the  Baptist 
church  and  died  in  the  faith  of  a happy  change  of  existence.  He 
was  an  industrious  and  enterprising  citizen,  and  has  realized  by 
his  own  exertions  an  independent  fortune.  He  has  left  a number 
of  descendants  and  connexions  to  lament  his  loss. — Huntsville, 
The  Democrat,  November  27,  1844.  See  Some  Tennessee  Heroes  of 
the  Revolution,  Vol.  4. 

CAVETT,  RUTH — Died  in  this  county,  on  the  5th  inst.,  in 
the  77th  year  of  her  age,  Mrs.  Ruth  Cavett,  wife  of  the  venerable 
Richard  Cavett,  a patriot  of  the  Revolution.  Mrs.  Cavett  was  for 
54  years  a professor  of  religion,  and  for  the  past  20  years  attached 
to  the  Baptist  Church.  She  was  the  mother  of  eleven  children,  who 
with  their  offspring,  deeply  lament  the  death  of  one  whom  they 
so  much  loved — indeed,  her  loss  is  greatly  lamented  by  her  neigh- 
bors and  all  who  knew  her,  and  doubly  so  by  the  partner  of  her 
bosom. — Huntsville,  The  Democrat,  December  14,  1843. 

CHALKER,  Mrs.  REBECCA,  of  Crottenden’s  Mills.  Real 
Daughter. — D.A.R.  Report , 1908-09,  p 33 

CHANCELLER,  DAVID — The  undersigned  served  in  the 
revolutionary  war,  in  the  Virginia  line — in  the  month  of  February, 
1777,  in  Captain  Holdman  Rice’s  company,  to  guard  the  troops  of 
Gen.  Burgoyne,  who  were  then  prisoners  of  war.  He  was  in  said 
company  about  eight  months,  when  he  was  transferred  to  Capt. 


542 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Merriwether’s  company,  where  he  served  15  months — Col.  Francis 
Taylor  commanded  the  Regiment  while  he  was  in  the  service,  and 
he  was  honorably  discharged  on  the  2nd  of  May,  1779.  He  was 
also  at  the  seige  of  Yorktown.  If  there  is  any  person  still  alive 
who  can  prove  his  service,  he  hopes  that  they  will  give  informa- 
tion.— Mr.  Wm.  Roundtree,  and  Mr.  Daniel  Kneaves,  who  a few 
years  ago  lived  in  Mercer  County,  Ken.  were  in  the  same  company 
with  him  ; but  he  cannot  learn  where  they  have  removed  to.  From 
his  age  and  his  helpless  situation,  he  needs  the  assistance  of  his 
country.  Information  will  be  communicated  to  Col.  Steven  F. 
Ogden,  \ ellow  ‘Banks,  Davies  County,  on  this  business.  David 
Chaneeller  August  15,  1825. — The  Tnscumbian,  August  22,  1825. 

CHANDLER,  JOHN — The  Jacksonville  (Alabama)  Republican 
contains  an  obituary  notice  of  John  Chandler  “Better  known  as 
Grandsire  Chandler”,  who  died  near  that  place  on  the  19th  lilt., 
aged  104.  He  was  a native  of  Virginia  but  moved  to  South  Caro- 
lina in  early  life,  where  his  familv  resided  during  the  Revolutionary 
War.  He  served  seven  years  in  that  war,  under  Generals  Greene 
& Sumter ; and  participated  in  the  battles  of  Eutaw,  Camden  and 
Cowpens,  and  other  skirmishes  with  the  Tories — -Greenville  Mountain- 
eer, Greenville,  S.  C.,  March  29,  1850. 

CHANDLER,  JOHN — Died,  In  Benton  County,  on  the  10th 
ult.  Mr.  John  Chandler,  aged  104,  a Revolutionary  soldier. 
Huntsville,  The  Democrat,  March  21,  1850. 

CHANDLER,  JOHN  served,  1776-82,  as  a private  in  Capt. 
John  Lyle’s  company,  Col.  James  Lyle’s  regiment,  at  the  battles 
of  Stono,  Ramsour’s  Mills,  Rocky  Mount,  Hanging  Rock,  and 
Fishing  Creek.  He  was  placed  on  the  pension  roll,  1832,  of  Gwin- 
nett County,  Ga.  He  was  born  in  Virginia;  died  in  Alabama. — 
D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  Vol.  53,  page  152. 

CHENEY,  Mrs.  AUGUSTA  BELLINGER,  of  Montgomery. 
Real  daughter. — D.A.R.  Report,  1908-09,  p.  33. 

CHRISTIAN,  GEORGE  (1762-1831)  served  as  private  in 
Capt.  Holman  Rice’s  company  of  Foot,  Col.  Francis  Taylor’s- regi- 
ment of  guards,  Virginia.  He  was  born  in  Goochland  County,  Va. : 
died  in  Wilcox  County,  Ala. — D.A.R.  IJheage  Book , Vol.  139,  page  131. 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


543 


CHRISTOPHER,  Mrs.  MARY  MALISSA  PAVER,  of 
Strange.  Real  daughter. — D.A.R.  Report  1908-09,  p.  33. 

CLARK,  ROBERT — Departed  this  life  at  his  residence  in 
Madison  County,  Ala.,  on  Monday  morning  November  20.  1837, 
Mr.  Robert  Clark.  He  was  born  in  Halifax  County,  N.  C.,  on  the 
23rd  of  February,  1756;  he  had  for  the  last  twenty  odd  years  been  a 
resident  of  this  county ; he  had  for  a long  time  been  a man  of 
affliction,  and  for  the  last,  two  weeks  of  his  life  he  was  confined 
by  exceeding  painful  affliction.  Yet  amidst  all  he  neither  mur- 
mured nor  repined,  but  sustained  it  with  patience,  fortitude  and 
resignation.  He  was  an  upright  citizen,  a kind  neighbor  and  af- 
fectionate parent,  and  fulfilled  the  duties  of  life  with  correctness 
and  fidelity ; kind  and  mourning  friends  ministered  to  the  hours  of 
illness,  and  watched  around  his  dying  couch,  but  all  availed  not 
to  avert  the  fatal  stroke.  The  hour  of  departure  had  arrived — ■ 
the  summons  of  Him  who  gave  life  had  recalled  the  vital  spark, 
and  the  soul  went  home  to  the  bosom  of  its  Father  and  God.  Be- 
reaved relatives  and  sorrowing  friends  may  weep  their  loss,  but 
their  hour  of  mourning  are  brightened  by  the  glorious  hope  of  a 
joyous  resurrection,  and  a full  belief  of  a happy  meeting  in  that 
better  world  where  all  is  peace,  where  sorrow  is  unknown  and 
happiness  without  alloy  prevails  forever.  Sacred  be  the  memory  of 
the  dead — long  will  the  memory  of  his  worth  be  cherished  and 
the  remembrance  of  his  virtues  remain  to  cheer  and  comfort  the 
appointed  years  of  those  who  remain  sojourners  and  pilgrims  in 
this  vale  of  tears. — Huntsville,  The  Democrat,  Nov.  25,  1837. 

CLARK,  THOMAS  H. — An  old  citizen  of  this  country,  and 
one  of  the  few  remaining  soldiers  of  the  revolution,  died  at  the 
residence  of  his  Son-in-law,  Larkin  Wedgeworth,  about  13  miles 
north  of  this  city,  on  the  15th  ult.  Mr.  Clark  was  born  in  Penn- 
sylvania February  14th  1765  and,  though  a mere  boy,  served  three 
years  in  the  war  of  the  revolution.  He  married  the  daughter  of 
Jas.  Braden  of  South  Carolina,  and  settled  in  Georgia;  thence  he 
removed  to  East  Tennessee  and  afterwards  to  Alabama  about 
1834.  He  joined  the  Presbyterian  Church  in  1792  and  was  a con- 
sistent Christian  and  eminently  good  man  through  his  whole  life. 
At  the  time  of  his  death  he  was  95  years  and  seven  months  old. 
A few  brief  years  more  and  the  last  of  these  venerable  heroes  will 
have  passed  away. — Tuscaloosa  Monitor,  Oct.  15,  1859. 


544 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERL\ 


CLAY,  WILLIAM,  Esq.,  Revolutionary  soldier.  On  the  4th 
ult.  at  his  residence  in  Gringer  County,  Tenn.,  William  Clay,  Esq.,  father 
of  the  Hon.  C.  C.  Clay,  Senator  in  Congress  from  Alabama.  The  de- 
ceased was  born  in  the  County  of  Chesterfield,  in  the  State  of  Virginia, 
on  the  11th.  of  August,  1760.  Consequently,  when  he  died  he  was 
within  one  week  of  completing  his  81st  year.  He  entered  the 
Revolutionary  Army  at  the  early  age  of  sixteen,  served  several 
tours  of  duty  with  the  militia  of  his  native  State,  and  aided  in  the 
closing  scene  of  the  War  of  Independence,  by  his  services  at  the 
siege  of  Y orktown  and  the  capture  of  Lord  Cornwallis.  After  his 
marriage,  he  settled  in  the  county  of  Halifax,  Va.,  where  he  resided 
several  years.  He  then  removed  to  the  Western  County,  and 
settled  in  Tennessee,  where  he  spent  the  last  forty-five  years  of  his 
life.  He  has  left  an  aged  widow  and  numerous  descendants  and 
relatives  to  mourn  his  loss.  He  died  as  he  lived  an  honest  man 
and  a patriot. — Huntsville  Democrat,  September  4,  1841. 

CLEMENT,  THOMAS  (1752-1823)  enlisted,  1776,  as  private 
in  Captain  William  Caldwell’s  company,  Colonel  William  Thomp- 
son’s 3d  South  Carolina  regiment.  He  was  wounded  at  the  Battle 
of  Eutaw  Springs.  He  was  born  in  South  Carolina ; died  in  Ala- 
bama.— D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  Vol.  155,  p.  206. 

CLEMENTS,  CULLIVER. — 'The  paternal  grand-father  of 
Ur.  B.  F.  Wilson,  also  came  from  Tennessee  to  Tuscaloosa  with 
his  son  William,  in  1818,  and  there  died,  over  thirty  years  ago.  His 
maternal  grand-father,  Culliver  Clements,  came  from  Georgia  to 
Tuscaloosa,  in  1818,  and  to  Pickens  County  the  next  year — settled 
the  place  where  now  lives  John  L.  Guyton,  and  subsequently  re- 
moved to  the  present  residence  of  Dudly  Pruitt,  where  he  died  in 
1840.  Jesse  Clements  was  his  son.  Both  these  ancestors  were 
soldiers  of  the  Revolution — Wilson  was  at  Guilford  Court-house 
battle — Clements  was  a South  Carolina  partisan  soldier,  in  the 
trying  times  of  Marion  and  his  whig  comrades.  The  descent  is 
said  to  be  Scotch-lrish  on  both  sides — Smith,  History  of  Pickens  Coun- 
ty, pp.  241-42. 

CLEVELAND,  COL.  LARKIN— The  grave  of  Mrs.  Larkin 
Cleveland,  wife  of  Col.  Larkin  Cleveland,  of  the  Revolution,  is  at 
the  old  Govan  graveyard  about  eight  miles  south  of  Selma,  and 
the  inscription  is  as  follows : This  marble  placed  here  by  C.  H. 

Cleveland,  son.  In  memory  of  his  mother  Mrs.  Frances  Cleveland, 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


545 


Widow  of  Col.  Larkin  Cleveland,  sen.  She  was  born  August  6th, 
1756  and  died  March  26th,  1836.  This  C.  H.  Cleveland  was  Carter 
Harrison  Cleveland. — Mrs.  R.  L.  Sturdivant,  Berlin,  Alabama. 

CLOWER,  JONATHAN  (1763-1836)  was  placed  on  the  pen- 
sion roll  of  Bristol  County,  Ala.,  (Shelby  County,  Ala.  Ala.  Pensioners, 
State  Branch  Bank,  1831-1838,  p.  11)  for  service  as  private  in  the 
North  Carolina  troops  under  Colonel  Dixon.  He  was  born  in  North 
Carolina;  died  in  Shelby  County,  Ala. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  Vol. 
153,  p.  266. 

CLOWER,  JONATHAN,  received  pay  at  Warrenton  through 
Eli  McVey,  as  a Revolutionary  soldier. — D.A.R.  Roster  of  N.  C.  Sol- 
diers in  the  American  Revolution,  page  513.  See  also  McCall,  Roster 
of  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Georgia,  p.  52. 

COCHRAN,  WILLIAM— Resident  of  Clarke  County  , aged 
about  seventy  in  1818,  in  his  application  for  a pension  states  that 
he  was  formerly  of  Henry  County,  Va.,  enlisted  on  January  4, 
1777,  in  the  Virginia  line,  14th  Regiment,  under  Col.  Charles  Lewis, 
Capt.  Henry  Conway,  later  under  Capt.  Nathan  Reid,  was  dis- 
charged, reinlisted  in  February  1780,  at  Fredericktown,  Maryland, 
under  Colonel  Webb.  He  was  on  the  roll  of  Pensions  of  Alabama 
at  the  rate  of  eight  dollars  per  to  commence  on  September  7,  1818. — 
From  Veterans  Administration,  Pension  Office,  Washington,  D.  C. 
See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Alabama,  1911,  p.  20. 

COLEMAN,  CHARLES,  (1744-1818),  served  as  quartermas- 
ter in  the  third  North  Carolina  regiment.  He  was  born  in  Edg- 
combe  Co.,  North  Carolina;  died  in  Greene  Co.,  Alabama. — D.A.R. 
Lineage  Book , vol.  41,  page  64. 

COLEMAN,  CHARLES,  quartermaster  in  Third,  North  Caro 
lina  Regiment,  moved  from  Edgecombe  County,  N.  C.,  to  Alabama 
settling  first  in  Bibb  County,  and  later  moving  to  Greene  County. 
He  died  in  1824  and  is  buried  at  “Grassdale”  Plantation,  near  Eu- 
taw,  Alabama,  along  with  many  descendants  and  relatives.  His 
wife  was  Mary  Rountree  of  North  Carolina.  Moved  to  Alabama 
about  1818. — Information  from  Mrs.  Marie  Scovel  Browder,  1415 
Isabella  Ave.,  Houston,  Texas, — See  also  Domhart’s  History  of  Walker 
County,  Alabama,  page  166. 


546 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


COLEMAN,  FRANCIS  (1744-1823)  served  as  a private  in 
the  Georgia  troops.  He  was  born  in  Virginia;  died  in  Washington 
County,  Ala. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  vol.  163,  page  121.  See  also 
McCall’s  Roster  of  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Georgia,  page  210. 

COLLIER,  JAMES  (1757-1832)  served  in  the  cavalry  in  the 
Virginia  Continental  Line.  He  was  born  in  Lunenburg  Co.,  Va. ; 
died  in  Madison  Co.,  Alabama. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  Vol.  22,  p.  136. 

COLLINS,  ELISHA — Revolutionary  Soldier.  Born  Novem- 
ber 30,  1759,  in  Halifax  County,  Virginia.  He  enlisted  February 
1778  in  Captain  Clarke’s  Illinois  Expedition  and  marched  to  Boones- 
borough,  Ky.,  stayed  there  until  June,  when  he  marched  to  the  Falls 
of  the  Ohio,  and  was  attached  to  Captain  John  Montgomery’s 
company,  then  marched  to  Kekaskia,  where  they  took  some  prison- 
ers. He  served  until  October  1778. 

Elisha  Collins  enlisted  May  15,  1779,  at  Lexington,  Ky.,  and 
served  twenty  days  in  Capt.  John  Holder’s  Company.  Col.  John 
Bowman’s  Regiment,  and  had  two  engagements  with  the  Shawnee 
Indians. 

Elisha  Collins  enlisted  at  Lexington,  Ky.,  August  1,  1780  and 
served  one  month  in  Capt.  Levi  Todd’s  Company,  Col.  Benjamin 
Logan’s  Regiment,  and  had  an  engagement  at  Picquaway.  He 
stayed  at  Lexington  until  June,  1782,  when  he  moved  back  to 
Virginia,  and  married  in  1783  (name  of  wife  not  given,  and  no 
further  details  of  marriage).  He  moved  back  to  Kentucky  in 
1784  and  moved  to  Greene  County,  Ala.,  in  1819. — Lettter  from 
Congressman  Ross  Collins,  Washington,  D.  C.,  September  14,  1927. 

COLLINS,  MRS.  ELIABETH— Died  March  20,  1852,  at  the 
residence  of  her  son,  ALFRED  COLLINS,  in  Limestone  County, 
Mrs.  ELIZABETH  COLLINS,  relict  to  SOLOMON  COLLINS 
(a  Revolutionary  soldier)  aged  about  88  years.  — Huntsville, 
Southern  Advocate,  March  31,  1852. 

COLLINS,  WYATT — Resided  at  Burnt  Corn  in  1825,  was 
invited  to  LaFayette  Celebration  at  Clairbourne,  April  6,  1825. — 
Alabama  Military  Archives. 


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547 


CONE,  JESSE,  Montgomery  County.  Name  appears  on  tablet 
placed  in  hall  of  Alabama  Memorial  Building  by  Francis  Marion 
Chapter,  D.A.R.,  1941. 

CONNALLY,  JOHN  WILLIAM — Name  appears  on  Hunts- 
ville Monument,  erected  by  Twickenham  Town  Chapter,  D.A.R. 

COSEY,  JAMES — Mr.  Cosey  and  the  Messrs.  Cluff  located 
within  the  limits  of  the  present  village,  (Evergreen)  while  Mr. 
Andrews  pitched  his  tent  upon  the  hill  beyond  the  small  branch, 
west  of  Evergreen.  Mr.  Cosey  was  an  old  Revolutionary  soldier, 
and  bore  the  mark  of  a severe  wound  in  his  bosom. — Riley’s  History 
of  Conecuh  County,  Alabama,  p.  63. 

COWLES,  WILLIAM  MARSTEN— At  his  residence  in  this 
county,  on  Friday  the  15th  inst.,  Major  William  Marsten  Cowles, 
in  the  70th  year  of  his  age. — Thus  passeth  away  the  witnesses  of, 
and  the  participators  in,  the  scenes  of  the  Revolution. 

Major  Cowles  was  a native  of  Charles  City,  Va.,  and  although 
a very  young  man  at  that  time,  voluntarily  put  on  the  armour  of 
his  country,  in  defence  of  her  violated  rights. — He  was  a member 
of  a voluntary  corps  of  cavalry,  stationed  at  Charles  City  Court 
House;  was  taken  prisoner  at  that  place,  carried  to  Westover  and 
put  on  board  an  English  ship  of  war,  then  lying  off  that  place, 
where  he  was  detained  two  months,  when  he  made  his  escape, 
carrying  off  six  other  prisoners;  he  landed  at  Ferry  Point,  from 
whence  he  proceded  to  the  Great  Bridge,  to  the^camp  of  General 
Gregory,  reaching  that  place  the  day  after  the  battle  fought  there ; 
he  thence  returned  home. 

Shortly  after  this  period,  Lord  Cornwallis  was  beseiged  by 
the  American  forces  under  General  Washington,  at  Little  York. 
Major  Cowles,  in  company  with  several  gentlemen  of  his  acquain- 
tance, repaired  to  the  scene  of  action,  & was  present  at  the  sur- 
render of  that  place.  In  1784,  he  emigrated  to  the  State  of  Georgia, 
and  settled  in  the  County  of  Richmond,  near  Augusta.  For  many 
years  after  the  peace  with  Great  Britain,  the  Creek  Indians  con- 
tinued to  be  troublesome  to  the  settlements  on  the  frontiers  of 
Georgia,  and  in  an  expedition  ordered  out  by  the  State  for  their 
chastisement,  Major  COWLES  volunteered  his  services,  and  dur- 
ing the  expedition,  served  in  the  capacity  of  Aid,  to  Major  General 


548 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Twiggs.  He  continued  to  reside  near  Augusta  until  1818,  when 
he  removed  to  this  State,  and  located  himself  in  this  county,  where, 
by  his  hospitality,  and  active  benevolence,  he  has  acquired  a nu- 
merous circle  of  friends  and  acquainances,  who,  with  the  more  im- 
mediate members  of  his  family,  will  long  deplore  his  loss.  — 
Selina  Courier,  November  20,  1828. 

COX,  JOHN — Listed  in  the  Report  of  the  Secretary  of  War 
of  1852  as  living  at  Clarksville,  Clarke  County,;  as  one  whose  ap- 
plication for  a pension  as  a soldier  of  the  Revolution  had  been 
rejected  for  the  reason  that  the  service  had  been  oi?  less  than  six 
months  duration.  The  Clarke  County  Census  of  1830  lists  him 
as  aged  between  sixty  and  seventy.  The  Census  of  1840  lists  him  as 
between  seventy  and  eighty.  His  name  does  not  appear  in  the  Census 
of  1850. 


COZBY,  ROBERT— Died— On  the  7th  day  of  October  last, 
at  the  residence  of  his  son,  in  the  Town  of  Trianna,  the  venerable 
Robert  Cozby,  in  the  69th  year  of  his  age ; a Revolutionary  Pen- 
sioner, who  received  the  enemy’s  ball  in  the  calf  of  his  knee  in  the 
commencement  of  the  War,  which  disabled  him  thro’  life.  Not- 
withstanding his  decreptitude,  through  a spirit  of  industry  and 
vigilance,  he  was  enabled  to  raise  a respectable  family.  He  died 
as  he  had  lived,  a steady  and  devoted  friend  to  the  cause  of  re- 
ligion. When  spoken  to  about  his  approaching  dissolution,  he 
declared  he  had  no  wish  to  live,  but  longed  for  the  happy  change. 
He  was  interred,  on  the  8th,  at  the  burying  ground  where  his 
aged  wife  had  been  previously  interred,  surrounded  by  friends 
and  pious  Christians. 

N.  B. — He  never  called  on  the  government  for  his  Pension 
till  he  came  to  Alabama,  whence  decreptitude  and  old  age  had 
combined  to  reduce  him  to  penury  and  want ; then  the  Pension 
Agent  at  Huntsville  paid  him  in  depreciated  paper,  which  should 
make  a black  mark  in  that  gentleman’s  conduct  through  life, 
except  he  make  amends,  acknowledges  his  faults,  repents  for  the 
crime,  and  asks  his  God  and  his  country  for  forgiveness.  Though 
his  friends  have  consolation  in  the  belief  that  his  soul  is  wafted 
to  a more  friendly  port,  where  his  agent  will  deal  honestly  and 
pay  his  pension  in  that  gold  which  moths  cant  corrupt  nor  thieves 
break  through  and  steal.  — A Christian  in  the  Neighborhood  of 
Trianna — The  Democrat,  Huntsville,  Ala.,  Dec.  2,  1825. 


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549 


CRANE,  MAYFIELD — Born  in  North  Carolina,  removed 
with  his  father  to  Ninety-Six  District,  S.  C.,  resided  there  until 
the  beginning  of  the  Revolutionary  War,  then  moved  to  Ruther- 
ford County,  N.  C.,  residing  only  a short  time  before  returning  to 
Ninety-Six  District,  S.  C.  While  residing  in  Ninety-Six  District, 
S.  C.,  he  enlisted  and  served  for  three  different  tours  in  the  South 
Carolina  Troops.  When  very  young  he  served  in  Capt.  Thomas 
Brandon’s  company,  Col.  William  Farr’s  Regiment  and  was  at 
the  battle  of  Brier  Creek,  Ga. ; later  was  in  Captain  Palmore’s 
(Palmer)  Company,  Col.  Thomas  Brandon’s  Regiment,  being  in 
an  engagement  near  Augusta,  Ga.,  continuing  for  one  year ; finally 
served  at  the  battle  of  Eutaw  Springs,  was  later  stationed  at  Four 
Holes  Bridge,  and  served  in  all  for  two  years  and  ten  months. 
He  returned  to  Rutherford  County,  N.  C.,  after  the  Revolutionary 
War,  lived  there  for  five  years,  removed  to  Mississippi  Territory, 
then  to  Pickens  County,  Ala.,  where  he  resided  for  sixteen  years, 
moved  to  Jefferson  County,  Ala.,  in  1836,  where  he  remained  until 
April,  1837,  then  moved  to  Tishomingo  County,  Miss.,  where  he 
resided  in  April,  1842,  and  died  in  Jackson  County,  Miss.,  No- 
vember 1,  1843. — Jones  and  Gandrud,  Alabama  Records , vol.  72,  Pick- 
ens County,  pp.  66-68.  See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Alabama , 
1911,  p.  25. 

CRENSHAW,  STEPHEN — A Revolutionary  soldier,  with  a 
large  family,  stores  and  stock,  etc.,  moved  from  Edgefield  District, 
S.  C.,  about  1817,  to  the  Territory  of  Alabama.  He  entered  the 
land  known  as  Lowndes  County,  Hayneville,  cutting  the  roads 
and  bridges  as  they  moved.  He  died  in  1820  from  exposure  and 
was  buried  in  the  woods  in  Lowndes  County.  Afterwards  a 
Methodist  Church  was  built  near  grave.  Later  others  were  buried 
there  and  was  enclosed  by  brick  wall  and  was  kept  by  Susan 
Crenshaw  Hardy  and  grandson,  Dr.  Henry  L.  Whipple,  of  Mont- 
gomery. During  the  War  Between  the  States  the  graves  were 
neglected  and  later  were  sold  and  a warehouse  marks  the  place. 
It  is  at  Hayneville,  Dreighman’s  Warehouse.  She  remembers 
seeing  part  of  his  uniform,  knee  buckles,  coat  and  pants.  She  saw 
these  things  at  Hayneville.  He  was  a private.  Mrs.  Hardy  is  87 
years  old.  Her  mother’s  name  was  Baby  Ruth  Queen  Victoria. 
Mrs.  Hardy  in  1927,  was  living  with  her  daughter  at  Stone’s  Tank. 

CROW,  ROBERT,  (1761-1850)  served  as  private  in  Crockett’s 
company  7th  Virginia  regiment  commanded  by  Col.  Holt  Richeson. 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


550 


He  applied  for  a pension,  1819,  and  his  claim  was  allowed.  He 
was  born  in  Fincastle  County,  Va. ; died  in  DeKalb  County.  Ala- 
bama.— D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  vol.  121,  page  160. 

CULP,  FREDERICK — Buried  near  Gurley  or  Huntsville, 
Ala.,  Madison  County  Several  letters  in  Library,  Department  of 
Archives  and  History,  making  this  statement  but  no  proof 

CUNNINGHAM,  ROBERT  MOORE  in  1775  left  college  to 
take  up  arms  for  his  country  and  enlisted  in  Capt.  Mathew  Smith’s 
company,  Lancaster  County,  Pa. ; taken  prisoner  at  the  siege  of 
Quebec,  was  discharged,  and,  1777,  served  as  lieutenant  in  the 
Virginia  artillery.  In  1837  he  received  a pension,  which  his  widow 
drew  for  many  years  after  his  death.  He  was  born  in  Lancaster 
County  ,Pa. ; died  in  Tuscaloosa,  Alabama.- — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book, 
vol.  71,  page  273-4. 

DALE,  ADAM  (1768-1805)  when  only  fourteen  volunteered 
in  a company  of  boys  for  home  defense.  He  was  born  in  Wor- 
cester County,  Md,  died  in  Madison  County,  Alabama. — D.A.R.  Line- 
age Book,  vol.  47,  page  58. 

DARDEN,  GEORGE  (1763-1844)  was  placed  on  the  pension 
roll,  1832,  for  service  as  private  in  the  South  Carolina  and  Georgia 
troops  under  Colonels  Dooly  and  Pickens.  He  was  born  in 
Brunswick  County,  Va. ; died  in  Tuscaloosa  County,  Ala. — D.A.R 
Lineage  Book,  vol.  164,  page  165. 

DARDEN,  GEORGE,  Patriot,  1763-1844,  Revolutionary  soldier 
and  son  of  Revolutionary  Soldier.  Elizabeth  Strozier  Darden,  1766- 
1842.  Daughter  of  Peter  Strozier  of  Virginia,  Revolutionary  Sol- 
dier.— Inscription  on  graves  found  at  Darden  Plantation,  on  Har- 
grove Road,  out  from  Tuscaloosa. 

DARDEN,  GEORGE — Porn  January  21,  1763,  place  not 
shown.  He  enlisted  the  latter  part  of  February  1779,  while  a 
resident  of  Wilkes  County,  Ga.,  served  with  Georgia  troops  in 
Captain  Cunningham’s,  Col.  John  Dooly’s  Regiment,  also  with 
the  South  Carolina  troops  in  Capt.  John  Cowen’s  Company, 
Col.  Andrew  Picken’s  Regiment,  was  in  an  engagement  with  the 
Cherokee  Indians,  in  the  battle  of  Stono  and  in  the  Siege  of  Sa- 
vannah, serving  for  eight  months  and  fourteen  days  as  a private. 


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551 


Later  he  enlisted  in  the  '‘settlement  of  Long  Cane”,  in  South 
Carolina.  In  1832  he  was  living  in  Tuscaloosa  County,  Ala.,  and 
was  still  living  there  in  1843 — From  National  Archives , Pension  Divi- 
sion,, Washington,  D.  C. 

DARDEN,  GEORGE — Aged  seventy  one,  and  a resident  of 
Tuscaloosa  County,  was  buried  at  Shakerag  Methodist  Church, 
six  miles  south  of  Tuscaloosa. — Information  from  Mrs.  Richard 
Little,  Tuscaloosa.  See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Alabama , 1911, 
p.  29. 

DAVIDSON,  WILLIAM  (1753-1849)  served  as  a soldier  in 
the  Virginia  Line  during  the  Revolution.  He  was  born  in  Vir- 
ginia; died  in  Alabama. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  vol.  85,  page  292. 


DAVIE,  ROBERT — Name  appears  on  Huntsville  Monu- 
ment, erected  by  Twickenham  Town  Chapter,  D.A.R. 

DAVIS,  ANDREW.  Andrew  Davis  applied  for  revolutionary 
pension  while  living  in  Bledsoe  County.  He  was  born  Dec.  21, 
1756  in  the  Waxsaw  settlement  of  South  Carolina.  He  was  living 
there  when  he  enlisted  Nov.  1,  1775  under  Capt.  John  Barkley, 
Col.  Richardson  and  Gen.  Sumpter,  serving  two  months.  He  en- 
listed again  and  was  in  Charleston  during  the  battle  of  Sullivan’s 
Island  but  was  not  in  the  battle.  In  1777  he  served  under  Capt. 
James  Pettigrew,  Col.  Samuel  Jack  and  Col.  Willian  Terrell  in  a 
regiment  which  was  called  the  Minute  Troops.  He  served  in 
1779  under  Capt.  Robert  Davis.  He  volunteered  in  a cavalry 
company  in  Lincoln  County,  N.  C.,  under  Capt.  Sanuel  Martin. 
His  papers  were  lost  when  his  house  was  burned.  He  knew  An- 
drew Jackson  as  a boy.  He  moved  from  South  Carolina  to  Iredell 
County,  N.  C.,  during  the  Revolution  and  subsequently  he  moved 
to  Rutherford  County,  Tenn.,  to  Warren  County,  Tenn.,  and  to 
Bledsoe  County.  He  then  moved  to  Benton  County,  Ala.,  and 
applied  to  have  his  pension  transferred  to  that  county. — Armstrong, 
Some  Tennessee  Heroes  of  the  Revolution,  Vol.  2. 

DAVIS,  BENJAMIN — An  officer  in  the  Revolution,  who 
lived  in  Brunswick  County,  Va.,  and  came  to  Alabama  in  the 
early  days  of  the  State,  about  the  time  of  its  admission  into  the 
Union,  and  settled  in  Autauga  county.  Whose  son,  Benjamin 
Davis,  came  to  Alabama  with  his  parents,  Maj.  Benjamin  and 


552 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Tabitha  Davis,  and  also  settled  in  this  county. — Owen’s  History  of 
Alabama  and  Dictionary  of  Alabama  Biography , vol.  3,  p.  460. 

DAVIS,  JAMES — Applied  for  a pension  while  living'  in 
Hamilton  County,  Tenn.,  August  28,  1832.  He  was  born  in 
Fauquier  County,  Va.,  the  date  not  given  but  he  was  seventy-one 
in  1832,  therefore  born  in  1761.  He  was  living  in  Wilkes  County, 
N.  C.,  when  he  enlisted  in  Capt.  John  Key’s  company  in  which 
he  served  three  months;  he  also  served  five  months  in  Capt. 
Smith’s  company,  six  weeks  in  Col.  Cleveland’s  regiment  and 
three  months  in  Capt.  Gordon’s  company.  Col.  Malbury’s  regiment 
and  was  in  the  Battle  of  Eutaw  Springs.  He  also  served  six 
weeks  in  Capt.  Pendleton  Isbell’s  company.  He  moved  after  the 
Revolution  to  Greene  County,  Tenn.,  then  to  Campbell  and  White 
Counties,  Tenn.,  then  to  Jackson  County,  Ala.,  then  to  Marion 
County,  Tenn.,  then  to  Hamilton  County,  Tenn.,  where  he  died 
Dec.  9,  1843.  He  married  Mary,  her  surname  not  being  given,  in 
1782,  when  she  was  sixteen  years  of  age,  so  born  1766.  She  sur- 
vived him  and  died  in  Hamilton  County,  after  1844  when  the 
record  states  that  she  was  living  and  before  April  19,  1845.  They 
had  several  children  who  were  then  residents  of  Hamilton  County. 
Note  : The  graves  of  James  and  Mary  Davis  are  in  that  section  of 
Hamilton  County  which  became  Sequatchie  County,  Tenn. — Armstrong, 
Some  Tennessee  Heroes  of  the  Revolution,  vol.  1. 

DAVIS,  JOHN — of  Chambers  County,  Ala.,  grave  located 
there. — D.A.R.  Report,  1927-28,  p.  109. 

DAVIS,  LEWIS  C’OOKSON.  Died  at  his  residence  in  Au- 
tauga county,  Ala.,  on  the  3d  day  of  February,  1835,  the  Rev. 
Lewis  C.  Davis,  in  the  79th  year  of  his  age.  Mr.  Davis  was  a 
native  of  Hanover  county,  Va.,  and  enlisted  in  the  service  of  his 
country,  in  1777,  and  served  faithfully  three  years,  the  time  for 
which  he  enlisted.  He  joined  the  main  army  under  Gen.  Wash- 
ington, a few  days  after  the  battle  of  Germantown.  He  was  with 
the  army  in  winter  quarters,  at  Valley  Forge.  In  the  spring  he 
marched  into  New  Jersey.  In  June  he  was  at  the  battle  of  Mon- 
mouth; from  there  to  White  Plains;  thence  to  King’s  Bridge,  in 
New  York;  thence  to  Bound  Brook,  in  New  Jersey,  into  winter 
quarters.  In  the  spring  of  1779,  under  Gen.  Wayne,  he  marched 
to  West  Point ; thence  to  Stony  Point,  and  aided  in  storming  the 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


553 


Fort  at  the  point  of  the  bayonet;  from  thence  to  Morristown, 
where  he  received  his  discharge. 

Mr.  Davis  was  a venerable,  pious,  and  useful  minister  of  the 
Baptist  Church,  for  more  than  forty  years.  Such  were  his  Christian 
attainments,  that  death  had  lost  all  its  terrors  to  his  mind:  to  use 
his  own  expression,  he  waited  anxiously  for  his  hour  of  dissolution, 
that  he  might  be  ‘absent  from  the  body,  and  present  with  the 
Lord/  He  has  left  a numerous  connection,  and  a large  circle  of 
acquaintances  to  mourn  their  loss.  In  tracing  the  life  and  charac- 
ter of  such  a man,  much  might  be  said  in  his  praise  ; but  it  is  suffi- 
cient to  sav,  that  he  faithfully  served  his  country,  his  God,  and  his 
church.  He  died  in  peace,  in  the  full  assurance  of  faith.  He  rests 
from  all  his  labours.  Rest,  rest,  weary  dust — Rest,  weary,  weary 
spirit,  with  the  Father  of  Spirits,  and  live  forever!!  Christian 
Index,  no  date. — Holcombe’s  Baptists  in  Alabama,  page  221-2. 

DAVIS,  LEWIS  COOKSON  (1756-1835)  received  a pension 
for  service  as  private  in  the  Virginia  troops.  He  was  born  in 
Hanover  County,  Va. ; died  in  Autauga  County,  Ala. — D.A.R.  Lineage 
Boob,  vol.  164,  page  106.  See  Jones  and  Gandrud,  Autauga  County. 
.Bahama  Records,  vol.  75,  p.  38. 

DAVIS,  REUBEN — Revolutionary  Pensions — The  following 
is  a list  of  the  Revolutionary  Soldiers  on  the  rolls  of  the  States  of 
Georgia  and  Alabama  who  are  regularly  receiving  their  pensions 
and  their  age  in  1859:  Alabama— REUBEN  DAVIS,  Chambers 
County,  97  years. — Mobile  Daily  Register,  August  14,  1859. 

DAVIS,  SAMUEL — -The  funeral  sermon  of  the  late  Samuel 
Davis,  an  old  soldier  of  the  Revolution,  will  be  preached  by  the 
Rev.  Robert  Donald,  at  Mount  Perrin  Camp  Ground,  near  New 
Market,  on  the  5th  Sunday  in  this  month. — Huntsville  Democrat , April 
30,  1843. 

DAVIS,  SAMUEL  (1755-1837)  received  for  service  as  private 
in  Virginia  militia  under  Colonels  Christie,  Logan  and  Campbell. 
He  was  born  in  Autauga  County.  Va. ; died  in  Madison  County, 
Ala. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  v.  148,  p.  252. 

DAY  IS,  SAMUEL  applied  for  Revolutionary  pension  while 
living  in  Madison  County,  Alabama,  in  1832.  He  was  born  De- 


554 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


cember  25,  1755,  in  Augusta  County,  Virginia.  He  enlisted  while 
living  in  Washington  County,  Virginia,  in  1776,  in  Captain  Robert 
Craig’s  company,  Col.  Christie’s  regiment.  During  1777  and  1778 
he  served  under  Captain  Matthew  Willoughby.  He  enlisted  again 
in  March  1779  in  Captain  Josiah  Harland’s  company  Colonel  Ben- 
jamin Logan’s  regiment.  He  enlisted  again  in  November  1780 
and  served  in  Captain  Joseph  Black’s  Company,  Colonel  Arthur 
Campbell’s  regiment.  He  was  in  several  battles  with  the  Indians. 
He  stated  that  his  father  was  killed  by  Indians. — Armstrong, 
Some  Tennessee  Heroes  of  the  Revolution,  vol.  3. 

DAVIS,  WILLIAM — applied  for  revolutionary  pension  while 
residing  in  Jackson  County,  Alabama.  He  was  born  in  Hanover 
County,  Virginia,  in  1753.  During  the  Revolution  he  resided  in 
Albermarle  County,  Va.  and  enlisted  from  that  county  in  the 
company  of  Captain  Nicholas  Davis  in  1776  under  General  La- 
Fayette.  He  served  several  tours,  the  third  tour  as  a substitute 

for Steele.  He  was  acquainted  in  Albermarle  County  with 

Colonel  James  Lewis  who  resided  later  in  Franklin  County,  Tennes- 
see. A letter  from  Colonel  Lewis  stated  that  he  and  William 
Davis  were  boys  in  the  same  neighborhood  in  Albermarle  County, 
Virginia.  William  Davis  stated  that  he  moved  from  Virginia  to 
Kentucky  and  thence  to  Alabama.  Note  : The  history  of  Alber- 
marle County,  Virginia,  gives  the  location  of  Colonel  James  Lewis’ 
residence  as  a boy.  It  was  on  the  western  part  of  the  present 
University  of  Virginia. — Armstrong,  Some  Tennessee  Heroes  of  the 
Revolution,  vol.  3. 

DAVIS,  WILLIAM,  born  in  Wales  in  1752,  died  August  19, 
1848.  Buried  in  Proctor  cemetery,  10  miles  from  Scottsboro,  Jack- 
son  County,  at  Maynard’s  Cove. — Marker  placed  by  Tidance  Lane 
Chapter,  D.A.R.,  Scottsboro,  October  17,  1936.  See  also  General 
D.A.R.  Report,  1936. 

DAY,  WILLIAM — was  born  in  August  1754,  in  a fort  in 
Edgefield  District,  S.  C.,  where  the  inhabitants  were  fortified 
against  the  Cherokee  Indians;  the  names  of  his  parents  are  not 
shown.  While  residing  in  Edgefield  District,  S.  C.,  about  ten 
miles  from  Augusta,  he  volunteered  at  the  beginning  of  the  war, 
served  as  private  in  Captain  John  Carter’s  mounted  company, 
under  Colonels  Purvis  and  LeRoy  Hammond,  was  in  the  Siege 
of  Augusta  and  in  many  skirmishes ; subsequently,  he  served  four 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


555 


or  five  months  in  Captain  Johnj  Hammonds  South  Carolina  com- 
pany, also  served  some  time  tinder  General  Andrew  Pickens,  and 
acted  as  guide  to  General  Nathaniel  Greeen’s  troops.  He  served 
at  various  times  during  the  period  of  the  entire  war,  amounting  to 
between  three  and  four  years.  The  Soldier  resided  in  Edgefield 
District,  S.  C.,  until  about  1819,  then  moved  to  Dallas  County, 
Alabama. 

He  was  allowed  pension  on  his  application  executed  Dec.  11, 
1832,  at  which  time  he  resided  in  Dallas  County,  Alabama. 

There  is  no  reference  of  wife  or  children  of  William  Day. 
In  order  to  obtain  the  date  of  last  payment  of  pension,  and  possi- 
bly the  date  of  death  of  this  pensioner,  you  should  apply  to  the 
Comptroller  General,  General  Accounting  Office,  Records  Division, 
this  City,  citing  the  following:  William  Day,  Certificate  6863, 
Issued  March  8,  1833.  Rate  $40  per  annum,  Commenced  March 
4,  1831,  Act  of  June  7,  1832  Alabama  Agency. — Veterans  Adminis- 
tration, Washington,  D.  C. 

DAY,  WILLIAM,  a pensioner  of  the  Revolutionary  War, 
Certificate  No.  6863,  Alabama  Agency,  Records  of  this  office  show 
that  the  last  payment  of  pension  covering’ period  from  March  4th, 
1835,  to  March  4,  1836,  was  made  at  Mobile,  Alabama,  on  March 
17,  1836,  to  George  H.  Fry,  at  attorney  for  the  pensioner. 

On  March  8,  1836,  the  pensioner  certified  that  he  had  resided 
in  Alabama  for  fourteen  years  prior  thereto  he  resided  in  South 
Carolina.  This  certification  was  executed  in  Dallas  County,  Ala- 
bama.— Comptroller  of  U.  S.  Accounting  Office , Washington,  D.  C. 

Last  Will  and  Testament  of  William  Day,  Sr.,  made  signed 
and  witnessed  on  March  1,  1836,  admitted  to  probate  and  recorded 
November  2,  1836.  Presented  for  probate  on  May  26,  1836. 
Record  of  Final  Settlement  of  Estate  May  Term  1836.  See  Will 
Book  Records,  Vol.  A,  page  125. — Minutes  of  Orphans  Court,  Vol.  D, 
page  36  and  318,  Dallas  County.  See  also  General  D.A.R.  Report, 
1935.  See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Alabama,  1911,  p.  30. 

DEAN,  JOHN — DIED. — At  his  residence  near  this  place  on 
the  morning  of  the  18th  inst.  after  a short  but  severe  illness,  JOHN 
DEAN,  Sen.  Esq.  aged  seventy  eight  years.  The  deceased  was  a 


556  ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


native  of  Virginia,  and  Soldier  of  the  Revolution.  He  was  an 
early  settler  in  this  country,  and  has  filled  many  of  the  civil  offices 
of  the  country  with  credit  to  himself — he  has  been  judge  of  the 
County  Court,  &c.  He  was  an  old  and  respectable  citizen  who  has 
left  a numerous  train  of  descendants  to  lament  his  loss — Com. — Clarke 
County  Post,  Suggsville,  Ala.  Jan.  20,  1837. 

DeJARNETTE,  FRANCES  HANNAH  (PICKETT),  real 
daughter,  daughter  of  James  Pickett,  Revolutionary  soldier.  She 
was  married  November  12,  1798,  to  Mumford  Dejarnette.  He  was 
born  February  10,  1776  and  died  in  Wadesboro,  N.  C.,  Aug*ust  5, 
1823.  She  was  buried  in  the  old  Robinson  Cemeterv  out  from 
Prattville  and  the  grave  was  marked  by  the  D.A.R.’s. 

DICKEY,  GEORGE  served  as  private  and  sergeant  in  South 
Carolina  militia,  1781-82.  He  was  born  in  South  Carolina;  died 
1817,  in  Huntsville,  Alabama. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  Vol.  67,  page  168. 

DINSMORE,  JAMES  (1760-1837)  served  as  a private  in 
Capt.  Maxfield’s  company,  Col.  Isaac  Shelby’s  N.  C.  Regiment.  He 
was  born  in  Ireland;  died  in  Morgan  County,  Ala. — D.A.R.  Lineage 
Book,  Vol.  99,  p.  216. 

DIXON,  JEREMIAH — Born  in  1764  in  Pitt  County,  North 
Carolina.  He  alleged  that  he  volunteered  in  1778;  served  at  various 
times  with  the  North  Carolina  Troops  under  Captains  George 
Falconer,  Thomas  Armstrong,  Anthony  Sharp,  Majors  Reading 
Blount,  Thomas  Donoho  and  Colonel  Archibald  Lytle,  also  under 
Colonels  William  Washington  and  Lee;  was  in  the  Battles  of 
Brier  Creek  in  Georgia  and  Eutaw  Springs  and  Dorchester  in 
South  Carolina;  was  discharged  at  Salisbury,  North  Carolina; 
served  as  Private.  His  alleged  service  amounted  to  18  months. 

Jeremiah  Dixon  applied  for  pension  March  25,  1834,  but  died 
before  the  evidence  was  completed.  Pension  Certificate  No.  33171, 
was  issued  September  16,  1853  to  his  surviving  heirs;  rate  $40  per 
annum;  ending  July  26,  1835;  act  of  June  7,  1832;  Mobile,  Alaba- 
ma, Agency. 

Jeremiah  Dixon  married  August  10r  1785,  place  not  stated. 
“Elisabeth”  Goff.  The  date  and  place  of  her  birth  or  age  and 
names  of  her  parents  were  not  given. 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


557 


Children:  Seth  P.,  born  December  8,  1788;  Mary,  born  April 
4-,  1790;  Elizabeth  L.,  born  May  26,  1793  and  in  1853  was  the  wife 

of  Dimond;  Sophrina,  born  August  23,  1795;  Rufus  Wiley, 

born  November  17,  1797 ; Jerh  or  Jeremiah,  born  January  5,  1801  ; 
John  Boneparte,  born  May  10,  1804. 

The  surviving  children  of  the  veteran  and  his  widow,  Eliza- 
beth, who  were  paid  the  pension  to  which  the  veteran  was  entitled 
at  death  were  Seth  P.,  Rufus  Wiley  and  Jeremiah  Dixon,  Elisabeth 
Dimond  and  John  B.  Dixon. 

During  service  the  veteran  was  a resident  of  Pitt  County, 
North  Carolina.  He  lived  there  until  1815,  when  he  moved  to 
Alabama.  In  1834  he  was  living  in  Covington  County,  that  state. 

In  1852  the  veteran’s  son,  John  Boneparte  Dixon,  was  a resi- 
dent of  Andalusia,  Covington  County,  Alabama. 

Jeremiah  Dixon  died  July  26,  1853.  Elisabeth  Dixon,  his 
widow,  died  June  15,  1840.  The  place  of  death  of  each  was  not 
stated ; and  dates  of  death  of  the  children  who  did  not  survive 
them  were  not  given — Comptroller  General  of  U . S.,  Accounting  Office, 
Washington,  D.  C. 

DRAKE,  JOHN — aged  91  years.  He  was  a soldier  of  the 
Revolution.  He  removed  from  Virginia  and  settled  near  this 
place  many  years  ago,  where  he  has  ever  been  known  as  one  of  our 
best  citizens,  maintaining  through  his  long  life  the  most  unim- 
peachable character.  He  was  a member  of  the  Baptist  Church, 
and  was  universally  esteemed  a truly  just,  pious  and  good  man. 
He  has  left  a large  family  connexion  to  lament  his  loss.  The 
Fincastle  (Va.)  Democrat  will  please  copy  the  above. — Huntsville, 
The  Democrat , March  2,  1839. 

DRAKE,  JOHN,  Name  appears  on  Huntsville  Monument, 
erected  by  Twickenham  Chapter,  D.A.R. 

DU  BIAS,  — Resided  in  Clarke  County  with  Mathew 

Allen.  Came  from  Marlow,  S.  C.  Died  about  1836.  Received 
Pension  when  Grove  Hill  was  Clarkesville. — Alabama  Military  Ar- 
chives. ... 


558 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


DUBOUT,  - — Revolutionary  Soldier  buried  in  Elijah 

Pugh  Cemetery.  See  Elijah  Pugh. 

DUNSMORE,  JAMES— See  Dinsmore,  James. 

EARL,  SAMUEL  (1760-1845),  enlisted,  1781,  as  a sergeant 
in  Capt.  Reuben  Field’s  company,  Col.  Thomas  Gaskins’  Virginia 
regiment  of  militia.  His  widow  received  a pension.  He  was  born 
in  Fauquier  County,  Va. ; died  in  Washington  County,  Ala. — 
D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  Vol.  115,  page  146. 

EDDINS,  BENJAMIN  (1735-1817),  a patriot,  was  confined 
at  “Ninety  Six”  as  a prisoner  of  war,  and  was  offered  a commission 
in  the  British  army  for  his  services ; also  indemnity  for  his  proper- 
ty which  had  been  destroyed.  All  were  rejected  with  scorn ; 
threats  of  punishment  were  resorted  to,  but  to  these  he  replied  : 
“I  am  your  prisoner;  you  may  inflict  any  punishment  or  cruelty 
your  imagination  can  invent ; you  may  cut  out  my  heart  and  drain 
it  of  its  last  drop  of  blood;  but,  sir,  my  services  belong  to  my 
country  and  you  can  never  command  them.”  He  was  born  in 
Virginia;  died  in  Madison  (Huntsville)  County,  Alabama.- — D.A.R. 
Lineage  Book , Vol.  57,  page  279.  See  also  Chapman’s  Annuals  of 
Newberry,  S.  C.,  p.  247. 

EDWARDS,  JOHN,  Born  August  12,  1762,  in  Culpeper 
County,  Va.  Parents  not  given.  According  to  his  statement  when 
he  applied  for  a pension  in  October,  1832,  he  rendered  the  follow- 
ing service:  From  the  fall  of  1777  or  1778  in  Capt.  Wm.  Hill’s 
Company  of  Light  Horse,  a part  of  the  time  under  Colonel  Sevier 
of  N.  C. ; he  marched  from  N.  C.,  to  S.  C’.  and  Georgia ; was  in  the 
engagement  with  the  Tories  of  “Bullsborough’’ ; was  stationed 
later  at  Augusta  and  was  discharged  there,  having  served  18 
months.  Pension  certificate  No.  19934  was  issued  Sept.  26,  1833 
to  John  Edwards,  rate  $75  per  annum,  act  of  June  7,  1832,  Alabama 
Agency.  No  reference  was  made  to  wife  or  children.  He  was  in 
Franklin  County,  N.  C.  when  he  enlisted.  Afterward,  he  resided 
in  Culpeper  County,  Va.,  a few  years,  moved  thence  to  Wilkes 
County,  Ga.,  thence  in  1821,  to  Perry  County,  Ala.,  where  he  re- 
sided when  he  received  his  pension.  The  last  payment  of  pension, 
covering  the  period  from  March  4,  1831  to  March  4,  1834,  certificate 
No.  19934,  Alabama  Agency,  was  made  at  the  Pension  Agency, 
Mobile,  Ala.,  on  June  4,  1834,  to  Wm.  Jones,  Jr.,  as  attorney  for 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


559 


the  pensioner.  On  May  20,  1834,  John  Edwards  attested  that  he 
had  been  living  in  Perry  County,  Ala.,  and  had  previously  lived  in 
Georgia. — Jones  and  Gandrud,  Perry  County,  Alabama  Records,  vol. 
73. 

EDWARDS,  JOHN  (1758-1827)  served  as  a private  in  Capt. 
Thomas  Wills’  8th  company,  Col.  Daniel  Morgan’s  11th  and  15th 
Virginia  regiments.  He  was  born  in  North  Carolina ; died  in 
Alabama. — D. A. R.  , Lineage  Book,  Vol.  61,  page  33. 

ELLIOTT,  ELIZABETH  KNOX,  (1750-1852),  a patriot  (in 
S.  C.)  during  the  Revolution,  molded  bullets,  provided  clothing 
and  carried  messages  for  the  soldiers.  She  was  born  in  Ireland ; 
died  in  (Moundville) , Tuscaloosa  County,  Alabama. — D.A.R.  Lineage 
Book,  Vol.  126,  page  65. 

ELLIOTT,  JOHN — Born  in  Augusta  County,  Virginia,  1755. 
He  served  during  the  Revolutionary  War  in  North  Carolina, 
moved  to  Kentucky,  later  to  Smith  County,  Tenn.,  and  applied 
for  a pension  in  Morgan  County,  Ala. — Jones  and  Gandrud  — 
Alabama  Records,  vol.  74,  Morgan  County,  pp.  57-58.  See  also  Revo- 
lutionary Soldiers  Sn  Alabama,  1911,  p.  37. 

ELMORE,  JOHN  ARCHER,  (1762-1834)  served  as  private 
under  General  Greene  in  the  Virginia  Line.  He  was  born  in 
Prince  Edward  County,  Va.;  died  in  Autauga  County  (now  El- 
more), Ala. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  vol.  144,  p.  261. 

EMBREY,  JOSEPH — Born  1753  in  South  Carolina  and  died 
after  1850  in  Coosa  County,  Ala.  The  name  of  Joseph  Embie 
appears  on  the  February  3,  1804,  Oglethorpe  County,  Ga.,  lottery 
list  as  a Revolutionary  soldier.  This  list  is  in  the  Ordinary’s  office 
of  the  county.  The  name  of  Joseph  Embrey,  R.S.,  appears  on  the 
Land  Lottery  List,  1827,  as  residing  in  Holloway’s  District,  Ogle- 
thorpe County,  Ga.  The  Talladega  County,  Ala.,  Census  of  1840, 
lists  .him  as  having  in  his  household  only  himself,  aged  between 
eighty  and  ninety.  The  Coosa  County,  Ala.,  Census  of  1850  lists 
him  as  age  ninety-sevep,  born  in  South  Carolina,  and  in  the  house- 
hold of  Joseph  Tuck,  age  forty-six,  born  in  Virginia,  and  Sarah 
Tuck,  aged  forty,  born  in  Georgia.  The  inference  to  be  drawn  is 
that  Joseph  Embry  was  the  father  of  Sarah  Tuck.  In  the  old 
Shiloh  Baptist  Churchyard  Cemetery,  about  eight  miles  west  of 


560 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Alexander  City,  on  the  old  Alexander  City-Nixburg  road  we  find 
the  following  instriptions  : 


Sacred 

to  the  Memory  of 
Sarah 
Consort  of 
Joseph  Tuck 
and  mother  of 
Mary  S.  Thomas 
who  was  born 
January  17,  ,1810 
and  died 
August  31,  1857; 
and  Sacred  to  the  Memory  of 
Mary  S. 

Consort  of 
A.  J.  Thomas  , 
and  daughter  of 
Joseph  and  Sarah  Tuck 
who  was  born 
March  8,  1828 
and  died 
June  18,  1863. 

There  is  no  monument  over  Joseph  Tuck.  In  the  same  rock  wall 
inclosure  there  is  another  grave  with  native  stones  stacked  roof- 
life  which  is  probably  the  grave  of  Joseph  Embrey.- — Information 
from  Leon  A.  Nolen,  Birmingham,  Ala. 

ENGLAND,  WILLIAM,  born  in  the  year  1762  in  Halifax 
County,  Va.  Name  of  parents  not  given.  According  to  this  vet- 
eran’s statement  when  he  applied  for  a pension  in  October  1832, 
he  rendered  the  following  service  as  Private : In  1776,  6 months 
under  Captain'  Samuel  Williams  and  Colonel  John  Sevier  in  the 
North  Carolina  Troops;  afterwards,  at  different  times  on  the 
frontier  ^gainst  the  Indians;  later  under  Captain  John  Fitts  and 
Colonel  Harden  also  under  John  Calhoun,  Samuel  Moore  and 
Colonel  Andrew  Pickens  of  South  Carolina;  he  was  in  the  Battle 
of  Salkahatchie  during  which  he  was  wounded  in  his  ankle ; he 
was  in  the  siege  of  Augusta  and  in  frequent  skirmishes  ; his  service 
amounted  to  at  least  9 months.  Pension  certificate  No.  29854  was 


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561 


issued  March  16,  1833  to  William  England,  rate  $30  per  annum, 
act  of  June  7,  1832,  Alabama  agency.  No  reference  was  made  to 
wife  or  children.  At  enlistment  he  resided  in  the  western  part 
of  North  Carolina,  which  was  later  Tennessee;  he  moved  thence 
during  the  Revolutionary  War  to  South  Carolina  and  resided  in 
Fairfield  and  Richland  Districts  in  that  state  about  30  years, 
moved  thence  to  Wilkes  County,  Georgia,  where  he  resided  15 
years,  thence  moved  to  Perry  County,  Ala.,  where  he  resided  in 
1832.  Date  and  place  of  death  not  shown.  Last  payment  of  pen- 
sion, from  records  of  the  Comptroller  General,  General  Accounting 
Office,  Washington,  D.  C.,  certificate  No.  29843,  covering  the 
period  of  March  4.  1835  to  March  4,  1836  was  made  on  May  3, 
1836,  at  the  Pension  Agency,  Mobile,  Ala.,  to  Rufus  W.  Greening 
as  attorney  for  the  pensioner.  William  England  certified  on  March 
14,  1836  that  he  had  been  living  in  Dallas  County.  Ala.,  for  six 
months,  and  that  he  had  previously  lived  in  Perry  County,  Ala. — 
Jones  and  Gandrud,  Perry  County , vol.  73,  Alabama  Records. 

EVANS,  ROBERT  (1744-1848)  enlisted,  1776,  in  Col.  Edward 
Stevens’  10th  Virginia  regiment.  He  died  in  Alabama. — D.A.R.  Line- 
age Book,  Vol.  102,  page  24. 

EVANS,  ROBERT — Born  in  1744,  resided  in  Virginia  during 
the  Revolution,  died  at  the  age  of  104,  in  1848,  in  Perry  County, 
and  buried  near  Marion.  He  served  in  the  10th  Virginia  Regiment 
in  Capt.  Richard  Stevens’  Company.  His  grave  was  marked  in 
1929  by  the  Cherokee  Chapter  of  Selma.- — Military  Records  War 
Dept.  216-1-5,  vol.  2,  p.  105;  also  O Vol.  4,  p.  171 ; vol.  S,  1,  p.  157, 

FARLEY,  OBEDIAH— Shelby  County  Census  of  1820  gives 
one  male  and  three  females  over  twenty-one.  The  Census  of  1830 
gives  one  male  and  one  female  between  seventy  and  eighty  and 
one  female  between  thirty  and  forty.  Obediah  Farley  of  Shelby 
County  appears  on  the  list:  of  pensions  rejected. 

FARROW,  ROSANNAH  WATERS  WOODRUFF  — the 
daughter  of  THOMAS  FARROW,  a gallant  soldier  in  the  Revo- 
lutionary War.  Thomas  was  one  of  five  sons  of  Rosannah  Waters 
Farrow,  a noted  * Revolutionary  heroine  of  North  Carolina.  All 
five  sons  served  in  the  Revolution.  Lineal  descendants  include 
members  of  the  Crook  and  Woodruff  families.  On  Feb.  23  at 
Mt.  Zion,  near  Alexandria,  an  official  D.A.R.  marker  will  be  placed 


562 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


upon  her  s^rave  bv  Bienville  Chapter. — The  Birmingham  News,  Octo- 
ber 30,  1932. 

FAVER,  JOHN  (1758-1846)  served  as  a private  1779  at  the 
battle  of  Kettle  Creek  and  his  name  is  on  the  roster  of  soldiers 
who  participated  in  that  battle.  He  is  buried  on  his  farm  in 
Limestone  County,  Alabama.  Daughter:  Mary  Malissa  Faver 

Christopher,  born  1842,  in  Limestone  County,  Ala.  She  was  the 
daughter  by  his  third  wife,  Mahala  Lee,  born  1808. — D.A.R.  Lineage 
Book,  Vol.  45,  p.  60,  vol.  47,  p.  450-51. 


FLEMING,  SAMUEL — Died  at  his  residence  in  Autauga 
County,  on  the  22d  of  Feb.,  in  the  84th  year  of  his  age,  Mr.  Samuel 
Fleming,  a native  of  Ireland,  though  for  a great  many  years  a 
citizen  of  Jefferson  County,  Georgia. 

The  deceased  was  at  the  siege  of  Augusta,  Ga.,  and  on  several 
other  occasions  periled  his  life  in  the  struggle  for  Independence. 

And  there  are  yet  some  few  of  his  brethern  in  arms,  who  on 
reading  these  hasty  sketched  lines,  will  drop  a silent  tear  at  the 
recollection  of  by-gone  days  and  dangers,  in  which  the  deceased 
bore  a manly  soldier’s  part.  He  was  seated  at  his  breakfast  table 
when  the  messenger  of  death  came,  and  after  a few  minutes  pain 
and  warning,  his  immortal  spirit  returned  to  God  who  gave  it. 
Encomiums  are  useless  to  the  dead. — -It’s  enough  to  know  he 
fought  the  battles  of  his  adopted  country,  and  his  name  being 
enrolled  with  the  heroes  of  the  Revolution  it  became  immortal. 
It  being  also  understood  he  was  a member  of  the  Masonic  Fra- 
ternity, it  is  expected  his  funeral  will  be  conducted  in  a way  that 
comport  with  their  time’s  honoring  gratitude.  His  remains  was 
committed  to  the  earth  on  Friday  the  23rd.,  by  the  side  of  his  first 
wife,  in  the  family  grave  yard  at  Kingston. — The  W etumpka  Argus, 
March  6,  1844.  See  also  Jones  & Gandrud,  Autauga  County,  Alabama 
Records , vol.  75,  p.  36. 

FLEMING,  WILLIAM  (1760-1849)  was  placed  on  the  pen- 
sion roll  of  Hall  County,  Ga.,  1832  for  service  as  private  1780  in 
the  company  of  N,  C’.  volunteers  under  Capt.  Hanna,  Col.  Bratton. 
He  was  born  in  Maryland;  died  in  Sumter  Co.,  Ala. — D.A.R.  Lineage 
Book,  vol.  47,  p.  429. 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


563 


FLUKER,  GEORGE— was  only  nineteen  years  of  age  when 
he  entered  the  service.  At  the  time  of  the  Revolutionary  war 
his  father  David  Fluker,  was  living  in  Bute  Co.,  N.  C.,  having 
moved  there  from  Northumberland  Co.,  Va.  He  served  as  a sub- 
stitute for  his  father,  six  months  as  sergeant  in  Capt.  Jordan 
Harris’s  Co.  N.  C.  Troops,  and  was  in  the  battle  of  Brier  Creek. 
He  later  enlisted  and  served  four  months  as  sergeant  in  Capt. 
Tom  Christmas’  Co.  N.  C.  Troops  and  was  in  the  battle  of  Guilford 
and  the  siege  of  Camden,  still  later  he  enlisted  and  served  four 
months  as  Sergeant  under  General  William  Caswell,  N.  C.  Troops. 
In  February  1834,  he  was  allowed  a yearly  pension  of  $80.00,  while 
a resident  of  Wilcox.  Buried  in  old  Hamburg  Cemetery  between 
Oak  Hill  and  Snow  Hill  near  Gastonburg,  Wilcox  County.  “Sacred 
to  the  memory  of  GEORGE  FLUKER,  an  old  Revolutionary  Sol- 
dier, who  departed  this  life  August  30th,  A.  D.  1839,  Aged  79  yrs., 
4 months  and  12  days.  “Blessed  are  the  dead  which  die  in  the 
Lord  from  Henceforth.  Yea  saith  the  Spirit  that  they  may  rest 
from  their  labours  and  their  works  follow  them.” — Birmingham  News, 
July  8,  1930. 

FLUKER,  ELIZABETH— Sacred  to  the  memory  of  ELIZA- 
BETH wife  of  GEORGE  FLUKER,  who  departed  this  life  April 
14,  A.D.  1841,  aged  78  yrs.,  4 months  and  1.6  days.  “My  flesh 
shall  slumber  in  the  ground.  Till  the  last  trumpets  joyful  sound. 
Then  burst  the  chains  with  sweet  surprise.  And  in  my  savior’s 
image  rise.” — Buried  in  Gastonburg,  Wilcox  County,  Alabama. — 
Marked  by  Joseph  Wheeler  Chapter,  D.A.R.,  Camden. — Birmingham 
News , July  8,  1930. 

FORD,  JOHN — One  More  Gone. — John  Ford,  a revolutionary 
soldier,  died  in  Bibb  County,  Georgia  on  the  28th  day  of  February, 
in  the  105th  year  of  his  age.  He  was  married  five  times.  His  last 
wife  survived  him,  and  his  only  child  is  eighty  years  old. — 
Southern  Advocate,  Madison  County,  Ala.,  March  28,  1860. 

FORNEY,  PETER — The  Bienville  Chapter  has  located  the 
graves  in  the  Jacksonville  cemetery  two  daughters  of  Gen.  Peter 
Forney.  Markers  will  be  placed  with  fitting  ceremonies  on  all  of 
these  graves. — Birmingham  News,  October  30,  1931. 

FOWLER,  JOHN,  (1739-1844),  received  a pension  for  service 
as  private  under  Captains  Clinton,  Moore  and  Vann,  Colonels 
Kenan  and  Moore,  North  Carolina  Line.  He  was  born  in  North 


564 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Carolina;  died  in  Pike  County,  Alabama.- — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  Yol. 

1 22,  page  180. 

FRANKS,  MARSHALL — Born  in  1752,  in  Charlotte  County, 
Y a.  He  volunteered  in  the  fall  of  1775  and  served  one  month  as 
a private  in  Capt.  James  Williams’  company,  Col.  Robert  Mc- 
Crary’s South  Carolina  Regiment;  in  1779  he  served  three  months 
as  a private  in  Capt.  James  Williams’  South  Carolina  Regiment, 
and  was  in  the  battle  of  Brier  Creek ; served  three  months  about 
the  time  of  the  “fall  of  Charleston”,  as  a private  in  Capt.  Charles 
Sexton  or  Saxon’s  Company,  Colonel  McCrary’s  South  Carolina 
Regiment ; next  served  for  three  months  as  a private  in  Capt. 
Lewis  Duvall’s  Company,  Col.  Levi  Casey’s  South  Carolina  Regi- 
ment, and  was  in  the  Siege  of  Ninety-Six.  On  September  24,  1781, 
he  was  commissioned  Second  Lieutenant  in  Capt.  Lewis  Duvall’s 
Company,  Col.  Joseph  Hayes  South  Carolina  Regiment.  He  lived 
in  Ninety-Six  District,  S.  C.,  in  1775,  removed  to  Giles  County, 
Tenn.,  after  the  Revolution,  and  to  Pickens  County,  Ala.,  in  1836, 
and  stated  that  he  had  been  living  there  for  twelve  years. — Jones 
and  Gandrud,  Alabama  Records,  vol.  72,  Pickens  County,  pp.  64-65. 
See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Alabama,  1911,  p.  40. 

FREEMAN,  PENINAH  (WALTON)  — Widow  of  Holman 
Freeman,  Jr.  who  served  in  the  Revolution  under  General  Elijah 
Clarke,  came  to  Alabama  from  Wilkes  County,  Ga.,  after  the  death 
of  her  husband  in  1817.  She  was  born  in  1772,  died  in  1823,  in 
Alabama,  and  was  married  about  1783  to  Holman  Freeman.  Their 
children  were : Fleming,  married  Sally  Bibb,  John  married  Miss 
Callaway,  and  Mary,  who  married  Dr.  William  Bibb,  Territorial 
Governor  of  Alabama.  All  three  children  moved  to  Alabama. — 
See  also  McCall’s  Roster  of  Revolutionary  Soldiers  of  Georgia,  p.  70. 
D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  vol.  38,  p.  167. 

FRENCH,  BENJAMIN — Satisfactory  evidence  was  this  day 
exhibited  to  this  Court  that  Benjamin  French  was  a Revolutionary 
pensioner  of  the  United  States  at  the  rate  of  eight  dollars  per 
month;  was  a resident  of  the  County  of  Lauderdale  in  said  State 
of  Alabama  and  died  in  said  County  of  Lauderdale  and  State 
aforesaid  on  the  twenty-first  day  of  March  in  the  Year  one  thousand 
eight  hundred  and  forty-seven  and  that  he  left  a widow  whose 
name  is  Catherine  French;  whereupon  the  same  is  ordered  by  the 
Court  to  be  entered  of  records  which  is  done. — Minutes  of  Orphans 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


565 


Courts , February  1847-May  1850,  page  18.  Recorded  at  Athens, 
Limestone  County,  Ala. 

FRIEND,  JOHN — Died  on  the  12th  inst.  at  his  residence  in 
Madison  Co.,  after  a short  illness,  Mr.  John  Friend,  a native  of 
Virginia,  and  for  many  years  a highly  respectable  citizen  of  that 
County. — From  “Athenian/’  Huntsville  Southern  Advocate , June  4. 
1830. 


JOHN  FRIEND— born  1765,  died  1830.  Married  Judith  Cary 
Bates  of  Virginia.  They  moved  to  Madison  County,  Ala.  lived 
and  died  there.  Judith  Cary  Bates  was  grandniece  of  Archibald 
Cary  of  Ampthill,  Va.,  granddaughter  of  Judith  Cary  Bell  -and 

Dr.  David  Bell  and  daughter  of  Eliza  Bell  and  Bates.  This 

Bates  is  supposed  to  have  been  a descendant  of  Pocahontas  and 
Rolfe. — D.A.R.  Magazine,  October  1908. 

FRY,  PHILIP — Died  at  his  residence  in  Marshall  County, 
Alabama,  on  the  morning  of  the  18th  of  April,  instant.  Mr.  Phillip 
Fry,  in  the  83rd  year  of  his  age.  Mr.  Fry  was  a native  of  Penn- 
sylvania, from  whence  he  emigrated  to  Virginia,  from  thence  to 
East  Tennessee,  and  thence  to  Alabama.  He  was  one  of  that 
glorious  band  of  patriots  who,  under  God,  assisted  in  achieving 
for  us  the  liberties  we  now  enjoy;  he  was  truly  the  kind  husband, 
the  affectionate  father,  the  obliging  neighbor,  the  honest  and  in- 
dustrious citizen.  Mr.  Fry  had  many  trials  through  life,  having 
buried  an  affectionate  wife  and  six  children  but  he  is  now  gone 
leaving  a disconsolate  widow  and  nineteen  children,  one  hundred 
and  thirteen  grandchildren,  and  great  grandchildren  together  with 
a numerous  circle  of  friends,  to  mourn  their  irriparable  loss,  but 
to  them  we  say,  sorrow  not  as  those  that  have  no  hope,  for  if  you 
believe  that  Jesus  died  and  rose  again,  them  also  that  sleep  in 
Jesus  will  God  bring  with  him,  blessed  are  the  dead  that  died  in  the 
Lord,  yea  saith  the  spirit,  from  hence  forth  they  rest  from  their 
labours,  and  their  works  do  follow  them.  COMMUNICATED. — • 
Huntsville  Democrat  of  May  2,  1840. 

GAMMAGE,  THOMAS,  Revolutionary  soldier  supposed  to. 
be  buried  either  at  Pleasant  Hill  or  Frog  Level,  near  Selma.  Age 
92. — Mrs.  R.  D.  Sturdivant,  Berlin,  Ala. 


566 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


GARNER,  STURDY  (1762-1845)  received  a pension  for  ser- 
vice as  private  in  the  North  Carolina  and  Virginia  troops.  He 
was  born  in  Orange  County,  N.  C. ; died  in  Madison  County,  Ala. — 
D.A.R.  Lineage  Book , vol.  166,  page  94. 

GARNER,  STURDY  — Buried  at  Hazel  Green,  Madison 
County. — General  D.A.R.  Report,  1915 

GARRETT,  THOMAS. — We  had  a conversation  yesterday 
with  one  of  the  Heroes  of  the  Revolution,  Mr.  Thomas  Garrett, 
of  Sumter  District,  aged  105  years  and  9 months,  who  came  to 
town  on  horse  back  alone,  for  the  purpose  of  receiving  his  pension. 
The  old  gentleman  appears  to  be  in  possession  of  his  faculties, 
answers  questions  readily  and  is  quite  humorous  in  his  conversa- 
tion. 


He  served  for  a considerable  period  under  Gen.  Sumter,  the 
“Game  Cock  of  the  South,”  and  was  profuse  in  his  praise  of  that 
brave  and  chivalrous  Commander. 

He  was  also  at  the  battle  of  Fort  Moultrie  and  the  seige  of 
Savannah,  at  the  storming  of  the  latter  place,  he  stated  that  while 
viewing  a wounded  fellow-soldier,  who  lay  among  heaps  of  slain, 
the  gallant  Pulaski  rode  up,  and  remarked  “My  brave  fellow,  take 
care,  you  are  in  dangerous  position”  to  which  Garrett  made  answer, 
“General,  if  you  intend  to  be  in  a place  of  safety,  I’d  keep  near 
you.”  Pulaski  put  spurs  to  his  horse  & rushed  furiously  into  the 
midst  of  the  fight,  where  he  soon  received  a mortal  wound,  and 
expired  in  the  arms  of  Garrett. — Voice  of  Sumter,  Livingston,  Ala. 
Nov.  29th,  1836. 

GARRETT,  WILLIAM  (1760-1829)  enlisted,  1776,  in  the 
Continental  Army,  in  Capt.  Everard  Meade’s  company,  Col.  Alex- 
ander Spottswood’s  2d  regiment.  He  was  born  at  Amherst,  V a. ; 
died  in  Decatur,  Ala. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  vol.  150,  p.  163. 

GARY,  THOMAS,  in  1780  served  as  private  in  the  South 
Carolina  Militia.  He  was  born  in  Buckingham  County,  Virginia; 
died,  1819,  in  Butler  County,  Alabama. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  vol. 
165,  page  260. 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


567 


GARY,  THOMAS.  Sacred  to  the  memory 

of 

Thomas  Gary 
son  of  Charles  Gary 
born  in  South  Carolina  August  the  11th 
1764 

and  departed  this  life 
x\pril  the  23rd 
1818 

This  marble  is  erected  as  the  last  token  of  friendship  by  his  dis- 
consolate wife  who  having  borne  him  whilst  living  still  retains 
him  through  death.  Blessed  are  they  who  die  in  the  Lord. 

Sacred  to  the  memory  of 
Rebecca  Gary 
wife  of  Thomas  Gary 
and  daughter  of 
Charles  Jones 
Born  in  South  Carolina 
December  15th  1764 
and  departed  this  life 
May  16th.  1826. 

Fort  Dale  Cemetery,  Butler  County,  Ala. 

GARY,  THOMAS,  married  Rebecca  Jones  in  1780.  She  was 
born  December  15,  1764  and  died  May  16,  1826.  Their  children 
were  Jesse,  Absolom,  Martin,  Arthur,  Charles,  William,  Isaac  and 
daughters  Sara  married  Charles  Davenport,  Caroline  married  a 
Gordon,  and  another  daughter  married  a Dalyrimple.  Thomas 
Gary  served  as  a private  and  was  paid  by  Thomas  Nicols  for 
service  rendered  after  the  “Reduction  of  Charleston,  S.  C.”  Rec- 
ords of  his  payment  are  dated  January  8,  1791. — Information  from 
Mrs.  Marie  Scovall  Browder,  Houston,  Tex. 

GAYLE,  MATHEW  (1754-1820)  was  a cavalryman  under 
Gen.  Francis  Marion,  S.  C.  He  was  born  in  Accomac  C’ountv, 
Ya. ; died  in  Clark  County,  Ala. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  vol.  164,  page 
165. 


GHORMLEY,  JOSEPH,  pensioner  in  Indiana,  born  1758,  in 
Cumberland  County,  Penna.  He  entered  service  about  Christmas, 
1776,  for  two  months;  in  Spring  of  1777,  served  two  months;  Fall 
of  1777,  for  two  more  months.  His  service  was  as  a private  under 


568 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Captain  Mitchell,  Pennsylvania  Militia.  In  the  Census  of  1809, 
of  Madison  County,  Ala.,  we  find  Joseph  Gormley  as  the  head  of 
a family  consisting  of  five  males  under  twenty-one  years  of  age, 
one  male  over  twenty-one,  one  female  under  twenty-one,  three 
females  over  twenty-one  and  ten  slaves.  At  the  time  of  his  appli- 
cation for  a pension,  October  25,  1843,  he  claimed  that  he  had 
lived  in  Parke  County,  Ind.,  for  two  years  and  previously  in  Floyd 
County,  Ind. — See  also  Roster  of  Soldiers  and  Patriots  of  the  American 
Revolution  buried  in  Indiana,  p.  155. 

GINN,  JESSE — Supposed  to  have  fought  in  the  Revolution 
as  his  descendants  possess  his  old  musket  and  clothes  worn  by 
him,  was  born  in  England  in  1760  and  died  April  8,  1840,  in  St. 
Clair  County.  The  name  of  his  first  wife  is  not  known  but  there 
were  nine  children  by  this  marriage.  He  came  to  St.  Clair  County 
after  1820  and  in  1824  married  Tabitha  Brewer,  born  in  February 
1800,  and  died  August  7,  1880.  He  also  had  nine  children  by  the 
second  marriage.  His  son  by  his  first  wife,  Robert  Douglass 
Ginn,  born  February  26,  1804,  died  March  27,  1844,  married  Jan- 
uary 4,  1829,  Martha  Taylor,  born  August  5,  1805,  died  August 
16,  1841.  They  were  the  parents  of  Reuben  Ginn,  born  December 
4,  1839,  died  April  11,  1893,  married  November  8,  1860,  Martha 
Douglass  born  June  4,  1839,  died  May  26,  1899,  and  their  children 
were:  John  Andrew  Ginn,  born  August  16,  1861,  who  was  living 
in  St.  Clair  County  in  1942,  but  had  died  before  April  1,  1945,  and 
who  married  June  14,  1896,  Cynthia  Foote;  Laura  Elizabeth,  born 
April  19,  1866,  died  February  17,  1898,  married  William  H.  Wright, 
February  23,  1888;  David  Moses,  born  March  20,  1869,  married 
Lena  Corner,  June  27,  1897;  Alonzo  Jackson,  born  November  27, 
1871,  married  Ola  Hammond,  November  10,  1898;  Joseph  Rubin, 
born  November  25,  1874,  died  unmarried  April  4,  1895 ; Robert 
Lee,  born  January  3,  1878,  died  October  25,  1908;  Sarah  Elberta, 
born  June  8,  1888,  unmarried.  The  Bible  from  which  these  records 
were  copied  was  in  the  possession  of  John  Andrew  Glenn,  along 
with  the  musket  and  -clothes.  — Information  from  William  F. 
Franke,  Birmingham,  Ala. 

GODBOLD,  ZE  CHARI  AH — A short  distance  from  Blakeley, 
remote  from  all  signs  of  travel  or  habitation,  at  the  summit  of  a 
long  grassy  slope  heavily  shaded  by  swaying  pines  through  which 
the  sunlight  flickers,  is  Saluda  Hill  Cemetery — just  one  enclosed 
family  burial  place  with  a few  scattered  graves  around  it,  but  of 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


569 


immense  historic  interest,  for  here  lies  buried  a Revolutionary 
soldier,  the  only  one  so  far  as  known  in  Baldwin  County.  The 
grave  is  bricked  up  about  two  feet,  and  the  stone  that  marks  the 
spot  and  is  remarkably  well  preserved  bears  the  following  in- 
scription : Sacred  to  the  memory  of  Zechariah  Godbold  a native 
of  Marion  District,  S.  C.  who  departed  this  life  July  13th,  1832, 
aged  69  years,  3 months  and  10  days.  At  an  early  age  he  joined 
the  ranks  of  Genl  Marion  in  that  eventful  struggle  which  was 
over  Independence.  This  stone  is  erected  by  his  widow  and  son 
in  testimony  of  their  esteem  for  a kind  husband,  indulgent  Father 
and  generous  friend. — Comings,  History  of  Baldwin  County,  Ala.  p. 
64-65. 


GOGERS,  JEREMIAH — -Died  in  this  County,  about  25th  of 
January,  last,  in  the  87th  year  of  his  age,  Mr.  Jeremiah  Gogers,  a 
soldier  of  the  Revolution. — An  honest,  up-right  and  highly  re- 
spectable citizen. — Huntsville,  Southern  Advocate . Nov.  3,  1832. 

GOGGANS,  WILLIAM.  William  Gog'gans,  a soldier  of  the 
Revolution,  was  born  in  Richmond  county,  Va.,  January  14,  1758. 
In  early  life,  his  parents  emigrated  to  Newberry  District,  South 
Carolina.  Young  Goggans  was  an  active  soldier  in  the  Revolu- 
tionary service.  He  was  in  Col.  Williams’  command  at  the  battle 
of  King’s  Mountain,  where  he  was  wounded  in  the  left  shoulder. 
Sometime  afterwards  while  with  a scouting  party  he  was  wounded 
in  the  left  leg.  And  again,  in  another  skirmish,  he  was  struck 
down  by  a severe  sabre  stroke  on  the  head  and  left  for  dead  upon 
the  field.  After  his  recovery  from  this  third  wound,  he  rejoined 
his  comrades  and  continued  an  active  partisan  to  the  end  of  the 
war.  After  peace  was  made,  Mr.  Goggans  married  Mary  Da- 
shields,  who  died  in  1800.  About  1815,  he  married  Elizabeth  Kil- 
patrick. After  many  years’  residence  in  South  Carolina,  Mr.  Gog- 
gans emigrated  to  Lincoln  county,  Tennessee.  Thence  in  1819  he 
emigrated  to  Lawrence  county,  Alabama,  where  he  resided  until 
the  death  of  his  wife  in  1836.  He  then  moved  to  Carroll  county, 
Georgia,  where  he  died  March  21,  1852  at  the  home  of  Alexander 
Goggans,  in  the  triumphs  of  a living  Faith.  He  was  buried  the 
next  day  with  military  honors  in  the  graveyard  at  Bethany  church. 
— Condensed  from  a sketch  in  Jacksonville  Republican,  Jacksonville, 
Ala.,  June  8,  1852. 


570 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Note  • This  name  appears  in  “ Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Alabama” , 
Bui.  5,  1911.  Department  of  Archives  and  History,  as  Alexander 
Goggans,  when  it  should  have  appeared  as  William  Goggans. 

GOODE,  WILLIAM  (1765-1837)  served  as  a private  in  the 
Virginia  troops  at  the  siege  of  Yorktown.  He  was  born  in  Pow- 
hatan County,  Va. ; died  in  Clarke  County,  Ala. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book , 
vol.  158,  p.  75. 

GOODE,  WILLIAM. — The  grave  of  this  Revolutionary  Sol- 
dier is  located  upon  a place  owned  by  Mr.  Lamar  Hamilton,  about 
3 miles  south,  of  Whatley,  Clarke  County,  Ala.  in  an  old  field,  not 
now  in  cultivation.  The  grave  sets  east  and  west,  and  is  marked 
by  a flat  marble  slab,  which  is  now  broken  into  four  pieces.  The 
inscription  is  as  follows:  IN  MEMORY  OF  WM,  GOODE  who 
died  on  the  4 of  March  1839,  in  the  80th.  year  of  his  age.  Entered 
upon  the  Alabama  Roster  of  the  Revolution  by  the  Needham  Bryan 
13.  A.  R.  Chapter  of  Mobile,  Alabama. 

His  wife  Sarah  James  sleeps  by  his  side,  but  her  grave  is 
unmarked.  The  land  occupied  by  these  two  graves  was  reserved 
by  the  Goode  family  in  the  deed  to  Alfred  Barnes.  At  the  foot  of 
the  WILLIAM  GOODE  grave  is  the  official  bronze  D.  A.  R. 
marker  placed  by  the  Virginia  Cavalier  D.  A.  R.  Chapter  in  1920 
with  the  following  inscription  : WILLIAM  GOODE.  Born  Pow- 
hatan Co.  Va.,  1765.  Died  Clarke  Co.  Ala.  1839.  Virginia  Cavalier 
Chapter. 

Our  noble  women  are  ever  on  the  alert  and  mindful  of  sacred 
things  as  were  Martha  and  Mary.  Such  is  the  case  with  Mrs. 
Charles  Redwood  of  1110  22nd  Avenue,  Meridian,  Mississippi,  and 
Mrs.  Erwin  Vass,  of  250  St.  Anthony  St.,  Mobile,  Alabama.  On 
October  21st,  1920,  these  good  ladies,  representing  the  Virginia 
Cavalier,  Mobile  Chapter,  Daughters  of  American  Revolution, 
with  the  assistance  of  M.  W.  Haskew  and  myself  placed  a bronze 
marker  at  the  grave  of  Hon.  William  Goode,  born  in  Powhatan 
County,  Virginia,  1759,  buried  1839  in  the  80th  year  of  his  age  on 
his  plantation  about  three  miles  south  of  Whatley,  Alabama.  Mr. 
Goode  was  a large  slave  and  land  holder  and  prosperous  and  in- 
fluential in  his  time.  He  was  married  in  Charleston,  S.  C.,  to 
Miss  Sarah  Jones,  and  reared  a large  family.  His  son  Thomas 
Jefferson  Goode  was  the  grandfather  of  the  above  Mrs.  Redwood, 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


571 


and  his  daughter,  Elizabeth  Carolina  Goode  Tate,  of  Wilcox 
County,  was  the  grandmother  of  the  above  Mrs.  Vass.  Mr.  Goode 
was  a first  cousin  of  Thomas  Jefferson  and  -Revolutionary  War 
soldier.  He  was  present  when  Cornwallis  surrendered  to  George 
Washington  at  Yorktown.  As  we  were  placing  this  marker  our 
minds  reverted  to  the  dim  and  distant  past  of  colonial  days.  The 
hardships,  privations  and  sufferings,  of  the  great  war  that  gave 
birth  to  Old  Glory  and  American  liberties.  We  thought  of  the 
young  bride  and  groom  of  Charleston,  S.  C , then  on  the  long  and 
perilous  journey  through  the  wilderness  subject  to  wild  beasts  and 
the  treacherous  Indians.  Then  we  thought  of  them  settling  on 
the  plantation  of  wide  and  fertile  acres,  with  multiplied  duties 
and  increasing  interest,  enjoying  the  divine  rights  secured  by  our 
constitution  and  the  great  war.  Then  we  thought  of  them  rearing 
a large  family  to  go  out  and  bless  humanity  by  emulating  the 
example  and  cherishing  the  precious  heritage  of  a noble  ancestry. 

After  placing  the  marker  and  erecting  Old  Glory  and  a short 
but  impressive  prayer,  each  of  us  went  wending  our  way  home- 
ward realizing  it  was  good  to  be  there.  (Signed)  Sam  H.  Gwin, 
Editor. — Clarke  County  Democrat , October  28,  1920. 

GOVER,  SAMUEL  (1750-1860)  served  as  private  in  the  North 
Carolina  Line.  He  died  in  Talladega,  Alabama. — D.A.R.  Linear/e 
Book , Vol.  131,  page  234. 

GOVER,  SAMUEL,  private,  enlisted  for  War,  in  Capt  Thomas 
Armstrong’s  company,  2nd  N.  C.  Battalion,  commanded  by  Col.  John 
Patton,  Sept.  10th,  1778. — N.  C.  State  Records,  vol.  13,  p.  524. 

GO\  ER,  SAMUEL — Talladega  County  Census  of  1860,  gives 
his  name  as  person  who  died  during  the  year  ending  1st  June, 
I860;  Aged  one  hundred,  sex  male,  born  Virginia,  died  in  the 
month  of  May,  occupation  farmer,  died  of  old  age  and  ill  for 
three  weeks. 

GOVER.  SAMUEL — Cemetery  records  in  Talladega  City 
Cemetery,  Talladega.  Sacred  to  the  memory  of  Samuel  Gover 
who  departed  this  life  May  17th  1860  in  the  110th  year  of  his  age. 

Sacred  to  the  memory  of  Tabitha  Gover,  wife  of  Samuel 
Gover,  who  departed  this  life  July  4,  1846  in  the  80th  year  of  her 


572 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


life.  Known  children  of  above  couple:  Banks  who  died  in  Talla- 
dega County,  in  1838;  Levi,  died  prior  to  1860,  married  October 
23.  1817,  in  Pulaski  County,  Ky.,  Sally  Copenhaver,  but  did  not 
come  to  Alabama;  Josiah,  born  1793,  married  April  20,  1824,  in 
Pulaski  County,  Ky.,  married  Elizabeth  Stewart,  was  a surveyor 
and  went  West;  Keziah,  married  in  Pulaski  County,  Ky.,  Decem- 
ber 23,  1824,  Ashberry  E.  Barker,  but  did  not  come  to  Alabama ; 
Tabitha  lived  in  Marshall  County,  Ala.;  John  B.,  Jr.,  born  1796, 
died  1854,  married  January  11,  1821,  in  Pulaski  County,  Ky..  Mar- 
garet Buster,  but  did  not  come  to  Alabama;  Samuel,  Jr.,  born 
1800,  married  October  25,  1825,  in  Pulaski  County,  Ky.,  Isabella 
Burns  (?)  and  came  to  Alabama.  Samuel  Cover,  his  wife  and  his 
children  were  said  to  have  been  born  in  A irginia.  A brother  who 
also  went  to  Kentucky  is  known  to  have  gone  from  Danville,  Va., 
or  vicinity.  He  was  an  early  settler  of  Talladeg*a  County,  coming 
to  Mardisville,  about  1833. — Information  from  Mrs.  H.  H.  Howard, 
Sylacauga,  Ala. 


GRAGG,  HENRY — Shelby  County  Census  of  1830  gives  two 
males  twenty  to  thirty;  one  male  sixty  to  seventy;  one  female 
sixty  to  seventy.  The  Census  of  1840  gives  one  male  thirty  to 
forty ; one  male  seventy  to  eighty ; one  female  under  five ; one  fe- 
male twenty  to  thirty ; one  female  seventy  to  eighty ; pensioner 
seventy-nine. — See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Alabama,  1911,  p. 
44. 


GRAHAM,  JOHN — Did  in  this  County,  on  the  21st  ult.  Capt. 
John  Graham,  in  the  71st  year  of  his  age.  Captain  Graham  was 
an  officer  of  the  Revolution  and  distinguished  himself  under  that 
gallant  soldier  Gen.  Marion  in  S.  Carolina.  He  was  taken  captive 
1)}T  the  British  and  confined  8 or  10  weeks  in  Camden  jail  where 
he  endured  the  privations  and  sufferings  incident  to  such  a con- 
finement. After  his  release  he  joined  the  American  Army  again 
mid  continued  gallantly  to  sustain  the  cause  of  his  country 
throughout  the  war.  Capt.  Graham  was  a gentleman  of  amiable 
•disposition,  respected  and  admired  by  all  his  acquaintances.  He 
has  descended  to  the  grave  full  of  honors,  and  left  a numerous 
progeny  to  deplore  his  loss.  There  are  few  men  whose  descendants 
count  so  numerously.  He  has  left  11  children,  six  sons  and  five 
daughters,  50  grand  children  and  27  great  grand  children,  10  sons 
in  law  and  daughters  in  law,  making  altogether  141. — The  Democrat r 
Huntsville,  Ala.,  March  3,  1825. 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


573 


GRAVES,  WILLIAM — Private  burial  grounds  of  the  Graves 
and  Stone  families  at  Manack,  Lowndes  County,  Alabama,  on  the 
old  Selma  road.  A short  distance  after  crossing  Pintlala  Creek 
over  a covered  bridge,  one  can  see  Manack  Station  from  the  road 
to  the  left.  Turn  from  the  mainroad  to  the  left,  cross  the  W.  of 
A.  Ry.,  go  straight  ahead  until  reaching  a red-clay  hill ; turn  to 
the  right  at  first  road — A negro  house  is  on  the  right.  A short 
distance  on  to  the  left  is  the  private  Graves  burial  ground,  almost 
hidden  by  trees.  The  grave  of  Revolutionary  Soldier  William  Graves, 
who  was  born  in  Henry  County,  Virginia,  and  served  in  the  American 
Revolution  in  the  Transportation  Department.  Tombstone  in- 
scription: WILLIAM  GRAVES,  born  in  Va.,  July  9th,  1755, 
Married  Sarah  Smith  in  1782,  Moved  to  Ala.  from  Ga.  1817,  Died 
Feb.  24th,  1836. 

GRAVES,  WILLIAM  (1755-1836)  signed  the  Oath  of  Alle- 
giance, and  served  as  “wagon  conductor"  in  the  militia  of  Henry 
County,  Va.  He  was  born  in  Virginia,  died  in  Manack,  Ala. — 
D.A.R.  Lineage  Book , vol.  51,  page  261.  See  also  McCall,  Roster  of 
the  R evolutionary  Soldiers  in  Georgia,  p.  76. 

GRAY,  WILLIAM — Died  at  his  residence  in  this  County  on 
the  13th  inst.,  William  Gray,  Sr.,  in  the  79th  year  of  his  age.  He 
was  born  in  Perth,  near  Edinburg,  in  Scotland,  and  in  early  life 
emigrated  to  the  United  States.  When  the  struggle  for  human 
liberty  commenced,  he  rallied  beneath  the  standard  of  his  adopted 
country,  and  served  as  a Private  and  Ensign  in  the  regular  service, 
under  Gen.  Morgan.  Upon  the  return  of  peace,  he  devoted  him- 
self to  agricultural  pursuits ; and  in  that  quiet  and  favored  mode 
of  existence  discharged,  through  a long  life,  all  of  the  social  duties 
of  a man  and  citizen.  He  was  an  affectionate  husband,  a fond 
parent,  and  an  indulgent  master,  and  was  universally  beloved,  not 
only  in  the  family  circle,  but  through  the  extended  circle  of  his 
acquaintance.  He  was  a professor  of  the  religion  of  Jesus  Christ 
for  58  years,  and  in  his  retired  sphere  inculcated  the  sacred  prin- 
ciples he  practised.  Having  disposed  of  his  property  and  settled 
all  his  earthly  concerns,  he  was  frequently  heard  to  observe  that 
nothing  remained  to  him  but  to  die ; and  this  last  act  of  his  life 
he  performed  with  the  calm  and  joyous  serenity  which  the 
Christian  alone  can  display — having  full  assurance,  as  he  himself 
said,  that  in  the  approaching  conflict  with  the  King  of  Terrors, 
he  should  come  off  more  than  conquerer,  through  Him  that  loved 


574 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


him  and  gave  himself  for  him.  He  sunk  to  death  calmly  as  to  a 
night’s  repose;  and  if  human  conduct  furnish  any  guide  to  future 
destiny,  he  has  secured  an  interest  in  the  first  resurrection. 

In  that  blest  region  to  the  just  assign’d. 

What  new  enjoyments  please  the  unbodied  mincl. 

As  wing’d  with  virtue  thro’  the  etherial  skv, 

From  world  to  world  unwearied  it  doth  fly. 

Does  it  delight  to  hear  bold  seraphs  tell. 

How  Michael  Battle  and  the  dragon  fell. 

Or  curious  trace  the  long  elaborate  maze 
Of  Heaven’s  decrees  where  wandering  angels  gaze ; 

Or  mix’d  with  milder  cherebims, 

And  gentle  like  the  dove, 

At  Jesus  feet  he  sits  to  glow 
In  hymns  of  love. 

— Huntsville,  Southern  Advocate,  Aug.  26,  1834. 

GREEN,  GEORGE — Died  1823.  Buried  at  Honeycomb  \ al- 
ley, Jackson  County.  Served  under  Gen.  Nathaniel  Greene.  Was 
at  King’s  Mountain. — From  Life  and  Papers  of  Dr.  Green.  In  . lla- 
bama  Military  Archives. 

GREEN,  JACOB,  b.  1767,  buried  in  huge  rock  grave  in  Hope- 
well  Church  Cemetery,  a few  miles  west  of  Gadsden,  St.  Clair 
County;  lived  in  York  District,  S.  C.,  later  moved  to  St.  Clair 
County,  Alabama,  in  1819.  Served  with  South  Carolina  troops. 
Government  Marker. — General  D.A.R.  Report,  1934. 

GREER,  MOSES — Born  in  1759,  in  York  County,  I Anna. 
He  lived  in  Richmond  County,  Ga.,  when  he  enlisted  in  1777, 
serving  for  four  months  in  Capt.  David  Sheet’s  Georgia  company. 
When  he  enlisted  in  1780,  he  was  living  in  North  Carolina  and 
served  for  three  months  with  North  Carolina  Troops  under  Gen- 
eral Rutherford  and  was  in  the  battle  of  Gate’s  Defeat  at  Camden; 
returning  to  Georgia,  he  again  enlisted  and  served  for  six  weeks 
in  Captain  Few’s  Georgia  company.  At  the  close  of  the  War  he 
returned  to  North  Carolina,  in  1789  again  removed  to  Georgia, 
and  in  1823  to  Autauga  Countv,  Ala.,  where  he  was  residing  when 
he  applied  for  a pension  in  1833.  He  died  August  11,  1837.  He 
left  no  widow  but  a son,  Moses  Grier.  The  pensioner  signed  his 
name  as  “Grier”,  but  was  placed  on  the  pension  as  “Greer.”— 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


575 


Jones  and  Gandrud,  Alabama  Records,  vol.  75,  Autauga  County,  pp. 
61-63.  See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Alabama,  1911,  pp.  44-45. 

GREGG,  SAMUEL  (GREGG  or  GRAGG  SENIOR)— Applied 
for  Pension  Lawrence  County,  Alabama,  1832,  September  29th 
Age  75.  States  he  was  born  in  Augusta  County,  Va..  and  enlisted 
from  there  under  Captain  Edward  Irvine.  Said  his  father’s  Bible 
was  now  in  possession  of  one  of  his  brothers  now  in  Missouri. 
That  he  moved  after  the  War  to  East  Tennessee,  and  from  East 
Tennessee  to  Alabama,  where  he  resided  23  years.  His  oldest 
brother  was  killed  by  the  Indians,  his  father  killed  Young  Mc- 
Cocmack,  a half  breed  Indian  chief.  March  24,  1838,  Samuel 
Gregg  or  Gragg,  removed  to  Arkansas,  Fayetteville.  The  reason 
he  moved  there  is  that  part  of  his  children  resided  in  W ashington 
County,  Arkansas,  and  other  are  moving  to  the  same  and  that  he 
has  lost  his  companion  and  wishes  to  end  his  days  with  his  chil- 
dren. Affidavit — of  Henry  Gragg,  made  in  Washington  County, 
Ark.,  and  John  Lloyd  state  that  they  have  been  acquainted  with 
the  soldier  for  over  13  years.- — Burns,  Virginia  Genealogies  and  County 
Records,  p.  16,  volume  3. 

GRESHAM,  THOMAS,  (1761-1816)  served  as  private  in 
Capt.  Robert  Powell’s  company.  Col.  Thomas  Marshall’s  3rd  Vir- 
ginia regiment.  He  was  born  in  Amherst  County,  Va. ; died  in 
Lauderdale  County,  Alabama. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book.  Vol.  117,  page 
272. 

GRIERSON,  ROBERT,  native  of  Scptland.  Died  about  1816 
or  1817  and  buried  near  Pinckney ville  in  Clay  County.  Col.  Haw- 
kins says  of  Robert  Grierson  that  he  was  attached  to  the  armies 
of  colonies  during  the  Revolutionary  War  and  made  contributions 
in  aid  of  them.  His  wife  was  an  Indian  woman  oi"  the  village  of 
Genalgee,  a branch  of  Hilibi  town.  She  was  named  Sinnuggee. 
They  had  children:  Sandy,  Sarah,  Walter,  David,  Liza,  Elizabeth 
and  Catherine. — Benjamin  Hawkins  Letters. 

GRIFFIN,  JOHN- — A man  of  this  name  is  listed  as  one  to 
be  invited  to  welcome  Lafayette  at  Claiborne,  April.  1825.  A man 
of  this  name  was  present  at  Montgomery  and  welcomed  Lafayette 
April  4,  1825. — James  Dellet  papers  & Woodward's  Reminiscences. 


576 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


GRIFFIN.,  JOSEPH— The  1827  lottery  of  Georgia  lists  him 
as  a Revolutionary  soldier  in  Monroe  County,  Ga.  His  will  is  in 
Will  Book  1,  Chambers  County,  Ala.,  and  bears  the  date  of  Jan- 
uary 8,  1835.  On  February  9,  1838,  John  Patterson  signed  as 
surety  along  with  David  Smith  and  Benjamin  Smith.  In  it  he 
mentions  his  son,  Andrew;  daughters,  Rachel  Waldrup,  Mary 
Johnson  and  Margaret  Ivy;  son-in-law,  Joshua  Pemberton ; grand- 
son, William  Pemberton  ; granddaughters,  Amanda  Malvi  Fitzalen 
and  Mary  Anne  Pemberton ; and  great-grandchildren,  Martha 
Anne  Patterson  and  Thursey  Elizabeth  Patterson. 

GURLEY,  JEREMIAH — -Died,  at  the  residence  of  his  son,  in 
this  county,  on  the  28th  October,  1843,  Mr.  Jeremiah  Gurley,  in 
the  84th  year  of  his  age.  Mr.  Gurley  was  a native  of  North  Caro- 
lina, and  for  several  years  belonged  to  the  Southern  Army,  and 
fought  under  General  Greene  the  two  distinguished  battles  of 
Eutaw  Springs  and  Guilford  Court  House — The  subject  of  this 
short  notice  enjoyed  an  unusual  good  share  of  health,  even  up  to 
the  day  of  his  death,  and  left  this  world  at  his  breakfast  table, 
without  a struggle  or  a groan ; the  weary  wheels  of  nature  stopped 
without  any  apparent  cause.  Thus  one  after  another  of  those 
heroes  are  dropping  off,  and  soon  the  last  will  be  gone  to  his  re- 
ward, and  will  live  on  earth  only  in;  the  minds  of  an  enlightened 
and  virtuous  people. — Pluntsville,  The  Democrat , November  16,  1843. 

HALL,  BOLLING  (1767-1836)  served  as  a private  in  the 
Virginia  troops.  He  was  born  in  Dinwiddie  County,  Va.,  died  in 
Ellerslie,  Ala. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book , vol.  159,  page  116. 

HALL,  BOLLING — Who  was  born  in  Dinwiddie  County 
Virginia,  on  the  25th  day  of  January  A.D.  1767.  Was  married  to 
Jane  Abercrombie  on  the  25th  day  of  October  A.D.  1798,  and  died 
at  Ellerslie,  his  residence  in  Autauga  County,  Alabama,  on  the 
25th  day  of  February  A.D.  1836.  He  served  when  16  yrs.  old  in 
the  Revolutionary  War  in  defence  of  the  rights  of  man.  After 
the  termination  of  that  war,  and  the  establishing  of  our  present 
form  of  government ; he  emigrated  to  the  State  of  Georgia,  where 
having  filled  many  official  stations  to  the  satisfaction  of  the 
people;  he  was  elected  to  the  Representative  Branch  of  the  Legis- 
lature and  finally  to  the  same  branch  of  the  Congress  of  the  U.  S. 
and  was  a member  of  that  body  at  the  time  and  voted  for  the 
declaration  of  war  against  Great  Britain  A.  D.  1812.  A Republi- 


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5 77 


can  of  98,  through  his  whole  political  career  he  was  esteemed  for 
his  firmness  and  devoted  attachment  to  the  Constitution  and  the 
cause  of  the  people.  Apart  from  his  public  virtues  his  private 
worth  endeared  him  to  his  friends ; a good  husband,  parent,  and 
neighbor,  he  was  loved  by  all.  He  removed  to  Ala.  A.  D.  1818. 
She  who  knew  him  best  his  companion  for  38  years  inscribes  this 
testimonial  of  her  love  to  him  whilst  living  and  her  sorrow  for  his 
loss  in  death. — Tombstone  Inscription. — -Miller  & Herd,  Mont- 
gomery, Alabama. 

HALL,  DIXON.  In  memory  of  Dixon  Hall,  Born  Dinwiddie 
Co.,  Va.,  1755 

Died  Montgomery,  Ala.,  1820 
Son  of  Hugh  & Mary  Dixon  Hall 
of  Petersburg,  Va. 

A soldier  of  the  Revolution 
who  fought  with  his  brother 
Bolling  Hall  in  the  Va.  Tine. 

xAn  affectionate  Husband 
x\  kind  and  indulgent  Father. 

This  grave  is  on  the  Flying  Field,  Gunter  Field,  Montgomery,  Ala. 
— Information  from  Miss  Elizabeth  Pickett,  Montgomery,  Ala. 
See  also  General  DA.R.  Report,  1930. 

HALL,  MARY  B.,  of  Millbrook.  Real  daughter. — D.A.R.  Re- 
port, 1908-09,  p.  33. 

HAMILTON,  THOMAS,  (1758-1844)  served  as  a soldier  in 
the  South  Carolina  troops,  and  was  at  the  battles  of  Cowpens  and 
Guilford  Court  House.  He  was  born  in  Belfast,  Ireland;  died  in 
Lowndes  County,  Alabama. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book , Vol.  121,  page  232. 

HAMILTON,  THOMAS — the  Revolutionary  soldier  honored 
by  the  Francis  Marion  Chapter,  was  born  in  Belfast  County,  Ire- 
land, April  9,  1758,  and  died  in  Lowndes  County.  Ala.,  August, 
1844.  He  has  many  distinguished  descendants.  Among  them 
are  the  late  Dr.  Hugh  William  C'affey,  of  Verbena,  the  late  Justice 
Jonathan  Haralson,  of  Montgomery,  the  late  Judge  William  Har- 
dy, Mississippi,  Hon.  Francis  Gordon  Caffey,  U.  S.  district  judge, 
New  York,  and  Hon.  Arthur  P.  Chilton,  U.  S.  District  attorney, 
Montgomery.  The  unveiling  took  place  at  Collirene,  Wathin 


578 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Cemetery  and  all  patriotic  organizations  were  cordially  invited. 
Arthur  Chilton  delivered  an  address  on  the  constitution  and  a 
sketch  of  the  life  of  Thomas  Hamilton. — The  Montgomery  Advertiser. 
The  Birmingham  News,  October  18,  1931. 

HANNA,  ROBERT— (1775-1825)  served  in  the  S.  C.  regi- 
ment, 1776.  He  was  born  in  South  Carolina,  died  in  Mobile,  Ala. 
— D.A.R.  Lineage  Book , Vol.  47,  page  429. 

HARPER,  THOMAS — Born  January  2,  1758,  in  Lancaster 
County,  Penna.  He  enlisted  March  1,  1777,  served  in  the  Third 
Pennsylvania  Regiment  under  Captain  Reese,  Captain  Moffit,  and 
Colonel  Craig,  was  stationed  at  various  places,  wintered  at  Morris- 
town, N.  J.,  was  next  employed  in  the  wagon  service  on  the 
Southern  Campaign,  was  in  the  battles  of  Brandywine,  Mon- 
mouth, Camden,  Alamance,  Guilford,  Ninety-Six,  Salisbury,  Eutaw 
Springs,  and  in  the  Siege  of  Yorktown,  was  discharged  by  Colonel 
Craig.  His  service  as  a private  and  teamster  amounted  to  about 
six  years.  During  the  Revolution  he  resided  in  Berks  County, 
Penna.,  then  moved  to  Monroe  County,  N.  C\,  from  there  to  Lin- 
coln County,  Tenn.,  then  to  Monroe  County,  Miss.,  and  later  to 
Pickens  County,  Ala.,  where  in  1832  he  stated  he  had  resided  for 
thirteen  years. — Jones  and  Gandrud,  Alabama  Records,  vol.  72,  Pick- 
ens County,  pp.  73-74.  See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Alabama, 
1911,  p.  50. 

HARRINGTON,  DRURY,  1751-1839,  enlisted,  1776,  from 
Chatham,  and  fought  at  the  battle  of  Moore’s  Creek  Bridge.  He 
was  in  the  cavalry  under  Sumter  at  Ramsour’s  Mills,  served  under 
Pickens  at  Cowpens  and  was  at  the  siege  of  Augusta.  He  was 
born  in  North  Carolina  and  died  in  Chambers  County,  Ala. — • 
D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  vol.  65,  pp.  288,  289. 

Drewry  Harrington’s  Will,  vol.  2,  page  33,  Fayette,  Chambers  Co. 

State  of  Alabama,  Chambers  County.  In  the  Name  of  God, 
Amen.  \ Dreevy  Harrington  of  the  state  and  county  aforesaid 
do  make  and  ordain  this  my  last  will  and  Testament  in  the  man- 
ner and  form  following,  Viz.  I will  my  son,  Wiley  Allen  Harring- 
ton, mv  wearing  clothes,  and  my  saddle.  The  balance  of  my  prop- 
erty it  is  my  will  that  it  shall  be  equally  divided  between  my  six 
living  children.  To-wit — Jeptha  Harrington,  Deliah  Darwin,  Nan- 
cy Petty,  Dreevy  Harrington,  Rachel  Poe,  and  James  Harrington 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


579 


and  now  I do  constitute  and  appoint  and  ordain  Jeptha  Harring- 
ton, executor  of  this  my  last  will  and  testament  hereby  revoking 
:uid  making  void  all  former  Testaments  hereto  or  made  by  me, — 
and  it  is  my  will  that  no  court  be  troubled  with  what  little  I have 
but  that  the  Executor  collect  and  sell  my  property  and  divide  it 
according  to  my  will  above.  In  testimony  whereof  I have  here- 
unto set  my  hand  and  affixed  my  seal  this  seventh  day  of  No- 
vember in  the  year  of  our  Lord  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and 
thirty  nine,  1839.  Signed  sealed,  and  declared  by  the  said  Dreevy 
Harrington  in  the  presence  of  us,  who  in  his  presence  and  in  the 
presence  of  each  other  have  subscribed  our  names  hereunto  as 
witness  of  the  Execution  thereof.  Dreevy  Harrington  (L.S.) 

Test.  James  P.  R.  Lockhart,  Henry  Byars,  Nancy  E.  Northirp. 
Personally  came  before  me  Samuel  Rotch  a Justice  of  the  peace 
in  and  for  the  county  aforesaid  Nancy  E.  Northrip  after  being 
duly  sworn  deposith  and  also  James  T.  R.  Lockhardt  and  Henry 
Byars  assigns  as  subscribing  witness  with  herself  sworn  to  & 
subscribed  before  me  this  27th  day  of  January  1840. 

Nancy  E.  Northrop. 

Samuel  Rotch,  J.  P.  The  State  of  Alabama,  S.S.  Chambers 
County.  Clerks  Office,  Be  it  remembered  that  on  the  19th  day  of 
May  A.D.  1845,  the  original  of  the  foregoing  will  was  deposited 
in  this  office  for  record  certified  as  above  and  on  the  4th  day  of 
September  of  the  same  year  was  duly  recorded  in  Book  of  Wills, 
Vol.  2,  page  33.  Edward  Croft,  Clerk. 

HARRIS,  FRANCIS  EPPES— was  born  about  1750  in  Vir- 
ginia. Dr.  F.  E.  H.  Steger,  in  his  sketch  of  the  family  states:  “He 
was  of  wealthy  parentage.  During  his  scholastic  days  he  was  a 
hard  student,  acquiring  an  ample  fund  of  varied  and  useful 
knowledge,  indispensible  to  the  performance  of  duties  laid  before 
him  by  Thomas  Jefferson,  for  whom  he  was  acting  as  secretary 
at  Monticello  (NOTE.  Thomas  Jefferson’s  wife  was  Ann  Eppes, 
Harris’  niece).  Later  he  returned  to  his  home  and  began  agri- 
cultural pursuits.  His  home  was  crowned  with  peace  and  plenty 
and  social  commingling  of  the  most  elegant  and  refined  society. 
His  body  was  adapted  to  endurance  and  longevity.  He  was  a little 
over  six  feet  tall,  fair  complexioned,  gray  eyes,  a manly  form, 
erect,  strong,  quiet,  and  active.  His  weig'ht  was  about  a hundred 
and  eighty  pounds.  An  accidental  tumble  downstairs  occasioned 


580 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


a shock  which  ended  his  life”.  He  came  to  Madison  County,  Ala., 
in  1809  made  deed  in  Va.  Oct.  12,  1808,  and  first  land  grant  in 
Madison  County,  Ala.  Aug.  10,  1809,  a few  days  after  the  Land 
Office  placed  the  Madison  Co.  land  on  sale. 

McAllister’s  Virginia  Militia,  page  222  shows,  among  those 
from  Powhatan  Co.,  who  served  in  the  Revolution  was  Francis 
K.  Harris,  Ensign  A.  May  21,  1778  under  E.  Munford. 

Dr.  F.  E-  H.  Steger  stated  that  his  wife  was  a Macon.  He 
died  in  Madison  Co.  Ala.  Dec.  1828  and  is  said  to  be  buried  in 
an  unmarked  grave  in  the  old  Harris  family  cemetery  near  Chase, 
Ala. 


Issue:  Ann  Eppes  Harris  married  Dr.  Francis  Newton  Ford. 
Martha  Harris  m.  1st  ....  Ford.  2nd  Lemuel  Mead.  Rebekah 
Macon  Harris  m.  John  Ferratt  Steger,  Jr.  Henry  Macon  Harris 
m.  Judith  Weaver.  Kennon  Harris  m.  Frances  P.  Ford.  Daniel 
Harris  m.  1.  Ann  H.  Scruggs.  2.  Eliza  Gay  Bentley.  — See 
Genealogy  of  the  Harris  and  Allied  Families , By  Pauline  Myra  Jones 
and  Kathleen  Paul  Jones.  Pages  20-21. 

HARRIS,  FRANCIS  EPPES— Name  appears  on  Huntsville 
Monument,  erected  by  Twickenham  Town  Chapter,  D.A.R. 

HARRIS,  HENRY— Executive  Department.  May  3,  1832, 
Henry  Harris  is  allowed  land  bounty  for  three  years  service  as  a 
private  of  Dragoons  in  the  Continental  Line,  John  Floyd.  Warrant 
No.  7140  issued  4 Apl.  1832  and  delivered  to  George  Harris. 

“Know  ye  all  men  by  these  present  that  I HENRY  HARRIS 
late  of  Frederick  Co.  in  the  State  of  Virginia,  now  residing  in 
Madison  Co.  in  the  State  of  Alabama,  appoint  by  son,  George 
Harris  of  said  Co.  and  state,  my  attorney.”  Henry  Harris  ac- 
knowledged the  above  power  of  attorney  before  William  H.  T. 
Browne,  J.  Of  P.  Huntsville,  Ala. — See  also  Burgess,  Virginia  Soldiers 
of  1776,  v.  2,  p.  566. 

HARRIS,  MATTHEW— (1753-1845)  was  placed  on  the  pen- 
sion roll,  1832,  of  Greene  County,  Ga.,  for  service  1776,  as  private 
in  CapL  Hatton  Middleton’s  company,  1st  regiment  of  Horse, 
commanded  by  Major  Leonard  Marbury.  He  was  born  in  Mecklen- 


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581 


burg  County.  N.  C.,  and  died  in  Tallapoosa  County,  Ala. 
D.A.R.  Lineage  Book , vol.  68,  p.  133. 

HARRIS,  RICHARD.  (1758-1853),  was  placed  on  the  pension 
roll  of  Madison  Co.,  Ala.,  1831,  for  services  in  the  Virginia  militia. 
He  was  born  in  Powhatan  Co.,  Va. ; removed  to  Alabama.  1803, 
and  died  in  Huntsville. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book , Vol.  22,  34d. 

HARRIS,  RICHARD — Grave  located  in  Madison  County. — 
General  D.A.R.  Report,  1928. 

HARRISON,  THOMAS — Another  Whig  of  the  American 
Revolution  gone.  Thomas  Harrison  departed  this  life  on  the  4th 
day  of  November  1839,  at  his  residence  in  Coffee  County,  Ten- 
nessee. He  lived  to  be  upwards  of  80  years  of  age,  and  died  greatly 
lamented  by  an  affectionate  wife  and  seven  children,  and  a large 
number  of  grand  and  great  grand  children.  He  was  beloved  by 
all  his  acquaintances  and  neighbors,  and  respected  as  an  honest, 
benevolent  man;  and  by  his  own  industry  had  been  placed  in  easy 
circumstances.  It  was  his  request  of  all  his  sons,  that  they  should 
remain  firm  in  the  Democratic  Republic  principles,  which  he  in 
part  had  fought  for,  and  for  the  last  several  years  had  drawn  a 
small  pension  from  the  government  of  the  United  States  as  an 
evidence  of  his  service.  He  was  born  in  England  ; himself  and 
his  brother  Richard,  came  to  the  United  States  when  orphan  boys, 
and  having  some  knowledge  of  the  British  yoke,  took  up  arms 
and  fought  bravely  to  rid  this  country  of  it : he  joined  the  North 
Carolina  Militia,  under  Brigadier  General  Davidson  and  was*  in  a 
great  many  serious  engagements.  He  died  with  a full  assurance 
of  future  bliss. 

The  Democratic  paper  at  St.  Louis,  Missouri  will  please  pub- 
lish the  above.  The  Talladega  paper  is  requested  to  do  the  same. — 
Huntsville  Democrat,  January  18,  1840.  See  also  Armstrong’s  Some 
Tennessee  Heroes  of  the  Revolution,  vol.  5. 

HARVEY,  JOHN,  born  December  7,  1758,  in  Orange  County, 
Va.,  and  died  in  Lawrence  County,  Ala.,  October  23,  1844..  He 
served  as  a soldier  in  several  Revolutionary  campaigns,  and  was 
taken  a prisoner,  but  made  his  escape.  After  the  war  he  emigrated 
to  North  Carolina,  in  1778  he  removed  to  Tennessee,  and  in  1821 
he  settled  in  Lawrence  County,  Ala.  He  was  married  in  North 


582 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Carolina  in  1780.  He  was  a Methodist  preacher. — McFerrin,  Metho- 
dism in  Tennessee,  vol.  2,  p.  227. 

HARVEY,  JOHN,  died,  in  Lawrence  County  on  the  23rd 
inst.,  Rev.  JOHN  HARVEY,  an  old  Revolutionary  veteran,  in 
the  86th  year  of  his  age.  These  old  soldiers  are  dropping-  into 
the  grave  rapidly,  and  there  will  soon  be  none  of  them  left  for  Mr. 
Polk  to  vote  against  receiving  pensions. — Southern  Advocate,  Hunts- 
ville, November  1,  1844. 

HAUGHTON,  ABRAHAM,  pensioner  of  1835.  See  Horton, 
Abraham. 

HAYS,  PATRICK— In  memory  of  PATRICK  HAYS  who 
departed  this  life  Oct.  15th,  1828,  aged  67  years,  3 months  and  24 
days.  He  fought  for  liberty  and  died  its  sacred  friend.  A soldier 
of  the  Revolution. — Cherokee  Chapter,  D.A.R.  Valley  Creek  Ceme- 
tery, 6 miles  north  of  Selma,  Dallas  County.  Marked  by  Chapter, 
March  6,  1916. 

HAYS,  PATRICK,  will  dated  October  2,  1823,  and  probated 
July  29,  1829.  Wife:  Rachael.  Children,  daughters:  Sally,  Polly, 
Louisy,  Fanny,  Cynthia,  and  one  whose  name  is  undecipherable; 
son,  James. — Will  Book  A,  Selma,  Dallas  County. 

HAYS,  PATRICK— Born  1755,  died  1823,  buried  in  Selma.— 
General  D.A.R.  Report,  1916. 

HENLEY,  MARGARET  COLE  (TERRELL)— Real  daugh- 
ter, was  the  second  wife  of  Darby  Henley,  to  whom  she  was  mar- 
ried on  February  27,  1827,  in  Jefferson  County,  Ala.  She  was  the 
daughter  of  Joseph  Terrell,  Revolutionary  soldier,  who  died  in 
1826,  in  Elbert  County,  Ga. — Information  from  Wm.  F.  Franke, 
Birmingham,  Ala. 


HERNDEN,  FRANCES,  widow  of  Reuben  Hernden,  revolu- 
tionary soldier  applied  for  a widow’s  revolutionary  pension  while 
living  in  Hamilton  County,  Dec.  8,  1843.  Reuben  Hernden  died 
in  Franklin  County,  now  Coffee  County,  Tenn.,  in  March  1813.  He 
had  a younger  brother,  James  Hernden  who  also  served  in  the 
Revolution  and  drew  pension  in  Rutherford  County,  according  to 
the  statement  of  his  son,  Jacob  Hernden,  who  testifies  in  Frances 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


583 


Hernden’s  application.  He  says  that  his  father,  James  Hernden 
died  in  Rutherford  County,  Oct.  1,  1843,  that  James  Hernder. 
married  about  1781  and  had  six  children.  That  Reuben  and  James 
were  sons  of  Jacob  Hernden,  Sr.,  and  that  Reuben  enlisted  when 
he  was  19  years  of  ag'e  and  was  taken  prisoner  in  Col.  Buford’s 
defeat  at  or  near  Lunenburg  Court  House,  Va.,  and  that  James 
Hernden  was  serving  in  the  same  company  and  was  also  taken 
prisoner.  Frances  Kenneda  was  born  June  6,  1765  and  was  mar- 
ried in  Charlotte  County,  Va.,  on  Twitty  Creek  in  the  Mossyford 
Meeting  House  by  John  Williams,  a Baptist  Preacher.  Her  name 
is  spelled  three  ways  in  the  application,  Kenneda,  Canada  and 
Kennedy.  After  she  secured  her  pension  she  moved  to  DeKalb 
County,  Ala.  The  children  of  Reuben  and  Frances  Hernden  were: 
Sarah,  born  1791;  James,  born  1792;  William,  born  1795;  John, 
born  1797 ; Elijah,  born  1799;  Jacob,  born  1801,  Reuben,  Jr.,  born 
1804;  Enoch,  born  1806;  and  Jane,  born  1809,  who  married  William 
George. — Armstrong,  Some  Tennessee  Heroes  of  the  Revolution , Vol. 

9 


HEWITT,  GOLDSMITH  WHITEHOUSE  — was  born  in 
England  in  1766  and  died  in  Jefferson  Co.  Ala.,  in  1846.  His 
grave  is  in  Smiths  Chapel  Cemetery,  12  miles  north  of  Birming- 
ham. Although  only  a lad  of  ten,  Goldsmith  Hewitt  rendered  aid 
to  the  American  cause.  The  whole  time  Washington’s  army  lay 
encamped  around  Yorktown  this  little  boy  was  employed  by  the 
Commissary  Dept,  to  take  beef  to  the  American  forces.  He  saw 
Cornwallis  surrender  to  Washington. — Information  from  F.  A. 
Hewitt.  Warrior,  Ala. 

HEWITT,  GOLDSMITH  WHITEHOUSE— Jefferson  Coun- 
ty Census  of  1840  lists  him  as  aged  between  seventy  and  eighty 
and  living  with  his  son,  James  H.  Hewitt.  His  wife  is  not  given. 

HIGGINBOTHAM,  ROBERT— Name  appears  on  Huntsville 
Monument,  erected  by  Twickenham  Town  Chapter,  D.A.R. 

HILL,  HIRAM,  (1760-1851),  served  in  the  Chester  district, 
South  Carolina,  where  he  was  born.  He  moved  to  Dallas  County, 
Alabama,  in  1820,  and  then  to  Carroll  County,  Mississippi,  where 
he  died. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book , Vol.  38,  page  197. 


584 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


HILL,  HIRAM — The  Dallas  County  Census  of  1820  gives  him 
with  a family  of  one  free  male  over  twenty-one,  seven  free  males 
under  twenty-one,  one  free  female  over  twenty-one,  and  six  free 
females  under  twenty-one. 

HILL.  LEWIS — the  maternal  grandfather  of  Francis  M. 
Cody,  was  born  in  North  Carolina,  when  young  went  to  South 
Carolina,  and  still  later,  but  afterward  moved  to  Barbour  county, 
Ala.,  and  died  there  about  1850,  aged  ninety  years.  He  served 
as  a soldier  in  the  Revolutionary  war,  was  of  Scotch  descent,  and 
raised  a large  family  of  children. — Manor ial  Record  of  Alabama,  Yol. 
1,  page  773. 

HILLHOUSE,  WILLIAM  — Revolutionary  War  pension 
claim,  S.  7008,  states  that  William  Hillhouse  was  born  March  18, 
1760  near  Land’s  Ford  on  the  Catawba  River,  South  Carolina. 

While  residing  in  York  District,  South  Carolina,  he  enlisted 
in  December,  1775,  and  served  at  various  times  in  the  South  Caro- 
lina troops  as  follows:  Fourteen  months  as  private,  five  weeks 

as  sergeant,  and  three  weeks  as  lieutenant,  under  Captains  Thomas 
Kirkpatrick,  Joseph  Woods,  and  James  Jamison,  Colonels  Thomas 
Neil,  Andrew  Neil  and  William  Bratton,  he  was  at  the  battles  of 
Biggins  Church,  Williamson’s  Plantation,  Rocky  Mount,  and 
Hanging  Rock,  where  his  captain,  James  Jameson  was  wounded, 
and  he  was  appointed  Captain,  and  served  under  Colonel  William 
Bratton,  was  in  the  battles  of  Camdens  Ferry,  Catawba  Ford, 
Grandby  Fort,  Big  Savannah,  Wright’s  Bluff,  Black  River,  Fort 
Motte  and  again  at  Fort  Grandby,  he  served  as  captain  until  the 
last  of  April,  1781,  when  he  resigned.  After  which  lie  served  until 
Oct.  1,  1781  under  Captain  Frame  Woods.  He  was  allowed  pen- 
sion on  his  application  executed  February  3,  1834  while  a resident 
of  Marengo  County,  Alabama.  In  1844,  he  was  living  in  Oktibbeha 
County,  Mississippi,  where  he  and  his  children  had  moved  from 
Alabama,  names  of  children  not  stated,  nor  is  the  name  of  his  wife 
on  record.  Soldier  died  April  28,  1848,  leaving  the  following  chil- 
dren, William,  Jane  and  Sarah  Hillhouse. — -Department  of  Pensions , 
Washington,  D.  C. 

HILLMAN,  ELIZABETH— At  her  residence  in  this  County, 
on  the  14th  inst,  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Hillman,  widow  of  the  late  Jose 
Hillman,  former! v of  Amelia  Countv,  Va.  in  her  84th  vear.  Her 


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585 


husband  was  a soldier  of  the  Revolutionary  war  and  she  was  the 
last  revolutionary  pensioner  of  the  General  Government  in  this 
County.  She  was  baptized  in  the  Episcopal  Church  in  Va.,  about 
the  year  1800,  and  died  professing  repentance  toward  God  and 
faith  in  the  Lord  Jesus  Christ. — Southern  Advocate , Huntsville,  Ala- 
bama, Sept.  24,  1857. 

HOGQ,  THOMAS — A person  by  the  name  of  Thomas  Hog 
received  a Revolutionary  claim  in  South  Carolina.  (Salley’s  Stub 
Entries  to  Indents  for  Revolutionary  Claims,  R-T,  p.  264)  Thomas 
Hogg,  of  Newberry  District,  S.  C.,  married  Martha  Chandler, 
daughter  of  John  Chandler,  of  this  district.  After  their  marriage 
they  moved  into  Greene  or  Wilkes  County,  Ga.  where  their  first 
child,  Joseph  Lewis  Hogg,  was  born.  Shortly  after  they  removed 
to  Tuscaloosa  County,  Ala.,  where  Thomas  Hogg  served  in  the 
State  Senate,  1819-1820.  Besides  Joseph  Lewis  Hogg  there  were 
two  other  sons,  Thomas  Hogg  and  Stephen  Hogg. — 'Information 
from  Miss  Maud  M.  Kelly,  Birmingham,  Ala. 

HO’LLADAY,  DANIEL — was  born  in  the  year  1752,  in  the 
State  of  South  Carolina.  While  residing  on  “the  High  Hills  of 
Santee,”  later  known  as  Sumter  District,  South  Carolina,  he  en- 
listed at  the  time  the  South  Carolina  troops  were  first  organized, 
served  as  orderly-sergeant  in  Captain  James  McDaniel’s  (possibly 
meant  for  McDonald’s)  company,  Colonel  William  Moultrie’s 
South  Carolina  regiment,  was  in  the  battle  of  Fort  Moultrie  on 
Sullivan’s  Island,  and  continued  to  serve  two  and  one  half  years, 
then  hired  a substitute  to  complete  the  remainder  of  the  three 
year  term  for  which  he  had  enlisted.  He  was  allowed  pension  on 
his  application  executed  April  28,  1835,  at  which  time  he  resided 
in  Marion  County,  Alabama.  He  had  lived  in  South  Carolina 
until  about  nine  years  previous  to  1835.  The  soldier  died  February 
14,  1837.  In  1835  Daniel  Holladay'  referred  to  his  sister’s  family 
in  South  Carolina,  but  he  did  not  give  the  name  of  said  sister. — 
Department  of  Pensions,  Washington.  D.  C. 

HOLLAND,  THOMAS — Grave  located  in  Limestone  County. 
— General  D.A.R.  Report,  1928.  See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in 
. llabama  1911,  p.  56. 

HOLLAND,  WILLIAM  - Revolutionary  Soldier  buried  in 
Holland  family  graveyard  within  a stones’  throw  of  the  home  he 


586 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


built  in  1835,  and  some  9 miles  from  Scottsboro. — Mrs.  Emma  C. 
Swindel,  Tuscaloosa,  Ala. — See  also  General  D.A.R.  Report , 1927-28, 
page  109. 

HOOKS,  CHARLES,  (1768-1843),  a lad  of  thirteen  joined  the 
forces  in  pursuit  of  Tarleton  in  North  Carolina.  He  removed  to 
Alabama  in  1826.  He  was  born  in  Bertie  Co.,  N.  C.,  died  in  Mont- 
gomery Co.,  Alabama. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book , Vol.  22,  p.  168.  See 
also  General  D.A.R.  Report , 1931. 

HORN,  PRESLEY— Morgan  Co.,  Ala.,  in  1828.  Letter  to 
Gov.  John  Murphy  regarding  Revolutionary  Claim,  November  10, 
1828. — In  Alabama  Military  Archives. 

HORTON,  ABRAHAM  (1759-1843)  received  a pension  for 
service  as  Private  at  Kings  Mountain  under  Colonels  Armstrong 
and  Shelby.  He  was  born  in  Pennsylvania ; died  in  Lawrence 
County,  Ala. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  Vol.  141,  page  258. 

HOUSTON,  SAMUEL  (1760-1840)  served  as  a private,  1780- 
83,  in  the  South  Carolina  militia.  He  was  born  in  Abbeville  Dis- 
trict, S.  C. ; died  in  Alabama. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  Vol.  97,  page 
40. 


HOWARD,  JAMES,  (1760-1820),  served  as  a private  in  Capt. 
Martin  Pfifer’s  2nd  troops,  North  Carolina  Light  Dragoons,  1777. 
He  was  born  in  North  Carolina;  died  in  Alabama — D.A.R.  Lineage 
Book,  Vol.  41,  page  88. 

HOWARD,  JOSEPH  (1760-1843)  served  as  private  in  Colonel 
Brandon’s  regiment  of  South  Carolina  Militia.  He  was  born  in 
Union  County,  S.  C. ; died  in  Cross  Keys,  Alabama. — D.A.R.  Lineage 
Book,  Vol.  128,  page  243. 

HUBBARD,  THOMAS — Pensioner  of  Morgan  County,  Ala., 
died  in  that  county  on  July  31,  1841,  leaving  no  widow  but  the 
following  children:  Greene  K. ; Thomas;  Vincent;  David;  Eliza- 
beth Wilson;  Margaret  Hewlett;  Catherine  Morris;  Stephen;  and 
James.  David  Hubbard  was  appointed  administrator  of  the  es- 
tate.4-Jones  and  Gandrud — Alabama  Records,  vol.  74,  Morgan  Coun- 
ty, p.  65.  See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Alabama,  1911,  p.  65. 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


587 


HUDDLESTON,  JAMES — Died  at  his  residence,  near  Wash- 
ington, Autauga  County,  on  Monday  morning,  the  1st  instant, 
James  Huddleston,  Esq.,  in  the  68th  year  of  his  life.  Mr.  Hud- 
dleston was  a very  affectionate  husband  a kind  and  indulgent 
father.  He  was  a native  of  Maryland,  a participant  in  the  Revo- 
lution and  was  an  undeviating  friend  to  his  coutnry. 

For  the  last  ten  years  he  has  been  afflicted  with  a paralytic 
affection,  that  rendered  him  almost  helpless,  which  he  bore  with 
Christian  fortitude  and  resignation.  During  the  latter  part  of  his 
illness  he  frequently  repeated  this  passage  of  the  scriptures  : “Oh 
death  where  is  thy  sting’.  Oh  grave  where  is  thy  victory  !”  A 
short  time  before  his  death  he  requested  his  children  to  read-  the 
10th  verse  of  the  41st  Chapter  of  Isiah  after  which  he  calmly  ex- 
pired, and  his  spirit  fled  to  that  “House  not  made  with  hands 
eternal  in  the  heavens.” — Selma  Courier,  Dec.  11,  1828. 

HUFF,  JAMES — Born  September  15,  1759,  in  Hopewell,  New 
Jersey,  parents  name  not  mentioned  but  his  father  died  in  1801. 
According  to  the  statement  made  when  this  veteran  applied  for 
pension  he  served  as  Private  with  Virginia  troops  as  follows: 
From  about  the  first  of  October  1776,  40  days  under  Captain 
George  Bell;  from  November  1779,  2 months  under  Captain 

James  McLuskey;  from  sometime  in  September  1781,  3 months 
under  Captain  George  Bell  and  Colonel  Meriwether  and  was  at 
the  Siege  of  Yorktown  and  the  Surrender  of  Cornwallis.  He  was 
living  in  Prince  William  County,  Virginia,  when  he  enlisted  in 
1778.  About  1792  or  1809,  he  moved  from  there  to  Elbert  County, 
Georgia.  About  1819,  he  moved  from  Elbert  County,  Georgia,  to 
Perry  County,  Ala.,  where  he  was  living  when  he  applied  for  a 
pension,  October  24,  1832,  and  he  was  living  there  in  1833.  Pen- 
sion certificate  No.  22419  was  issued  to  James  Huff  October  29, 
1833,  rate  $20  per  annum,  act  of  June  2,  1832,  Alabama  agency. 
Date  and  place  of  death  not  mentioned. 

From  the  records  of  the  Comptroller  General,  General  Ac- 
counting Office,  Washington,  D.  C.  The  last  payment  of  the  pen- 
sion of  James  Huff,  certificate  No.  22419,  covering  the  period 
March  4,  1838  to  September  4,  1838  was  made  on  February  1, 
1839  at  the  Mobile  Agency,  to  Charles  C.  Langdon,  as  attorney 
for  the  pensioner.  On  October  20,  1838,  James  Huff  certified  that 
he  had  been  living  in  Perry  County,  Alabama,  for  seventeen  years, 


588 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


and  that  he  had  previously  lived  in  Elbert  County,  Ga. — Jones  and 
Gandrud,  Perry  County , Alabama  Records,  vol.  73. 

HUGHES,  JOSEPH,  (1760-1834).  served  at  the  age  of  fifteen 
in  the  Cherokee  warfare.  He  was  lieutenant  under  Sumter  at 
Rocky  Mount,  Hanging  Rock,  Musgrove  Mills,  King’s  Mountain 
and  Cowpens.  He  was  promoted  captain,  1781,  and  led  his  corn- 
pan}  at  Eutaw  Springs.  He  was  horn  in  Chester  county.  South 
Carolina,  removed  to  Alabama,  1825,  and  was  a pensioner  when  he 
died  there. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  Vol.  16,  p.  361.  See  also  W hite, 
King's  Mountain  Men,  p.  190.  See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in 
Alabama.  1911,  pp.  58-61. 

HUGHES,  WILLIAM — Shelby  County  Census  of  1820,  gives 
him  as  “Seignor”  with  one  male  and  one  female  over  twenty-one  ; 
three  males  and  two  females  under  twenty-one  ; total  whites  seven. 
The  census  of  1830  gives  one  male  seventy  to  eighty  ; one  female 
fifty  to  sixty  ; two  females  twenty  to  thirty.  The  name  is  spelled 
“HUGHS.”  Note:  Sarah  Hughes,  widow  of  William,  is  in  list  of 
suspended  applications  for  pensions. — See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers 
in  Alabama,  1911,  p.  61. 

HUSSTULLAR,  GEORGE — Age  76,  Eastern  Division  of 
Blount  Co.  in  1840. — Census  of  1840. 

INGE,  RICHARD — born  in  King  and  Queen  County,  Vir- 
ginia, 1754,  died  August  13,  1833.  A Revolutionary  soldier.  Member 
of  the  Legislature,  1825. — Greenwood  Cemetery,  Tuscaloosa,  Ala. 

JENNINGS,  WILLIAM — “A  Revolutionary  soldier  born  Feb. 
26,  1761,  died  August  17,  1840.”  “To  the  memory  of  Sarah  daugh- 
ter of  William  and  Mollie  Jennings  who  was  born  Feb.  10,  1801. 
and  married  John  Smoot  Jan.  10,  1824  and  again  James  Williamson 
July  4,  1841  and  died  Jan.  10,  1842  aged  40  years  11  months.” — 
Cpitaphs  from  tombs  in  cemetery,  Harpersviller  Ala. 

JENNINGS,  WILLIAM  applied  for  Revolutionary  pension 
while  Jiving  in  Lincoln  County,  Tenn.  He  was  born  Feb.  26,  1761. 
He  lived  in  Prince  Edward  County,  Va.,  in  April,  1777,  when  he 
entered  the  service.  He  served  under  Capt.  Henry  Walker,  Col. 
Mason,  Lieut.  Richard  Holland  and  Ensign  John  Black.  In  the 
summer  of  1781  he  enlisted  in  Prince  Edward  Co.,  under  Capt. 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


589 


Cunningham.  He  was  at  the  surrender  of  Cornwallis.  In  1836 
he  asked  for  a transfer  of  his  pension  to  Shelby  County,  Ala.  He 
died  July  17,  1840.  His  widow  Polly  Jennings  said  that  she  was 
married  Jan.  18,  1787,  her  name  before  marriage  being  Polly  Kidd. 
She  was  born  Nov.  4,  1771.  Their  children  were:  Martin,  born 
1787;  Nancy,  born  1789;  Elizabeth,  born  1792;  Allen,  born  1796; 
William  Kidd,  born  1798;  Sally,  born  1801  ; Webb,  born  1802;  Wil- 
liam Calvin,  born  1803;  Robert,  born  1808;  Lucrecy,  born  1810: 
Sophy,  born  1812,  James  W.,  born  1813.— Armstrong,  Some  Tennessee 
Heroes  of  the  Revolution , Vol.  2.  See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in 
Alabama,  1911,  p.  62. 

JOHNSON,  JOHN — Born  January  2,  1762,  in  Halifax  Coun- 
ty, N.  C.  He  enlisted  and  served  about  three  months  as  a private 
in  Capt.  Abram  DeMoss’s  Company,  Col.  Benjamin  Cleveland’s 
North  Carolina  Regiment ; reenlisted  in  March,  1782  and  served 
in  Capt.  Charles  Gordon’s  North  Carolina  Company  for  twelve 
months  as  a private.  In  1782  he  was  a resident  of  Rowan  County, 
N.  C.  He  removed  to  Rutherford  County,  Tenn.,  after  the  Revolu- 
tionary War,  and  later  to  Lawrence  County,  Ala.  He  was  living 
in  Pickens  County,  Ala.,  in  1836. — Jones  and  Gandrud,  Alabama  Rec- 
ords, vol.  72,  Pickens  County,  p.  72.  See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers 
in  Alabama,  1911,  p.  62. 

JOHNSON,  RICHARD — Departed  this  life  in  Madison  Coun- 
ty, Ala.,  30th  of  August  last,  Richard  Johnson,  in  the  84th  year  of 
his  age,  after  a painful  confinement  of  about  eight  weeks,  which 
he  bore  with  great  fortitude,  and  during  which  time  he  was  sen- 
sible of  his  approaching  dissolution.  The  deceased  was  a Revo- 
lutionary Soldier  of  the  United  States  ; having  entered  the  Army 
of  the  Revolution  in  the  17th  year  of  his  age,  he  served  for  the 
space  of  seven  years,  was  engaged  in  many  battles,  and  fought 
amongst  others  under  General  Lee.  The  deceased  has  left  a 
widow  (with  whom  he  had  lived  more  than  58  years)  and  four 
surviving  children  to  mourn  their  loss.  Richard  Johnson  was  a 
native  of  Virginia,  from  which  State  he  emigrated  to  Alabama  in 
the  year  1842,  and  during  the  last  12  years  of  his  life  enjoyed,  as 
a pension  the  bounty  of  his  Government.— Huntsville  Democrat,  Sep- 
tember 24,  1842. 

JOHNSON,  WILLIAM — 'Born  October  16,  1757,  Edgefield 
District,  S.  C.,  died  April  23,  1854,  buried  in  Johnson  private 


590 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


graveyard,  about  six  miles  from  Selma,  marked  by  Cola  Barr 
Craig  Chapter. — General  D.A.R.  Report , 1931. 

JONES,  FREEMAN,  (1763-1835),  served  as  private  under 
Captains  Neville,  Lytle  and  Whiteside,  Colonels  Hampton  and 
Armstrong,  North  Carolina  Line.  He  was  born  in  Pickens  County, 
Va. ; died  in  Alabama. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book , Vol.  115,  page  14.  See 
also  Jones  and  Gandrud,  Pickens  County,  Alabama  Records,  vol.  72, 
p.  69. 

JONES,  HARRISON — Died  at  his  residence  in  Marshall 
County,  Mississippi,  on  the  12th  of  January  last,  in  his  84th  year. 
He  was  a native  of  Cumberland  County,  Virginia,  and  lost  a leg 
at  the  battle  of  Guilford.  In  1807  he  moved  to  the  State  of  Georgia, 
and  about  five  years  ago  emigrated  to  Mississippi.  He  left  a wife, 
five  sons,  and  numerous  relations  and  friends,  to  mourn  his  death 
and  cherish  him,  in  their  memory.  He  was  an  affectionate  hus- 
band, a fond  and  indulgent  father,  and  a kind  master.  He  enjoyed 
the  esteem  of  his  neighbours  and  acquaintances,  and  a full  share 
of  their  kind  sympathies. — Huntsville  Democrat,  February  13,  1841. 

JONES,  JOHN — Revolutionary  pensioner,  died  about  two 
o’clock  in  the  morning,  September  4,  1836,  and  left  surviving  a 
widow,  Mary  Jones.  The  arrears  of  the  pension  due  were  paid  on 
September  20,  1836,  at  the  Pension  Agency,  in  Decatur,  Ala.,  to 
the  widow. — Jones  and  Gandrud,  Alabama  Records,  vol.  74,  Morgan 
County,  pp.  61-62.  See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Alabama,  1911, 
pp.  62-63. 


JONES,  LEWELLEN— Name  appears  on  Huntsville  Monu- 
ment, erected  by  Twickenham  Town  Chapter,  D.A.R. 

JONES,  NATHAN — Name  appears  on  Huntsville  Monument, 
erected  by  Twickenham  Town  Chapter,  D.A.R. 

JONES,  VINCENT— Shelby  County  Census  of  1830,  gives 
the  name  as  “Vincen”,  with  one  male  and  one  female  sixty  to 
seventy;  one  male  fifteen  to  twenty. — See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers 
in  Alabama,  1911,  p.  64. 

JORDAN,  BARTHOLOMEW— Died  at  the  resident  of  his 
son  in  this  County,  in  the  83rd  years  of  his  age,  on  the  24th  ultimo. 


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591 


Bartholomew  Jordan.  The  deceased  emigrated  from  North  Caro- 
lina and  settled  near  Huntsville  many  years  ago.  His  unexampled 
piety,  his  orderly  walk,  and  his  Christian  conversation,  connected 
with  his  many  acts  of  benevolence  and  charity,  were  well  calcu- 
lated to  endear  him  to  the  community  in  which  he  lived.  Old 
Father  Jordan,  was  emphatically  one  of  those  rare  beings  who  left 
the  world  without  an  enemy.  He  seemed  perfectly  sensible  of 
his  approaching  dissolution  and  spoke  of  his  departure  from  this 
world  as  one  who  had  long  had  it  in  his  mind  to  visit  his  friends 
in  a far  off  land,  and  appeared  as  though  he  was  anxiously  waiting 
for  the  arrival  of  the  moment  when  he  could  set  out  upon  his  long- 
journey.  His  faith  in  the  merits  of  a Saviour’s  blood,  like  the  sun, 
seemed  to  grow  larger  when  setting,  and  abundantly  showed  that 
in  his  last  moments  his  immortal  soul  was  vigorous  and  strong, 
and  that  it  remained  unhurt  amid  the  ruins  of  dissolving  nature. 
The  writer  of  this  poor  sketch  feels  confident  that  no  one  could 
have  witnessed  the  last  moments  of  this  venerable  old  Patriarch 
and  Saint  without  being  fully  convinced  of  the  blessed  reality  of 
the  Christian  religion.  While  the  poor  feeble  emanciated  body 
was  fast  declining  and  the  pulse  became  faint  and  few.  The  im- 
mortal soul,  as  if  in  the  vigor  of  manhood,  seemed  like  a bounding 
courser  which  had  been  long  held  back  from  the  eager  chace  by 
the  twisted  bit,  was  anxious  to  be  let  loose  from  the  body,  that  it 
might  take  its  mystic  flight  into  the  boundless  regions  of  felicity 
where  even  fancy  itself  has  ceased  to  pursue.  As  a master  Father 
Jordan  was  kind;  as  a friend  and  neighbour  he  was  obliging  and 
sincere ; as  a father  his  affection  for  his  children  could  not  be 
surpassed.  But  he  is  gone  to  the  better  land,  where  it  is  hoped 
that  his  friends  will  all  meet  him. — Huntsville  Democrat,  April  9,  1842. 

KELLY,  GRESHAM — Widow  of  this  Revolutionary  soldier 
who  received  pay  as  a captain  on  militia  duty  for  two  hundred 
and  forty  days  in  South  Carolina  in  1781  and  1782,  removed  to 
Alabama  with  her  family  before  1818.  Captain  Kelly  died  on 

October  1,  1799,  having  married  January  17,  1769,  B Tatum. 

She  died  August  19,  1830.  The  Census  of  Jefferson  County  for 
1830  shows  a female  aged  between  eighty  and  ninety  in  the  home 
of  Isham  Harrison.  This,  no  doubt,  was  the  mother  of  Mrs.  Har- 
rison, as  Isham  Harrison’s  mother,  Elizabeth  Hampton  Harrison, 
had  died  in  South  Carolina  in  1799.  Children  of  this  couple,  all 
born  in  South  Carolina:  Ann  Kelly,  born  January  25,  1771,  died 
March  15,  1805,  married  a Mr.  Cobb;  James,  born  March  23,  1773, 


592  ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


died  November  11,  1804;  Moses,  born  October  8,  1775,  died  Jan- 
uary 9,  1837.  .major  in  War  of  1812,  first  chief  justice  of  Blount 
County  and  of  Jefferson  County;  Mary,  born  January  25,  1779, 
died  November  15,  1806;  married  Mr.  Tarrant;  Elizabeth,  born 
February  25.  1781,  died  May  16,  1813,  married  Mr.  Townsend; 
Jane,  born  August  6,  1783,  died  November  22,  1816,  married  Mr. 
Thomason  ; William,  born  September  22,  1786,  died  August  24, 
1834,  represented  Alabama  in  both  the  House  and  Senate,  U.  S. 
Congress;  Harriett,  born  July  15,  1789,  died  July  1,  1856,  Monroe 
County,  Aliss. ; married  I sham  Harrison. — Owen,  A Genealogy  of  the 
Kelly  family,  p.  3. 

KELS( ),  ISABELLA — Revolutionary  heroine,  buried  at 
-Mount  Pleasant.  ISABELLA  WYLIE  was  daughter  of  Samuel 
Kelso,  who  in  1780  lived  on  the  North  Side  of  Fishing  Creek 
Churchyard.  Some  vestiges  of  the  Settlement  remaining  at  the 
present  day.  most  of  his  children  were  grown  at  the  time  he  came 
to  Alabama,  1820,  to  Perry  County,  now  Dallas  County.  Alost  of 
their  children  went  Wrest.  There  is  remaining  in  this  State  Wil- 
liam Wilie  Walker  of  Selma.  Mr.  Kelso,  the  father  died,  in  1830. — 
Revolutionary'  Graves  in  Alabama  by  Mrs.  Robert  Sturdivant, 
Berlin,  Ala. 

KENDRICK,  JOHN,  (1759-1836),  was  born  on  the  Eastern 
Shore  of  Maryland  and  his  name  is  found  in  the  Maryland  Line.  He 
died  in  North  Alabama  and  is  buried  on  Sand  Mountain. — D.A.R. 
Linege  Book,  Vol.  24,  p.  96. 

KENNEY,  WILLIAM — Born  October  10,  1768,  in  Waxhaw 
Settlement,  S.  C.  Applied  for  a pension  in  Morgan  County,  Ala., 
November  22,  1832,  at  the  age  of  sixty-four.  His  pension  was 
rejected.  He  stated  that  he  did  not  remember  the  year  that  he 
enlisted  but  that  it  was  while  Lord  Rawdon  was  encamped  at 
Camden.  He  resided  in  Waxhaw  District,  now  Lancaster  Dis- 
trict, S.  C.,  and  served  under  General  Sumpter,  Col.  Frederick 
Kimball,  Maj.  Thomas  Thompson,  Capt.  George  Dunlap.  He  was 
in  no  regiment  or  battalion  but  was  in  several  skirmishes.  He 
entered  as  a volunteer.  He  also  states  that  he  guided  part  of 
Gates  defeated  men  back  to  Charlotte,  N.  C.  When  he  returned 
home  he  found  that  the  Tories  were  looking  for  him  so  he  returned 
to  Charlotte.  N.  C.,  and  again  volunteered,  serving' in  Capt.  George 
Dunlap's  Company  with  Lt.  Andrew  Mcllvain.  His  father  was 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


593 


also  a member  of  this  company.  After  the  War  he  returned  to 
Waxhaw  settlement,  S.  C.,  later  removed  to  Tennessee,  and  finally 
to  Morgan  County,  Ala. — Jones  and  Gandrud,  Alabama  Records,  vol. 
49,  Morgan  County,  p.  15. 

KEYES,  JOHN  WADE,  (1752-1839)  responded  , to  the  call 
of  volunteers  in  the  Shenandoah  Valley,  Va.,  where  he  was  living 
during  the  war.  He  commanded  a company  in  Colonel  Moon’s 
regiment  under  General  Thomas.  He  was  born  in  Boston,  Mass., 
died  in  Athens,  Ala. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book  vol.  159,  page  295. 

KING,  JOvSEPH — -About  the  30th  ultimo,  in  Wilcox  county, 
Alabama,  Mr.  Joseph  King,  aged  about  seventy  years,  and  be- 
lieved to  be  a native  of  South  Carolina ; in  which  state  he  officiated 
as  chaplain  of  a regiment  during  the  revolutionary  war.  He  died 
seized  of  considerable  property,  which  as  he  had  no  kin  in  this  part 
of  the  country,  must  escheat  to  the  state,  unless  his  relatives  sup- 
posed to  reside  in  upper  Alabama  and  South  Carolina,  present 
their  claims  within  the  time  prescribed  by  law.  By  inserting  this 
notice,  the  Huntsville  and  South  Carolina  papers  may  confer  a 
benefit  on  his  kinsfolk. — Southern  Advocate,  Huntsville,  June  30,  1826. 

KIRBY,  EPHRAIM  (1757-1804)  served  as  ensign  in  a Rhode 
Island  regiment,  1782,  and  also  served  as  lieutenant,  Connecticut 
troops.  He  was  an  original  member  of  the  Cincinnati  of  Connecti- 
cut. He  was  born  in  Litchfield,  Conn.;  died  in  Fort  Stoddard, 
Alabama.— D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  Vol.  107,  page  233. 

KIRKLAND,  WILLIAM — A Revolutionary  Soldier  who  is 
interred  17 miles  north  of  Selma,  Dallas  County,  Alabama,  at 
Pea  Ridge  Church,  Pea  Ridge,  Ala.  The  grave  is  on  the  road  side, 
and  there  is  no  fence  around  the  church  yard.  The  inscription  on 
the  flat  slab  which  covers  the  grave  is  as  follows : Sacred  to  the 

memory  of  WILLIAM  KIRKLAND,  a native  of  South  Carolina. 
Departed  this  life  October  4th  1838  aged  80  years.  Loved  for  his 
patriotic  services  as  a Revolutionary  soldier,  and  respected  for 
Virtue  as  a private  citizen.  May  he  rest  in  peace.  Amen.  — 
Cherokee  Chapter,  D.A.R.,  Selma,  Ala. 

KIRKLAND,  WILLIAM— Born  1758,  died  1838,  buried  in 
Selma. — D.A.R.  General  Report,  1916,  See  also  Jones  and  Gandrud, 
Autauga  County,  Alabama  Records,  v.  76,  p.  55. 


594 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


KITCHENS,  MRS.  KATE  SALTER.  On  the  twenty-fourth 
of  last  month  the  Mobile  Chapter  of  the  Daughters  of  the  Ameri- 
can Revolution  placed  an  official  bronze  marker  on  the  grave  of 
Mrs.  K.  S.  Kitchens  of  Monroeville.  This  old  lady  but  recently 
passed  on,  was  a real  Daughter  of  the  American  Revolution.  The 
daughter  of  a Revolutionary  soldier,  she  was  at  the  same  time  a 
member  of  the  organization  of  Daughters. — Montgomery  Advertiser, 
March  4th,  1928.  See  also  General  D.A.R.  Report,  1928. 

LACY,  JOHN — Horn  in  Virginia,  the  son  of  Theophilus  Lacy 
and  Martha  Cocke.  His  father  died  in  Virginia  while  the  mother 
died  in  1812  in  Rockingham  County,  N.  C.  The  inventory  of  the 
estate  of  Theophilus  Lacy  was  filed  in  both  Pittsylvania  County, 
Va.,  and  Guilford  County,  N.  C.,  and  bears  the  date  of  November 
24,  1777.  During  the  Revolution,  John  Lacy  served  in  the  Second 
North  Carolina  Regiment,  Col.  Alexander  Martin,  commanding. 
He  enlisted  in  1777  for  the  duration  of  the  War,  in  Captain  Vail’s 
Company,  Second  North  Carolina  Regiment,  was  promoted  in  1778 
to  sergeant-major,  promoted  in  1778  to  sergeant,  made  ensign 
May  20,  1779,  and  resigned  in  the  same  year.  He  was  listed  among 
the  officers  and  men  to  whom  allowances  were  made  in  1792  as 
having  served  in  the  continental  line,  and  yet  another  time  where 
he  is  listed,  as  of  Hillsboro  District.  He  must  be  differentiated 
from  the  John  Lacy  who  enlisted  July  20,  1778,  for  nine  months  in 
Captain  Baker’s  Company,  Tenth  North  Carolina  Regiment,  Col. 
Abraham  Shepard  commanding.  He  married  March  17,  1803,  in 
Rockingham  County,  N.  C.,  Polly  Henderson,  born  January  16, 
1785,  daughter  of  Thomas  and  Jane  (Martin)  Henderson,  the  latter 
a sister  of  Gov.  Alexander  Martin  of  North  Carolina.  The  children 
were:  Theophilus,  born  January  1,  1804,  in  Rockingham  County, 
N.  C..  died  February  10,  1874,  at  Huntsville,  Ala.,  married  (1) 
Mary  W.  Harris,  (2)  Frances  Hardeman  Binford;  Thomas  Hen- 
derson, married  Mary  McClelland;  Frances  Hardeman,  born  1810, 
died  young;  Alexander  PI.,  born  1814,  married  Sallie  Wall;  John 
Lacy  removed  to  Madison  County,  Ala.,  and  owned  land  in  both 
Madison  and  Morgan  Counties.  Lacey’s  Springs  takes  its  name 
from  him  and  he  are  his  wife  are  buried  there. 

LAVENDER,  HLTGH  (called  Huey)  gives  lots  of  information 
on  himself,  in  his  Revolutionary  War  Pension  Application.  He 
says  he  was  born  Nov.  11,  1754,  in  County  Antrim,  Ireland,  near 
Ballymena;  landed  1771  in  South  Carolina  and  settled  on  Wateree 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


595 


Creek  in  Camden  District  (now  Fairfield)  ; volunteered  early  in 
the  Revolution,  and  served  at  various  times  until  the  close  of  the 
war,  about  two  years  in  all,  as  a private  in  S.  C.  Troops  under 
Captains  Robert  Allison,  John  Mullen,  Casey  and  John  Wolgen 
and  Colonel  John  Winn  and  Generals  Sumter,  Pickens  and  Nathan- 
iel Greens;  was  in  the  siege  of  Ninety-Six.  Hugh  Lavender’s  rec- 
ord says  he  lived  also  in  Newberry  District  S.  C.,  and  in  1822 
came  to  Greene  County  (now  Hale).  He  refers  to  John  Elliott, 
David  Campbell  and  James  Campbell  for  veracity  and  character. 
Hugh  Lavender  died,  1834,  and  is  buried  at  Concord  with  no 
marker  to  his  grave. 

Hugh  Lavender’s  will  at  Eutaw  (Book  b,  Page  153)  gives,  a 
list  of  his  children  namely:  Margaret  Lavender,  Sarah  Bennett, 
Robert  S.  Lavender,  John  Lavender,  Ruth  Barbour,  Mary  Torbert, 
Nancy  McDaniel,  Levi  Lavender.  Hugh  also  leaves  money  to 
James  Campbell  and  Lucy  Lavender,  but  does  not  state  who  they 
are.  He  makes  no  mention  of  his  wife  who  must  have  died  first, 
but  I have  just  recently  received  copy  of  Bible  records  in  posses- 
sion of  John  Levi  Lavender,  of  Birmingham,  and  Hugh’s  wife  is 
given  as  Rebecca  Smith,  born  1759  in  Ireland,  married  1777. 

John  Levi  Lavender  (age  82)  is  a brother  of  Catherine  Ann 
(Kate)  Lavender,  who  married  (1897)  her  fourth  cousin,  John 
William  Lavender.  Mrs.  Kate  Lavender  helped  me  a great  deal 
until  her  death,  April  12,  1943,  in  Birmingham.  Her  sister-in-law 
by  marriage,  Mrs.  Annie  Bobinette  Dominick  Lavender  (widow 
of  Francis  Marion  Lavender)  of  Greensboro,  has  also  greatly 
helped  with  this  history.  Mrs.  Kate  Lavender  remembered  that 
her  grandfather  had  a sister  who  married  a Bennett,  and  told  me 
of  her  grandson,  Dr.  James  D.  Bennett,  of  Meridian,  but  I’ve  never 
been  able  to  hear  from  him.  Dr.  Bennett  is  a son  of  Hugh  Laven- 
der Bennett  and  grandson  of  Kinard  Bennett,  who  married  Sarah 
Lavender,  Sarah  had  another  son,  David,  but  this  is  the  limit  of  our 
record  on  them. 

Robert  S.  Lavender  (Bobin),  son  of  Hugh,  in  1825  joined  Con- 
cord Church,  and  in  1828,  one  of  his  children  was  baptized  at 
Concord.  These  records  are  from  the  old  Church  minutes.  Census 
records  at  Tuscaloosa  give  some  information  and  Sumter  County 
records  give  some.  Bobin  had  sons,  H.  E.  and  David  S.  Lavender, 


596 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


and  Daughters,  Nancy  G.  (Mrs.  John  C.  Porter)  and  one  whose 
name  is  not  given. 

Concord  Church  records  show  that  William  McDaniel  had 
four  Children  Baptized  Oct.  30,  1831  ; namely,  Elizabeth,  Hugh 
Lavender,  Anne  Montgomery  and  Moses  Martin  McDaniel.  This 
is  undoubtedly  husband  of  Nancy  Lavender  and  their  children, 
but  I have  no  further  record  of  them. 

Hugh  Levi  Lavender,  son  of  Hugh,  married  Dec.  12,  1824, 
Jane  Hopper  (Jennie)  and  had  several  children,  among  them  John 
David  Lavender  (born  Feb.  29,  1836,  Greensboro — died  June  16. 
1899,  Birmingham,  buried  East  Lake).  John  David  married  1860 
m Sumterville,  Ala.  Rebecca  Barlow  Poythress,  who  had  come  in 
1853  in  a covered  wagon  from  Petersburg,  Va.,  with  her  parents 
(James  Edward  Poythress  and  Catherine  Smith  Preston).  Re- 
becca was  born  Nov.  10,  1838,  in  Petersburg,  and  died  Jan.  28, 
1936,  in  Birmingham  at  the  age  of  97.  Her  children  were:  John 
Levi  Lavender  (now  living  in  Birmingham)  Catherine  Ann  (Mrs. 
J.  W.  Lavender)  who  died  1943;  Ida  Thomas  (Mrs.  Janies  S. 
Sullivan),  Birmingham;  Dr.  William  Algernon  Lavender  (died 
1940  in  Birmingham),  Lemuel  Thomas  Lavender  (who  married 
first  Jane  Elizabeth  Lavender),  LaGrange,  Ga. ; Herbert  Windham 
Lavender  (married  Mary  Ruth  Scarborough),  Livingston,  Alaba- 
ma. 


John  Lavender  (born  July  1,  1780,  Camden  District,  S.  C., 
died  March  3,  1861,  at  Havana,  buried  Concord),  married  Rebecca 
Sant  (born  March  15,  1784,  in  South  Carolina,  died  May  15,  1860, 
At  Havana,  buried  Concord).  Rebecca  was  full  Irish,  says  Miss 
Annie  Stokes,  but  others  say  she  was,  named  Sent  and  was  from 
London.  Snedecor  Directory  (1855)  gives  John  Lavender,  Planter, 
Havana,  1821,  Section  14  and  15,  Township  22,  Range  5,  East. 
This  was  between  Havana  and  Liberty.  • Mrs.  Annie  Lavender 
says  Cousin  Mag  told  her  that  several  brothers  came  from  South 
Carolina  and  settled  first  near  Moundville,  but  because  of  chills 
and  fevers,  moved  out  near  Liberty  and  Havana.  Some  of  the 
brothers  moved  into  Pickens  County,  near  Ethelsville.  There  are 
many  Lavenders  in  that  county  today. 

John  Lavender’s  children  were:  Elizabeth  (married  Tyree 
Hollis)  ; Ann  Montgomery  Lavender  (1808-1831)  ; Sarah  (Sallie) 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


597 


Lavender  (born  Feb.  28,  1811;  died  April  24.  1902;  buried  Con- 
cord) ; Mary  Lavender  (died  young)  ; Hugh  Lavender  (died 
young)  ; Margaret  Jane  (Peggy)  Lavender  (born  June  26,  1818; 
died  Nov.  8,  1894;  buried  Concord);  Thomas  Lavender  (married 
Mariah  Davis);  Emoline  (married  Isaac  Mitchell  Poole);  Martha 
Rebecca  (Mattie)  Lavender  (born  Sept.  16,  1825 ; died  May  25, 
1905;  buried  Concord);  Diana  Augusta  (married  Feb.  14,  1850, 
Martin  LaGrone),  and  John  Dorrell  Lavender  (twin  to  Diana). 
Sallie,  Peggy  and  Mattie  Lavender  all  died  old  maids. 

John  Lavender’s  oldest  child,  Elizabeth  (born  Jan.  7,  1807  in 
South  Carolina;  Married  Dec.  15,  1829,  at  Havana,  Tyree  Hollis, 
who  was  born  1794  in  South  Carolina).  Snedecor  (1855)  gives 
Tyree  Hollis,  Planter,  Havana,  1822,  Section  21,  Township  22, 
Range  5,  East.  This  is  out  toward  Liberty.  Tyree  died  1870.  He 
and  wife  are  buried  at  Concord  (no  stones).  Miss  Hattie  Hollis, 
of  Sawyerville,  and  Miss  Annie  Stokes,  of  Havana,  furnished  most 
of  the  Hollis  records. 

Tyree  Hollis  had  these  children  (maybe  others)  ; Calvin  De- 
witt Hollis  (married  Anne  Elizabeth  Elliott)  ; Rebecca  Margaret 
(born  about  1853;  died  July  8,  1909,  single);  Henry  (born  about 
1835,  probably  died  young)  ; Thomas  (born  about  1838;  died  about 
1915)  ; Tyree  Josephus  (born  1840  died  April  10,  1864,  single)  ; 
James  Harvey  Hollis  (married  Martha  Ann  Hendrix)  ; Elizabeth 
Ann  (married  James  Augustus  Stokes)  ; Hugh  (no  dates)  ; John 
(no  dates);  and  Caroline  (who  married  Garland  Rice). 

Calvin  Dewitt  Hollis  (1830-1884),  married  Anne  Elizabeth 
Elliott  and  most  of  their  descendants  were  given  in  the  Hale 
County  News,  March  30,  1944,  but  here  are  a few  additions.  James 
Pinkney  Hollis,  son  of  Calvin,  first  married  (1893),  Marie  Elba 
Abernathy,  daughter  of  Burrell  Brown  (Joe)  Abernathy  and  Sarah 
Elizabeth  Lavender,  and  had  James  Calvin  Hollis  (Married  1931, 
Kate  Seay  Ford)  ; Alma  Onida  (married  1925,  John  Vernon  Han- 
na), and  Thomas  Brown  Hollis  (died  Nov.  13,  1918,  from  injuries 
received  in  Battle  of  Chateau  Thiery,  France,  in  First  AYorld  War). 

James  Pinkney  Hollis,  married  February  (1904)  Annie  Mae 
Parr,  daughter  of  King  Drew  Parr  and  Mary  Satira  May,  whose 
ancestor  (John  Parr)  was  a soldier  of  the  Revolution,  who  settled 
west  of  Greensboro  about  1835  from  Fairfield  District,  S.  C.  where 


598 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


he  died  1847,  age  86.  Annie  Mae  had  these  children  : Mary  Eliza- 
beth, John  Pinkney  Hollis  (married  Lou  Emma  Mclnvale)  ; Annie 
Mae  (married  Emmett  Lee  Callahan)  ; Eugene  Elliott  Hollis  (mar- 
ried Louise  Grote),  and  Harry  Ryan  Hollis. 

Ludie  W.  Ryan  and  Elizabeth  Hollis  had  these  : Ludie  Adou- 
phus  Ryan,  James  Hollis  Ryan  (married  Isabel  Duskin),  and  Wil- 
liam Edward  Ryan  (married  Miriam  Payne). 

James  Augustus  Stokes  (1843-1923),  married  first  Cornelia 
Williams  and  had  James  Willis  Stokes  (married  Annie  Lelia 
Avery)  ; he  married  second  (1873)  Elizabeth  Ann  Hollis  (1851- 
1925)  and  had  : Margaret  Carolyn  (married  George  Tolman  Wil- 
liams) ; Annie  Electra : John  Calvin  Stokes  (married  Alberta 
Hutt)  ; Robert  Harvey  Stokes  (married  Lallie  Ethel  Caldwell)  ; 
Cora  Dean  (married  John  Rufus  Whitfield)  ; Tyree  Josephus 
Stokes  (married  Bertha  Crawford)  ; Edward  Fletcher  Stokes  (mar- 
ried Maggie  Carlee  Caldwell)  ; Mary  Frances  (married  George 
Walter  Whitfield),  and  Mable  Claire  (married  Clarence  Eugene 
Ryan). 

James  Harvey  Hollis  (1844-1911)  and  Martha  Ann  Hendrix 
(1855-1900)  of  Butler,  Choctaw  C’ount\,  Alabama,  had  these:  Tyree 
Josephus  Hollis  (Alma  Chrietzburg)  ; Jessie  Vernon  (married 
Brooks  Emmons,  of  Brewton)  ; Clyde  Fontaine  Hollis,  Cullom- 
burg;  James  Harvey  Glenn  Hollis,  and  Mattie  Hollis  (died  young). 
Descendants  of  Thomas  Lavender  and  Mariah  Davis  will  be  given 
next  week.  Don’t  forget  to  write  me  if  you  find  errors  in  my 
articles  or  can  add  to  them. — -F.  S.  Mosley,  Hale  County  News,  Mound- 
ville,  May  25,  1944.  See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Alabama , 
5911,  p.  70-71. 

LAWLER,  JACOB — Appeared  before  the  Circuit  Court  of 
Walker  County,  Ala.,  November  1837,  applying  for  a pension  but 
was  rejected  because  he  did  not  serve  six  months  in  a regularly 
organized  corps.  He  was  born  in  the  State  of  North  Carolina, 
had  no  record  of  his  age,  was  living  in  Burke  County,  N.  C5.,  when 
he  volunteered  under  Capt.  Francis  McKorkle,  Colonel  McDowell ; 
marched  to  Catawba  River;  later  was  drafted,  but  hired  a man  to 
take  his  place;  again  volunteered  in  Burke  County,  N.  C.,  under 
Captain  Davidson,  Colonel  McDowell.  He  remembers  a Colonel 
Daniel  Mclsik  and  Col.  George  Davidson.  He  did  not  receive  a 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


599 


discharge  but  was  dismissed  each  time.  This  record  is  in  the 
National  Archives,  Washington,  D.  C. — Information  from  Mrs. 
Maud  May  Brown  Williams,  Quitman,  Miss. 

LEE,  CATO  (1757-1832)  served  as  private  in  the  North  Caro- 
lina militia.  He  was  born  in  Virginia;  died  at  Snow  Hill,  Ala. — 
D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  vol.  160,  p.  254. 

LEFTWICH.  JABEZ — a Revolutionary  soldier,  died  in  this 
vicinity  on  the  21st  inst.,  in  his  90th  year.  He  was  an  honest  man, 
a good  citizen  and  much  esteemed  by  all  who  knew  him.  He  was 
a native  of  Virginia,  and  formerly  represented  Madison  County 
in  the  Legislature.  His  funeral  will  be  preached  at  the  Cumber- 
land Church  at  this  place  on  next  Sabbath  by  the  Rev.  B.  C.  Chap- 
man.— Southern  Advocate , Huntsville,  June  27,  1865. 

LEVERETT.  MARY  (GRIFFIN)  Widow  of  Thomas  Lev- 
erett  (1755-1834)  whose  service  was  as  a private  in  the  Georgia 
line,  Capt.  John  Clarke’s  Company,  Col.  Alexander’s  regiment.  He 
married  Mary  Griffin  in  1789  according  to  McCall’s  Roster  of 
Revolutionary  soldiers  in  Georgia,  page  199.  She  removed  to  Ala- 
bama and  the  Census  of  1850  of  Chambers  County  states  that  she 
was  born  in  1771  and  died  suddenly  of  asthma  in  February,  1850. 
Her  will  dated  August  25,  1848,  date  of  probate  not  shown,  states 
that  she  was  a widow  lately  the  wife  of  Thomas  Leverett  of  Troup 
County,  Ga.,  deceased.  In  it  she  mentions  the  following  children: 
Jeremiah;  Katherine  Tompkins,  deceased,  wife  of  Nicholas  Tomp- 
kins; Mariah  wife  of  John  H.  Walker;  Thomas,  Jr.;  Gideon;  Ma- 
tilda, wife  of  Thomas  Black;  Almeda,  wife  of  Charles  Bussey; 
Malita,  wife  of  Dredzil  E.  Race;  Abraham;  Mary  E.,  wife  of  Green 
M.  Carlisle;  and  a granddaughter,  Lucretia  Pace.  Bible  records 
of  Rev.  Charles  Bussey  show  that  his  wife,  Almeda  Leverett.  was 
born  January  22,  1806,  in  Lincoln  County,  Ga.,  died  November 
16,  1876,  place  not  given.  She  was  married  to  Charles  Bussey, 
July  1,  1822,  in  Putnam  County,  Ga.,  by  John  Robinson  (Putnam 
County  Marriages,  Vol.  P,  p.  36),  and  in  1843  they  were  living  in 
Tallapoosa  County,  Ala.,  but  were  in  Carroll  County,  Miss.,  by 
the  end  of  1844.  The  tombstone  of  Malita,  in  the  Baptist  Church- 
yard, Ashland,  Ala.,  recites:  Malita  wife  of  Rev.  Dreadzil  E.  Pace 
Born  May  12,  1808y  Died  Dec.  30,  1883.  The  tombstone  of  Rev. 
Gideon  Leverett,  in  the  cemetery  at  Milltown,  Chambers  County, 
Ala.,  records  his  birth  as  Tulv  14,  1799  and  his  death  as  October 


600 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


27,  1864.  'Abraham  Leverett  lived  in  that  part  of  Talladega  Coun- 
ty which  later  became  Clay  County.  There  are  references  to  him 
in  the  early  records  of  Talladega  County  and  the  Coosa  River 
Baptist  Association. 

LINDSEY  , DAVID — Shelby  County  Census  of  1820  gives 
one  male  and  one  female  over  twenty-one;  eight  slaves.  The 
Census  of  1830  gives  one  male  and  one  female  between  eighty  and 
ninety. — See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Alabama,  1911,  p.  71. 

LIPSCOMB,  JOEL — Native  of  Culpeper  County,  Va.,  and  a 
Revolutionary  soldier,  moved  to  South  Carolina  prior  to  the  War, 
afterwards  migrated  to  Mississippi  Territory  and  settled  on  the 
Tombigbee  River  in  Washington  County,  now  Alabama.  He  and 
his  wife,  Elizabeth  (Chiles)  Lipscomb,  born  April  20,  1760,  mar- 
ried August  26.  1779,  died  November  15,  1847,  are  both  buried  in 
Old  Erie  churchyard,  four  miles  from  Demopolis.  His  will  is 
recorded  in  Greene  County  and  bears  the  date  of  April  30,  1834. 
In  it  he  mentions  his  wife,  Betsey,  sons  Nathan,  Abner  S.,  'William 
C.,  Elihu,  Dabney  and  Joel,  and  daughters  Pollev  Eddins,  Sally 
Barrett,  deceased,  and  Betsey  Weir.  The  executors  named  in  the 
will  are  Nathan  Lipscomb  and  William  Chiles  Lipscomb.  Its 
execution  was  witnessed  by  William  Kennedy,  Joseph  Anderson 
and  Robert  Parker. — Owen’s  History  of  Alabama  and  Dietionary  of 
Alabama  Biography , Vol.  4,  p.  1052  and  biographical  file. 

LITTLETON,  CHARLES,  served  as  a private  under  Captain 
Jordan,  Col.  John  Gile,  and  Brigadier  General  Pickens  in  the  South 
Carolina  troops.  His  widow  received  a pension.  He  was  born  in 
Virginia;  died,  1848,  in  Alabama. — D.A^R.  Lineage  Book,  vol.  166 
page  46. 

LIVINGSTON,  SAMUEL — Born  in  1757,  in  King  and  Queen 
County,  Va.  While  residing  in  North  Carolina,  he  enlisted  No- 
vember 1,  1776,  served  two  months  in  Capt.  Isaac  Bledsoe’s  Com- 
pany, Col.  Christy’s.  Regiment.  He  enlisted  again  on  March  15, 
1778,  and  served  in  Capt.  Abram  Bledsoe’s  Company,  Col.  Shelby’s 
Regiment,  until  the  last  of  April,  1778.  He  served  from  August  25, 
1781  until  November  25,  of  the  same  year  under  Capt.  John  Mont- 
gomery. He  had  lived  in  North  Carolina  and  Tennessee  before 
removing  to  Madison  County,  Ala.,  and  later  to  Morgan  County. 
On  September  7,  1781,  in  Washington  County,  Va.,  he  married 


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601 


Phebe who  also  drew  a pension  after  his  death  October 

6,  1834.  Their  children  were:  James;  Jesse;  Anthony;  Samuel; 
William;  Joseph;  Henry;  Susan,  wife  of  James  King;  and  Cather- 
ine, wife  of  Ichabod  Hensley. — Jones  and  Gandrud,  Alabama  Records , 
vol.  49,  pp.  16-18.  See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Alabama,  1911. 
p.  72. 

LOFTON,  THOMAS — Born  May  18,  1761,  in  Mecklenburg 
County,  N.  C.,  son  of  Samuel  Lofton,  who  died  in  Kentucky.  He 
volunteered  and  served  in  the  Revolutionary  War  as  follows  : in 
1775  for  two  months  in  Capt.  James  Duff’s  Company,  Col.  Thomas 
Neel’s  South  Carolina  Regiment  for  about  fifteen  months  begin- 
ning April  1.  1776,  in  Capt.  James  Duff’s  Company.  Col.  Thomas 
Sumter’s  South  Carolina  Regiment ; for  six  months  from  the  fali 
of  1778,  in  Capt.  William  McKenzie’s  Company,  Col.  Hugh  Brev- 
ard’s North  Carolina  Regiment;  from  May,  1780  until  October  1, 
1780,  as  first  lieutenant  under  Capt.  Joseph  Howe  and  Capt.  John 
Barber,  in  Col.  Andrew  Neel’s  and  Col.  William  Hill's  North  Caro- 
lina Regiments;  on  October  1,  1780,  he  was  elected  captain  of 
“Barber’s  Old  Company”,  serving  until  March,  1781,  in  Col.  Wil- 
liam Graham’s  and  Col.  Francis  Locke’s  North  Carolina  Regi- 
ments, participating  in  the  battles  of  Rocky  Mount.  Hanging 
Rock,  King’s  Mountain,  Cowan’s  Ford  and  Guilford  Court  House; 
from  the  fall  of  1781  until  the  spring  of  1782,  served  as  captain 
with  North  Carolina  Troops  under  General  Rutherford.  He  lived 
in  Lincoln  County,  N.  C..  when  he  enlisted;  moved  to  Abbeville 
District,  S.  C.,  in  1783 ; moved  to  Pendleton  District,  S.  C.,  in 
1785 ; moved  to  Greene  County,  Ala.,  in  1824,  and  to  Pickens 
County,  Ala.,  in  1828,  having  died  there  May  28,  1840.  He  was 
survived  by  two  children,  names  not  given,  and  his  administrator 
was  one  Andrew  Lofton.  His  brother,  Andrew  Lofton,  was  killed 
at  the  Battle  of  Cowpens,  and  his  sister,  Margaret  McDow,  was 
living  in  Greene  County,  Ala.,  in  1832.  — Jones  and  Gandrud, 
Alabama  Records,  vol.  72,  Pickens  County,  pp.  82-84.  See  also  Revo- 
lutionary Soldiers  in  Alabama,  1911,  pp.  72-73. 

LOVE,  HEZEKIAH — Aged  eighty  years  on  10  October, 
1832,  applied  for  a pension,  his  application  being  set  out  in  full 
on  page  131  et  seq.  He  served  in  South  Carolina,  having  enlisted 
in  March,  1776. — White’s  The  King’s  Mountain  Men,  p.  131. 


602 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


His  widow,  Nancy  Love,  removed  to  Alabama,  as  her  pension 
was  transferred  to  Huntsville,  Alabama,  in  1841. — Ibid,  p.  251. 

LYNN,  JAMES — Born  October  1,  1764,  in  Mecklenburg 
County,  N.  C‘.  He  enlisted  as  a volunteer  November  15,  1779, 
with  Captain  Summer  and  General  Butler,  served  three  months. 
On  March  1,  1780,  he  again  volunteered  under  Captain  Simmerson 
and  Major  Harris,  marched  to  Charleston,  was  taken  a prisoner, 
and  paroled  in  June.  He.  enlisted  again  in  August,  1780,  and  was 
with  Captain  Foster,  Colonel  Davy,  and  General  Sumpter,  at  the 
Battle  of  Hanging  Rock.  He  was  dismissed  from  service.  He 
resided  in  Mecklenburg  County,  N.  C.,  removed  to  Pendleton, 
S.  C’.,  then  to  Buncombe  County,  N.  C.,  later  to  Henderson  County, 
Ky.,  removed  to  Maury  County,  Tenn.,  came  to  Madison  County, 
Ala.,  and  later  to  Morgan.  Among  his  children  were  a son,  Wil- 
liam, and  a daughter  who  mraried  Isaac  Holmes.  — Jones  and 
Gandrud,  Alabama  Records,  vol.  49,  pp.  19-20.  See  also  Revolutionary 
Soldiers  of  Alabama , pp.  73-74. 

Me  BEE,  SILAS.  Mas  born  November  24,  1765,  and  there- 
fore was  not  quite  fifteen  when  fighting  at  King's  Mountain  under 
Colonel  Williams.  He  lived  at  Thicketty  Ford,  South  Carolina, 
and  was  there  at  the  time  of  the  capture  of  Captain  Moore  and 
his  men.  He  was  a member  of  the  first  legislature  of  Alabama 
('Marion  County)  but  in  1842  was  living  in  Pontotoc  county,  Mis- 
sissippi, where  he  died  three  years  later.  Draper  had  several  in- 
terviews with  him. — White  s King's  Mountain  Men , page  202. 

McBEE,  SILAS  (1765-1845)  was  pensioned,  1831,  for  service 
as  a private,  1781,  at  Kings  Mountain  under  Captains  Thompson 
and  Padue,  Colonels  Brandon  and  Pickens.  He  was  born  in  South 
Carolina;  died  in  Pontotoc  County,  Miss. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  vol. 
1 16,  page  132. 

McCAMPBELL,  SOLOMON.  Was  present  at  the  Battle  of 
King’s  Mountain,  and  was  put  on  the  pension  list  in  1833.  He 
removed  to  Mobile,  Alabama. — White’s  The  King's  Mountain  Men, 
t).  252. 

McCARTY,  MICHAEL— Jefferson  County  Census  of  1850 
states  that  he  died  in  March  of  that  year,  aged  one  hundred  and 
six,  sex  male,  widowed,  and  born  in  Virginia.  Jefferson  County 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


603 


Census  of  1840  lists  him  as  ag£d  ninety. — See  also  Revolutionary  Sol- 
diers in  Alabama,  1911,  p.  74.  See  also  S.  C.  Stub  Indents,  Y.Z. 

McCORMICK,  JOSEPH — Applied  for  revolutionary  pension 
while  living  in  Marion  County,  Tenn.,  with  his  father.  He  enlisted 
under  Col.  Benjamin  Few  and  Capt.  James  Bowen.  He  enlisted 
again  under  Col,  Elijah  Clarke  and  was  in  the  battle  of  King’s 
Mountain.  He  moved  from  Tennessee  to  Jackson  County,  Ala., 
by  1835,  to  reside  with  his  son,  Joseph  R.  McCormick,  who  had  a 
wife  and  two  children.  The  soldier  had  another  son  whose  name 
is  not  given  in  his  application. — Armstrong,  Some  Tennessee  heroes  of 
the  Revolution,  vol  3. 

McCORMICK,  JOSEPH — Was  in  the  Battle  of  King’s  Moun- 
tain. Removed  to  Jackson,  Alabama,  1834. — White’s  King  Mountain 
Men.  p.  252.  See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Alabama,  1911, 
p.  75. 

McCRORY,  JAMES  (1750-1840)  served  as  a volunteer  at  the 
battles  of  Brandywine,  Germantown,  and  Guilford  Courthouse. 
He  was  born  in  Ireland ; died  in  Greene  County,  Alabama. — 
D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  Vol  76,  page  363. 

McCUTCHEON,  JOHN.  Grave  marked  in  Long  Hollow, 
Jackson  County,  Ala.,  October  22,  1931,  by  Tidence  Lane  Chapter, 
D.A.R.,  Scottsboro,  Ala.  — Kennemer’s  History  of  Jackson  County, 
page  195. 

McCUTCHEON,  JOHN  (1755-1835)  served  as  private  in 
Capt.  John  Caldwell’s  company,  Col.  William  Thompson’s  regi- 
ment, South  Carolina  Line.  He  was  born  in  South  Carolina,  died 
in  Jackson  County,  Alabama. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  Vol.  128,  page 
48. 

McDEARMAN,  THOMAS — Born  June  12,  1752,  in  Anson 
County,  N.  C.  He  was  drafted  at  the  commencement  of  the  Revo- 
lutionary War  for  a period  of  three  months,  serving  under  Cap- 
tain Council.  Not  long  after  he  was  again  called  into  service  and 
was  for  three  months  under  Captain  Goodbolt,  Colonel  William 
Davis.  His  third  term  of  service  was  under  Captain  Foxworth, 
whose  detachment  joined  Colonel  Baxter  and  his  forces  while  a 
fourth  term,  which  lasted  for  forty  days,  was  under  Captain 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


604 


Hudson  and  Colonel  Baxter.  After,  receiving  his  discharge  from 
this  detachment  he  volunteered  under  Capt.  Lewis  Harroll  and 
Col.  Hugh  Kllis.  When  he  entered  the  service  lie  resided  near 
the  Cheraw  Hills  in  South  Carolina.  After  the  War  he  resided  in 
Tennessee,  Mississippi  and  Alabama.  He  was  residing  in  Pickens 
County.  Ala.,  December  11,  1833,  and  in  Lauderdale  County,  Miss., 
Tulv  12,  1839. — Jones  and  Gandrud,  Alabama  Records , vol.  72,  Pickens 
County , pp.  89-90.  See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Alabama,  1911, 
p.  78. 


McDOWKLL,  JOHN — Born  August  10,  1758.  He  made  ap- 
plication for  a pension  while  a resident  of  Morgan  County,  Ala. 
Stated  that  he  entered  the  service  under  General  Smallwood.  Col- 
onel Guest,  Capt.  William  Woodall,  in  1775,  served  for  three 
months  in  Maryland,  and  was  in  the  battle  of  Germantown.  He 
then  removed  to  North  Carolina,  enlisting  under  Capt.  James  Fair. 
Next  he  volunteered  in  Richmond  County,  N.  C.,  under  Capt. 
Thomas  Jennings,  and  served  for  eight  months.  He  was  a prison- 
er of  war,  Wilmington  to  Charleston,  and  was  paroled.  On  May 
27,  1790,  in  Marlborough  District,  S.  C.,  he  married  Sarah  Thomas, 
born  June  15,  1772,  daughter  of  Philemon  Thomas.  In  March 
1855,  she  was  drawing  a pension,  aged  eighty-three,  and  living  in 
Lawrence  County.  Ala.  He  died  in  this  county,  January  1,  1841. 
Their  children  were:  Elizabeth,  born  January  7,  1791;  William 
Thomas,  born  April  26,  1792,  died  April  11,  1814;  Nancy,  born 
January  13,  1794;  Tristam,  born  February  1,  1796;  Mary,  born 
March  12,  1798;  Alexander  Thomas,  born  February  12,  1800; 
Clarissa,  born  June  23,  1802;  Miles  McKinnis,  born  June  26,  1804; 
Harriet,  born  November  25,  1806;  John  Washington,  born  Feb- 
ruary- 12,  1808;  Charlotte,  born  May  1,  1810,  died  March  29,  1831; 
James  Pressley,  born  May-  12,  1812. — (ones  and  Gandrud,  Alabama 
Records,  vol.  49,  Morgan  County,  pp.  23-29.  See  also  Revolutionary 
Soldiers  in  Alabama,  1911,  p.  79. 

McGAUGHEY,  SAMUEL,  was  born  in  York  County,  Penn- 
sylvania, 1763,  and  died  in  Lawrence  County,  Alabama,  1842.  He 
served  1778-91,  being  .also  at  Eutaw,  Tiger  River,  Pacolet  River, 
on  scout  dutv.  Widow  applied  for  pension  in  1842.-  White’s  Kings’ 
Mountain  Men,  page  241. 

McGAUGHEY,  SAMUEL  (1763-1841)  received  a pension  for 
service  as  private,  lieutenant  and  captain  in  the  North  Carolina 


■ WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


605 


troops.  He  was  born  in  Pennsylvania;  died  in  Lawrence  County. 
Ala ,—D.A.R.  Lineage  Book , vol.  163,  page  115. 

McGEE,  DAVID — Died  at  his  residence  in  this  county,  on 
Friday  the  7th.inst.,  aged  94  years  and  15,  days.  He  served  in  the 
latter  part  of  the  Revolutionary  War,  and  was  one  of  the  early 
settlers  in  Tennessee,  whence  he  removed  to  this  county  in  1817. 
and  has  resided  here  ever  since.  Thus  rapidly  is  passing  away  that 
noble  band  of  patriots,  who  achieved  our  independence  against 
such  fearful  odds,  and  amid  such  dreadful  privations.  The  widow 
whom  he  leaves  behind  to  mourn  his  death  was  his  sixth  wife.  He 
lies  buried  by  the  side  of  three  of  his  wives.  Peace  be  to  his  ashes. 
Communicated. — 7'uscaloosa  Monitor , August  27,  1857. 

McGUIRE,  ELIJAH — was  born  January  19,  1757,  in  Cum- 
berland County,  Virginia.  The  names  of  his  parents  are  not 
shown.  Elijah  McGuire  enlisted  in  South  Carolina  about  August 
17,  1777,  served  as  orderly  sergeant  in  Captains  Uriah  Goodwin's 
and  John  Buchanan’s  companies  in  Colonel  William  Thompson’s 
Third  South  Carolina  Regiment  until  he  (Elijah  McGuire)  was 
taken  prisoner  by  the  British  when  they  captured  Charleston. 
South  Carolina.  Having  made  his  escape,  Elijah  McGuire  enlisted 
June  4,  1781,  and  served  ten  months  as  sergeant  in  Captain  Philip 
Waters’  Troop  of  South  Carolina  Light  Dragoons  which  was 
commanded  by  Lieutenant  Colonel  John  Thomas.  Elijah  Mc- 
Guire married  in  1784  or  1785  Everet  whose  maiden  name  is  not 
shown.  He  was  allowed  pension  on  his  application  executed 
October  12,  1827,  at  which  time  he  was  living  in  Tuskaloosa  Coun- 
ty Alabama.  Elijah  McGuire  died  December  31,  1843,  in  Tuska- 
loosa County,  Alabama.  Everet  McGuire  the  widow  of  Elijah, 
died  July  17,  1848,  aged  about  eighty-seven  years.  She  died  in 
Tuskaloosa  County  and  both  she  and  Elijah  were  buried  at  John 
Thomas’  on  Byler’s  road  sixteen  miles  north  of  Tuskaloosa.  Elijah 
and  Everet  McGuire  had  the  following  children  : John  McGuire, 
aged  about  seventy  in  1856  and  then  a resident  of  Tuskaloosa 
County,  Alabama.  Elijah  McGuire,  Jr.,  aged  about  sixty-seven 
in  1856  and  then  a resident  of  Tuskaloosa  County,  Alabama.  Amos 
McGuire,  born  about  1791,  lived  in  Chickasaw  County,  Mississippi, 
survived  his  mother  but  was  dead  in  February,  1856.  Merry  Mc- 
Guire, aged  about  sixty-two  in  1856  and  then  a resident  of  Tuska- 
loosa County,  Alabama.  Williams  McGuire,  aged  about  fifty-nine 
in  1856  and  then  a resident  of  Choctaw  County,  Mississippi. 


606 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Polly,  aged  about  fifty-six  in  1856  and  then  a resident  of 
Payette  County,  .Alabama,  and  was  the  wife  of  John  Spears.  Moses 
McGuire,  aged  about  fifty-three  in  1856  and  then  a resident  of 
Tuskaloosa  County,  Alabama.  Rhoda  Whatley,  aged  about  fifty 
in  1856  and  then  a resident  of  Tuskaloosa  County,  Alabama.  'The 
soldier’s  son,  Moses  McGuire,  was  Judge  of  Probate  Court  in 
Tuskaloosa  County,  Alabama,  in  1856.  On  February  9,  1856,  an 
application  was  made  for  the  arrears  of  pension  due  on  account 
of  the  service  of  Elijah  McGuire  in  the  Revolutionary  War.  The 
pension  was  allowed  for  the  benefit  of  the  then  surviving  children 
(noted  above)  of  the  soldier. — Veterans  Pensions  Dept.,  Washington 
D.  C. 

McORCLE,  JAMES— Claiborne,  Ala.,  in  1825.  Listed  as 
“Hero  of  ’76”  to  be  invited  to  LaFayette  Celebration  April  1825. — 
tames  Dellet  Papers. 

McWHORTER,  REV.  GEORGE  G.,  of  the  Presbytery  of 
Georgia,  became  a member  of  the  Presbytery  of  Alabama,  April  2d, 
1829.  Of  this  father  I have  no  recollection.  He  was  soon  called 
from  his  new  field  of  labor.  Under  date  of  Nov.  19th,  1829,  I find 
the  following  minute:  “It  is  our  painful  duty  to  record  the  death 
of  our  father  and  fellow  laborer,  the  Rev.  George  G.  McWhorter. 
He  was  a patriot  and  soldier  in  the  Revolutionary  War.  Having- 
been  permitted  to  labor  in  the  vineyard,  he  has  ceased  from  his 
labors,  and  entered,  as  we  trust,  into  the  enjoyment  of  the  right- 
eous. This  dispensation  we  desire  to  improve  to  our  edification 
and  usefulness.” — Nall’s  Dead  of  the  Synod  of  Alabama,  1851,  page  10. 

Sacred  to  the  memory  of 
Rev.  Geo.  Grey  McWhorter 
He  was  a minister  of  the 
Gospel  of  the  Presbyterian 
order  forty  years 

Blessed  are  the  dead  who  died  in  the  Lord 
Let  angels  trim  their  lamps  and  watch 
his  sleeping  clay  till  the  last 
trumpet  bid  him  rise  to  bright  celestial 
day. 

Also 

Mrs.  Eliza  McWhorter 
Born  Feb.  4,  1769 
Died  Feb.  3,  1810 

— Inscriptions  from  Oakwood  Cemetery,  Montgomery,  Alabama. 


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607 


MAHAN,  JOHN — Inscription  on  tombstone  in  Mahan-Smith 
Cemetery  in  Bibb  County: 

Maj.  John  Mahan,  Esq. 

Died  Apr.  27,  1820 
age  70  years 

Soldier  in  the  Revolution 
Mary  Scott 

wife  of  Maj.  John  Mahan 
In  Memory  of 
Col.  James  Mahan 
Died  May  29,  1849 
Son  of  John  and  Mary  Mahan 

See  also  Armes’  The  Story  of  Coal  and  Iron  in  Alabama , p.  24.  Perry 
Will  Book  A,  page  7,  August  4,  1820,  recorded  26  June  1823 — Will  of 
Mary  Scott  Mahan. 

MAJORS,  BENJAMIN— He  was  born  in  1761  in  Pendleton 
District,  S.  C.,  and  died  August  11.  1835.  He  applied  for  a pension 
in  September  1833,  and  stated  that  he  had  volunteered  in  Feb- 
ruary 1779,  as  private  in  Captain  William  Lang’s  Company,  Colonel 
Robert  Goodwin’s  South  Carolina  Regiment  and  served  until  some- 
time in  July.  He  enlisted  later  in  1779,  served  five  months  as 
private  under  Colonel  Robert  Goodwin  and  was  discharged  in  the 
Spring  of  1780.  Subsequently  he  served  1 month  as  Guard  under 
Captain  John  Chestnut  and  drove  an  ammunition  wagon  from 
Camden,  S.  C.  to  “Fort  Charlotte  or  Mecklenburg  in  North  Caro- 
lina.” At  enlistment  he  resided  in  Kershaw  County.  S.  C.,  where 
he  continued  to  reside  for  some  time.  Certificate  No.  27580  was 
issued  August  28,  1834  to  Benjamin  Majors,  rate  $30  per  annum, 
act  of  June  7,  1832,  Alabama  Agency.  From  records  of  The  Comp- 
troller General,  General  Accounting  Office,  Washington,  D.  C., 
the  records  indicate  that  Benjamin  Majors,  Certificate  No.  27580, 
Alabama  Agency,  died  on  August  11,  1835.  The  papers  covering 
payment  of  pension  due  the  deceased  pensioner  have  not  been 
located,  but  the  papers  relating  to  the  period  March  4,  1831  to 
September  4,  1834,  which  was  made  to  him  on  December  8,  1834, 
at  the  Mobile  Agency,  show  that  on  December  8,  1834,  he  certified 
that  he  had  been  living  in  Dallas  County,  Alabama,  for  eight  years, 
and  that  previously  he  had  lived  in  South  Carolina. — Jones  and 
Gandrud,  Alabama  Records , vol.  77,  page  29. 


608 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


MALLORY,  JOHN  (1759-1844)  enlisted  1781,  and  served  as 
corporal  in  Captain  Smith’s  company.  Colonel  Gaskin’s  regiment, 
Virginia  troops.  He  was  born  in  Orange  County,  Ya. ; died  in 
Benton  County,  Ala. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  Vol.  161,  p-  284. 

MALONE,  CORNELIUS — Born  January  17,  1759,  in  Cashaw 
County,  S.  C.  He  enlisted  September  20,  1780,  under  Capt. 

Douglas  Starkes  and  Lt.  James  Canby,  and  continued  for  about 
nineteen  or  twenty  months,  in  the  South  Carolina  militia.  He  also 
names  Col.  John  Marshall,  Major  Ballard,  Capt.  John  Watts  and 
Capt.  William  Nettles  as  officers  under  whom  he  served.  He 
applied  for  a pension  in  Morgan  County,  Ala.,  August  20,  1832. 
Jones  and  Gandrud — Alabama  Records,  vol.  49,  Morgan  County,  pp. 
20-21.  See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Alabama,  1911,  p.  81. 

MANASCO,  JEREMIAH,  a native  of  Wales,  who  came  to 
Virginia  during  Colonial  times  ; was  a Captain  in  the  Revolutionary 
Army,  subsequently  lived  in  North  and  South  Carolina  and  in 
Alabama,  and  has  many  descendants  in  Walker  County,  Alabama. 
— Dombhart's  History  of  Walker  County,  Alabama,  pages  276-8. 

MANGUM,  JOHN — Born  January  19,  1763,  in  Mecklenburg 
County,  Ya.  He  served  as  a private  in  the  South  Carolina  Troops 
fluring  the  Revolutionarv  War  beginning  about  December,  1778, 
or  January,  1779,  for  three  months  under  Captains  Joseph  Hayes 
and  Moore,  Col.  James  Williams’  Regiment;  for  two  months  from 
early  in  1780  under  Capt.  John  Griffin  and  Colonel  McRory  ; for 
two  months  in  the  spring  of  1781  in  Capt.  David  Harris’  Company, 
Col.  Elijah  Clarke’s  Regiment,  at  the  Siege  of  Augusta;  for  about 
four  months  from  July  1,  1781,  under  Capt.  Laughlin  Leonard, 
Col.  Joseph  Hayes’  Regiment,  during  which  he  was  in  the  Battle 
of  Edge  Hill,  was  wounded  in  the  head  and  taken  a prisoner;  for 
six  months  from  December,  1781,  in  Capt.  Joseph  Towle’s  Com- 
pany; and  for  one  month  from  July  1,  1782,  in  Capt.  William  Irby’s 
Company  under  Alajor  Ford.  When  he  enlisted  he  lived  in  New- 
berry District,  S.  C.,  removed  to  Warren  County,  Ohio,  in  1805, 
where  he  resided  until  1815,  from  thence  moved  to  Saint  Clair 
County,  111.,  and  in  1823  or  1824  removed  to  Pickens  County,  Ala., 
and  continued  to  reside  there.  Pie  was  survived  by  his  widow, 
Rebecca  Mangum. — Jones  and  Gandrud,  Alabama  Records,  vol.  72, 
Pickens  County,  pp.  91  -.92.  See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Ala- 
bama, 1911,  p.  82. 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


609 


MARTIN,  ANDREW — Departed  this  life,  at  his  residence, 
in  this  county,  on  the  5th  of  September,  inst.,  Mr.  Andrew  Martin, 
who  had  attained  the  astonishing  age  of  117  years  on  the  4th  day 
of  July  last.  He  was  born  in  the  State  of  Maryland — settled  in 
the  State  of  North  Carolina,  about  the  commencement  of  our 
infant  struggle  for  Independence,  in  which  he  early  embarked — 
battling  for  his  country  as  a soldier,  from  its  beginning  to  its 
glorious  termination ; — from  thence  he  emigrated  to  this  State 
about  thirty  years  since,  where  he  has  continued  to  live  a quiet, 
unobstrusive  and  retired  life,  up  to  its  close,  with  probably  as  few 
enemies  as  any  man  that  ever  lived.  He  was  emphatically  an 
honest  and  a good  man,  and  though  attached  to  no  church,  was  a 
Christian.  Thus  he  died,  as  he  had  lived — full  of  years  and  the  kind 
feelings  of  all  who  knew  him. — Huntsville  Democrat , September  11, 
1844. 

MARTIN,  BEN,  (1757-1852),  received  money  for  his  services 
in  the  North  Carolina  troops.  He  was  born  in  Hyde  County,  N.  C. ; 
died  in  Butler  County,  Alabama. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  Vol.  108, 
page  22. 

MASSENGALE,  SOLOMON — Name  appears  on  Huntsville 
Monument,  erected  by  Twickenham  Town  Chapter,  D.A.R. 

MAXWELL,  AGNESS — Widow  of  a Revolutionary  soldier, 
John  Maxwell,  is  buried  in  the  old  Maxwell  family  cemetery  about 
four  miles  west  of  Alexander  City,  Tallapoosa  County,  Ala.  The 
following  are  inscriptions  from  the  graves : 

Sacred 

to  the  memory  of 
Agness  Maxwell 
who  was  born 
March  2nd  1770 
and  died 

December  1st  1851 
Sacred 

to  the  memory  of 
Allen  T.  Maxwell 
born 

November  29th  1822 
Died 


610 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


September  11th  1881 
aged  58  years  9 months 
and  12  days 
Sacred 

to  the  memory  of 
Cynthia  S.  Carreker 
who  was  born 
December  23.  1826 
and  was  married  to 
A.  T.  Maxwell 
November  23,  1842 
and  died 
July  29,  1850. 

Elizabeth  Walker 
Second  wife 
A.  T.  Maxwell 
Born 

November  10th  1828 
Died 

Jan.  30,  1890. 

— Information  from  Leon  A.  Nolen,  Birmingham,  Ala.  See  also 
D.A.R.  Lineage , No.  208150. 

MAYBERRY,  GEORGE — Born  October  1760,  in  New  Jersey, 
exact  date  and  place  not  shown  and  parents  not  mentioned.  This 
veteran  stated  that  he  had  the  following  service : while  living  in 
Bedford  County,  Virginia,  he  enlisted  in  the  fall  of  1779  and  served 
3 months  as  a Private  in  Captain  John  Cottrell’s  Company  of 
Cavalry,  to  guard  Tory  prisoners;  he  enlisted  in  August  or  Sep- 
tember 1781  and  served  6 months  in  Captains  David  Baird’s  and 
Cummins’  Companies,  and  was  at  the  siege  of  Yorktown.  Pension 
application  dated  November  2,  1832.  Pension  was  granted.  Cer- 
tificate No.  22748,  issued  December  18,  1833,  rate  $32.50  per  an- 
num, commenced  March  4,  1831  ; act  of  June  7,  1832,  Alabama 
Pension  Agency.  He  lived  in  Bedford  County,  Va. ; Hancock 
County,  Tenn. ; and  Perry  County,  Ala.  From  records  of  The 
Comptroller  General,  General  Accounting;  Office,  Washington,  D. 
C.,  concerning  George  Mayberry,  certificate  No.  22748,  Alabama 
Agency,  the  last  payment  of  pension  was  made  at  the  Pension 
Agency,  Mobile,  Ala.,  on  May  24,  1836,  to  Dunklin  Sullivan,  as 
attorney  for  the  pensioner.  On  May  17,  1836,  George  Mayberry 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


611 


certified  that  he  had  been  living  in  Perry  County,  Ala.,  for  sixteen 
years,  and  that  previously  he  had  lived  in  Bibb  County,  Ala.,  and 
in  Ray  (Rhea)  County,  Tenn. — Jones  and  Gandrud,  Alabama  Records, 
Volume  73,  page  86. 

MAYNOR,  CATHERINE— 80  years  old.  One  in  family.  No 
land — No  stock — Widow  of  Revolutionary  soldier — Very  old  and 
feeble  and  not  able  to  do  anything  in  the  way  of  making  a support. 
— -Returns  of  the  indigent  families  in  the  County  of  Russell,  taken 
for  the  use  of  the  Legislature  by  order  of  the  Provisional  Gov- 
ernor of  the  State.  Oct.  1865.  This  book  on  file  in  the  Ala.  State 
Dept,  of  Archives  and  History. 

MESSICK,  MRS.  NANCY  A.,  of  Kentopia.  Real  Daughter. — 
D.A.R.  Report , 1908-09,  p.  33. 

MILAN,  JOHN — Name  appears  on  Huntsville  Monument, 
erected  by  Twickenham  Town  Chapter,  D.A.R. 

MILLS,  MORGAN.  Married,  in  the  vicinity  of  Pleasant  Hill, 
in  this  county,  on  the  16th  ult.,  by  L.  P.  Ramsey,  Esq.,  Mr.  Morgan 
Mills  to  Miss  Sarah  McDaniel.  Mr.  Mills  is  one  of  the  surviving 
heroes  of  the  American  Revolution.  His  mental  as  well  as  his 
physical  powers  are  unusually  good  for  one  of  his  age. — Free  Press, 
Selma,  Jan.  2,  1836. 


MINTER,  MORGAN — The  Cherokee  Chapter  of  Selma  re- 
ported the  locating  of  the  grave  of  Mrs.  Mary  K.  Gardner  (Mrs. 
Jason  M.  Gardner),  daughter  of  MORGAN  MINTER,  a minute 
man  in  the  Revolution. — Birmingham  News,  October  30,  1932. 

MITCHELL,  FLUD  (1757-1839)  received  a pension  as  pri- 
vate under  Captains  Purvis,  Boykin,  and  Jones;  Colonels  Thomp- 
son and  Hammond,  South  Carolina  troops.  He  also  served  as  a 
spy  under  Pulaski.  He  was  born  in  Brunswick  County,  Va. ; died 
in  Limestone  County,  Ala. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book , Vol.  130,  page  269. 

MITCHELL,  ISAAC — Served  as  captain  in  Col.  James  Wil- 
liams’ regiment,  S.  C.  troops.  He  is  said  to  have  removed  to 
Alabama,  along  with  John  Pool  and  other  members  of  the  Mitchell 
and  Williams  families  about  1819,  settling  in  Shelby  County.  The 
Census  of  1820,  Shelby  County,  lists  him  as  having  one  free  white 


612 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


male  over  twenty-one,  five  males  under  twenty-one,  one  female 
over  twenty-one  and  one  female  under  twnty-one. — Information 
from  William  F.  Franke,  Birmingham,  Ala. 

MITCHELL.  STEPHEN  was  a sergeant  in  Capt.  George 
Lambert's  company.  14th  Virginia  regiment,  Col.  Charles  Lewis 
in  command.  He  was  born  in  Scotland ; died  in  Montgomery 
County,  Alabama. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  Vol.  117,  page  199. 

MITCHELL,  WILLIAM — Applied  for  a pension  while  living 
in  Morgan  County,  Ala.,  in  April,  1824,  aged  sixty-eight.  He 
stated  that  he  enlisted  in  1777  and  served  for  three  years  under 
Captain  Hawkins,  who  was  killed  at  the  Battle  of  Brandywine, 
and  Colonel  Lewis  of  the  Fourth  Virginia  Regiment.  He  was  in 
the  battles  of  Brandywine,  Germantown  and  Monmouth  and  was 
discharged  by  Captain  Overton.  His  wife  was  dead  and  his  chil- 
dren were  away  from  home. — Jones  and  Gandrud,  Alabama  Records , 
vol.  49,  Morgan  County , p.  22.  See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  of 
Alabama,  1911,  p.  85. 

MOODY,  FRANCIS — In  memory  of  FRANCIS  MOODY, 
a Revolutionary  Soldier,  and  of  his  wife,  Ann  Hester,  both  born 
in  Mecklinburg  County,  Virginia,  he  died  in  Tuscaloosa  County, 
Alabama.  Later  on  she  died  in  Fayette  County. — Greenwood  Ceme- 
tery, Tuscaloosa,  Ala. 

MOORE,  CHARLES— Capt.  CHARLES  MOORE,  father  of 
Gov.  Andrew  Barr)-  Moore,  Revolutionary  soldier,  buried  in  Perry 
County,  Ala. — Owen’s  History,  Vol.  4,  p.  1222. 

MOORE,  JOHN — Martha  Gaines  Moore,  the  daughter  of 
JOHN  MOORE  of  Louisa  Co.  Va.,  Oglethorpe  Co.,  Ga.,  and  who 
died  in  Madison  County,  Ala.  1817;  he  was  a Revolutionary  sol- 
dier.— Genealogy  of  the  Harris  and  Allied  Families,  by  Pauline  Myra 
Jones  and  Kathleen  Paul  Jones.  Pages  97-98. 

MOORE,  REV.  JOHN- — Born  January  1,  1757,  in  Northamp- 
ton County,  N.  C.,  and  died  April  28,  1854,  in  Limestone  County, 
Ala.,  a soldier  of  the  Revolution.  He  was  the  son  of  Mark  Moore, 
died  in  1794,  in  Warren  County,  N.  C.  and  Sarah  Mason,  and  the 
grandson  of  John  Moore,  who  died  in  Northampton  County,  N.  C., 
and  his  wife,  Tabitha  Pace.  Rev.  John  Moore  was  licensed  by 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


613 


John  Pope  in  1784,  and  ordained  by  Bishop  Asbury.  In  1807  he 
removed  to  Davidson  County,  Tenn.,  and  in  1818  to  Limestone 
County,  Ala.  He  married  Mrs.  Rebecca  Fletcher  Leslie,  daughter 
of  William  Fletcher,  of  Virginia.  Among  their  children  were  Dr. 
David  Moore,  born  1789,  in  Brunswick  County,  Va.,  died  in  1845 
in  Huntsville,  Ala.,  who  represented  Madison  County  in  the  legist 
lature  for  thirteen  times  and  was  speaker  in  1841  ; Dr.  Alfred 
Moore,  of  Huntsville,  surgeon  in  the  War  of  1812,  married  Eliza- 
beth Jones,  parents  of  Col.  Sydenham  Moore,  of  Eutaw,  Judge 
John  Edmund  Moore,  of  Florence,  Alfred  Moore,  of  Huntsville, 
and  Olivia  Moore,  Avife  of  Governor  Edward  A.  O’Neal,  of  Flor- 
ence.— Information  from  Mrs.  Daniel  L.  Killian,  Kendall,  Fla. 

MOORE,  OBADIAH — Born  in  Princess  Anne  County,  Va.. 
and  was  seventy-eight  years  of  age  in  1832.  He  stated  that  he 
enlisted  and  served  six  months  as  a private  and  draftsman  in 
Capt.  George  Faulkner’s  N.  C.  Company,  was  at  the  siege  of 
Charleston,  then  enlisted  and  served  about  ten  days  as  a private 
in  Capt.  William  Buck’s  N.  C.  Company.  He  was  allowed  a 
pension.  He  married  about  the  last  of  December.  1782,  or  the 
first  of  January.  1783,  Winney,  last  name  not  given.  In  1851,  she 
was  aged  ninety-five  and  was  living  in  Autauga  County  with 
Allen  Ray.  During  the  Revolutionary  war  Obadiah  Moore  lived 
in  Pitt  County.  N.  C.,  removed  to  Georgia  after  the  War.  resided 
there  for  about  thirty  years,  and  in  1832,  was  in  Autauga  County, 
Ala.  He  died  September  20,  1839 — Jones  and  Gandrud,  Alabama 
Records , Vol.  75,  Autauga  County , pp.  34-35.  See  also  Revolutionary 
Soldiers  in  Alabama , 1911,  PP-  85-86. 

MORDECAI,  ABRAM  M. — The  LaFayette  Tribune  of  the 
31st.,  August  says:  “Abram  M.  Mordecai,  generally  known  as  the 
'Old  Indian  Countryman,’  departed  this  life,  near  Dudleyville, 
Tallapoosa  county,  on  the  25th  inst.  He  was  born  we  believe,  in 
Pennsylvania,  and  in  early  life  he  resided,  at  various  times,  in  the 
cities  of  Philadelphia,  Norfolk  and  Charleston.  For  more  than 
fifty  years  he  lived  among  the  Creek  Indians,  in  Georgia  and 
Alabama,  and  had  many  romantic  adventures;  and  at  one  time 
was  Chief  of  the  ‘Buzzard  Roost’  town.  The  Creeks  always  called 
him  Miccogee,  or  the  Little  Chief.  He  married  among  the  Indians, 
and  has  descendants  in  Arkansas.  He  was  by  trade  a trunk 
maker. 


614 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


“Mr.  Mordecai,  was,  as  his  name  indicates,  a Jew  by  birth 
and  was  nearly  related  to  the  Cohens,  Levys  and  Mordecais  of 
Norfolk  and  Charleston.  Many  years  ago,  however,  he  adjured 
the  religion  of  his  fathers,  and  attached  himself  to  the  Methodist 
Church.  He  has  often  told  us,  that  he  was  converted  by  hearing 
preaching  across  a river,  while  out  cow  hunting.  We  knew  the 
old  man  nearly  fifteen  years  and  can  testify  to  his  hospitality  and 
harmlessness  of  character.  He  was  born  in  October  1755,  as 
nearly  as  our  recollection  of  the  entry  in  his  Bible  serves  us.” — 
Wetumpka,  State  Guard , Sept.  4,  1849. 

To  the  Memory  of 
ABRAHAM  MORDECAI 
First  permanent  settler 
in  Montgomery  County. 

Born  in  Penn.  1752; 

Died,  in  Dudleyville  about  1850. 

Soldier  in  Revolutionary 
and  Creek  Indian  Wars. 

Trader  and  authority 
on  pioneer  history. 


Erected  by  Tohopeka  Chapter,  D.  A.  R. 

July  4,  1933 

MORGAN,  JAMES — was  born  March  9,  1760,  near  James 
River,  Virginia.  While  a resident  of  Fairfield  County,  South 
Carolina,  he  enlisted  late  in  1776  and  served  three  months  as  pri- 
vate in  Captain  William  Rabb’s  and  Lieutenant  Proctor’s  Com- 
panies, Colonels  Henderson’s  and  Wallace’s  South  Carolina  Regi- 
ments. He  enlisted  in  1781  and  served  three,  months  as  private  in 
Captain  Rabb’s  Company,  Colonel  Henderson’s  South  Carolina 
Regiment ; was  in  the  battle  of  Eutaw  Springs  where  he  received 
three  wounds,  one  in  the  head,  one  just  above  the  ankle,  and  one 
in  the  groin.  He  enlisted  in  July,  1782,  and  served  three  months 
as  private  in  Captain  John  McCool’s  South  Carolina  Company.  He 
was  allowed  pension  on  his  application  executed  July  1,  1833, 
while  a resident  of  Perry  County,  Ala.  In  1842  he  was  living  in 
McNairy  County,  Tennessee,  with  his  children,  no  names  given. — 
Dept,  of  the  Interior,  Bureau  of  Pensions,  Washington,  D.  C. 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


615 


MORRIS,  ISAAC  enlisted  from  Hanover  Co.,  and  when  of 
age  removed  to  Louisa  County  where  he  was  drafted.  He  was 
made  sergeant  1779  under  Capt.  Benjamin  Timberlake  when  Ar- 
nold plundered  Richmond.  He  applied  and  received  a pension 
1832  in  Perry  County,  Alabama,  for  service  as  sergeant,  Virginia 
Militia.  He  was  born  1760  in  Hanover  County,  Va. — D.A.R.  Lineage 
Book,  Vol.  45,  p.  29. 

MORROW,  SAMUEL — This  tomb  covers  the  remains  of 
SAMUEL  MORROW,  born  A.  D.  1743,  died  March  8,  1835,  aged 
92  years.  The  deceased  was  a native  of  Ireland.  Pie  emigrated 
to  the  United  States  at  the  age  of  fifteen  years  and  landing  at 
Charleston,  South  Carolina,  joined  the  army  of  the  Union  in  -the 
struggle  for  independence.  He  was  at  the  siege  of  Charleston  and 
Savannah  and  served  his  country  faithfully  throughout  the  War 
of  the  Revolution.  At  the  close  of  the  War,  he  emigrated  to 
Kentucky  and  was  among  the  first  settlers  of  that  State  where  he 
lived  for  many  years  a blessing  to  his  family,  beloved  by  all  who 
knew  him.  The  institutions  of  this  country  are  his  monuments. — 
Greenwood  Cemetery,  Tuscaloosa,  Ala. 

MOULTON,  MICHAEL — Departed  this  life  on  Sunday  the 
31st  ult.,  at  his  residence  in  Meridianville  in  this  county,  Col. 
Michael  Moulton  in  the  forty-ninth  year  of  his  age.  After  a 
tedious  illness  he  was  fondly  indulging  the  flattering  hope  of  re- 
turning health,  when  he  was  suddenly  called  from  the  stage  of 
mortal  existence.  Col.  Moulton  was  born  in  the  county  of  Duplin, 
N.  C. — he  represented  a county  in  that  State  in  the  Legislature 
several  years.  He  afterwards  removed  and  became  a citizen  of 
Tennessee.  At  the  commencement  of  the  great  war  with  Great 
Britain,  he  flew  with  alacrity  to  the  standard  of  his  country;  and 
continued  his  unremitting  exertions  in  defence  of  our  right,  until 
the  final  and  glorious  conclusion  of  the  struggle.  He  accompanied 
Gen.  Jackson  in  the  1st  descent  of  the  Mississippi,  as  captain  of 
a troop  of  cavalry  from  Tennessee;  and  also  his  expedition  against 
the  Southern  Indians.  Afterwards,  having  been  promoted  to  the 
command  of  a regiment  of  militia,  he  descended  the  river  a second 
time  under  command  of  Gen.  Carrol,,  and  contributed  by  his  ser- 
vices to  “foil  the  last  demonstration”  of  our  enemy  at  New  Or- 
leans. Col.  M.  has  left  a wife  and  only  daughter  to  lament  his 
loss ; they  will  find  their  best  consolation  in  the  sympathies  of 
numerous  acquaintances  and  friends,  whose  unfeigned  sorrow  will 


616 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


testify  his  worth.  His  remains  were  attended  to  the  grave  by 
many  of  his  friends  and  his  Masonic  brethren  of  this  place,  and 
interred  with  the  ceremonies  of  their  order.  In  the  death  of  Col. 
M.  Society  has  lost  a valuable  and  worthy  member  and  his  country, 
a friend. — Huntsville  Republican , Huntsville,  Sept.  1,  1817. 

MOULTON,  MICHAEL — Name  appears  on  Huntsville  Mon- 
ument, erected  by  Twickenham  Town  Chapter,  D.A.R. 

MURRAY,  DAVID,  (1760-1840),  served  as  a private.  He 
was  born  in  Lincoln  Co.,  Ga. ; died  in  Talladega  Co.,  Ala.,  and 
upon  his  tomb  is  the  inscription  “A  soldier  of  the  Revolution.” — 
D.A.R.  Lineage  Book , Vol.  25,  p.  170.  See  also  McCall's  Roster  of  the 
Revolutionary  Soldiers  of  Georgia , page  215. 

NEEL.  WILLIAM  served  as  private  in  the  Virginia  troops. 
He  was  born  in  Norfolk,  Va,  died  in  1823  in  Alabama.- — D.A.R.  Line- 
age Book , Vol.  138,  page  261. 

NEELY,  JOHN — Shelby  County  Census  of  1820  gives  one 
male  and  one  female  over  twenty  one;  three  males  and  one  female 
under  twenty-one;  eight  slaves.  The  Census  of  1830  gives  one 
male  between  ten  and  fifteen ; one  male  between  fifteen  and 
twenty ; one  male  twenty  to  thirty ; one  male  thirty  to  forty ; one 
male  sixty  to  seventy  ; one  female  ten  to  fifteen ; one  female  forty 
to  fifty.  He  is  buried  in  the  Mahan-Smith  Cemetery,  in  Shelby 
County,  below  Montevallo.  His  tombstone  inscription  is : 

John  Neely,  Sr. 
died  March  20,  1838 
aged  76  years. 

His  wife  is  buried  beside  him,  her  tombstone  bearing  the  inscrip- 
tion : 

Rebecca  Neely 
wife  of  John  Neely,  Sr. 
died  Feb.  1,  1845 
age  64  years. 

— See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Alabama , 1911,  p.  88. 

NELSON,  ANDREW,  was  born  in  York  County,  Pennsyl- 
vania, in  1762,  but  later  he  or  his  family  moved  to  Virginia.  While 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


'617 


residing  in  Augusta  County,  Virginia,  on  June  15,  1779,  he  volun- 
teered and  served  as  a private  in  Captain  John  Cunningham’s 
company  of  the  Virginia  troops,  until  September  15,  1779.  On 
May  II,  1780,  he  again  enlisted  with  the  Virginia  troops  and  served 
in  Captain  McKitterick’s  company.  He  was  out  against  the  In- 
dians in  Northwestern  Virginia  until  August  15,  1780.  From 
December  15,  1780,  until  May  1,  1781,  he  served  in  Captain  James 
Tate’s  company,  under  Colonel  Campbell.  He  marched  to  North 
Carolina  and  was  in  the  Battle  of  Guilford.  In  1832  Andrew  Nel- 
son was  residing  in  Morgan  County,  Alabama,  and  in  1840  he  was 
i:vit)gr  in  Walker  County.  He  died  on  November  1,  1850,  whd 
living  with  his  son-in-law,  George  Ellis,  near  Houston,  Winston 
County,  and  is  buried  in  Winston  County,  in  a small  graveyard 
on  the  east  side  of  the  Sipsey  River,  between  Double  Springs  and 
Addison.  Fie  is  known  to  have  been  the  father  of  at  least  two 
children — Peggy  Nelson,  who  married  George  Ellis,  of  Winston 
County,  and  later  moved  to  Lawrence  County;  and  L.  S.  Nelson, 
who  was  born  December  15,  1797  and  died  November  2,  1874,  and 
is  buried  in  the  Fike  Graveyard. — Dombhart’s  History  of  Walken’ 
County,  Alabama,  page  293-4. 

NELSON,  ANDREW,  born  in  Virginia,  ninetv  five  years  of 
age  and  living  with  Nathan  Montgomery,  Hancock  County  (now 
Winston)  in  census  of  1850.  Drew  pension  in  [Morgan  County, 
1831  and  1832.  Private,  Virginia  Continental  line.  Thought  to  be 
buried  on  the  east  bank  of  the  Sipsey  River,  five  and  one  half 
miles  from  Double  Springs,  near  Albert  Shipman’s. 

NELSON,  ANDREW — Born  in  1762,  in  York  County,  Penna 
He  enlisted  June  15,  1779,  served  as  a volunteer  in  Augusta  Coun- 
ty, Va.,  and  was  discharged  September  1,  1779.  by  Captain  Cun' 
ningham.  He  again  enlisted  the  next  spring,  1780,  and  served 
until  May  10,  under  Capt.  John  Makitrick.  On  December  1,  1780, 
he  enlisted  under  Capt.  James  Tate,  and  served  until  May  1,  1781. 
He  was  living  in  Morgan  County,  Ala.,  when  he  applied  for  a 
pension  May  13,  1833,  but  in  the  1840  pension  list  we  find  him 
residing  in  Walker  County,  with  Robert  Howard. — Jones  and  Gan- 
drud,  Alabama  Records,  vol.  49,  Morgan  County,  p.  30.  See  also 
Revolutionary  Soldiers  in  Alabama,  1911,  p.  72. 

NESMITH,  THOMAS — Name  appeacsr- on  Huntsville  Monu- 
ment, erected  by  Twickenham  Town  Chapter.  D.A.R. 


618 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


NICHOLS,  MARGARET— daughter  of  NICHOLS— 

“I  finally  married  after  two  years.  My  wife  was  only  fourteen 
years  of  age  when  we  were  married.  She  has  black  eyes,  black 
hair,  and  very  fair  skin,  and  is  rather  on  the  chunky  order.  She 
was  MARGARET  NICHOLS  and  her  father  was  an  old  revolu- 
tionary soldier  and  drew  his  bounty  in  Decatur,  Alabama” — 
Letter  from  Robert  Barrett — See  Families  of  Virginia , Barret,  by 
George  W.  Chappelear,  Vol.  No.  3. 

NICHOLSON,  HARRISON,  (1760-1841),  was  ‘a  soldier  of 
the  Revolution.”  This  is  his  record  on  his  tombstone  in  Tuskegee, 
Alabama. — D.A.R.  Linage  Book,  Vol.  40,  page  159. 

NOLEN,  STEPHEN  NOLAND,  Junior,  of  Scotch-Irish  an- 
centry,  was  born  1753  in  Frederick  County,  Virginia,  the  son  of 

Stephen  Nowland/Noland,  Senior,  and  Susannah  Nothing 

further  of  his  ancestry  is  definitely  known.  He  is  probably  one 
of  the  contemporary  branches  of  Nowland/Nolands  who  settled 
very  early  in  Maryland,  in  Cecil  County  and  along  the  Eastern 
Shore,  and  thence  into  Charles  County,  Maryland,  and  thence 
crossed  over  the  Potomac  River  into  Stafford  County,  Virginia, 
and  thence  up  the  Northern  Neck  into  Loudoun  and  Frederick 
County,  Virginia.  Whether  or  not  he  is  a son  of  Stephen  Nowland 
whose  widow  Mary  married  in  1738  in  Charles  County,  Maryland, 
John  Dempsey,  whose  son  Daniel  Noland  married  Henrietta 
Smallwood,  is  not  known — certainly  he  is  of  the  right  age  so  to  be. 

Stephen  Nowland-Noland,  Senior,  in  1772  received  a Royal 
Land  Grant  of  100  acres  of  land  “Situate  on  Mill  Creek  a Branch 
of  Broad  River  on  the  North  East  side  thereof  in  Craven  County,” 
South  Carolina,  (now  Fairfield  County).  He  is  definitely  known 
to  have  had  five  sons — tradition  says  seven — who  served  in  the 
Revolutionary  War,  Viz  : 

James  Nolen,  listed  in  the  1840  Census,  of  Revolutionary 

Pensioners,  page  145,  page  90.  Residence  Forsyth  County, 

Ga., 


Shadrach  Nolen,  listed  in  the  1840  Census  of  Revolution- 
ary Pensioners,  page  159,  age  89.  Residence  Hardin  County, 
Tenn.  Also,  South  Carolina  Indents,  No.  488,  Lib.  M. 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


619 


Stephen  Noland  Nolen,  Junior,  South  Carolina  Indents, 
No.  266,  Book  R. 

William  Noland  Nolen,  South  Carolina  Indents,  No.  264, 
Book  R.  Also,  Revolutionary  Pension  Application  S.  30,623, 
died  in  Carter  County,  Kentucky,  age  101  years. 

George  Nolen,  South  Carolina  Indents,  No.  265,  Book  R. 
Stephen  Noland/Nolen,  Junior,  in  his  account  against  South 
Carolina  sworn  to  14  July  1784,  for  services  rendered  in  the  South  Caro- 
lina Militia  states  that  he  served  191  days  in  1781  in  Colonel  Richard 
Winn’s  regiment  for  which  he  was  issued  Indented  Certificate  for 
the  sum  of  L 15.  17.  iy2.  (No.  266,  Book  R.) 

Stephen  Noland/Nolen,  Junior,  married  probably  about  1775 
in  Fairfield  District,  South  Carolina,  Mary  Smith,  (parents  un- 
known.) This  is  a record  of  seven  children,  there  may  have  been 
others,  viz : 

James  Nolen,  b.  1778.  d.  28  June  1864  in  Chambers  Coun- 
ty, Alabama,  m.  Barbara  Addison.  Some  of  children  moved 
to  Choctaw  County,  Mississippi. 

William  Nolen,  b.  10  March  1783.  d.  18  December  1850 
in  Newton  County,  Georgia,  m.  Mary  Ann  Alcorn.  Their 
2nd  son  Abner  Nolen  moved  to  Coosa  County,  Alabama. 

George  Nolen,  b.  8 April  1786.  d.  12  March  1857  in  Ran- 
dolph County,  Alabama,  m.  Elizabeth  Addison. 

Stephen  Nolen,  b.  17  October  1787,  d.  5 May  1870  in 
Coosa  County,  Alabama,  m.  Mary  (Polly)  Addison,  sister  of 
Babara  and  Elizabeth  Addison,  and  daughter  of  Christopher 
Addison,  R.  S.,  of  Fairfield  District,  S.  C. 

Isaac  Nolen,  b.  1795.  moved  ca  1855  to  Smith  County, 
Texas,  m.  Elizabeth  

Richard  Nolen,  b.  12  August  1789/1798,  d.  7 October  1851' 
in  Butts  County,  Georgia,  m.  22  January  1822  Nancy  ann 
Coleman.  J'A 

. ••  : / - •:  7. 


620 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


Mary  Nolen,  date  of  birth  and  death  unknown. 

Stephen  Nolen,  Junior,  Revolutionary  soldier,  lived  in  the 
forks  of  Little  River  about  six  miles  northwest  of  Winnsboro  in 
Fairfield  District,  South  Carolina.  He  was  a successful  planter 
and  accumulated  considerable  land  and  slaves.  During  the  period 
1820  to  1824  all  of  his  six  sons  moved  to  Newton,  Monroe  and 
Henry  Counties,  Georgia,  no  doubt  attracted  by  the  land  lotteries 
and  the  opportunity  of  obtaining  free  and  productive  land  in  a 
new  and  fast  developing  section. 

In  the  spring  of  1824,  Stephen  Noland/Nolen,  Junior,  then  in 
his  71st  year,  disposed  of  his  plantations  in  Fairfield  District,  South 
Carolina,  and  following  the  trek  of  his  sons,  moved  to  formerly 
Monroe  Count}',  now  Butts  County,  Georgia,  where  in  December 
1824  he  purchased  a lot  of  land  consisting  of  20 2^2  acres,  on  which 
he  built  a two  story  log  house.  Here,  20  January  1829  his  wife 
passed  away  and  was  buried  probably  in  the  family  cemetery 
nearby  his  home. 

Shortly  after  the  death  of  his  wife,  in  March  1829,  Stephen 
Nolen.  Junior,  (R.S.)  deeded  to  his  daughter  Mary  the  home  place, 
also,  by  deed  of  gift  gave  to  her  certain  slaves  and  household  fur- 
niture, retaining  a life’s  interest  therein. 

Here  he  continued  to  reside  until  1842  when,  then  in  his  89th 
year,  he  moved  to  Chambers  County,  Alabama,  to  live  with  his 
son  Isaac  Nolen.  In  the  meantime  three  other  sons  had  moved, 
to  Chambers  County,  viz:  Stephen,  James  and  George. 

In  March  1846,  then  in  his  93rd  year,  Stephen  Nolen,  Junior, 
by  a simple  Bill  of  Sale  conveyed  to  his  son  Isaac  all  of  his  per- 
sonal property  consisting  of  slaves  and  money,  thereby,  obviating 
the  necessity  of  a will.  There  he  died,  his  tombstone  inscription 
in  the  Sweet  Home  Methodist  Church  Cemetery  reads  as  follows  : 


Sacred  to  the  Memory  of 
STEPHEN  NOLEN 
: who  departed  this  life 

October  26,  1846 
Aged  93  Years. 

— Information  from  Leon  A.  Nolen,  Birmingham,  Ala. 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


621 


O’NEAL,  WILLIAM  — Revolutionary  soldier  of  Lincoln 
County,  Ga.,  whose  widow,  Amy  (Bussey)  O’NEAL  Wadsworth, 
is  believed  to  be  buried  at  Harpersville,  Shelby  County,  Ala.  He 
married  twice  having  by  his  first  wife  two  daughters,  Jane,  who 
married  John  Yasser,  and  Nancy  who  married  Allen  Holliday. 
On  July  28,  1825,  in  Lincoln  County,  Ga.,  he  married  Amy 'Bussey, 
born  March  7,  1797,  in  Lincoln  County,  Ga.  daughter  of  Rev.  Ben- 
jamin Bussey  and  his  first  wife  Mary  Burgamy.  Both  of  the 
grandfathers  of  Amy  (Bussey)  O’Neal  served  in  the  Revolution 
in  Georgia.  By  his  second  wife,  Wdliam  O’Neal  had  the  following 
children:  William,  born  Aug'ust  6,  1826,  in  Lincoln  County,  Ga., 
died  in  1877  at  Harpersville,  Shelby  County,  Ala.,  married  Feb- 
ruary 20  1850,  Martha  G.  McGraw ; Benjamin  Pulliam,  born  Oc- 
tober 6,  1827,  Lincoln  County,  Ga.,  died  November  13,  1880,  at 
Thomson  Ga.,  married  in  Lincolnton  Ga.,  in  1846  Ellen  Paschal ; 
Mary  Elizabeth  born  1829,  died  without  issue,  married  November 
23,  1852,  John  M.  Kidd.  William  O’Neal’s  will,  not  dated  but  pro- 
bated September  7,  1829,  in  Wilkes  County,  Ga.,  is  recorded  in 
Will  Book  D,  p.  230.  In  it  he  states  that  he  is  advanced  in  years 
and  now  afflicted  in  body.  After  his  death  in  1829  his  widow 
married  Hogan  Wadsworth  in  April,  1836,  and  removed  with  him 
to  Shelby  County,  Ala.,  bringing  with  her  the  three  young  children 
by  her  first  husband.  In  this  county  on  October  10,  1839,  her 
daughter,  Lavania  Wadsworth,  was  born,  who  later  married  and 
moved  to  Texas. — Information  from  Maud  M.  Kelly.  Birmingham. 

OAKS,  ISAAC.  Born  May  13,  1760,  in  Louisa  County,  Vir- 
ginia. He  enlisted  in  December  1776,  and  served  three  months  in 
Captain  James  Hawkins’  Company,  Colonel  Mathews’  Virginia 
Regiment.  He  enlisted  and  served  three  months  in  Captain  Buck- 
ner’s Virginia  Company  and  was  discharged  the  first  of  July,  1777. 
He  enlisted  and  served  three  months  in  Captain  James  Hawkins' 
Virginia  Company  and  was  discharged  in  October,  1777.  He  then 
enlisted  and  served  three  months  in  Captain  Buckner’s  Virginia 
Company.  He  then  enlisted  and  served  three  months  in  Captain 
James  Hawkins’  Virginia  Company.  He  enlisted  and  served  three 
months  in  Captain  Buckner’s  Virginia  Company  and  was  dis- 
charged in  the  summer  of  1778.  After  the  close  of  the  Revolu- 
tionary War  he  moved  to  Albermarle  County,  Virginia,  then  to 
Oglethorpe  County,  Georgia,  where  he  lived  about  thirty  years 
and  about  1827,  he  moved  to  Perry  County,  Ala;,  where  his  pen- 
sion was  dated  June  7,  1833.  From  records  of  the  Comptroller 


622 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


General,  General  Accounting  Office,  Washnigton,  D.  C.,  the  rec- 
ords show  that  the  last  payment  of  pension,  certificate  No.  22422, 
Alabama  Agency,  covering  the  period  from  March  4,  1844  to 
September  4,  1844,  was  made  on  April  19,  1845,  at  the  Pension 
Agency  in  Mobile,  Ala.,  to  William  Stringfellow,  as  attorney  for 
the  pensioner.  On  September  5,  1844,  the  pensioner  certified  that 
he  had  resided  in  Perry  County,  Ala.,  for  a period  of  eighteen 
years  and  previous  thereto  he  resided  in  Oglethorpe  County,  Geor- 
gia.— Jones  and  Gandud’s  Alabama  Records , vol.  73,  page  89. 

ODEN,  ALEXANDER,  lieutenant  colonel,  born  Scotland,  1752, 
died  Dallas  County,  Ala.,  1834. — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  Nos.  171391 
and  197790. 

ODEN,  ALEXANDER — Served  in  the  Revolution  in  the 
militia  of  Edgefield  District,  S.  C.,  removed  to  Autauga  County, 
Ala.,  about  1820,  and  died  there  in  1834,  near  the  Dallas  County 
line.  He  married  Letitia  Bussey,  daughter  of  George  Bussey, 
who  died  in  Edgefield  District,  S.  C.,  in  1796.  Their  children  in- 
cluded: Alexander,  Jr.,  born  April  9,  1788  in  South  Carolina,  died 
March  11,  1853,  in  Talladega  County,  Ala.;  Joshua,  born  January 
22,  1796,  in  South  Carolina,  died  October  20,  1876,  at  Sylacauga 
Ala.;  Dempsey,  born  1798,  in  South  Carolina,  died  February  1877, 
in  Dallas  County,  Ala.;  John;  Thomas  Bussey,  born  1774-1777  in 
South  Carolina,  died  before  1838;  Elias,  born  1774-1790,  died  1814 
in  Edgefield  District,  S.  C.,  Eleanor,  born  1783,  died  1860  in  Talla- 
dega County,  Ala.,  married  her  cousin,  Alexander  Oden;  Hettie. 
born  after  1800,  married  Nathan  Peoples,  born  1786,  lived  in  Dallas 
County.  Alexander  Oden,  with  his  family,  moved  from  Edgefield 
District,  S.  C.,  to  Jones  County,  Ga.,  where  his  sons,  Alexander 
and  Dempsey  at  least  were  married.  About  1820,  he  removed  to 
Autauga  County,  Ala.,  where  his  son  Joshua  married.  In  1830, 
Alexander  Oden  was  a widower  living  in  Autauga  County  with 
his  son,  Dempsey,  and  is  listed  in  the  Census  of  1830  as  aged  70-80. 
Other  Odens  listed  are  A.,  J.,  and  B.  By  1840,  only  Dempsey 
Oden  remained  in  Autauga  County  near  the  Dallas  County  line. — * 
Information  from  Miss  Maud  M.  Kelly,  Birmingham,  Ala. 

ODOM,  JACOB  (1760-1835)  received  a pension  for  service 
as  private  in  the  North  Carolina  militia.  He  was  born  in  Edge- 
comb  County,  N.  C. ; died  in' Pickens  County,  Ala. — D.A.R.  Lineage 


WINTER  ISSUE,  1944 


623 


Book,  Vol.  154,  p.  22.  See  also  Jones  and  Gandrud,  Pickens  County, 
Alabama  Records,  vol.  72,  p.  80. 

OGLESBY,  SOBERT' — 

Born  in  Scotland 
Died  Apr.  19,  1831 

Enlisted  in  Revolutionary  War  Dec.  1.  1776 
4th  Artillery  Reg.  S.  C.  Troops  as  Gunner 
also  served  in  War  of  1812. 

— Tombstone  inscription  on  grave  in  Hickman  or  Oglesby  Ceme- 
tery, near  Green  Pond,  Bibb  County,  Ala. — Information  from  Wil- 
liam F.  Franke,  Birmingham,  Ala. 

OSTEEN,  DAVID — Born  in  1761,  in  Cantright  County,  N.  C. 
He  entered  service  in  the  fall  of  1778,  and  served  for  six  months 
under  General  Ash,  Capt.  William  Dennis,  Lt.  Eli  West,  Ensign 
Belshaser  Fullen.  He  returned  home  the  last  of  April,  1779,  then 
served  on  another  tour  for  one  month.  In  1780  he  was  for  one 
month  in  Capt.  Eli  West's  company.  He  was  drafted  for  the  first 
tour  and  volunteered  for  the  second.  His  first  engagement  was 
under  General  Lincoln,  to  Augusta  and  Savannah,  Ga.,  suffering 
defeat,  he  went  to  South  Carolina.  Later  he  was  discharged  at 
Wilmington,  N.  C.,  by  Major  Blount,  of  the  Georgia  Line.  After 
his  marriage  he  moved  to  Onslow  County,  N.  C.,  then  removed  to 
Tennessee,  residing  in  Davidson,  Maury  and  Roane  Counties,  re- 
moved to  Alabama,  and  lived  in  Limestone  and  Morgan  Counties. 
When  he  made  application  for  a pension  January  28,  1833,  he 
stated  that  he  had  lived  in  Morgan  County  for  the  past  nine  years. 
In  December,  1835,  he  applied  for  a transfer  of  his  pension  to 
Bedford  County,  Tenn.— Jones  and  Gandrud,  Alabama  Records,  vol. 
49,  Morgan  County,  pp.  31-32.  See  also  Revolutionary  Soldiers  ii\ 
Alabama,  1911,  p.  91. 

OUTLAW,  ALEXANDER  (1738-1826)  was  a private  at  the 
Battle  of  Kings'  Mountain',  under  the  command  of  Colonel  Camp- 
bell. He  was  born  in  Duplin  County,  N.  C. ; died  in  Catawba,  Ala. 
(Cahaba) — D.A.R.  Lineage  Book,  Vol.  155,  p.  34.  See  also  White’s 
King's  Mountain  Men,  page  214.  See  also  McCall,  Roster  of  Revolu- 
tionary Soldiers  in  Georgia,  p.  46. 


624 


ALABAMA  HISTORICAL  QUARTERLY 


OUTLAW,  ALEXANDER — Departed  this  life,  at  Celatchie 
Heights,  in  Dallas  County,  on  the  25th  August  last,  in  the  S7th 
year  of  his  age.  Col.  Alexander  Outlaw,  formerly  of  Jefferson 
County,  Tennessee,  but  for  the  last  9 years  a venerable  and  re- 
spected inhabitant  of  this  State.  Notwithstanding  the  shortness 
of  human  life,  we  are  engaged  in  so  many  different  pursuits,  and 
our  minds  are  led  away  by  so  many  attractions,  that  we  seldom 
attempt  to  form  an  estimate  of  the  worth  and  merits  of  our  fel- 
low creatures,  until  they  have  gone  into  the  eternal  and  unchangeable 
state;  until  the  picture  of  their  lives  is  reflected  back  by  the 
dark  shades  of  death.  It  is  then,  and  not  until  then,  that  the 
lingering  hand  of  friendship,  or  the  partial  finger  of  affection  are 
exerted  to  trace  the  paths  pursued  by  those,  who  have  been  dear 
to  us  in  this  transitory  life.  It  is  then,  that  memory  hovers,  with 
fond  and  melancholy  remembrance  over  each  incident,  as  they  are 
presented  thro'  the  lapse  of  years  that  are  past,  and  endeavors 
to  present  the  outlines  of  the  picture,  on  which  it  delighted  to 
gaze,  while  it  was  animated,  by  the  transient  spark  of  life.  Con- 
sidering the  shortness  of  the  duration  of  man’s  existence,  and  the 
countless  number  of  intelligent  beings  with  which  it  has  pleased 
the  Almighty  Ruler  of  the  Universe  to  people  the  earth,  it  has 
fallen  to  the  lot  of  but  very  few  indeed,  to  act  so  conspicuous  a 
part  in  the  drama  of  human  life,  as  Col.  Outlaw.  Firmly,  and  in- 
violably attached  to  the  principles  of  free  government,  he  warmly 
engaged  and  acted  a conspicuous  part  in  that  eventful  and  glorious 
struggle,  which  terminated  in  his  country’s  independence.  The 
strong  energies  of  his  mind,  the  respectability  of  his  character, 
and  a well  placed  confidence  in  his  judgement,  enabled  him  to 
carry  with  him  into  the  field  of  danger  and  glory,  a choice  collec- 
tion of  the  companions  of  his  youth,  who  were  willing  to  unite, 
and  identify  their  fortunes  with  his.  In  the  command  of  that 
respectable  corps,  of  which  he  never  ceased  to  speak  in  terms  of 
unceasing  respect  and  soldierly  affection,  he  acted  a conspicious 
part  in  the  battles  of  Monks  Corner,  Briar  Creek,  Eutaw  Springs, 
and  the  memorable  sieges  of  Savannah  and  Charleston.  At  the 
close  of  the  Revolution  he  settled  in  Tennessee  where  he  con- 
tinued through  the  lapse  of  many  years,  to  enjoy  various  proofs  of 
the  confidence  of  his  fellow-citizens.  He  was  sent  first,  as  a dele- 
gate* to  the  Legislature  of  North  Carolina,  afterwards  elected  as 
a member  of  the  Convention  that  framed  the  Constitution  of 
•Tennessee. -and- -imme